Dean of the Faculty

Reed College Faculty Profiles

+ Expand all

faculty profile photo Diego Alonso, Professor of Spanish and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Spanish Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Born in Buenos Aires, Diego Alonso obtained his DEA from the University of Paris III in 1989 and his PhD from Princeton University in 1998. His research has focused on the relationship among aesthetics, rhetoric, and politics, as reflected in a corpus of essay writers (Martí, Rodó, Vasconcelos, Lugones, Mariátegui, Ortiz, Pedreira, among others) in the context of nineteenth- and twentieth-century modernization processes in Latin America. Related to this subject, he published José Enrique Rodó: una retórica para la democracia (Editorial Trilce, 2009). His other line of research involves hermeneutical analysis of contemporary Argentinean and Uruguayan fiction (Borges, Walsh, Onetti, Piglia). In this domain, he has published in prestigious academic journals (Variaciones Borges, Iberoamericana, Latin American Literary Review, Catálogos) and is currently working on a book, Fiction and Truth: Hermeneutical Approaches to History and Memory in Borges and Walsh. Alonso is a board member of LALISA, an association devoted to promoting Latin American, Latino, and Iberian studies in the Pacific Northwest.

Spanish Department webpage

faculty profile photo Kristen G. Anderson, Associate Professor of Psychology

faculty profile photo

Psychology Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

Kristen G. Anderson, Ph.D. is the Principal Investigator of the Adolescent Health Research Program and an Associate Professor of Psychology at Reed College. Her area of expertise is the developmental psychopathology of addictive behaviors from late childhood through emerging adulthood. Dr. Anderson has specialized in youth alcohol and drug use decision-making in social contexts, longitudinal modeling of process-oriented data, and the integration of personality and social-cognitive models of substance use initiation and maintenance. Dr. Anderson has published extensively and has received research funding from the National Institutes of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) and Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the ABMRF: The Alcohol Research Foundation. In 2013-2014, she was as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Amsterdam. Dr. Anderson is currently the Academic Director of the Summer Institute on Alcohol, Drugs, and Addiction at the University of Amsterdam. She was the principal investigator of the Portland site of Project Options, a national, multisite field trial of a school-based alcohol and drug prevention program funded by NIAAA. A licensed psychologist, Dr. Anderson received her Ph.D. from the University of Kentucky and completed her postdoctoral training at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Prior to joining the faculty at Reed, she was a research scientist and clinical faculty member in the UCSD Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry. Dr. Anderson attended Simon’s Rock College and Drew University as an undergraduate and also holds a M.Ed. in Special Education from American International College. For more information, please see her websites listed below.

Adolescent Health Research Program
Psychology Department webpage

faculty profile photo Derek A. Applewhite, Associate Professor of Biology

faculty profile photo

Biology Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

I am happy to have joined the community here at Reed College in 2014. I received my B.S. from the University of Michigan in 2002, and my Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology, from Northwestern University in 2007. As a Cell Biologist I subscribe to the mantra "seeing is believing," and microscopy and cell imaging techniques have revolutionized the field, allowing us to observe phenomena at a level of detail previously unimaginable to scientists just a few decades ago. I strive to incorporate imaging and microscopy into the classes I teach as well as in my own research. The courses I currently teach include Biology 101 which is an introductory Biology course, as well as Cell Biology (Bio 372) and a primary literature-based Seminar course focused on Cytoskeletal Dynamics (Bio 431), which is my particular field of expertise. The Cytoskeleton is a network of filaments found within cells that regulate cell shape (morphology) and how cells move (cell motility). Our understanding of how the Cytoskeleton is regulated is fundamental to our knowledge of how immune cells combat pathogens, neurons make connections in our brains, or how cancer cells migrate during metastases. My lab uses the humble fruit-fly (Drosophila melanogaster) to study these basic properties of cells. 

Biology Department webpage

Igor Bascandziev, Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology

Psychology Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

Igor Bascandziev joined the Department of Psychology at Reed College in 2017 as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology. He has earned his doctoral degree in Human Development and Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 2011. After acquiring his degree, he has spent three years teaching as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology at Lycoming College and at Clark University. Next, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University and then a Mind Brain Behavior Research Associate, also at Harvard University. Dr. Bascandziev’s primary research interest is conceptual development. Humans, unlike any other animal, have an extraordinarily rich conceptual repertoire. Understanding the learning mechanisms and cognitive resources involved in the construction of scientific and mathematical concepts is one of the primary goals of his research program. Dr. Bascandziev’s teaching is closely related to his research. He teaches courses that are at the intersection of developmental psychology, cognitive science, science education, and history of science. Recently, he was awarded the George W. Goethals Award, recognizing excellence in teaching in the psychology sophomore tutorial program at Harvard University.

Psychology Department webpage

faculty profile photo Samiya Bashir, Assistant Professor of Creative Writing

faculty profile photo

English Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Samiya Bashir joined the Reed College faculty in 2012. She teaches poetry writing and making as well as the writing of creative nonfiction. She is especially interested in opening dialogues with students about experimental poetics and poetry forms, grounding in multicultural traditions of verse, and the establishment of individuality of perspective and voice as both writers and readers. Bashir’s books of poetry, Field Theories (Nightboat Books, 2017), and Gospel, and Where the Apple Falls, both short-listed for the Lambda Literary Award, and anthologies, including Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art, exist. Sometimes she makes poems of dirt. Sometimes zeros and ones. Sometimes variously rendered text. Sometimes light. Her work has been widely published, performed, installed, printed, screened, experienced, and Oxford comma'd. Bashir holds a BA from the University of California, Berkeley, where she served as Poet Laureate, and an MFA from the University of Michigan, where she received two Hopwood Poetry Awards. She is the recipient of numerous grants, fellowships, residencies, prizes, and is a founding organizer of Fire & Ink, an advocacy organization and writer's festival for LGBT writers of African descent and a recipient of the 2011 Aquarius Press Legacy Award, given annually in recognition of women writers of color who actively provide creative opportunities for other writers. Bashir has collaborated on a number of multimedia poetry and art projects including M A P S :: a cartography in progress, and Silt, Soot, and Smut, with Alison Saar, both of which currently travel the country in exhibition and performance.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Kara Becker, Associate Professor of Linguistics

faculty profile photo

Linguistics Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

Kara Becker is Associate Professor of Linguistics at Reed College. Kara is a sociolinguist, a variationist, and a dialectologist, whose scholarship concerns regional and social varieties of American English. Kara received a B.A. in Linguistics and an M.A. in Educational Linguistics from Stanford University, and Ph.D. in Linguistics from New York University. She joined the Reed faculty in 2010, and teaches courses on language and society, including Dialects of English, Contact Languages, Language, Sex, Gender and Sexuality, and African American English. Kara talks often to the media about linguistic diversity in the U.S., most commonly about the New York City dialect, but also about West Coast dialects (recent article). More information on Kara’s research interests, teaching, and media presence can be found on her website.

faculty profile photo Evgenii Bershtein, Professor of Russian

faculty profile photo

Russian Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Evgenii (Zhenya) Bershtein grew up in Leningrad (now St. Petersburg), Russia, and graduated from Tartu University (Estonia). His PhD is from UC Berkeley. He has held research fellowships at Columbia University (2001-02), Helsinki University (2004, 2005), and University of Cambridge (2014). Evgenii Bershtein has published on eighteenth–century Russian poetry, the cultural and intellectual history of Russian modernism, and on Russian film (you can read some of his work here and here, in English and Russian). Most recently, he has edited the English translation of Yuri Lotman’s Non-Memoirs (Dalkey Archive Press, 2014) and has been working on a project entitled Eisenstein, Sexuality, and Decadence. Professor Bershtein joined the Reed faculty in 1999, and he teaches classes on twentieth-century Russian literature and culture, Russian and European Symbolism, Russian film, Pushkin, Tolstoy, Eisenstein, as well as the Russian language at the intermediate and advanced levels.

faculty profile photo Miriam Bowring, Assistant Professor of Chemistry

faculty profile photo

Chemistry Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

I am excited to be at Reed, where I teach general and inorganic chemistry courses, and run a research laboratory. In the lab, we aim to untangle the fundamental mechanisms that make catalysts work, using approaches from across inorganic, organic, physical, and synthetic chemistry. We have a special focus on protons, the smallest nuclei, and determining what they can do that heavier nuclei cannot. We are also looking for ways to put heavy metal contaminants to good use. The mechanisms we uncover may lead to better catalysts for synthesis and fuels. Before my arrival at Reed, I studied proton-coupled electron transfer (postdoctoral work at Yale University and the University of Washington) and organometallic catalysis (Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley; B.S. at Yale University), and I taught high school chemistry. My favorite thing to chase after, besides a chemical reaction mechanism, is a frisbee.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Betsey Brada, Assistant Professor of Anthropology

faculty profile photo

Anthropology Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Betsey Brada is a cultural anthropologist specializing in health and medicine in southern Africa. She received her Ph.D. in 2011 from the University of Chicago. She comes to Reed this fall from Princeton University where she taught and mentored students in the interdisciplinary Program in Global Health and Health Policy. Her research and teaching interests include: medical anthropology; the anthropology of pedagogy and expertise; and the ethnography and history of Africa. Her book manuscript in progress argues that global health, rather than a unidirectional flow of moral practice and expert knowledge from North to South, is an imaginative framework that organizes the space, time, and ethics of encounter. Based on ethnographic research at the intersection of Botswana's national public HIV treatment program and the private U.S.-based partnerships supporting it, Betsey analyzes the pedagogic projects by which visiting American experts and students as well as local clinicians and patients come to regard themselves and one another in terms of this framework. An article drawn from this project appeared in American Ethnologist and received the 2013 Clark Taylor Paper Prize. A second ethnographic project currently underway examines the development of Botswana's new and only medical school, the first African medical school to be founded after the advent of public HIV treatment and the transnational engagements that have accompanied it.

faculty profile photo K.E. Brashier, Professor of Religion and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Religion Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

Ken Brashier 白瑞旭 received his BA from Oxford as a Rhodes scholar, his MA from Harvard, and his PhD from Cambridge, after which he began teaching Chinese religions and humanities at Reed in 1998. Author of Ancestral Memory in Early China (Harvard University Asia Center, 2011) and Public Memory in Early China (Harvard University Asia Center, 2014), he is currently studying the idea of purgatory in late imperial China. In 2006, he was recognized as the national "Outstanding Baccalaureate Colleges Professor of the Year" by the CASE/Carnegie Foundation, but his chief goal in life remains a futile attempt to get his two cats to respect him.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Kate Bredeson, Associate Professor of Theatre

faculty profile photo

Theatre Department
Division of the Arts

Kate Bredeson is a theatre historian, a director, and a dramaturg. In her theatre history scholarship, Kate researches and writes about 20th and 21st century experimental theatre, with a particular focus on the 1960s. Kate is interested in the way innovations in theatre were made during this period, and how these developments reflect what was happening outside of the theatres in politics, culture, and society. She is currently working on two books: Occupying the Stage: the Theater of May ’68 and A Lifetime of Resistance: the Diaries of Judith Malina 1947-2015. Kate’s research has been supported by fellowships including a Fulbright, grants from the Mellon and Killam Foundations, and residencies at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France and the Rockefeller Center in Bellagio, Italy. Kate regularly presents at national and international conferences, and has recently published essays in PAJ, TDR, Theater, The Routledge Companion to Dramaturgy (Routledge, 2014), International Women Stage Directors (U. Illinois, 2013), and May 68: Rethinking France's Last Revolution (Palgrave, 2011). The relationship between theatre and society is also the focus of her teaching. At Reed, Kate teaches classes including Theatre History I and II, Gender and Theatre, Playwriting, Dramaturgy, Translation and Adaptation, and she frequently directs stage productions featuring students. Kate is also a professional dramaturg, and a recipient of the Literary Managers and Dramaturgs of the Americas residency grant. She is currently working as dramaturg with Portland choreographer Tahni Holt. Before coming to Reed in 2009, Kate was the Resident Dramaturg at the Court Theatre in Chicago and Lecturer at the University of Chicago. Kate holds an MFA and a doctorate in Dramaturgy and Dramatic Criticism from the Yale School of Drama.

Theatre Department webpage

faculty profile photo Michael P. Breen, Professor of History and Humanities

faculty profile photo

History Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Michael P. Breen is a specialist of early modern French & European social, political, and cultural history. His first book, Law, City, and King: Legal Culture, Municipal Politics, and State Formation in Early Modern Dijon (University of Rochester Press, 2007) examined how the political activities and consciousness of the barristers (avocats) who dominated local governance in an early modern provincial capital evolved in response to the expansion of the royal state. He is currently working on Law and Society in Medieval & Early Modern Europe (under contract with Cambridge University Press), which examines how and why "the rule of law" emerged in medieval Europe and came to be a foundation of the European social order, rivaling and even surpassing the importance of religion. Law and Society examines not only development of the legal professions and their crucial role in transforming European politics, culture, and society, but also the law's evolution as a set of social, cultural, and institutional practices shaped by the ordinary men and women who increasingly utilized it in their daily lives. At the same time, he is also beginning a study of the controversies surrounding a medico-legal procedure used by early modern French Church courts to adjudicate marital annulment lawsuits (the épreuve du congrès) and the larger implications of these debates for the legal culture of the period (an article on this will appear shortly in the Journal of Modern History). Professor Breen has received numerous fellowships to support his research, including an American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship, an NEH Summer Stipend, and grants from the American Philosophical Society and Folger Shakespeare Library. He has also been an Invited Professor at the Ecole des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris and has served on the editorial boards of French Historical Studies and Histoire, Économie, et Société.

History Department webpage

faculty profile photo Enriqueta Canseco-Gonzalez, Professor of Psychology

faculty profile photo

Psychology Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

I obtained my undergraduate and masters degree at the National University of Mexico, and my Ph.D. at Brandeis University. I teach introductory and advanced courses on the study of language covering a broad range of topics including language acquisition, language production/comprehension, bilingualism, and brain-language relations. I also teach a course in neuropsychology studying higher cognitive functions focusing on empirical evidence obtained from brain-damaged individuals. In my research, I specialize in the use of two time-sensitive techniques to study the mental architecture of language processing and of cross-modal interactions; the recording of brain electrical activity (event-related potentials) and the recording of eye movements. Recent research questions studied in the lab are: the time course of access to different types of linguistic information in bilinguals, audiovisual interactions in the context of speech, brain signatures of speech recognition, the automaticity of word processing, cross-modal interactions, synesthesia, and neural plasticity via sensory substitution mechanisms (see article). Details can be found in the SCALP lab website.

Psychology Department webpage

faculty profile photo Kara Cerveny, Associate Professor of Biology

faculty profile photo

Biology Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Kara earned a BS in Biology from Duke University, a Ph.D. in Biochemistry, Cellular, and Molecular Biology from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and conducted research as a post-doctoral fellow at the University College London, before joining the Reed Biology faculty in the fall of 2012. She teaches Developmental Biology with lab (BIO 351L), Developmental Neurobiology (BIO 431, an advanced conference-style course that focuses on historical and current topics in the visual system), and Introduction to Biology (Cells and Development Module, BIO 102). She also mentors year-long thesis projects (BIO 471) and semester-long independent studies (BIO 481). The research in Kara's lab focuses on how cells transition from proliferation to differentiation in the developing zebrafish visual system and is supported by the NIH National Eye Institute and the MJ Murdock Trust. Kara has a passion for sharing the beauty of biology and is always happy to share movies and images of developing zebrafish with any who would like to tour her lab.

Personal website
Biology Department webpage

faculty profile photo Kelly Chacón, Assistant Professor of Chemistry

faculty profile photo

Chemistry Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

I study how metal ions are trafficked in the cell by using a mixture of biochemistry and spectroscopy. My lab is particularly interested in catching the physical act of metal ion transfer from one metalloprotein to another, as well as characterizing newly discovered metalloproteins. This work heavily relies upon bi-yearly lab trips to a number of synchrotron lightsources. At Reed, I teach Introductory Chemistry, Metabolic Biochemistry (with emphasis on metal ions), and Biochemical Methods. I am also very passionate about increasing the presence of historically underrepresented groups in chemistry, by improving and/or creating institutional scaffolds of support for those groups. Outside of our beautiful College, I am heavily involved in the bioinorganic chemistry community, as well as devoted to exploring the great outdoors. I invite anyone who wants to know more about my work to stop by my office for a cup of tea — it is my true pleasure to translate my science for the public and potential students.

faculty profile photo Safia Chettih, Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics

faculty profile photo

Mathematics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Professor Chettih works in the area of algebraic topology, using its tools to study configuration spaces of graphs and related spaces. She is interested in the exploration of mathematical structures through geometric models, and her most recent work focuses on non-k-equal configuration spaces. She earned her B.Sc. in Mathematics from MIT in 2009 and her Ph.D in Mathematics from the University of Oregon in 2016.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Kimberly Clausing, Thormund A. Miller and Walter Mintz Professor of Economics

faculty profile photo

Economics Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Kimberly Clausing is the Thormund A. Miller and Walter Mintz Professor of Economics at Reed College. Her current research studies the taxation of multinational firms, examining how government decisions and firm behavior interplay in an increasingly global world economy. Professor Clausing has received two Fulbright Research awards, supporting research in Belgium (1999-2000) and Cyprus (2012). Her research has also been supported by external grants from the National Science Foundation, the Smith Richardson Foundation, the International Centre for Tax and Development, and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. She has worked on related policy research with the Hamilton Project, the Brookings Institution, the Tax Policy Center, and the Washington Center for Equitable Growth.  Professor Clausing received her B.A. from Carleton College in 1991 and her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1996. She teaches international trade, international finance, and public finance at Reed College.

Economics Department webpage

faculty profile photo Jeremy Coate '92, Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology

faculty profile photo

Biology Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Jeremy Coate is a proud alumnus of Reed College (BA, Biology), and has an MS in Forest Science from Oregon State University and a PhD in Plant Cell and Molecular Biology from Cornell University. He joined the Reed Faculty in fall 2017 and will teach Genetics and (tentatively) a seminar course in Bioinformatics. Jeremy is interested in understanding how plant genomes evolve following whole genome duplication (polyploidy), and how polyploid plants utilize their duplicated genomes to produce novel phenotypes. He uses high-throughput sequencing to quantify transcriptional responses to genome duplication, and utilizes this information to better understand patterns of genome evolution as well as the genetic/genomic basis for polyploidy-induced physiological traits. He is particularly interested in phenotypes relating to light stress, including excess visible light and UV-B radiation. He is currently a co-Principal Investigator on a grant from the National Science Foundation to quantify global shifts in gene expression following genome duplication.

faculty profile photo Kris Cohen, Assistant Professor of Art History and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Art Department
Division of the Arts

Kris Cohen is trained as a media theorist and an art historian. These two fields come together in his work on the technological mediation of social life. His first large scale research project, now complete, takes up this history near the end, with the advent of electronic networks and the building of new collective forms in networked environments. Future projects will extend this history back in time as a way to better understand the present. One will consider the relationship between art practices and changes to the intellectual property laws that govern creative labor and the commons. Another seeks to write a history for the bitmap as a mid-century screen technology that significantly transformed techniques of visual representation. Kris' PhD is in Art History from the University of Chicago (2010). He has written for the journals Afterall, New Media and Society, Continuum, caareviews, and a number of exhibition catalogues. He has also recently been involved in starting a new online journal, Open-Set. At Reed, he's taught "Video, Media, Politics (1968-Present)," "Figuring Relation," "The Art of Capitalism," "Theories of Forms," and Humanities 110.

Art Department webpage

faculty profile photo Jennifer Henderlong Corpus, Professor of Psychology

faculty profile photo

Psychology Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

Jennifer Henderlong Corpus is a professor of developmental psychology. Her research focuses on the factors that underlie children’s motivation to learn. She studies the tension and synergy between intrinsic and extrinsic forms of motivation as well as the strategies parents and teachers use to affect children’s motivation. Her courses in developmental psychology focus on the individual in social context and the reciprocal nature of socialization. She also teaches a course in educational psychology that focuses on motivation in educational contexts, which is informed by her scholarly work on achievement motivation. Jennifer earned her B.A. in psychology from the University of Michigan in 1995 before attending Stanford University, where she obtained her Ph.D. in 2000. She has been teaching at Reed since 2001, and in 2014 was named Oregon Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 

Psychology Department webpage

faculty profile photo John K. Cox, Visiting Assistant Professor of Music

faculty profile photo

Music Department
Division of the Arts

John K. Cox is Visiting Assistant Professor of Music and serves as director of the Reed Chorus and Collegium Musicum. Prior to Reed he spent five years as Director of Performance at Union College in Schenectady, NY. He holds degrees from Oberlin College (B. A., Musicology), University of Oregon (M.M., Choral Conducting and M.A., Music History), and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (D.M.A., Choral Conducting and Literature). John’s research focuses on 17th- and 18th-century Italian Sacred Music. He is currently preparing a critical edition of the psalm settings of Alessandro Melani (1639-1703). Recently, a performance of his edition of Melani’s Lauda anima mea was broadcast on Boston’s WBUR. While in Eugene, John served as Apprentice Conductor of the Eugene Symphony under Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Assistant Conductor of the Eugene Symphony Chorus under Sharon Paul, and music director of the Eugene Chamber Singers. He has been a guest conductor of the University of Oregon and University of Illinois Symphonies. Active as a singer as well as conductor, John is a core member of the Skylark Ensemble, and has been a soloist with Crescendo, The Cantilena Chamber Choir, and All Saints Cathedral Choir of Men and Boys in Albany, NY.

faculty profile photo Alison Crocker, Assistant Professor of Physics

faculty profile photo

Physics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Alison Crocker is an astrophysicist whose research focuses on the physics of star formation in nearby galaxies. She works on connecting what we know about the gas in galaxies (the precursor to star formation) to what we know about the stars that actually form. Her most recent paper documents how the ultraviolet light from young stars interacts with their surroundings. Alison majored in physics and mathematics at Dartmouth College before attending the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar. She earned her DPhil in astrophysics from Oxford and completed two postdoctoral positions at the University of Massachusetts and the University of Toledo before joining the physics faculty at Reed in the fall of 2014. In addition to teaching an astrophysics course, Alison teaches courses across the physics major and runs a weekly open astronomy/astrophysics discussion group.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Troy Cross, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Philosophy Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

Troy Cross (PhD 2004, Rutgers) works on, broadly speaking, questions of knowledge and reality. In addition to those core areas of philosophy (epistemology and metaphysics), he has recently taught courses on the philosophy of religion, the philosophy of mind, and the nature of color. Before coming to Reed in 2010, he held positions at Yale and at Merton College, Oxford.

faculty profile photo Paul Currie, Professor of Psychology

faculty profile photo

Psychology Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

I joined the Department of Psychology at Reed in the fall of 2007. My teaching expertise focuses on neuroscience and neuropharmacology with courses examining the neural bases of behavior including an emphasis on brain anatomy, physiology, and transmitter-receptor function. Research in my neuroscience lab is currently funded by a grant from the Murdock Charitable Trust. One line of work is directed at understanding the role of brain transmitter and peptide systems in relation to energy homeostasis and metabolism. A second line of research focuses on brain reward mechanisms including ghrelin and dopamine signaling. In a related line of research my lab is investigating the role of limbic structures in stress and anxiety. In recently published work, for example, we have mapped the feeding and metabolic effects of the gastric peptide ghrelin. We have also demonstrated that central ghrelin plays a critical role in stress and anxiety, and moreover, that midbrain ghrelin signaling plays an important role in drug reward, including alcohol reward. Overall this work demonstrates the interplay of neural systems mediating metabolic, reward, and emotional signaling. I am currently an active member of various professional societies including the Society for Neuroscience and the Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience. I am also a section editor for the rapid communication neuroscience journal NeuroReport.

Psychology Department webpage

faculty profile photo David Dalton, Professor of Biology

faculty profile photo

Biology Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

David Dalton holds degrees in botany from Duke University (B.S.) and Oregon State University (M.S. and Ph.D.). He teaches Plant Physiology, Plant Communities of the Pacific Northwest, Introductory Biology and seminar courses on Climate Change Biology and Plant Biotechnology. He has been at Reed since 1987. He has also taught several courses in the Masters of Arts in Liberal Arts (MALS) program including Environmental Issues of the Pacific Northwest and The Biological Legacy of Lewis and Clark. He is the author of a popular book on this latter topic (The Natural World of Lewis and Clark). During sabbatical years he has held adjunct faculty positions at Washington State University, The University of Arizona, and Oregon State University. His research interests include biological nitrogen fixation, antioxidants such as vitamin C in plants, and the ecophysiology of northwest forests. He has published over 34 research articles in leading journals and received 23 research grants including 5 major awards from the National Science Foundation. 

Biology Department webpage

faculty profile photo Ann T. Delehanty, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Professor of French and Humanities

faculty profile photo

French Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Ann T. Delehanty joined the Reed faculty in 2000 after completing a PhD in comparative literature at the University of California, Berkeley and a BA in philosophy at Carleton College. She is a professor of French and Humanities. She teaches Humanities 110, French language, French literature from the medieval and early modern periods, and comparative literature. She teaches courses that cover all literary genres. She has a particular interest in how literature serves a vital social role not only by representing social relationships but also by critiquing the (sometimes) harmful presumptions that lie behind those relationships. Delehanty's research is focused on the literature and philosophy of early modern Europe, particularly France, Spain, and England. Her first book, Literary Knowing in Neoclassical France: From Poetics to Aesthetics, came out in 2013. That book traces the shift away from rule-based poetics in the late seventeenth century and towards experience- and sentiment-based aesthetics in the early eighteenth century. She is currently working on a second book, tentatively entitled Disillusion and the Early Modern Novel, which argues that the experimental form of several early modern novels served to allow their authors to "disillusion" (desengañar) their readers and to make a veiled social critique.

faculty profile photo Jay M. Dickson, Professor of English and Humanities

faculty profile photo

English Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Jay M. Dickson is Professor of English and Humanities at Reed College. He received an A. B. in English and American Language and Literature from Harvard University, and his Ph.D. in English from Princeton University. Professor Dickson has taught at Reed College from 1996 to 1999 as a Visiting Assistant Professor, and then since 2001 on a permanent basis. From 1999 to 2001 he was Assistant Professor of English at the University of Tennessee—Knoxville, where he was awarded the John G. Hodges Excellence in Teaching Award. At Reed, he teaches in Humanities 110 and Humanities 220, and also teaches courses in the English department on British 20th- and 19th- century fiction; encyclopedic fictions; fictions of English India; and sexuality and desire in literature. He has published on such modernist figures as Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, E. M. Forster, and Lytton Strachey. His recent scholarship includes a chapter, "The Last of Katherine Mansfield: The Affective Life in the Journal and the Letters," in Modernism and Autobiography, ed. Maria DiBattista and Emily O. Wittman (Cambridge UP, 2014). He is currently at work on a monograph entitled Katherine Mansfield and the Limits of Modernist Emotional Expression.

faculty profile photo William J. Diebold, Jane Neuberger Goodsell Professor of Art History and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Art Department
Division of the Arts

William J. Diebold is the Jane Neuberger Goodsell Professor of Art History and Humanities at Reed College. He was educated at Yale and Johns Hopkins, receiving his PhD from the latter with a thesis on the patronage of the Carolingian emperor Charles the Bald. He has published extensively on early medieval topics, including his book Word and Image:  An Introduction to Early Medieval Art. He has taught these areas at Reed since 1987, and participates in the College's humanities program, teaching in both ancient Mediterranean and modern European courses. The latter appointment makes sense, since his current research is not on medieval art per se, but on its modern reception (specifically in 20th-century Germany), an interest that has led to publications such as "The High Middle Ages on Display in the Exhibition Deutsche Größe (1940-1942)” (2013) and a recent advanced art history course on medievalism.

faculty profile photo Jacqueline K. Dirks '82, Cornelia Marvin Pierce Professor of History and Humanities

faculty profile photo

History Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Professor Dirks was educated at Reed College and Yale University. She is a veteran teacher of undergraduate U.S. history. She has taught classes on U.S. cultural and political history, the history of western consumer culture, U.S. women's history, the history of the nineteenth-century family, and twentieth-century gender and sexuality. Professor Dirks also participates in Reed’s American Studies colloquium. Her current research project is tentatively titled Giving Women Credit and focuses on twentieth-century American women's claims to citizenship rights based on their economic roles as consumers, wage earners and heads of household. She recently contributed a review essay to the Oregon Historical Quarterly's special issue to mark the state centenary of woman suffrage: "The Straight State of Oregon: Notes Toward Queering the History of the Past Century."

faculty profile photo Alexei Ditter, Associate Professor of Chinese

faculty profile photo

Chinese Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Alexei Ditter (迪磊) obtained his B.A. from the University of Minnesota and his PhD from Princeton University. His research explores interactions between social and textual practices in medieval Chinese literature, focusing in particular on questions of place, genre, and memory. Articles he has published have addressed such topics as civil examinations and cover letters in the mid-Tang, literary histories of the Tang dynasty published in the 20th century, conceptions of urban space in Duan Chengshi's 9th century Records of Monasteries and Stupas, and the commercialization of funerary writing in the mid- to late-Tang. He is currently working on two monograph projects, one examining changing practices and styles of prose writing in China's late-8th and early-9th centuries and the other studying genre and memory in medieval Chinese literature. He is also contributing to and co-editing a volume of translations of tales from the 10thcentury anthologyTaiping guangji. Professor Ditter joined the Reed faculty in 2006. In addition to lecturing and leading conferences in the Chinese Humanities, he teaches classes in medieval and late imperial Chinese literature and in modern and classical Chinese language.

faculty profile photo Elizabeth Drumm, John and Elizabeth Yeon Professor of Spanish and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Spanish Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Elizabeth Drumm is the John and Elizabeth Yeon Professor of Spanish and Humanities. She joined the Reed faculty in 1995 after receiving a BA from the Program of Liberal Studies at the University of Notre Dame and a PhD in Comparative Literature from the University of Chicago. She teaches Spanish language courses, literature courses on 19th- and 20th-century Peninsular Spanish literature and a course on Don Quixote and narrative theory. She also teaches Reed’s interdisciplinary Humanities course on the ancient Mediterranean. Her current research focuses on memory and representation in Spanish modernism and, in particular, Ramón del Valle-Inclán's "aesthetics of memory." She has published articles on Valle-Inclán, Antonio Buero Vallejo, Ignacio Amestoy and Fernando Arrabal and is the author of Painting on Stage: Visual Art in Twentieth-Century Spanish Theater, a book that explores the relationship between theatrical language and visual images.

Spanish Department website

faculty profile photo Catherine Ming T'ien Duffly, Assistant Professor of Theatre

faculty profile photo

Theatre Department
Division of the Arts

Catherine (Kate) Ming T'ien Duffly is a scholar-director and community-engaged theatre artist with a Ph.D. in Performance Studies from the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to her position as Assistant Professor of Theatre at Reed, Kate taught at UC Berkeley and California College of Arts. Her teaching and research interests include acting, directing, socially engaged and community-based theatre, 20th and 21st century American theatre, race theory and performance and feminist performance. Kate's writing has appeared in Theatre Journal, Theatre Annual, and TDR. She has collaborated on projects with Cornerstone Theater, Touchable Stories, Lunatique Fantastique, Wise Fool Community Arts, and Bread and Puppet Theatre. Kate currently sits on the board of Portland's August Wilson Red Door Project, an organization which seeks to change the racial ecology of Portland through the arts.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Walter Englert, Omar and Althea Hoskins Professor of Classical Studies and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Classics Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Walter Englert is the Omar and Althea Hoskins Professor of Classical Studies and Humanities. He received his BA in Classics and Integral Liberal Arts from St. Mary’s College of California, his MA in Classics from UC Santa Barbara, and his Ph.D. in Classics from Stanford University. He has been at Reed since 1981, and has also taught at the University of Michigan, UC Berkeley, and at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. He teaches Greek and Latin courses at all levels, courses in translation, Humanities 110, and courses in the MALS (Master of Arts in Liberal Studies) program. His research is primarily in ancient philosophy, especially Hellenistic philosophy (Epicureanism, Stoicism, and the New Academy) and the reception of Greek philosophy in Rome (Lucretius, Cicero, and Seneca). He is the author of Epicurus on the Swerve and Voluntary Action. American Classical Studies 16. Oxford University Press, Oxford: 1987; Commentary on Cicero’s Pro Caelio. Bryn Mawr Commentary Series: 1990; and Lucretius: On the Nature of Things. Focus Publishing. Newburyport, MA. 2003. He has also published articles and book reviews on various aspects of ancient philosophy. He is currently working on a book project, Cicero and the Creation of Roman Philosophy.

Classics Department webpage

faculty profile photo John Essick, David W. Brauer Professor of Physics

faculty profile photo

Physics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

John Essick is a solid-state physics experimentalist whose research interests center on the optoelectronic properties of semiconductors. Essick received his B.S. degree in physics from UC Berkley (1976), M.S. in physics from UCLA (1978) and Ph. D. in physics from the University of Oregon (1988). He has been a professor in the Reed College Physics Department since 1993, where he is currently the David W. Brauer Professor of Physics. While at Reed, Essick has supervised 51 yearlong senior thesis projects on semiconductor topics including amorphous silicon, porous silicon and quantum dots as well as his other research interests in quantum optics and laser-based atom trapping. He is on the Board of Directors of the Advanced Laboratory Physics Association and is author of the popular textbook Hands-On Introduction to LabVIEW for Scientists and Engineers.

Physics Department webpage

Michael Faletra, Professor of English and Humanities

English Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Michael Faletra has been teaching and writing about the literatures of medieval Britain, including Middle English, Anglo-Latin, Anglo-Norman, Welsh, Irish, and Anglo-Saxon. He is the editor and translator of Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain (Broadview Press, 2008), one of the most influential books of the English Middle Ages. His most recent critical study, Wales and the Medieval Colonial Imagination: The Matters of Britain, was published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2014, and he has also published a number of articles on English proto-nationalism, Middle English and Anglo-Latin pseudo-histories, and on the interpenetration of English and Celtic cultures during the "long" twelfth century. His current projects include a book-length study of the Anglo-Latin writer Gerald of Wales and a collaborative translation (with Paul Merchant) of some of the works of the finest poet of medieval Wales, Dafydd ap Gwilym. Since 2001, Michael has been a member of the faculty at Reed College, where he regularly teaches courses on Chaucer, Dante, the medieval romance, and medieval Celtic literatures.

Personal website

Samuel Fey, Assistant Professor of Biology

Biology Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Sam earned a BA in Biology from Hamilton College, a PhD in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Dartmouth College, and recently completed a three-year postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Yale University before joining the Reed Biology faculty for the fall of 2017. Sam will be teaching Ecology (BIO 301, a laboratory and lecture course), a seminar in Global Change Ecology (BIO 431), and an Ecology Module in Introduction to Biology (BIO 101). His research focuses on how population and community dynamics respond to, and are shaped by, environmental variation. Much of his research focuses on understanding and predicting the response of freshwater ecosystems to ongoing environmental change.

Biology Department webpage

faculty profile photo Douglas L. Fix, Elizabeth C. Ducey Professor of Asian Studies

faculty profile photo

History Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Douglas Fix (費德廉) offers a broad range of seminars on the history of China and Japan and is part of the Chinese studies faculty who teach Reed's unique multidisciplinary course on Chinese humanities (focusing on the Qin-Han and Song periods). Current seminars explore topics in the history of Qing and Japanese colonialisms, early modern maritime China, nineteenth- and twentieth-century Chinese urban history, the early development of photography in East Asia, and the complexities of social and cultural modernity in China and Japan. With the help of staff, students and colleagues around the world, Fix created and now manages a digital collection entitled Formosa: Nineteenth century images. In collaboration with LO Hsiao-teh, his first book, 看見十九世紀台灣:十四位西方旅行者的福爾摩沙故事 [Curious investigations: 19th-century American and European impressions of Taiwan], translated twenty-some texts from this website into Chinese for use by students, professors and researchers in East Asia. His most recent book, in collaboration with John Shufelt, was a critical and annotated edition of Charles William Le Gendre's Notes of travel in Formosa (1875), a travelogue, ethnography, and intelligence brief that is essential to understanding the complex diplomatic relations between the U.S., Japan, and the Qing dynasty during the 1860s and 1870s. British maritime surveying of Formosan coastal waters and nineteenth-century EuroAmerican photographic images of Taiwanese aborigines have been the focus of recent articles and papers. However, Fix is currently researching the history of the multi-national community in the southern Chinese treaty-port of Xiamen and that city's regional and global networks.

faculty profile photo James D. Fix, Richard E. Crandall Professor of Computer Science

faculty profile photo

Mathematics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Professor Fix received his B.S. in mathematics and computer science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1992, and his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Washington in 2002. His main interests are in the design and analysis of algorithms and in the theory of computation. Fix's work seeks to adapt ideas from theoretical approaches to their practical implementation. His past work, for example, considered the impact of cache performance on algorithm design. More recently, he has investigated the parallel implementation of algorithms and data structures that support graph search and large text indexing, and also formal methods for reasoning about concurrent and distributed computation.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Victoria Fortuna, Assistant Professor of Dance

faculty profile photo

Dance Department
Division of the Arts

Victoria Fortuna is a dance studies scholar and contemporary dance practitioner. Her teaching and research interests include Latin/x American concert and social dance, dance as a mode of political and community organization, collaborative creation methods, and cultural histories of dance in transnational perspective. She founded and directs the Community Dance at Reed project, which brings together members of the Reed and broader Portland communities. Victoria is completing a book that examines the relationship between Buenos Aires based contemporary dance practices and histories of political and economic violence in Argentina from the 1960s to the present. Her second research project considers concert dance as a historic site for negotiating indigenous identities in Latin America. Her articles appear in publications including Dance Research JournalPerformance Researche-misférica, and Conversations Across the Field of Dance Studies. She has received grants and awards from Fulbright, the Society of Dance History Scholars, the American Society for Theatre Research, and the Latin American Studies Association. She also serves on the Board of Directors of the Society of Dance History Scholars. Prior to joining Reed’s Dance Department, she completed a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in Dance at Oberlin College (2013-15), where she taught courses in dance and performance studies. Victoria holds a BA in Comparative Literature from Brown University and an MA and PhD in Performance Studies from Northwestern University.

Eitan Frachtenberg, Visiting Associate Professor of Computer Science

Mathematics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Eitan Frachtenberg comes to Reed after 25 years in the software industry, government, and academia. His research interests include all areas of computer systems, from hardware to software, and he is particularly interested in making systems scale larger and faster. He's previously worked for startups as well as industry giants (Microsoft, Facebook), and tries to bring to his teaching at Reed a modicum of real-world perspective and experience. Eitan received his Ph.D in Computer Science from the Hebrew University in 2004, and has published over 50 peer-reviewed papers, articles, volumes, and patents.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Ariadna García-Bryce, Professor of Spanish and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Spanish Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Ariadna García-Bryce earned her BA from Yale University in 1989, majoring in Comparative Literature; she earned her PhD in Spanish Literature from Princeton University in 1997. She works on early modern Spanish literature and culture and has published in peer-reviewed journals on a variety of topics: the relationship between drama, religion, and visual culture; rhetoric, poetics and the construction of social authority; the appropriation of Baroque poetics in twentieth-century Latin America; conceptions of the body and gender construction. Her book, Transcending Textuality: Quevedo and Political Authority in the Age of Print (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2011), examines the connection between political prose and court spectacle in the context of incipient bureaucratization. At Reed, aside from courses in her area of expertise, she teaches Humanities 110, “Introduction to Humanities: Greece and the Ancient Mediterranean”, and Humanities 210, “Early Modern Europe.” 

faculty profile photo Katja Garloff, Professor of German and Humanities

faculty profile photo

German Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Katja Garloff joined the Reed Faculty in 1997 after obtaining an M.A. from the University of Hamburg and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. She is the author of Words from Abroad: Trauma and Displacement in Postwar German Jewish Writers (Wayne State University Press, 2005), Mixed Feelings: Tropes of Love in German Jewish Culture (Cornell University Press, 2016), and many articles on authors such as Franz Kafka, Paul Celan, Theodor Adorno, Hannah Arendt, and W.G. Sebald. She is currently coediting a book on the reemergence of Jewish literature in post-unification Germany. In recent years, Garloff has been a visiting professor at Harvard University, a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, and a member of the program committee of the German Studies Association Conference. She currently serves on the editorial board of Nexus: Essays in German Jewish Studies and on the division executive committee of the Modern Language Association Committee of America. At Reed, she teaches Humanities 220, German language, modern and contemporary German literature, German Jewish culture, critical theory, and film.

faculty profile photo David T. Garrett, Richard F. Scholz Professor of History and Humanities

faculty profile photo

History Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

I teach Latin American history, and classical and early modern European humanities. As the only Latin Americanist and Iberianist in the history department, I try to offer a broad array of classes, focusing on social, religious, and ethnohistory; generally I teach one colonial and one modern class a year. Recent offerings have been Catholicism in the Early Modern Spanish World; the Incas; the Maya; Race and Ethnicity in the Andes; the United States and Latin America; Labor in Modern Latin America; and the Mexican Revolution. My research and publications focus on colonial Cusco [Peru]. Earlier work on the Incas include Shadows of Empire: The Indian Nobility of Cusco, 1750-1825 (Cambridge, 2005) and several articles. At present I am working the geography of late 17th-century Cusco and the role of royal government in this mid-colonial society; this project has produced several articles to date. Among grants and awards I’ve won since joining Reed in 1998 are Marjorie Millicent McIntosh Fellowship from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation (2006-8) and the Alice Adams Fellowship at the John Carter Brown Library (2015); and, for articles, the James Alexader Robinson Prize (2005), the Tibesar Prize (2008), and the Franklin Pease G.Y. Prize (2012, runner-up). I have a BA from Yale in Political Philosophy, an MA from Harvard in History, and an MPhil and PhD from Columbia in History.

faculty profile photo Daniel Gerrity, Professor of Chemistry

faculty profile photo

Chemistry Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Professor Gerrity received a B.A. in Chemistry from Cornell College in 1977, and a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from Harvard University in 1982. He joined the Reed Faculty in 1987. Dan currently teaches all of the physical chemistry lecture and laboratory courses offered at Reed, and he participates in the teaching of the analytical chemistry course as well (during his first dozen years at the College, Dan was solely responsible for teaching all four of the 300-level chemistry courses required for the chemistry major at Reed — including all of the lab sections associated with these courses). He served as a member of the Committee of Examiners for the Graduate Record Exams Subject Test in Chemistry for eight years, was elected to the Executive Committee of the American Chemical Society’s Division of Physical Chemistry (serving from 1994-1997) as well as the Western Spectroscopy Association (serving from 1991-1994), and was Reed’s liaison for the Partners In Science Program for over fifteen years. Dan is an experimental physical chemist; his research utilizes the short bursts of extremely intense light produced by pulsed lasers to study chemical dynamics and the electronic structure of molecules. In addition to the hundreds of students he has had the pleasure to teach, Dan is most proud of his contributions to the construction of the Arthur Scott Chemistry Building (including helping to get financial support from the NSF and the Murdoch Foundation), raising funds for several major equipment purchases for the chemistry program, and helping to obtain College funding for over 50 student summer research positions in the sciences at Reed.

Chemistry Department webpage

faculty profile photo Kambiz GhaneaBassiri, Professor of Religion and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Religion Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

Kambiz GhaneaBassiri, Professor of Religion & Humanities, joined Reed College in 2002 after completing his doctoral studies in the committee on the study of religion at Harvard University. An internationally recognized scholar in Islam in America and the Middle East, he was named a Carnegie Scholar for his book A History of Islam in America and a Guggenheim Fellow for his current book project on the mosque in Islamic history. He also served as one of five national scholars who developed the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association Muslim Journeys Bookshelf.

faculty profile photo Leah Goldman, Visiting Assistant Professor of History and Humanities

faculty profile photo

History Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Leah Goldman is a cultural historian of the Soviet Union. At Reed, she teaches courses on European cultural politics and the concept of revolution in Russian and Soviet history, as well as modern European humanities. Her further teaching interests include Russian, Soviet, and post-Soviet cultural and social history, arts and resistance/revolution, comparative Cold War culture, European avant-gardes, socialist aesthetics, and empire and cultural hegemony in Central Asia. Leah’s research focuses on the complexities of the censorship of cultural production, particularly classical music, in the Soviet Union during the Stalin and Khrushchev eras. Her book manuscript in progress investigates collaborative creativity and collective professional self-censorship among Soviet composers during the late-Stalinist repression of the intelligentsia. Leah has presented her research at a variety of national and international conferences, and her article “Negotiation ‘Historical Truth’: Art Authority, and Iurii Shaporin’s The Decembrists” was recently published in Journal of Musicology. Leah is the recipient of the 2016 Robert C Tucker/Stephen F Cohen Prize for Outstanding Dissertation in Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and History, and has previously been awarded a Mellon-Council For European Studies Dissertation Completion Fellowship and a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Grant. She received her PhD in Russian and Soviet History from the University of Chicago in 2015.

faculty profile photo Marat Grinberg, Associate Professor of Russian and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Russian Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Marat Grinberg came to Reed College in 2006 and is professor of Russian and Humanities. He received his BAs in Comparative Literature from Columbia University and in Modern Jewish Studies from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America in 1999, and his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of Chicago in 2006. He is a specialist in 20th century Russian literature and culture, with an emphasis on Soviet poetry, modern Jewish literature, culture, and politics, and post-war European and American cinema. At Reed he teaches courses in Russian poetry and 19th century novel, Russian and Jewish literature of destruction, Jewish modernisms, Soviet science fiction, and Introduction to Comparative Literature. He is the author of I am to be Read not from Left to Right, but in Jewish: from Right to Left: The Poetics of Boris Slutsky (Academic Studies Press 2011/ paperback 2013) and the forthcoming Commissar (Intellect 2016). He is also co-editor of Woody on Rye: Jewishness in the Films and Plays of Woody Allen (Brandeis University Press 2013). He has published extensively in both academic and journalistic venues on Russian and Jewish literature, culture, and cinema.

faculty profile photo Adam Groce, Assistant Professor of Computer Science

faculty profile photo

Mathematics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Adam Groce is a cryptographer whose work focuses on database privacy. The goal of this field is to allow large databases of private information (e.g., medical records) to be used by researchers interested in advancing our understanding of the world while at the same time protecting the individuals whose information the databases contain. He is also involved in efforts to apply game-theoretic concepts to cryptography, treating adversaries as self-interested agents with particular goals. Apart from his research in cryptography, he is interested in all aspects of theoretical computer science, as well as in cybersecurity policy questions. Adam holds bachelors degrees in mathematics and political science from MIT and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Maryland. He joined Reed as a visitor in 2014.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Paul Gronke, Professor of Political Science

faculty profile photo

Political Science Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Paul Gronke (PhD Michigan, '93, MA University of Essex '84, BA Chicago '82) studies American politics, specializing in convenience and early voting, election administration, public opinion, and elections. He is the editor of the Election Law Journal, an interdisciplinary journal of election law, administration, and politics, and co-editor of PS: Political Science and Politics, one of three flagship journals of the American Political Science Association. Paul's research for the past decade has focused on the phenomenon of "early voting," modes of balloting whereby voters can cast their ballots at a place and time other than at the polling place on Election Day. In 2005, he established the Early Voting Information Center. EVIC searches for common sense, non-partisan solutions to identified problems in election administration that are backed by solid empirical evidence and tailored to the conditions of the time and jurisdiction, and that may or may not include the administration of early voting. EVIC has worked with a number of state and local governments, Secretaries of State and state election directors, federal agencies, and non-profits, mostly but not exclusively related to early voting and social scientific research on election administration.Paul lives with his family in the beautiful city of Portland, OR where he runs cycles, sits in coffee shops, gardens, and follows politics. If you're really nice to him, he may give you a cucumber.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Timothy Hackenberg, Professor of Psychology

faculty profile photo

Psychology Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

Tim Hackenberg is a Professor of Psychology, with interests in behavior analysis, comparative cognition, and behavioral economics. He received a B.A. from the University of California, Irvine, and a Ph.D. from Temple University. He completed a postdoctoral research fellowship at the University of Minnesota, and served on the faculty at the University of Florida for 19 years prior to arriving at Reed in 2009. He teaches courses in Learning (PSY 373), Comparative Cognition (PSY 330), Research Methods in Learning & Comparative Psychology (PSY 415), and History and Systems of Psychology (PSY 392). He takes a strong comparative and evolutionary approach, trying to understand general principles of adaptive behavior that cut across species and habitats, while at the same time, appreciating the unique adaptations of a given animal in its world. Work in his lab has been funded by NIH and NSF over the years, and is concerned broadly with cross-species analysis of adaptive behavior, including decision-making (e.g., self-control, risky choice), social behavior (e.g., cooperation, reciprocity), and behavioral economics (e.g., token economies). He is also interested in the history and philosophy of science; in particular, how psychological principles can help us to understand science as a social process.

Psychology Department webpage
Lab webpage

faculty profile photo Denise Hare, Dr. Lester B. Lave Professor of Economics

faculty profile photo

Economics Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Denise Hare is the Dr. Lester B. Lave Professor of Economics at Reed College. Her research examines economic development in China and Vietnam, addressing questions about labor markets, gender, rural industry, privatization and property rights, local public finance, and food security policy. Current work explores the labor market experiences of urban women in post-reform China. Denise received her B.A. from Carleton College and her Ph.D. from Stanford University, both in economics. From 1995 to 1997, she held a Postdoctoral Fellow position in the Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies at The Australian National University. In 2000 and 2001, she held a Fulbright Senior Research Fellowship at Vietnam National University. In 2008 she was an Institute for International Research Fellow at the Hopkins-Nanjing Center of Nanjing University. Her work also has been funded by the Ford Foundation, the Committee for Scholarly Communication with the People's Republic of China, and the Pew Foundation. Since 2002 she has served as an instructor and research mentor in the Chinese Women Economists' Network hosted by the China Center for Economic Research at Beijing University.

Economics Department webpage

faculty profile photo Sameh Helmy, Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry

faculty profile photo

Chemistry Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Sameh Helmy is currently serving at Reed College as Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry teaching Organic Chemistry Lecture and Laboratory. Sam completed his undergraduate studies at California State University, Chanel Islands in 2010, where he conducted research on the synthesis of water-soluble curcumin analogues as a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease under the direction of Dr. Philip Hampton. Sam went on to conduct his doctoral studies in the Read de Alaniz group at the University of California, Santa Barbara, graduating in 2015. His research culminated in the discovery and development of a novel class of photochromic molecular switches termed donor-acceptor Stenhouse adducts.  These unique molecules have been applied to a diverse range of fields including: light controlled drug delivery, catalyst recycling, and as an indicator for impact and thermal stress in polymer composites. Following his doctoral studies he joined the laboratory of Sumita Pennathur (Mechanical Engineering, UCSB) researching surface modification of silicon micro/nano-channels, and developing methods for nanoscale detection of biomolecules and carbohydrates. Sam’s current research interests focus on molecular systems capable of converting visible light to mechanical motion, and developing new reaction platforms for the rearrangement of heterocycles.

Mark Hinchliff '81, Professor of Philosophy

Philosophy Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

PhD, Princeton, 1988. Joined the faculty in 1991. His interests are in metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of language. He teaches these subjects regularly, and has written on them for journals and collections. He is currently doing work in the philosophy of time, specifically on the nature and reality of tense.

faculty profile photo Hugh Hochman, Professor of French and Humanities

faculty profile photo

French Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Hugh Hochman joined the Reed College faculty in 1999 and is Professor of French and Humanities. He received his BA in Comparative Literature from Columbia University in 1990, and his PhD in French from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1999. He teaches French language courses, courses in 20th-century French poetry and prose, and Humanities 220, Reed’s interdisciplinary modern humanities course. His research focuses on 20th-century French poets, and he is especially interested in the relationship of language to material reality and in the ways in which the interpretive gestures demanded by literary texts are related to ethical questions of human action. He has published articles on Yves Bonnefoy, Guillevic, Paul Eluard, Robert Desnos, and Jacques Réda. He is currently working on a book project entitled Loose Ends: Francis Ponge and Dilemmas of Literal and Figurative Reading, which treats rhetoric, science, and morality in the work of Francis Ponge.

faculty profile photo Paul Hovda, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Philosophy Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

Paul Hovda's research interests include metaphysics and philosophical logic. He is particularly interested in formally rigorous theories that bear on metaphysical topics, such as mereology. He received his B.A. with majors in Mathematics and in Philosophy from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from UCLA.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Joshua Howe, Associate Professor of History and Environmental Studies

faculty profile photo

History Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Joshua Howe is Associate Professor of History and Environmental Studies. He teaches courses in American and world environmental history, the history of science, and American foreign policy, as well as in the interdisciplinary Environmental Studies junior seminar. In his research he investigates the intersections of science and environmental politics in both domestic and foreign political contexts. His recent book, Behind the Curve: Science and the Politics of Global Warming (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2014), explores the political history of climate change since the 1950s, and his work on climate change has also appeared in Environmental History and the interdisciplinary journal Climatic Change, among others. Josh holds a B.A. in history and creative writing from Middlebury College and a Ph.D. in history from Stanford University. From 2010-2012, he served as a postdoctoral fellow with the National Science Foundation’s John Tyndall Correspondence Project at Montana State University in Bozeman, Montana. He moved to Portland to take up his position at Reed in the fall of 2012. Josh will serve as the chair of the Environmental Studies Program for the 2015-16 academic year, and he continues to serve as the official college liaison for the Thomas J. Watson Fellowship. When he is not in the archives or grading papers in Portland’s coffee shops, you can find him fishing Oregon's rivers, riding its waves, exploring its deserts, and playing in its mountains.

faculty profile photo Lucas Illing, Associate Professor of Physics

faculty profile photo

Physics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Born in Germany, I studied physics at the Humboldt University in Berlin, obtained my Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego in 2002 and joined Reed College in 2007 after a postdoctoral position at Duke University. I am interested in the nonlinear dynamics of dissipative systems and networks of such systems. Through an interplay of theory and tabletop experiments I address questions such as: How do systems transition from equilibrium to a state of complicated non-repeating oscillations as parameters are changed? How does one determine the value of those parameters from measured output? What new collective phenomena arise when several oscillatory systems are linked to form a network? How do these phenomena depend on the topology of the network, the coupling strengths and the coupling delays that arise due to finite signal propagation times? Experiments in my lab range from mechanical systems, such as a chaotic water wheel whose slow movements can be observed with the naked eye, to optoelectronic oscillators whose light intensity fluctuates on timescales of nanoseconds or less.

Physics Department webpage

faculty profile photo Albyn Jones, Professor of Statistics

faculty profile photo

Mathematics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Professor Jones received his Ph.D. in Statistics from Yale University in 1986. He has worked on a wide range of topics, from computation to Bayesian and maximum likelihood inference. Recent areas of application include biology, volcanology, and rating systems in sports.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Keith Karoly, Laurens N. Ruben Professor of Biology

faculty profile photo

Biology Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Keith Karoly received his B.A. in biology from Whitman College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in evolutionary biology from The University of Chicago, studying the reproductive biology of California annual lupines for his doctoral research. He conducted post-doctoral research at SUNY-Stony Brook and the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, investigating the pollination dynamics of avalanche lilies in Colorado and the evolution of separate sexes for a meadow rue in upstate New York. Keith began his current position in the Reed College Biology Department in 1994. He teaches Vascular Plant Diversity, Molecular Ecology, Introductory Biology, and seminar courses on Molecular Genetic Analyses of Plant Evolution and Plant-Human Ecological and Evolutionary Interactions. His research projects have been broadly centered on the genetics and ecology of plant evolutionary diversification, with a particular interest in the mating systems of flowering plants. Specific projects since arriving at Reed have included continuing studies of mating system variation in annual California lupines, the evolution of floral diversity in the mustard family, the phylogeography of the Oregon white oak, and genetic and ecological studies focused on understanding the recent evolutionary divergence of PNW larkspurs (the genus Delphinium) — several of which are species of conservation concern.

Biology Department webpage

Dana E. Katz, Joshua C. Taylor Associate Professor of Art History and Humanities

Art Department
Division of the Arts

Dana E. Katz, Ph.D. (2003) in Art History from the University of Chicago, is Joshua C. Taylor Associate Professor of Art History and Humanities at Reed College, where she has been teaching courses since 2005 on Italian Renaissance art and architecture, early modern culture in Europe and the Americas, and art historical methodologies. Her research explores representations of religious difference in the art and culture of early modern Italy. In particular, she studies the relations and negotiations between Jewish cultural history and the visual culture of the Italian Renaissance. A recipient of fellowships from the Fulbright Foundation, Kress Foundation, Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundations, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and Renaissance Society of America, Katz is the author of The Jew in the Art of the Italian Renaissance (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008) and The Jewish Ghetto and the Visual Imagination of Early Modern Venice (Cambridge University Press, 2017). Her new book project redirects her study of religious difference to Islam in order to rethink how the heterogeneous Muslim worlds correlated with the Christian worlds of early modern Europe. In this project, Katz examines how visual culture in the West pluralized the idea of Islam.

faculty profile photo Sameer ud Dowla Khan, Associate Professor of Linguistics

faculty profile photo

Linguistics Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

Sameer joined the Linguistics Department at Reed College in 2012. His research interests lie in phonetics and phonology, areas that cover the physical attributes of speech sounds, the complex patterns they form, and the abstract representations they embody in our mental grammars. His publications focus on intonation, voice quality, and reduplication, with a particular interest in the languages of South Asia and Mesoamerica. Every year, he teaches phonetics, phonology, and half of the introductory course on formal linguistics. In selected years, he also teaches advanced courses on intonation, laboratory phonology, phonological knowledge, field methods, and South Asian languages. He serves as the director of the Lab of Linguistics, where faculty and students conduct research on diverse languages and their varieties.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Nathalia King, David Eddings Professor of English and Humanities

faculty profile photo

English Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Educated in France, Germany and the US, Nathalia King holds a French baccalaureat, studied at the University of Freiburg, has a B.A. in Comparative Literature from UMass/Amherst and a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from New York University. She has taught at Reed since 1987 and has been the recipient of Fulbright and Mellon grants. Her research focuses on the transitions between oral and literate cultures (in classical and modernist literature); text-image relations; and comparative accounts of consciousness in philosophy, psychology, and literature. Her courses include: Intro to Theory; Literary Theory; Description and Narration; the Literary Imagination and the Working Hand; and Theories of Mind: Representations of Consciousness.

Robert S. Knapp, Reginald F. Arragon Professor of English and Humanities

English Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Robert Knapp comes from Alamosa, Colorado. Educated at the University of Colorado, the University of Denver, and Cornell University, he taught for eight years at Princeton University, and considers himself very lucky to have begun teaching at Reed in 1974. A specialist in Shakespeare and early modern English drama, he also has a developed interest in literary theory. He has published journal articles on a variety of late medieval and early modern texts, and is the author of Shakespeare: The Theater and the Book (Princeton University Press, 1989). He is currently finishing a second book entitled Shakespearean Mimesis.

Personal website

Lyudmila Korobenko, Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Mathematics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

I work in the area of Real Analysis, more precisely, degenerate elliptic PDEs. I study properties of solutions to such equations and associated metric measure spaces. It turns out that metric spaces associated to some infinitely degenerate operators are not geometrically doubling, and there is not much theory available for such spaces yet. I received my Masters degree from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and a PhD from the University of Calgary in Canada. I received an NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship, which I took at McMaster University, and then I had a one year postdoc at the University of Pennsylvania before joining Reed in 2016.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Chris Koski, Associate Professor of Political Science and Environmental Studies

faculty profile photo

Political Science Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Chris was an assistant professor at James Madison University from 2007-2011 and has been at Reed since Fall 2011. His research interests include many aspects of the policy process, with a particular theoretical focus on policy design and implementation. Substantively, Chris has focused on environmental policy, homeland security policy, and the politics of state budgeting. Chris currently teaches introduction to public policy, state and local politics and policy, and environmental politics and policy. Chris' classes are also a part of the environmental studies (ES) program at Reed. He can be found talking politics and policy anywhere, but particularly where there is pinball, bowling, barbeque, and good fishing.

Political Science Department webpage

faculty profile photo Christian Kroll, Assistant Professor of Spanish and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Spanish Department
Division of Literature and Languages

I hold a PhD in Romance Languages and Literatures (Spanish) from the University of Michigan (2012) and joined Reed in August 2014. I also hold a master’s degree in urban planning and studies from Michigan, and was a practitioner architect before turning to academia. My area of specialization is 20th and 21st century Latin American literature and culture with an emphasis on contemporary Central America, Mexico and Peru. My research interests include critical, spatial and political theory, state violence and the languages of resistance, and the relation between culture, politics and the production of space, all of which I strive to incorporate in my teaching. I am currently at work on a book-length project on the languages and spaces of (counter)insurgency in Latin America.

faculty profile photo Peter Ksander, Associate Professor of Theatre

faculty profile photo

Theatre Department
Division of the Arts

Peter Ksander is a stage designer and theater artist who joined the Reed College Faculty in 2011. He holds an MFA from the California Institute of the Arts and a BA from the University of Iowa. In the decade prior to arriving at Reed he created designs for performance events in both the United States and Europe. His work has been presented at The National Theater of Hungary, Maison des Arts de Creteil, The Brooklyn Academy of Music, The Public Theater, The Chocolate Factory, The Walker Art Center, Arts at St. Ann’s, La Mama ETC. PS122, HERE Arts Center, The Ontological-Hysteric Theater, The ICA (Boston), Theater for a New Audience, The TBA Festival, and the Under the Radar Festival as well as regional theaters around the country. In 2005 Peter was a recipient of the NEA/TCG Career Development Program, through which he spent two years investigating how experimental theater ideas are explored at all levels of production in the United States. In 2006 He joined the curatorial board of the Ontological-Hysteric Incubator and for the next five years served as a curator of new and experimental work. During that time he worked alongside co-curator Brendan Regimbal to develop SHORTFORM, a residency program for artists to explore serial and sequential performance works. In 2008 he won an Obie award for the scenic design of Untitled Mars (this title may change) and in 2014 he won a Bessie award for the visual design of This was the End.

Theatre Department webpage

faculty profile photo Rebecca LaLonde '01, Associate Professor of Chemistry

faculty profile photo

Chemistry Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Rebecca began her career at Reed College, earning her BA in chemistry in 2001. During her time away from Reed, Rebecca completed a MS in chemistry at Stanford University and PhD in chemistry at UC Berkeley. In addition to her academic experience she also has industrial experience as an Associate Scientist at Dow Agrosciences and a research associate in medicinal chemistry at Genentech. While at Genentech, Rebecca was a key contributor to the discovery of Erivedge, a drug used for the treatment of basal cell carcinoma. Rebecca returned to campus as faculty in the fall of 2013. As an avid outdoors person and paragliding pilot, Rebecca is particularly concerned with reducing the environmental impact of organic chemistry. Her research interests are focused on developing non-toxic catalysts derived from bismuth. These catalysts will be used to synthesize new chemical bonds that are critical for drug & agrochemical research. Rebecca teaches introductory organic chemistry (Chem 202) and advanced synthetic organic chemistry (Chem 343).

faculty profile photo Thomas Landvatter, Assistant Professor of Classics and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Classics Department
Division of Literature and Languages

I earned a BA in History and a BA in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies from Penn State University in 2006, and my PhD in 2013 from the Interdepartmental Program in Classical Art and Archaeology (IPCAA) at the University of Michigan. Before coming to Reed in 2015, I taught at Kalamazoo College and Valparaiso University. My teaching and research interests both center on the history and archaeology of the ancient Mediterranean, in particular during the Hellenistic period (323-30 BCE). Geographically, I focus on the Eastern Mediterranean and Near East, especially Egypt. However, my broader interests encompass issues of cross-cultural interaction, imperialism, and material culture across the entire ancient Mediterranean, from the end of the Bronze Age (ca. 1200 BCE) into Late Antiquity (ca. 700 CE). My research specifically focuses on the archaeology of death and burial, and uses data from human burials to understand the social structures and practices of ancient societies. I am a field archaeologist, and I have excavated in Israel, Poland, and Egypt, where I conducted the field component of my dissertation research at the cemetery site of Abydos (a short article summarizing my finds can be found here). Recently I received a fellowship to undertake research in Cyprus.

Classics Department webpage

faculty profile photo Sharon Larisch, Professor of Spanish and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Spanish Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Sharon Larisch joined the Reed faculty in 1986 and is a professor of Spanish and Humanities. She received her BA in Spanish from the University of California, Santa Barbara and PhD in comparative literature from the University of Oregon. She teaches Spanish language and a broad range of courses on Spanish American literature, from the chronicles of the conquest and colonization of America to modern narrative and performance art. What unites these disparate courses is an interest in the intersections of ethics and literature, including most recently the ethics of spatial representation. Some publications representative of her work include articles on the ethics of loss in the elegy, on the stumbling of allegorical representation in the face of marginalized spaces, on the human implications of representations of paradise, and on the aesthetics of the crime scene. Her current project is focused on seventeenth-century Spanish-American piracy and the literary and cartological representations of ever-moving oceanic and mercantilist spaces.

faculty profile photo Andrew Larkoski, Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics

faculty profile photo

Physics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Andrew Larkoski is a theoretical particle physicist whose research focuses on the physics of the Large Hadron Collider experiment, located in Geneva, Switzerland. He is most interested in jets: collimated streams of particles that are the manifestation of the strong nuclear force, quantum chromodynamics, at exceptionally high energies. Two recent papers published by Andrew developed methods that are now widely used in analyzing the data from the Large Hadron Collider.  Andrew double majored in physics and mathematics at the University of Washington before attending Stanford University for graduate school. He earned his Ph.D. in physics in 2012 and went on to postdoctoral positions at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. Andrew joined the physics faculty at Reed as a visiting assistant professor in 2016.

faculty profile photo Yan Lau, Assistant Professor of Economics

faculty profile photo

Economics Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Yan Lau is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Reed College. His research focuses on the economics of education, labor economics, and public policy. He is also interested in political economy. He joined Reed's Economics Department in 2013 after obtaining his Ph.D. in Economics at Princeton University.

Economics Department webpage

Benjamin Lazier, Professor of History and Humanities

History Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

I tend to be attracted to a kind of thinking that marries philosophical reflection to historical inquiry, with specific interests in technology, the environment, globalisms, psychoanalysis, religious thought, political thought, political economy, animality, the emotions, and movements for social action. I received my Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, taught for three years at the University of Chicago, and have been at Reed since 2005. As a scholar and writer, I have done some work in the history of religion, and my book, God Interrupted (Princeton, 2008), received awards from the American Academy of Religion and the Templeton Foundation. I've also co-edited a volume in the study of emotion called Fear: Across the Disciplines (Pittsburgh, 2012). I've since embarked on some new research projects, principally a history of the Whole Earth. A sample of that project, a capsule history of philosophical reactions to the first images of the Earth from space, appeared as an article ("Earthrise; or, the Globalization of the World Picture") in the American Historical Review. This year I am teaching a course on technology and social thought, on the Whole Earth, and a sequence of classes in modern Humanities from the Enlightenment era to the present. In the near future I hope to offer courses on the psychoanalytic tradition, on the history of emotions, and on the concept of the anthropocene era.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Elliot Leffler, Visiting Assistant Professor of Theatre

faculty profile photo

Theatre Department
Division of the Arts

Elliot Leffler is a scholar, director, performer, and facilitator of applied theatre projects. In his research and in the creative projects he leads, Elliot primarily explores how theatre can be used as a catalyst for intercultural and interfaith dialogue. He has led theatre projects with white, black, and coloured South Africans, with Jews and Palestinians in Israel, with Kurdish and Arab Iraqis, with urban US high school students, and with racially-diverse houses of worship. These creative and scholarly projects frequently take Elliot away from traditional theatre spaces: he has worked in summer camps, prisons, rural villages, and urban high schools. However, he has also worked closely with many prominent theatre companies, including Sojourn Theatre and Portland Playhouse (Portland), Theatre J (Washington, DC), Magnet Theatre (Cape Town, South Africa), and Lifeline Theatre (Chicago). Elliot joined the faculty of Reed College in 2014 after completing his PhD in Theatre at the University of Minnesota. He also holds an MA in Applied Theatre from the University of Cape Town, and a BA in Theatre from Northwestern University. He frequently presents at national and international conferences, and has published in The Drama Review, Research in Drama Education, and Theatre Topics. His chapter, "Bursting the Bubble of Play: Making Space for Intercultural Dialogue," recently appeared in Megan Lewis’s and Anton Krueger’s book, Magnet Theatre: Three Decades of Making Space. He has won several awards, including a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholarship and a Dorot Fellowship. His teaching interests include acting, directing, devising, improvisation, theatre history (with an emphasis on 20th century South African theatre), performance of religion, and Theatre of the Oppressed.

Theatre Department webpage
Personal website

faculty profile photo Laura Arnold Leibman, Professor of English and Humanities

faculty profile photo

English Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Laura Arnold Leibman is Professor of English and Humanities at Reed College. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1995. Her general field of interest is religion and American culture prior to the American Civil War. She is the author of Indian Converts (U Mass. P. 2008) and numerous academic articles, including three articles co-authored with Reed students, one of which won the 2015 Wasserman Essay Prize from the journal American Jewish History. She known for her scholarship in Digital Humanities and regularly teaches courses in this area. In addition to being the chair of the Digital Media Committee for the Association of Jewish Studies, she served as the academic director of the award-winning, multimedia public television series American Passages: A Literary Survey (2003). Her book Messianism, Secrecy and Mysticism: A New Interpretation of Early American Jewish Life (Vallentine Mitchell 2012) won a Jordan Schnitzer Book Award and a National Jewish Book Award, and was a Choice Outstanding Academic Title. She has been a Fulbright scholar at University of Panama and Utrecht University (Netherlands) and will be a visiting fellow at Oxford University in 2017. She is currently a Distinguished Lecturer for the Association of Jewish Studies. Her current book project uses material culture to explore the topic of Jews and race during the emancipation debates that swept the Americas in the 1790s-1830s.

Personal website

faculty profile photo John Lind '06, Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics

faculty profile photo

Mathematics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

I am interested in the formal nature of structure, and the unifying power of understanding a pattern as it arises in different contexts. My mathematical research is in the fields of algebra, topology, and category theory, and my teaching emphasizes the creative and participatory aspects of mathematics. I was educated at Reed College (B.A. 2006) and the University of Chicago (M.S. 2008, Ph.D. 2011), and have held visiting research positions at the Johns Hopkins University and the University of Regensburg.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Mónica López Lerma, Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish

faculty profile photo

Spanish Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Prior to coming to Reed, Mónica was a post-doctoral researcher at the Faculty of Law of the University of Helsinki and taught courses on Law and Cinema, Transitional Justice, Law and Gender, and Jurisprudence. Mónica received a PhD in Comparative Literature and a Graduate Certificate in Film Studies from the University of Michigan. Her research interests include contemporary Spanish film and literature, with particular emphasis on aesthetics, film theory, gender, and cultural and theoretical aspects of law. Her work has appeared in Revue Interdisciplinaire d'Etudes Juridiques, Conserveries Mémorielles, Southern California Interdisciplinary Law Journal, Política Común, Nordic Journal of Law and Social Research, as well as in various edited volumes. Mónica is currently writing a monograph entitled "Sensing Justice. Aesthetics, Politics, and Law through Contemporary Spanish Cinema" and editing a volume on "Rancière and the Law". She is co-editor of the journal No Foundations: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Law and Justice. At Reed, she will teach courses on film theory and law and violence through contemporary Spanish cinema.

Morgan James Luker, Associate Professor of Music

Music Department
Division of the Arts

Morgan James Luker is Associate Professor of Music at Reed College. An ethnomusicologist, Morgan's scholarly work focuses on the cultural politics of Latin American music, with special emphasis on contemporary tango music in Buenos Aires, Argentina. His first book on this topic is forthcoming from the University of Chicago Press. Morgan received a B.A. in Music History from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and a M.A. and Ph.D. in ethnomusicology from Columbia University. He joined the Reed faculty in 2010, and teaches a wide variety of courses on world music and culture, including the Cultural Study of Music, Music and Politics, Latin American Popular Music, and Musical Ethnography, among many others. Morgan is also the director of Tango For Musicians at Reed College, an intensive summer music program that brings musicians from around the world to Reed to study tango.

faculty profile photo Charlene Makley, Professor of Anthropology

faculty profile photo

Anthropology Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

I have served on the Reed College faculty in the Department of Anthropology since 2000. I received my Ph.D in anthropology from the University of Michigan (1999), where I pursued interdisciplinary graduate studies in Buddhist Studies, Chinese and Tibetan language and culture, and linguistic and cultural anthropology. For the past twenty years, I have been conducting ethnographic and historical research in the troubled Sino-Tibetan frontier zone (Gansu and Qinghai provinces, China). My first book, The Violence of Liberation: Gender and Tibetan Buddhist Revival in Post-Mao China, was published in 2007 by the University of California Press. That project was based on several years of fieldwork (1990s-early 2000s) in the famous Buddhist monastery town of Labrang in Gansu province. My current book project, funded by Fulbright Senior Scholar and American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Fellowships, is The Politics of Presence: State-Led Development, Personhood and Power among Tibetans in China. In it, I analyze data I collected in a new, but historically related research site in Rebgong several mountain passes to the northwest. During this new stage of research (early 2000s-present), I have been looking at the multi-faceted impacts on Tibetan communities of state-led development projects unleashed since the Great Develop the West campaign (Ch. Xibu Da Kaifa) was launched in 2000.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Carla Mann '81, Professor of Dance

faculty profile photo

Dance Department
Division of the Arts

Professor Carla Mann has been a member of the dance faculty since 1995, teaching beginning through advanced levels of contemporary technique, choreography, improvisation, dance cultural studies and special projects. Her choreographic work includes dance for stage, alternative sites, installation and video. Mann has performed with Oslund+Co/Dance, tEEth, Bonnie Merrill and Minh Tran & Company among others. Mann was awarded a 2015 Oregon Arts Commission Fellowship and was recently profiled in Stance on Dance. During her 2015-16 sabbatical, Mann will serve as Associate Artistic Director of Heidi Duckler Dance Theatre/Northwest and undertake a new choreographic commission for the Northwest Dance Project.

faculty profile photo Lucía Martínez Valdivia, Assistant Professor of English and Humanities

faculty profile photo

English Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Lucía Martínez Valdivia (Reed 2014-, PhD University of Pennsylvania 2014, MA Columbia University 2007, BMus Florida State University 2005) is an assistant professor of English and Humanities at Reed College. She works primarily in early modern English poetry and non-dramatic prose, with a focus on Reformation politics and poetics. Lucía's first book project is titled Mere Meter: Early Modern Metrical Psalms and the Sound of English Poetry, and argues that metrical psalms produced in the sixteenth century — namely those found in early modern England's bestselling book, the Sternhold and Hopkins psalter — were central to the development of the idea and sound of post-medieval English "poetry." Her other current (and ongoing) interests include the lyric poetry of Sidney and Donne, music in Milton, family dynamics in Shakespeare, Spenser's shorter works and letters, and cognitive poetics. Lucía teaches various poetry-focused courses in the English department, including Introduction to Poetry and Poetics and a new upper-level class for 2017-18 on John Donne. 

Dylan McNamee, Visiting Professor of Computer Science

Mathematics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Professor McNamee was raised in both Eugene and Elgin Oregon. He received his B.A. in computer science at UC Berkeley in 1989 and his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Washington in 1997. He taught three computer science classes at Reed in the 1990's as a visitor from the Oregon Graduate Institute. He was in the software industry from 1999 to 2015; co-founding two startups, then joining Galois, Inc. in downtown Portland as a Principal Investigator. He is happy to be returning to teaching at Reed. McNamee's research has mostly been in areas related to operating systems: file systems, virtual memory, and high confidence systems. His interests include algorithm design and application, computer-based art, video games, and computer security. He is also a HAM radio operator (callsign N4LYD), cyclocross rider, coffee roaster and recreational programmer.

faculty profile photo Jay L. Mellies, Professor of Biology

faculty profile photo

Biology Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Jay is a Professor of Biology and Chair of the Biology Department at Reed College, where he began teaching in 1999. Before he began teaching, Jay was a research scientist at Microgenics Corporation, a small biotechnology company in California (now a subsidiary of Thermo Fisher Scientific). Jay earned a BS in biochemistry, with a minor in music, in 1986 and a PhD in microbiology in 1994 from the University of California at Davis. He was an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Germany and a postdoctoral fellow in the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. At Reed, he teaches courses in Microbiology, Immunology and a senior seminar on Bacterial Pathogenesis. His research focuses on the molecular pathogenesis of Escherichia coli bacteria. Jay has received funding for undergraduate student-driven research from the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Murdock Charitable Trust, and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). He and student co-authors have published a number of articles in professional journals, and he holds a patent for a therapeutic drug discovery technology. Jay is a curriculum section editor for the American Society for Microbiology's Journal of Microbiology and Biology Education.

Biology Department webpage

faculty profile photo Tamara Metz, Associate Professor of Political Science and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Political Science Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Tamara Metz's fields of interests include history of political thought, liberalism and its critics, feminist, democratic and critical theory, American political thought and theories of freedom. Her current research includes: care in diverse, liberal democracies. In Untying the Knot: Marriage, the State and the Case for Their Divorce (Princeton University Press, 2010), she explores the history of liberal treatment of the relationship between marriage and the state, and concludes that marriage should be disestablished. Metz is the co-editor of Justice, Politics, and the Family (Paradigm Press, 2014). Her work also appears in Just Marriage (Oxford, 2004), Contemporary Political Theory (2007), Politics & Gender (2010) and The Nation (2013). In addition to her work in political theory, she has a special interest in pedagogical issues especially those pertaining to thesis advising.

Political Science Department webpage

faculty profile photo Jan Mieszkowski, Professor of German and Comparative Literature

faculty profile photo

German Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Jan Mieszkowski is a specialist in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century European literature and philosophy. At Reed, he teaches courses in German and Comparative Literature and has been part of both the Ancient and Modern Humanities staffs. He regularly offers seminars in poetry and poetics, the methods of literary analysis, and continental philosophy. Jan is the author of two books: Labors of Imagination: Aesthetics and Political Economy From Kant to Althusser and Watching War. His recent articles explore a variety of topics in Romanticism and critical theory, modern art and performance studies, and the philosophical and ideological foundations of contemporary literary criticism. A recipient of National Endowment of the Humanities and Mellon fellowships, he is on the editorial board of Postmodern Culture and serves on the Modern Language Association’s Committee on Comparative Studies in Romanticism and the Nineteenth Century. Jan is currently writing a new book called Crises of the Sentence.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Ellen Millender, Professor of Classics and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Classics Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Ellen G. Millender is Professor of Classics and Humanities at Reed College. She received a B.A. and M.A. in Classics from Brown University, a B.A. in Literae Humaniores from Oxford University, and a Ph.D. in the Graduate Group in Ancient History from the University of Pennsylvania. Professor Millender joined the Reed faculty in 2002, and she teaches Humanities 110 (the first-year humanities class), Greek and Latin at all levels, and courses in Greek and Roman history and historiography. Her research focuses on both the history of ancient Sparta and Athenian representations of Spartan society in the fifth and fourth centuries BCE. She has published articles on a wide range of topics in Spartan social, political, and intellectual history, including literacy, kingship, military organization, and sexual and gender mores. Professor Millender’s recent work includes chapters on Spartan women and kingship for the forthcoming Blackwell Companion to Sparta, a chapter entitled “The Greek Battlefield: Classical Sparta and the Spectacle of Hoplite Warfare” in The Topography of Violence in the Greco-Roman World (Michigan, forthcoming 2015), and another chapter, “Spartan State Terror: Violence, Humiliation, and the Reinforcement of Social Boundaries in Classical Sparta,” in the Brill Companion to Insurgency and Terrorism in the Ancient Mediterranean (Leiden, forthcoming 2015). She is also currently completing an edited volume entitled Unveiling Spartan Women and a monograph entitled The Strangest of the Greeks: The Spartans in the Democratic Athenian Imagination.

Classics Department webpage

faculty profile photo Mary Ashburn Miller, Associate Professor of History and Humanities

faculty profile photo

History Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Mary Ashburn Miller is a historian of modern Europe with a specialization in eighteenth and nineteenth-century France. She is the author of A Natural History of Revolution: Violence and Nature in the French Revolutionary Imagination (2011), and her current research is on the return of emigrants and refugees to France after the French Revolution. Her teaching interests include the history of war and violence, European travel and colonization, and the history of science; recent courses include Europe and North Africa in the Long Nineteenth Century and War & Peace in Europe, 1700-1914. She also teaches in Reed’s Humanities program. A native of Lexington, Kentucky, Mary received her B.A. from the University of Virginia, and her Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University. She joined Reed’s faculty in 2008.

Margot Minardi, Associate Professor of History and Humanities

History Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Margot Minardi is a historian of the early American republic, with particular interests in reform movements, historical memory, slavery and freedom, and nationalism and colonialism. Her current research concerns American peace reformers in the nineteenth century. She is the author of Making Slavery History: Abolitionism and the Politics of Memory in Massachusetts, which won a first book prize from the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic. In 2011-2012, she was an MHS-NEH Long-Term Research Fellow at the Massachusetts Historical Society. At Reed, she offers courses on race, African American history, American social reform, antebellum U.S. history, and the American Revolution, and she also teaches in the college’s first-year interdisciplinary course, Humanities 110. Minardi came to Reed in 2007 after completing a Ph.D. at Harvard University.

Personal website

Akihiko Miyoshi, Associate Professor of Art

Art Department
Division of the Arts

Akihiko Miyoshi has been exploring the intersection between art and technology most frequently dealing with issues surrounding photographic representation. His works often reveal the conventions of perception and representation through tensions created by the use of computers and traditional photographic techniques. Miyoshi received a MFA in photography in 2005 from the Rochester Institute of Technology after taking a leave of absence as a PhD student in computer engineering at Carnegie Mellon University to pursue art. His work has been exhibited widely including Portland, New York, Los Angeles, Rochester, Pittsburgh, and Toronto. He was named the International Award Winner of Fellowship 12 at The Silver Eye Center for Photography in Pittsburgh PA and the finalist for the Betty Bowen Award in 2012 and Aperture Portfolio Prize in 2013. Miyoshi received a Hallie Ford Fellowship in 2012.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Alexander H. Montgomery, Associate Professor of Political Science

faculty profile photo

Political Science Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Alexander H. Montgomery has published articles on dismantling proliferation networks and on the effects of social networks of international organizations on interstate conflict. His research interests include political organizations, social networks, weapons of mass disruption and destruction, social studies of technology, and interstate social relations. Most recently, he has been a Residential Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; prior to that he was a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow in Nuclear Security with a placement in the US Office of the Secretary of Defense (Policy) working for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction. His portfolio included writing a new Department of Defense Strategy for Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction.

Political Science Department webpage

faculty profile photo Radhika Natarajan, Assistant Professor of History and Humanities

faculty profile photo

History Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Radhika Natarajan is a historian of Modern Imperial Britain, with particular interests in ethnicity, migration, decolonization, social democracy and multiculturalism. She is writing a book on engagements between social workers and migrants to Britain from the decolonizing empire, examining how these interactions transformed older, imperial frameworks of community and difference into contemporary multiculturalism. She has recently published an article in the Journal of British Studies on the Commonwealth Arts Festival of 1965, an important moment when the nations of the former empire came together to perform their post-imperial association. She received her PhD in 2013 from the University of California, Berkeley. She joined the Reed faculty in 2014 as Assistant Professor of History and Humanities. At Reed, she offers courses in British, Imperial and twentieth century history and also teaches in the college’s first-year interdisciplinary course, Humanities 110.

faculty profile photo Noelwah R. Netusil, Stanley H. Cohn Professor of Economics

faculty profile photo

Economics Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Noelwah R. Netusil is the Stanley H. Cohn Professor of Economics. Her research has explored the effect of urban environmental conditions, such as water quality, proximity to open spaces, vegetation, and green infrastructure, on property sale prices. Her current research, which is funded by a grant from USDA-National Institute for Food and Agriculture, will estimate if urban stream restoration projects influence property sale prices in the Johnson Creek Watershed, Oregon. She is a member of the Portland-Vancouver Urban Long Term Research Area and the Clean Water for All research teams. Her teaching encompasses environmental and natural resources economics, economics of the public sector, and the intersection of law and economics. Dr. Netusil serves on the Independent Economic Analysis Board of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council, the Urban Ecosystem Research Consortium (UERC) of Portland-Vancouver steering committee, and on the board of Mercy Corps Northwest.

Economics Department webpage

Allen Neuringer, MacArthur Professor of Psychology, Emeritus

Psychology Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

Allen Neuringer obtained a B.A. from Columbia College in 1962 and Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1967. He joined the Reed faculty in 1970 where he is currently MacArthur Professor of Psychology, Emeritus, and teaches one upper-division course, Functional Variability. He previously taught courses in Learning; History of Psychology; Self-Experimentation and Self-Control; and Introductory Psychology. He has served on NSF graduate fellowship panels and on NSF and NIH research study sections. His research, which was supported by NSF and NIH, has been directed at operant variability (see Neuringer, A. [2004]. Reinforced variability in animals and people. American Psychologist, 59, 891-906; Neuringer, A. & Jensen, G. [2012] Operant variability. In G. J. Madden (Ed.) APA Handbook of Behavior Analysis, Volume 1: Methods and Principles (pp 513-546). Washington, D.C.: APA). His most recent work describes a theory of volition based upon operant variability (see Neuringer, A. & Jensen, G. [2010] Operant variability and voluntary action. Psychological Review, 117, 972-993; Neuringer, A. [2014] Operant variability and the evolution of volition. International Journal of Comparative Psychology, 27, 62-81). He has also published on self-experimentation, self-control, the "Protestant ethic effect," music discrimination in pigeons, percentage reinforcement, pigeon intelligence (Hick's law), and choice under concurrent reinforcement schedules. The majority of his research and publications were collaborations with Reed students.

faculty profile photo Nigel Nicholson, Walter Mintz Professor of Classics and Dean of the Faculty

faculty profile photo

Classics Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Nigel Nicholson is the Walter Mintz Professor of Classics, and is currently serving as the Dean of the Faculty. He has been at Reed since 1995, and received his BA from Oxford and his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. He teaches Greek and Latin language and literature classes, Hum 110 (the first-year Humanities class), and courses on literary theory. His research focuses on Greek athletics and politics, particularly in Sicily and southern Italy. He recently wrote The Poetics of Victory in the Greek West: Epinician, Oral Tradition and the Deinomenid Empire (Oxford University Press, 2015) and edited a special issue of the "Paedagogus" section of Classical World 108 (2015) on teaching literary theory to graduates and undergraduates in Classics. Currently he is working with Dr. Nathan Selden of Oregon Health Sciences University on a project for Oxford University Press, The Rhetoric of Medicine: Contemporary Lessons from Ancient Greece. A dedicated teacher, he was named Oregon Professor of the Year in 2005. See the Dean of Faculty webpage, Nigel's Classics department webpage, or Nigel's CV.

faculty profile photo Kathryn C. Oleson, Professor of Psychology

faculty profile photo

Psychology Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

Kathryn C. Oleson, PhD, joined the Reed faculty in 1995. She is a Professor of Psychology and former Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning. She was a National Institute of Mental Health Postdoctoral Fellow at The Ohio State University from 1993-1995 after finishing her Ph.D. in Social Psychology at Princeton University funded by a National Science Foundation graduate fellowship. She has been Associate Editor of the journal Basic and Applied Social Psychology and co-editor (with Robert Arkin and Patrick Carroll) of the Handbook of the Uncertain Self. Much of her research has examined the reactions of the social self in challenging academic contexts, concentrating on self-doubt, achievement goals, academic procrastination, and behavioral strategies. Currently, her primary research project is exploring ways to make the college classroom more inclusive, with a particular focus on productive and unproductive discomfort. She teaches a range of courses including Introduction to Psychology, Research Design and Data Analysis, Social Psychology, Interpersonal Perception, Stereotyping and Prejudice, and The Social Self. She seeks to actively involve students in the learning process and to help them develop important skills in writing, research, and critical thinking; in her courses students are engaged with research design and implementation that involves the collection and analysis of new data.

Psychology Department webpage

faculty profile photo Kyle Ormsby, Assistant Professor of Mathematics

faculty profile photo

Mathematics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Kyle Ormsby studies topology, especially homotopy theory and its interactions with algebraic geometry. He earned his Ph.D. in 2010 from the University of Michigan, and then worked as an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow at MIT before joining the Reed College math department in 2014. He has been a visiting scholar at the University of Oslo and at the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute in Berkeley, California. Ormsby was a co-organizer for the conferences Equivariant and motivic homotopy theory (hosted at Reed with colleague Angélica Osorno, May 2015) and Equivariant derived algebraic geometry at the American Institute of Mathematics (June 2016). He has supervised undergraduate theses and research projects on topics ranging from topological quantum field theory to modular forms to algebraic K-theory, the final project under the auspices of an NSF grant-funded summer program, The K-group. At Reed, Ormsby is currently developing the course Knot theory, knot practice, an inclusive introduction to contemporary mathematics through the lens of knot theory.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Angélica M. Osorno, Assistant Professor of Mathematics

faculty profile photo

Mathematics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Angélica M. Osorno is an assistant professor of mathematics. She does research in algebraic topology, with a particular interest in higher category theory and its connections with higher K-theory and infinite loop space theory. She received a B.Sc. in Mathematics from MIT in 2005, and a Ph.D. in Mathematics, also from MIT, in 2010. She joined the Reed faculty in 2013. She was the invited faculty speaker at the Underrepresented Students in Topology and Algebra Research Symposium in April 2015.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Jeffrey Parker, George Hay Professor of Economics

faculty profile photo

Economics Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Jeffrey Parker teaches a wide range of courses at Reed, mostly related to macroeconomics. In addition to the core macroeconomics courses, he teaches classes in monetary and fiscal policy, economic growth, econometrics, and the economics of science and technology. His current research has focused around estimating equilibrium long-run unemployment rates for U.S. states and small European states and regions. He has also done research on the economics of higher education, including work on the demand for liberal-arts colleges, determinants of achievement by Reed students, and classroom peer effects in core courses such as Hum 110. He completed his Ph.D. at Stanford University and taught for nearly a decade at the University of Houston prior to joining the Reed faculty in 1988. During the 2015-16 academic year, he will be in residence at the University of Economics, Bratislava on a Fulbright Fellowship.

Economics Department webpage

faculty profile photo Matt Pearson '92, Professor of Linguistics

faculty profile photo

Linguistics Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

Matt Pearson received his BA in linguistics from Reed College in 1992, and his PhD in linguistics from UCLA in 2001. He has taught at Reed since 2001. The founding chair of Reed’s Linguistics Department, Matt teaches courses dealing with formal theory and grammatical analysis, focusing on morpho-syntax (the structure of words and sentences), typology and language universals, and the grammatical description of the world’s languages. He also teaches courses on semantics (the relationship between sentence structure and interpretation) and field methods (techniques for eliciting morpho-syntactic data from native speakers). Matt’s scholarship focuses on the syntax of Malagasy, the language of Madagascar. He has worked with native speakers of Malagasy in Madagascar, Montreal, and Los Angeles, and his research has appeared in Natural Language and Linguistic Theory and other publications. Matt is also interested in constructed languages, and in 1996 he developed the alien language for the NBC science fiction show Dark Skies.

Personal website

faculty profile photo David Perkinson, F.L. Griffin Professor of Mathematics

faculty profile photo

Mathematics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

David Perkinson was trained in algebraic geometry at the University of Chicago (Ph.D. 1990). He has published on the subjects of toric varieties, the inflectionary behavior of embeddings, polyhedra, hyperplane arrangements, and tilings. His current research interest is the Abelian sandpile model (ASM) and the closely related subject of divisors on graphs, for which the central object of study is the discrete Laplacian operator on a network. Perkinson has been a visitor at the University of Oslo, Norway, and the University of Genoa, Italy, and has taught at the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences in South Africa, in Ghana, and in Cameroon. He has recently served as co-organizer for workshops on the Abelian sandpile model: Generalizations of chip-firing and the critical group (July 2013) American Institute of Mathematics, Palo Alto, CA, and Sandpile groups (November 2015) BIRS-CMO, Oaxaca, Mexico. In his 25 years of teaching at Reed College, he has advised approximately 40 senior theses on a wide range of topics.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Michael Pitts, Associate Professor of Psychology

faculty profile photo

Psychology Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

I joined the Reed faculty in 2011, after earning a Ph.D. in Psychology from Colorado State University in 2007, followed by four years of post-doctoral research in Neuroscience at UCSD. My primary research interests center around the search for the neural substrates of consciousness. In psychology and cognitive neuroscience, it is generally accepted that most of what the brain does, it does so automatically, unconsciously. Because we have conscious experiences, however, some aspects of what the brain does must result in our subjective awareness of the world and of our own thoughts and feelings. A key unanswered question that my research seeks to resolve is: How does brain activity differ during conscious versus unconscious processing of objects and events in our world? To address this question, the primary strategy I use is to compare brain activity elicited by the same physical stimulus (typically visual or auditory) when it is perceived versus not-perceived, or perceived as X versus Y. In my lab we measure electrical brain activity non-invasively with EEG and use psychophysics, behavioral tasks, and eye tracking to manipulate attention and awareness in human subjects. My teaching relates to my research by providing students with a background in cognitive neuroscience methods, sensation and perception research, and specialized investigations into the neuroscience of consciousness and attention and consciousness research. I currently share research space with my colleague, Enriqueta Canseco-Gonzalez who studies neural mechanisms of language processing, and our lab is collectively known as the "SCALP Lab," an acronym for "Sensation, Cognition, Attention, Language, and Perception Lab."

SCALP lab website
Psychology Department webpage

faculty profile photo Jamie Pommersheim, Katharine Piggott Professor of Mathematics

faculty profile photo

Mathematics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Jamie Pommersheim, Katharine Piggott Professor of Mathematics, joined the Reed faculty in 2004. He held post-doctoral positions at the Institute for Advanced Study, M.I.T., and U.C. Berkeley, and served on the mathematics faculty at New Mexico State University and Pomona College. Pommersheim has published research papers in a wide variety of areas, including algebraic geometry, number theory, and topology. Much of his recent work centers around quantum computation, specifically quantum learning algorithms. For many years, Pommersheim has taught talented high-school students at Johns Hopkins University's Center for Talented Youth (CTY), as well as the Hampshire College Summer Studies in Mathematics (HCSSiM). His 2010 number theory text, co-written with Tim Marks and Erica Flapan, provides a rigorous yet leisurely-paced introduction to the subject.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Roger Porter, Professor of English and Humanities, Emeritus

faculty profile photo

English Department
Division of Literature and Languages

I taught at Reed for 54 years, beginning in 1961. I have a BA from Amherst and a Ph.D from Yale. My courses have included various versions of Autobiography and Memoir, Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama, Modern American Fiction, Modern and Contemporary Drama, and such non-fiction prose courses as Travel Writing. Most of my scholarly work has been in the field of Life Writing. I have co-authored The Voice Within: Reading and Writing Autobiography (Knopf), and written Self-Same Songs: Autobiographical Performances and Reflections (Nebraska), and Bureau of Missing Persons: Writing the Secret Lives of Fathers (Cornell). I have articles and reviews in such journals as Eighteenth-Century Studies, The Sewanee Review, The Journal of Narrative Technique, Contemporary Literature, The Massachusetts Review, The Hudson Review, The American Scholar, Biography, and A/b: Auto/Biography. I have had Fulbright lectureships at Aristotelian University in Greece, and The Chinese University of Hong Kong, and have taught at The American University of Paris and The University of Versailles in France. I have lectured in France, Australia, New Zealand, Germany, England, the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, China, India, Egypt, Thailand, the Netherlands, Canada, Spain, and Norway; and have presented papers at numerous MLA conferences as well as at Stanford, U.C. Irvine, Evergreen College, Penn State, Baylor, West Virginia, The University of Hawaii, Michigan State, and the University of Texas. I have also been a food writer and restaurant critic, receiving a James Beard Foundation nomination for Best Restaurant Writing in America, and have just published the co-edited (with Sandra Gilbert) Eating Words: The Norton Anthology of Food Writing. I started a theatre (Portland Conservatory Theatre), and have directed numerous plays, including works by Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, Becket, Aeschylus, and Arthur Miller. For many years I was on the Board and the Artistic Council of Artists Repertory Theatre in Portland.

faculty profile photo Johnny Powell, Professor of Physics

faculty profile photo

Physics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Johnny Powell joined the Reed faculty in the Fall of 1987, following a two-year post-doc at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Solid State Physics in Stuttgart, Germany where he worked on molecular biophysics of the DNA molecule using a Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer in Professor Ludwig Genzel’s Abteilung. His experience at the MPI led to his receiving an NSF grant for $200,000 during his first year on the faculty which was used to purchase a state-of-the-art FTIR spectrometer for his laboratory at Reed College. Although Johnny’s publication and grant record are primarily in experimental condensed matter physics of the DNA molecule: FTIR, Raman, and Brillouin spectroscopy, he spent several years in neural biological physics which included a sabbatical at the Medical Research Council (MRC) in Cambridge, England where his research efforts concentrated on total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of endo- and exocytosis. Johnny is presently concentrating his research efforts on understanding galactic bars through N- body simulations in collaboration with the Department of Astronomy at the University of Washington. In his nearly 30 years at Reed College, he has directed over 70 theses of which the astrophysics theses have included the following topics: N-body galactic simulations, observations of an active galactic nucleus, laboratory astrophysics, offset galactic bars, and exo-planet detections.

Physics Department webpage

Michael Powers, Visiting Assistant Professor of German

German Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Michael Powers joined the German Department at Reed in 2017. He received his Ph.D. in German Studies from Brown University in 2015, and his B.A. in German Language and Literature from New College of Florida. Before coming to Reed, he taught for two years at Tufts University. His research and teaching interests include media and visual studies, critical and literary theory, and modern German literature and culture. His articles, translations, and book reviews have appeared in journals such as MLNThe German Quarterly, and Symplokē. He is currently preparing a book-length manuscript entitled Clouds: Walter Benjamin and the Rhetoric of the Image. He is the recipient of fellowships by the Fulbright Program and the DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service), and has also been recognized for his teaching. He was presented with the Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching at Brown University, and he received nominations for “Best Course” at Tufts University.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Daniel Reisberg, Patricia and Clifford Lunneborg Professor of Psychology

faculty profile photo

Psychology Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

Daniel Reisberg, the Patricia and Clifford Lunneborg Professor of Psychology, has been at Reed since 1986.  Reisberg’s professional work focuses on the role of perception and memory in the justice system.  He has written extensively about the reliability of eyewitness memory, and also works with the courts to evaluate and improve this type of memory.  Reisberg consults extensively on specific legal cases, and draws on these cases to enrich his teaching.  For example, his “Psychology and the Courts” seminar features guest appearances by lawyers, judges, and police investigators.  Reisberg is author or editor of more than 20 books, including textbooks (published by W.W. Norton) aimed at undergraduates and a recent volume (by Oxford University Press) intended for attorneys.

Psychology Department webpage

Darius Rejali, Professor of Political Science

Political Science Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

I am a Professor of Political Science at Reed College, a Carnegie (2003) and Fulbright (2009) scholar. My work concentrates on violence in modern societies, and particularly on modern torture. I am trained as a political philosopher, comparative political scientist, and social theorist, and so my writing reflects both concerns for the causes and effects of violence, as well as what it can tell us about the human condition and how our world is changing. My teaching also follows my scholarly concerns. I teach advanced courses in political philosophy (Injustice, Augustine and Hobbes, Muslim Kingship, Dangerous Speech, Hobbes and Schmitt), courses in comparative politics (Iran and American Social Science, Torture Prevent, Torture in Wars Transitional Justice, Comparative Revolutions), and courses in social theory (Muslim as Enemy, Max Weber, Power, Approaches to Violence, and Foucault, Latour, Bourdieu). You can find information on my award-winning book Torture and Democracy (2007) here. Allow me to direct you to my personal webpage for further information on my recent scholarly work and other activities. This official website includes links to reviews, editorials, magazine articles, public lectures, and radio and television appearances. It also includes information on my first book, a major study of modern Iranian torture (Torture and Modernity: Self, Society, and State in Modern Iran (Westview, 1994)).

faculty profile photo Anna Ritz, Assistant Professor of Biology

faculty profile photo

Biology Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

In a nutshell, I use computer science to solve biological problems. I joined the Biology Department in the Fall of 2015 after studying how cells respond to external signals as a postdoctoral researcher at Virginia Tech. Before that, I received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from Brown University, where I was an NSF Graduate Research Fellow and taught a computational thinking class for humanities majors, and I received my B.A. from Carleton College. My research explores different ways to model biological systems using computers, concentrating on the ways diseases such as cancer affect these systems. I am excited to present students with computational methods to use in their biology study and research — my lab is filled with computers! I hope my teaching promotes interdisciplinary learning in a way that attracts a wide array of students, including those typically under-represented in the field.

Biology Department webpage

faculty profile photo Peter Rock, Professor of Creative Writing

faculty profile photo

English Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Peter Rock joined the Reed College faculty in 2001. He teaches the writing of prose, both fiction and non-fiction, with special interest in the intersection between the two, economical forms, the fantastic and invisible, animals, ghosts and linkages of every kind. His favorite book is most likely Yasunari Kawabata’s Palm-of-the-Hand Stories. Rock was born and raised in Salt Lake City. His most recent novel is Klickitat, which concerns mysterious writing, wilderness survival and the relationship between two sisters. He is also the author of the novels The Shelter Cycle, My Abandonment, The Bewildered, The Ambidextrist, Carnival Wolves and This Is the Place, as well as a story collection, The Unsettling. Rock attended Deep Springs College, received a BA in English from Yale University, and held a Wallace Stegner Fellowship at Stanford University. He has also taught fiction at the University of Pennsylvania, Yale, Deep Springs College, and in the MFA program at San Francisco State University. His stories and freelance writing have both appeared and been anthologized widely, and his books published in various countries and languages. The recipient of a 2014 Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, an Alex Award and others, he resides in Portland with his wife, who saves lives, two fierce young daughters, and various animals. His novel-within-photographs, Spells, has been shown at Blue Sky Gallery and throughout Oregon; it will be published as a book in 2017. His current research involves open water swimming, the vagaries of memory, and the use of sensory deprivation tanks.

Personal website

Jon Rork, Professor of Economics

Economics Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Jon Rork joined Reed College in 2010, having previously been on the faculty at the University of New Hampshire, Vassar College and Georgia State University. Rork studies a variety of issues in state and local public finance. His current research interests are in the realm of state taxation, interjurisdictional competition, and the economic determinants of interstate migration, especially as it pertains to the elderly. At Reed, Rork teaches courses in microeconomic theory, game theory, public finance, urban economics and behavioral economics.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Sonia Sabnis, Associate Professor of Classics and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Classics Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Sonia Sabnis is Associate Professor of Classics and Humanities. She received her B.A. from Columbia University and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Before coming to Reed in 2006 she was a Predoctoral Fellow at Vassar College. Her work focuses on literature of the Roman empire, primarily the works of Apuleius and Lucian, and the ways in which these authors depict slavery, ethnic alterity, imperial authority, and animals. Recent work has focused on reception, including a book chapter on Robert Graves’ and T.E. Lawrence’s reading of Apuleius’ Golden Ass (Robert Graves and the Classical Tradition, ed. Alisdair Gibson, Oxford University Press 2015). In addition to Humanities 110, she teaches Latin and Greek at all levels and particularly enjoys advanced classes in Hellenistic Poetry, Apuleius, and Longus.

Classics Department webpage

David Harris Sacks, Richard F. Scholz Professor of History and Humanities, Emeritus

History Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

David Harris Sacks received his BA degree in History from Brooklyn College and his AM and PhD degrees in History from Harvard University, where he taught before moving in 1986 to Reed College. He has been a Fellow of the Folger Shakespeare Library, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, American Council of Learned Societies, John Carter Brown Library, and Clare Hall, Cambridge (of which he is a Life Member). In addition, he is an elected Fellow of the Royal Historical Society in the United Kingdom and the recipient on two occasions from Franklin research grants from the American Philosophical Society. Along with membership on the editorial board of the Journal of the History of Ideas and until for a term on the editorial board the Journal of British Studies, he has served as Executive Secretary of the North American Conference on British Studies (NACBS) and, at the American Historical Association, as a member of its elected Council as well as on its Program Committee and its Gershoy Prize Committee His published works include The Widening Gate: Bristol and the Atlantic Economy, 1450-1700 (1991), winner of the NACBS’s John Ben Snow Prize for 1992; an edition of Thomas More’s Utopia (1999); and a collection of essays, edited with Donald R. Kelley, on The Historical Imagination in Early Modern Britain: History, Rhetoric, and Fiction, 1500-1800 (1997). He has also published more than thirty articles and essays covering various topics in the cultural, intellectual and social history of early modern Britain and the Atlantic world, the most recent of which focus on the ethics of commercial exchange, especially in the developing Atlantic economy and on the intellectual and religious context for Richard Hakluyt’s writings on navigation and “discovery.” More recently he has added a focus on the career of the polymath mathematician Thomas Harriot to his scholarship. In May 2014, he delivered The Thomas Harriot Lecture in Oriel College, Oxford and is presently completing a book entitled The Certain and Full Discovery of the World: Richard Hakluyt and Thomas Harriot, which was also the title of the lecture. Although he has retired, he remains an active scholar and writer based in Portland, and continues to be available to advise seniors working on senior theses in his areas of scholarship. In Spring 2017, he shall be teaching History 382: Riddles of Reciprocity as an Emeritus course. It is devoted to exploring in historical terms the diversity of forms of “exchange” as a ubiquitous feature of sociability and social interaction.

faculty profile photo Sarah Schaack, Associate Professor of Biology

faculty profile photo

Biology Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

I started at Reed in 2011 after attending a small liberal arts college for undergraduate, finishing my PhD at Indiana University, and doing a couple of post-docs. My training is in evolutionary genetics and genomics, and my specific area of expertise is mobile DNA. At Reed, I teach a variety of courses on these topics and work with students individually who are interested in learning about how mutations occur, and how they affect organisms. In addition to regular courses, I organize workshops to introduce students to problems and tools in bioinformatics and genomics — a frontier in the field of biology right now that lends itself to the intense learning environment provided by the workshop format. In terms of doing science, the major themes of research in the lab that I spearhead provide lots of opportunities for students to do research, often for the first time. That's not the whole story though, since often students come to me with their own research passions and a strong desire to develop their own ideas. These collaborations are also very rich and rewarding — I enjoy learning as much as my students do.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Margaret Scharle, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Philosophy Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

Margaret Scharle (PhD 2005, UCLA) works in ancient philosophy, with special interest in Aristotelian natural philosophy. Her papers have appeared in Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, Phronesis, and Apeiron, and most recently in Theory and Practice in Aristotle's Natural Philosophy (Cambridge University Press, 2015) and in Aristotle's Physics, A Critical Guide (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Her current projects include papers on Aristotle’s Generation and Corruption II.4 and on Aristotle’s use of protreptic rhetoric in his natural philosophy. She and a senior philosophy major were awarded a Ruby-Lankford Grant for Collaborative Research in the Humanities to co-author a paper on teleology in Aristotle’s Politics. They recently presented their work at the American Philosophical Association meeting in San Francisco. 

Philosophy Department webpage

faculty profile photo Kristin Scheible, Associate Professor of Religion and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Religion Department
Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics

Kristin Scheible is a scholar of South Asian Religions. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard University, M.T.S. from Harvard Divinity School, and B.A. from Colby College. Her research interests include Theravāda Buddhist history, the genre of historical narrative literature (vaṃsa) in the Pāli language, rhetorical strategies employed in Pāli and Sanskrit texts, and the affective domain provoked by religious texts. Her first book, Reading the Mahāvaṃsa: The Literary Aims of a Theravāda Buddhist History (Columbia University Press, 2016), explores the work-like dimension of the fifth century Sri Lankan Mahāvaṃsa, and destabilizes the dominant reading of this text as a political charter. In 2014, after ten years at Bard College, she enthusiastically returned home to Portland to join the Reed faculty and raise her three kids under Douglas firs. She is a member of the Hum 110 faculty, and teaches courses in Buddhism, Hinduism, emotion and the arousal of faith, gender and South Asian religious nationalisms.

faculty profile photo David Schiff, R.P. Wollenberg Professor of Music

faculty profile photo

Music Department
Division of the Arts

David Schiff, the R.P. Wollenberg Professor of Music, teaches courses in musical composition and theory and on twentieth and twenty-first century music, and he conducts the Reed College Orchestra. He is the composer of operas, symphonic works, concertos, chamber music, choral music and jazz compositions. His opera Gimpel the Fool has been recorded twice for Naxos; his jazz violin concerto, 4 Sisters, received its American premiere with Regina Carter and the Detroit Symphony; his orchestral work Stomp was recorded by the Baltimore Symphony conducted by David Zinman. His works have been performed by the Oregon Symphony, Seattle Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Minnesota Orchestra and the Virginia Symphony, and at Chamber Music Northwest, the Aspen Music Festival, Tanglewood, Ravinia, and Aldeburgh (UK). He is the author of books about Elliott Carter, George Gershwin, and Duke Ellington, and his articles and reviews have appeared in the New York Times, Atlantic Monthly, The Nation and the Times Literary Supplement.

faculty profile photo Marc Schneiberg, John C. Pock Professor of Sociology

faculty profile photo

Sociology Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Marc Schneiberg received his BA from Haverford College, and his PhD in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and has taught at Reed since 2000. He is an economic and organizational sociologist who researches the rise, contemporary fates, and economic consequences of organizational diversity and alternatives to giant, shareholder corporations in American capitalism. This work addresses both the evolution of cooperative and other alternative enterprise systems in the US, including electrical and agricultural cooperatives, insurance mutuals, community banks, and credit uinons, and how the emergence of such enterprises can help upgrade markets, regulate corporations, and foster more decentralized and small stakeholder trajectories of capitalist development. Schneiberg also studies association, regulation and self-regulation in American manufacturing and finance. He is Editor of Socio-Economic Review, and Consulting Editor of Sociological Science, has served on the executive councils of the American Sociological Association and the Society for the Advancement of Socio Economics, and has twice received National Science Foundation support for his research. He teaches courses in economic and organizational sociology (Economic Sociology, Institutional Analysis, American Capitalism, Sociology of Finance, Regulation) but also Race and Ethnicity and Race, Economic Sociology, and Organizations. His papers and course syllabi can be found on his webpage.

Personal website
Sociology Department website

faculty profile photo Darrell Schroeter '95, Associate Professor of Physics

faculty profile photo

Physics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

As a condensed matter theorist, my teaching in the physics department at Reed College has focused on Physics 201 (our students' introduction to mathematical methods), solid-state physics, and the advanced quantum mechanics course.  My education began at Reed College in 1991 and I received my PhD in physics from Stanford University in 2002. From 2007-2009, working with my thesis student Eliot Kapit (Reed '05), I published a pair of papers in Physical Review Letters and Physical Review B which identified a microscopic model for a state of matter known as the chiral spin liquid. This is the work of which I am the most proud, in part because it is a significant scientific accomplishment, but also because the solution to the problem arose from the senior thesis experience at Reed.  Recently, I have been working with Reed students both during the summer and during the year on a type of magnetic ordering known as orbital antiferromagnetism that may play a role in the phenomenon of high-Tc superconductivity.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Jessica Seidman, Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Classics Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Jessica Seidman is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics and Humanities and has been at Reed since 2013. Her work focuses on Latin Literature, especially poetry of the late republic and early empire. She is especially interested in the intimate association that the Romans had between place and memory and how the powerful impact of site-specific commemoration can be reflected and simulated through words on a page. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago and is currently revising her book A Place to Remember: Site-Specific Memory in Latin Literature for Cambridge University Press. Other current projects include an article on Lucan’s Caesar as rival poet in the Pharsalia and an essay on her visit to Constanţa, Romania, the site of Ovid’s exile. She is also interested in (and passionate about!) ancient conceptions of imitation and originality. She has recently taught Latin courses on Lucan, Livy, and Vergil, a non-traditional Classical Mythology course, and in Hum 110. She is very much looking forward to teaching Introductory Latin in Fall 2015 and an advanced Greek course on Apollonius’ Argonautika in Spring 2016. 

faculty profile photo Janis Shampay, Howard Vollum Professor of Biology

faculty profile photo

Biology Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

I received my BA from Northwestern and PhD in Molecular Biology from UC Berkeley. At Berkeley I trained with Elizabeth Blackburn, and was centrally involved in the work leading to the discovery of telomerase, which replenishes chromosome ends and rescues them from the shortening that comes with cell division. After postdoctoral work in the human gene-mapping field, I returned to telomeres when I joined Reed in 1990. My current research interests lie in the regulation of telomere function in the frog, Xenopus laevis, which expresses active telomerase in all tissues. Since coming to Reed I have taught genetic and molecular biology topics at all levels, from the team-taught introductory biology sequence, through a core lecture-lab course in gene regulation, to an advanced seminar on contemporary telomere research.

Biology Department webpage

faculty profile photo Gail Berkeley Sherman, Professor of English and Humanities

faculty profile photo

English Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Having taught at SUNY/Plattsburgh and UCLA, Gail Berkeley Sherman came to Reed in 1981 with degrees from Barnard College and Princeton University. She has received NEH and Mellon grants, and has published on Chaucer and on twentieth-century American literature. She teaches mostly twentieth-century American literature in the English department, and in Hum 110, she has lectured on The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Oresteia, The Bacchae, Genesis, the Book of Esther, The Gospel according to Matthew, Ovid's Metamorphoses, and Apuleius' The Golden Ass as well as many other texts that no longer appear on the syllabus. Sherman enjoys working with students on overcoming their writing challenges, discovering their academic strengths and passions, and introducing lesser-known works in the American canon. She is currently writing parts of a book provisionally entitled Deafness and Disability in American Fiction: Marginalities of the Center, which puts the fiction of Joanne Greenberg into dialogue with works by writers from Eudora Welty to Toni Morrison.

faculty profile photo Alan Shusterman, Professor of Chemistry

faculty profile photo

Chemistry Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

I am a computational chemist. In my case, this means using computer programs grounded in quantum mechanics to construct molecular models and predict molecular properties. On the research side, I have used models to unravel chemical reaction mechanisms, interpret novel bonding mechanisms, and quantitatively predict chemical toxicity. Most of my work has focused on developing and disseminating ways to use models to teach chemistry. I have also been involved in the development of student-friendly computer apps, like Spartan and iSpartan (Wavefunction, Inc.) that quite literally give students the ability to "see" molecules and molecular properties. Education: B.S. '76 Calif. Institute of Technology; Ph.D. '81 U. Wisconsin-Madison. Selected awards: Camille and Henry Dreyfus Distinguished New Faculty in Chemistry '85; Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) '11. Professional service: Wavefunction, Inc. (Consultant, Author); Feature Editor (Molecular Modeling Exercises & Experiments), Journal of Chemical Education '05-'09.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Will Smiley, Assistant Professor of History and Humanities

faculty profile photo

History Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Will Smiley is a historian of the Middle East, especially the Ottoman Empire, with particular interests in the histories of international and Islamic law. He joined Reed in 2015, after holding a postdoctoral fellowship in Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University. He received a PhD from the University of Cambridge, and a JD from Yale Law School. He previously taught at Yale and St. Mary’s University (London), and he has also worked at the U.S. House of Representatives, U.S. Department of State, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton, and the Iraqi Refugee Assistance Project. Since 2011, he has been a non-resident Research Associate of the Harvard-Cambridge Center for History and Economics. His publications have appeared in the International Journal of Middle East Studies, International History Review, Turkish Historical Review, Journal of Ottoman Studies, and Yale Journal of International Law. In spring 2016 he will teach a new course, "International Law and Human Rights in Global History."

faculty profile photo Peter J. Steinberger, Robert H. and Blanche Day Ellis Professor of Political Science and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Political Science Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Peter Steinberger is Robert H. and Blanche Day Ellis Professor of Political Science and Humanities. A member of the Reed faculty since 1977, he teaches political philosophy. He is a former president of the Western Political Science Association and served as Reed’s Dean of the Faculty from 1997 to 2010. His books include The Politics of Objectivity: An Essay on the Foundations of Political Conflict (Cambridge University Press, 2015), The Problem With God: Why Atheists, True Believers and Even Agnostics Must All be Wrong (Columbia University Press, 2013), The Idea of the State (Cambridge University Press, 2004), The Concept of Political Judgment (University of Chicago Press, 1993), Logic and Politics: Hegel’s Philosophy of Right (Yale University Press, 1988) and Ideology and the Urban Crisis (State University of New York Press, 1985). His articles have appeared in most of the major political science journals including American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics and Political Theory, as well as in such general interest publications as the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Christian Science Monitor.

Political Science Department webpage

faculty profile photo Lisa M. Steinman, Kenan Professor of English and Humanities

faculty profile photo

English Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Lisa M. Steinman, who came to Reed in 1976 with an MFA and a PhD from Cornell University, has published nine books:  six books of poetry (from Ithaca House, Arrowood Books, and the University of Tampa Press) and three books about poetry (from Yale University Press, St. Martin's, and Blackwell) as well as many individual poems and articles about poetry. She is also a founder and editor of Hubbub, a poetry journal. Her work has been recognized by various granting agencies, including the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Rockefeller Foundation, although it was her passion for teaching that drew her to Reed College. She has taught in three of Reed's four Humanities courses and teaches a variety of English courses (including introductory poetry classes and advanced courses, especially on modernist and contemporary American poetry). She has recently lectured on the place of poetry in U.S. culture, on African-American poetry, and on the poetry of Wallace Stevens at colleges and universities in the U.S. and abroad.

faculty profile photo LaShandra Sullivan, Assistant Professor of Anthropology

faculty profile photo

Anthropology Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

LaShandra Sullivan (Ph.D., University of Chicago 2013) researches the expansion of agribusiness in Brazil and resulting land disputes with social movements. Her dissertation, titled “‘The Space to Be Ourselves’: Ethnicity, Agribusiness, and Land Conflict in Brazil,” is an ethnography of roadside squatter camps of indigenous and non-indigenous land protesters in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul. Sullivan analyzes the emergence of these camps with rural economic development—specifically mass displacement of rural inhabitants, casualization of labor, deforestation, and reorganization of politics in recent decades. Her current research also focuses on Afro-Brazilian and Guaraní landless movements in São Paulo. Previous research includes an MA thesis on transformations of state-society relations and the built environment in Gabon with its 1960s petroleum production boom. This project was informed by Sullivan’s prior tenure as the Economic Attaché at the United States Embassy in Libreville, Gabon, whose mission and mandate also covered the separate country of São Tomé and Principe.

faculty profile photo Irena Swanson '87, Professor of Mathematics

faculty profile photo

Mathematics Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Irena Swanson '87 received her Ph.D. in mathematics in 1992 from Purdue University. She had a postdoctoral position at University of Michigan, and then worked at New Mexico State University before joining Reed College as a faculty member in 2005. She finds Reed as attractive to her as a professor as it was to her as a student: the love of interesting and contagious learning is palpable and real. She finds seeing students in a classroom seriously engaged in material and working with seniors on their theses especially rewarding. Her research area is in commutative and computational algebra. She is a co-author (with Craig Huneke) of the graduate-level textbook Integral Closure of Ideals, Rings, and Modules (published by Cambridge University Press in 2006). She is the author of 40 publications listed on MathSciNet, and has in addition written many course notes for several classes. She is currently on the editorial board of the Journal of Commutative Algebra, and she is a co-moderator of the commutative algebra section of arXiv (open access to over a million e-prints in physics, mathematics, computer science, quantitative biology, quantitative finance and statistics).

Personal website

faculty profile photo Mariela Szwarcberg Daby, Associate Professor of Political Science

faculty profile photo

Political Science Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Mariela Szwarcberg Daby studies the incentives that contribute to the persistence of clientelism in consolidated democracies in Latin America. She is also interested in questions of political participation, voter turnout, and gender and development in new democracies. Her work has been published in the Journal of Comparative Politics, Latin American Research Review, Social Networks, Latin American Politics and Society, Nueva Sociedad, and Women's Policy Journal of Harvard.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Misha Teramura, Assistant Professor of English and Humanities

faculty profile photo

English Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Misha Teramura joined the Reed College faculty in 2016 as an Assistant Professor of English and Humanities. He received his B.A. from the University of Toronto and his Ph.D. from Harvard University. He specializes in English Renaissance drama with particular interests in Shakespeare, theatre history, and the history of the book. He is currently completing a monograph titled Shakespeare and Chaucer: Influence and Authority on the Renaissance Stage, which explores how Shakespeare’s adaptations and appropriations of Chaucer—the canonical English author par excellence—chart the playwright’s changing views about drama as an increasingly amphibious mode of writing, one that can be experienced both as a dramatic event on the stage and as a textual encounter on the page. (A chapter from this book on The Two Noble Kinsmen appeared in Shakespeare Quarterly.) Other published or forthcoming work includes essays on the lost plays of Shakespeare’s time, early modern theories of friendship, and the ownership of Chaucer’s works in colonial North America. At Reed, he teaches courses on Shakespeare in the English Department as well as Reed’s interdisciplinary course on the ancient Mediterranean.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Minh Tran, Visiting Associate Professor of Dance

faculty profile photo

Dance Department
Division of the Arts

Born in Vietnam, Visiting Associate Professor Minh Tran immigrated to the United States in 1980 as a political refugee. In addition to receiving dance training in classical Vietnamese opera at the National School of Fine and Performing Arts in Saigon (Ho Chi Minh City), he holds a MFA from the University of Washington and Bachelor’s degree and Dance Certificate from Portland State University. Minh joined Reed Dance Department in the Fall 2008. Minh has created over thirty choreographic works, performed throughout the United States and internationally in Thailand, Indonesia and Vietnam. Minh's work has received numerous grants and fellowships, including those from the Regional Arts & Culture Council; White Bird / Tiffany & Company New Works Fund; Oregon Arts Commission; UCLA's Asian & Pacific Performance Exchange Initiative; New York's Dance Theater Workshop Suitcase Fund’s Mekong Project with support from the Rockefeller Foundation; and New England Foundation for the Arts/National Dance Project for his work with his dance company, Minh Tran & Company. Minh teaches intermediate and advanced technique and choreography, special projects courses, and Dance Traditions of Southeast Asian Civilization.

Dance company website

faculty profile photo Sarah Wagner-McCoy, Assistant Professor of English and Humanities

faculty profile photo

English Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Sarah Wagner-McCoy is an Assistant Professor of English and the Humanities at Reed College. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard University, M.A. from University College Dublin, and B.A. from Columbia University. She specializes in 19th- and 20th-century U.S. literature and is currently working on an edition of the complete writings of Charles W. Chesnutt, the first major African American fiction writer, publishing manuscripts discovered in 2014 with the support of the NEH. Her book manuscript, Eden Scams: Transatlantic Pastoral and the Realist Novel, builds on her doctoral work at Harvard, for which she received the Helen Choate Bell Dissertation Prize. She argues that developments such as speculation, slavery, industrialization, and immigration required increasingly abstract conceptions of American land and labor; realist novelists used pastoral literary conventions to envision America’s changing international economic and cultural role. At Reed, Sarah teaches a range of seminars including The American Con Artist, Transatlantic Bestsellers, Race and Region: Southern Fiction, American Pastoral, and, based on her time in Ireland as a Mitchell Scholar, Modern Irish Drama. She also teaches in Humanities 110, the college’s first-year interdisciplinary course, where she is able to synthesize her love of classical literature with her interest in the politics of educational access in America.

faculty profile photo Michelle H. Wang, Assistant Professor of Art History and Humanities

faculty profile photo

Art Department
Division of the Arts

Michelle H. Wang specializes in art and archaeology of tenth century BCE to third century CE China, with an emphasis on material culture studies and theories on writing. Her current book project provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of early Chinese script systems that maps the depths of materiality embedded in different scripts that appear on a variety of surfaces. Future projects will build upon her current interests in script-based art to include explorations into contemporary art practices that challenge and deconstruct the technology of writing. Other academic interests include architecture and design, both of which are topics for courses in preparation for the upcoming academic year. Michelle received her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley (2014), and prior to joining the Reed faculty, she was a lecturer in the History of Art department at Bryn Mawr College.

faculty profile photo Kjersten Bunker Whittington, Associate Professor of Sociology

faculty profile photo

Sociology Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Kjersten Bunker Whittington is Associate Professor of Sociology at Reed College. A quantitative and network methodologist, her research and teaching interests lie at the intersection of gender and work, scientific careers and science-based organizations, networks and social structure, and the knowledge economy. Her primary line of research focuses on sex disparities in scientific and technical careers. A second research focus investigates regional dynamics and the science economy; in particular, the influence of inter-organizational network structure on firm-level outputs, and the determinants of successful regional clustering in the biotechnology industry. Kjersten received a B.S. in Physics from North Carolina State University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Sociology from Stanford University. She joined the Reed faculty in 2007, and teaches courses on gender, networks, science, and social science methodology. Most recently, Kjersten served a year away as a AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow, with a placement in the Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) at the National Institutes of Health working for the NIH Associate Director for Research on Women's Health. Her fellowship work at ORWH included the development and formulation of NIH policy to enhance consideration of sex as a biological variable in NIH-funded biomedical research.

Personal website

faculty profile photo Nicholas Wilson '99, Associate Professor of Economics

faculty profile photo

Economics Department
Division of History and Social Sciences

Nicholas Wilson studies the health of poor people in poor countries. His research focuses on the economics of HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa. This includes measuring the epidemiological effects of HIV/AIDS service expansion at scale, examining behavioral responses to this service expansion, and using consumer demand models of decision-making under uncertainty to understand the causes and consequences of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), the University of Chicago Population Center, and the International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie) have funded his work. Much of his research is collaborative work with undergraduate students and he teaches courses in health, health in poor countries, and introductory economics. Nicholas received his Ph.D. in Economics from Brown University, a MA in Economics from Brown University, a MPA in International Development from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and a BA in Economics from Reed College. To learn more about his work, navigate to his website.

Catherine Witt, Associate Professor of French

French Department
Division of Literature and Languages

Catherine Witt works on French literature and philosophy post-1750s. Her research interests center on Romantic poetry and the notion of philological imagination in authors of the first half of the nineteenth century, ranging from André Chénier and Giacomo Leopardi to Charles Baudelaire. She has written on the emergence of the modern prose poem; the "found object" in early French Romanticism; the anecdote; the lexicography of Charles Nodier; the elusive notion of the nescio quid; Baudelaire reading Chateaubriand; among other topics. Along with Joseph Acquisto and Adrianna Paliyenko, she recently co-edited Poets as Readers in Nineteenth-Century France: Critical Reflections (2015), a collection of essays on how poets approach reading as a notion, a practice, and a political praxis that informs their writings as well as their relationship to readers. Since her arrival at Reed in the fall of 2005, she has taught a wide variety of courses on nineteenth-century and twentieth-century French literature, theater, and film, and has advised and co-advised senior theses in French, English, Lit-Theater as well as Lit-History. Catherine Witt received her BA in modern history and French literature from Oxford University (Merton College), a Masters in modern European literature from the University of Sussex, and a PhD in French and Italian from Princeton University. She studied at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris and was a visiting scholar (pensionnaire scientifique) at the Centre d’Études Poétiques (ENS-Lyon).

faculty profile photo Erik Zornik, Associate Professor of Biology

faculty profile photo

Biology Department
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Erik is a neuroscientist with a broad interest in understanding how brains generate behaviors. He studied cell and molecular biology at the University of Michigan (BS '97), trained in neurobiology as a graduate student at Columbia University (PhD '06) and was a postdoc at Boston University and the University of Utah. His research primarily investigates how neurons and neural circuits generate vocal behaviors of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. Much of his research employs electrical recordings of vocal neurons. Since arriving at Reed in 2012, he has also been collaborating with Reed students to use molecular tools to identify genes that are critical for the production, development and evolution of frog vocalizations. Erik's courses focus on understanding how neurons work, and how nervous systems control physiologically critical functions such sensory processing, movement, and metabolism.

Biology Department webpage