Accent

English Conundrums

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This is a clip from an "I Love Lucy" episode in which a foreign man is having troubles with some English words. It is interesting, because it points out the several different ways one can say -ough. In my opinion, this is a great example why English is considered one of the more difficult languages to learn as a second language.

Posted by Sarah Brown on July 1, 2018

Tags:
American English;
English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent;
Multilingualism

Rethinking Grammar: How We Talk

We as people judge the way that others speak, we assume intelligence based on the way that people speak. African American Vernacular tends to be associated with not being very smart [Published on 10-21-2015]

Is "talking white" really a thing

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This is a clip in which two people are blindfolded and asked to determine if people are white or black only by their voice. The speaker is given a song to read aloud as the listeners try to determine if “talking white is really a thing”. There is a belief that people will inherently sound different simply because of their ethnicity. This puts the stereotypes to the test and shows how different vocal inflections are perceived

Posted by Olivia Rodriguez on June 30, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent;
Stigma

American Accent Immitations

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This video depicts 70 non-Americans doing their best impression of an American "accent". I find this video interesting because there are so many different dialects of English and numerous other languages spoken in America, but the impressions all tend to be pretty similar, depicting Americans as ditzy, uneducated, improper, etc. This relates to language ideologies and how people outside of America perceive and have certain opinions about how all Americans tend to speak.

Posted by Lauren Hart on June 29, 2018

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
American English;
Accent

Fargo - Chit Chat

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Having experiences traveling around the country, many people find Minnesotan accents to be a novelty. In this clip from the movie "Fargo", two Minnesotan men are discussing a recent homicide in the town. The example does a great job of portraying the conversational mannerisms and (overwhelmingly polite, questioning, not all that descriptive, and full of town references) and linguistic relativity that one finds in Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin.

Posted by Brighid Hegarty on June 29, 2018

Tags:
Northern Cities;
Variation;
Accent;
Linguistic Relativity

NPR Linguistic Profiling

NPR's Tovia Smith reports on linguistic discrimination in relation to the Fair Housing Act. The interviewee was repeatedly denied housing because of linguistic profiling, and Smith talks about legality and the lawsuit that ensued. The segment addresses many of the concerns in Baugh's "Linguistic profiling" paper. (CW: N-word is used by AAE speaker) [Published on 09-05-2001]

Posted by Luna Albertini on April 17, 2018

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
African American English;
Accent

Why Do Cartoon Villains Speak in Foreign Accents?

This article examines the issue of accent in children's media, particularly the accents of cartoon villains. It addresses many of the themes found in Lippi-Green (2012), and indeed cites her work, along with the work of researchers Calvin Gidney and Julie Dubrow. [Published on 01-04-2018]

Posted by Aidan Malanoski on April 16, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
Accent

Accent Self-Analysis of a Chicago English Speaker

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This video is a Chicago English speaker's analysis of their own use of Northern Cities Chain shift and Midwestern variants, showing that even without formal linguistic training, Chicago English speakers are to some degree aware of the ways how they speak is different from standard English.

Posted by Amber Burns on April 1, 2018

Tags:
Accent;
Northern Cities Shift

Mandarin Chinese Accent Challenge: "North or South?"

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This video demonstrates differences between northern and southern dialects of Mandarin, including 'er-hua', the feature discussed in Zhang (2008).

Posted by Aidan Malanoski on April 1, 2018

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Accent

Pheobe Buffay Language Ideology and British Accent

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This clip is part of the movie series “Friends”. In this clip Phoebe is trying to impress her boyfriend’s family by changing her accent. She thinks because her boyfriend’s family is rich, she needs to speak like them and dress like them. This demonstrates a language ideology that British accent is regarded as used by upper class community. When she changes her accent back to her speech community ‘New York' accent she says many things that did not impress her boyfriend’s family and goes back to the British speech community accent to try to impress them again.

Posted by Omaima Alenezi on March 3, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
British English;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting;
Accent

MSNBC's Thomas Roberts Busts Out His Baltimore Accent

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In this video, a Maryland-born reporter gives an example of "Baltimorese," an accent of English found among many white working-class individuals in the Baltimore metropolitan area. This video also gives an example of language prejudice, as the reporter from Maryland expresses his own dislike for the accent, and the two other reporters mock the accent to some extent. Given that Baltimorese is a working-class accent, this prejudice against the language is likely a proxy for some prejudice against working class people.

Posted by Aidan Malanoski on February 28, 2018

Tags:
Baltimore English;
Socioeconomic Status;
Accent;
Stigma;
o fronting

Listen To What Shakespeare Sounded Like In The Original Pronunciation From 1600s

Linguist David Crystal and his son Ben (an actor) present an argument which reconstructs the "Original Pronunciation" of Shakespearean texts through historical linguistics. They claim that these works were meant to be read/performed with rhoticity and vowel changes that don't correspond well to Modern British English. CW: near the end of the video, a joke is reconstructed in OP that uses language some may find troubling [Published on 10-31-2016]

Posted by Elaina Wittmer on February 11, 2018

Tags:
British English;
Language Shift;
Accent

Saturday Night Live (SNL) - Coffee Talk: Linda Richman Talks Yom Kippur

Raising of back vowels in the New York City accent - such as the “aw” sound in words like coffee. Could the popularity of this sketch in the early 1990s have led to an increase in stigmatization of the NYC accent and quickened the change from above?

Posted by David Isaak on February 7, 2018

Tags:
New York City English;
Accent

Professor's Universal Translator

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In Futurama, the creator of the Universal Translator states that the machine, which translates English to French, only speaks an incomprehensible language. This shows the language ideology of French sounding like nonsense and not able to be understood. He describes French as being gibberish.

Posted by Kaman Dhanoa on January 8, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
French;
Accent

Foreign Word Pronounciation

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College Humor showing how trying to fit in with the culture is not always a positive thing.

Posted by Sam Georgiana on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Accent;
Monolingualism

Philadelphian Accent - Indexing and Ideologies (PhillyTawk: Da Accent inna Media)

Philadelphian and self-proclaimed “accent nerd” Sean Monahan makes Youtube videos about the accents in the Mid-Atlantic region. In this video he talks about representations of the Philadelphian accent in movies and TV (or lack thereof), then it cuts to a montage of Philadelphians speaking to hear the difference between actors and native speakers. This video is a great example of indexicality and language ideologies at play. Sean is very proud of the accent that indexes him as a Philadelphian but aware that the lack of accurate representations of the dialect makes it hard for outsiders to recognize it. In the beginning of the video he even mentions people on the west coast though he had a speech impediment – this reveals a language ideology they have about how English “should” sound. [Published on 12-15-2017]

Posted by Heaven Snyder on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Philadelphia English;
Variation;
Accent

NBA Rising Stars Try to Pronounce "Giannis Antetokounmpo"

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This video shows NBA players trying to pronounce a name they are not familiar with. It presents some funny language barriers and interesting takes on speech community.

Posted by B. Stein on December 10, 2017

Tags:
Accent;
Communities of Practice

Coca Cola - Mock Spanish

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This Coca Cola - Hispanic Heritage commercial clip shows the Coca Cola company using Hispandering by using Hispanic sterotype such as a run down town, and tattoos that are on the coke can that they can apply to their skin, especially the one of "Rodriguez" which he applied the tattoo to his neck.

Posted by Phoenix Byrd on December 7, 2017

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent

Trump's Hispanic Accent

This is another example of Hispandering by none other than our current president, Donald Trump. He gets a laugh out of some of the people in the crowd but the look on Melania Trump's says it all... why Donald, why? It is a short video that not only captures hispandering and a total disregard for offending Puerto Ricans and other Hispanics, but it depicts Trump's belief in what's right and wrong to say in a Presidential Address. Getting laughs to show your support for hurricane-stricken Peurto Rico doesn't seem very presidential. [Published on 10-06-2017]

Posted by Kolin Sanders on December 5, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Accent

Bernie Sanders' accent, explained

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This video breaks down Bernie Sanders’ accent. It explains how his accent is very unique in the way that it reflects his social class, the area and time where he grew up and his ethnicity. The video explains how Sanders’ accent reflects the dominant New York/Jewish/Middle Class accent of the 1950’s while also explaining how this accent is decreasing in more recent generations

Posted by Julia Nordhem on December 4, 2017

Tags:
New York City English;
Jewish;
Accent;
Communities of Practice

Why Linguists are Fascinated by the American Jewish Accent

This article discusses the American Jewish accent, what it sounds like, and its origins. It discusses how the American Jewish accent is derived from Yiddish, Hebrew, and the languages of prominent Jewish communities, and is common in Jewish people across America.

Posted by Sarah DeBauche on November 28, 2017

Tags:
New York City English;
Jewish;
Accent;
Communities of Practice;
Multilingualism

Australian English

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Looking at the different Australian accent varieties. Also shows some popular language myths about why the Australian accent sounds the way it does, and shows a bunch of people pronouncing the same line.

Posted by Miles Baker on November 7, 2017

Tags:
Australian English;
Variation;
Accent

Key & Peele Loco Gangsters

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Key & Peele are using mock spanish and code switching as well in this video. They are acting as hispanic gang members, going back in for to see who is more Loco.

Posted by Steven Sims Jr. on September 28, 2017

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent

Subways

This meme demonstrates the use of the term "subways" to mean footlong submarine sandwiches, which are strongly associated with the restaurant chain Subway. Lexical innovation!

Posted by Gregor McGee on September 14, 2017

Tags:
Accent;
Lexicon

Movie Accent Expert Breaks Down 31 Actors Playing Real People

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Not directly related to gender and language but it's fun and linguistic. This linguist critiques movie accents (this is the second video of his that I've seen) & often talks about how the usage of certain sounds or aspects of a person's speech help create a sense of the character as well as the setting, which I think goes along with some of the themes we've already started to address in the area of language as it constructs identity.

Indian Summer Part One with Mom John Roberts

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John Roberts doing an impression of his mom, who is a n Italian from Brooklyn. This voice would later be used as the voice of Linda Belcher on the show Bob's Burgers.

Posted by Dustin Wendt on July 27, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
New England;
Femininity;
Gender;
Accent;
falsetto

Philippine English vs. Australian English

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"Philippine English vs. Australian English" is a funny YouTube video by a Filipino husband and his Australian wife illustrating the differences between the two different dialects of English. By comparing different words and terms between the two dialects, the differences are sometimes profound, incomprehensible, and often very funny!

What kind of Asian are you?

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In this video directed by Ken Tanaka (David Ury), a common topic/"issue" is addressed in a humorous way. This issue is the tendency of caucasian people to ask people who are clearly not caucasian the question "Where are you from?" This is a strange issue because almost all the time, the asker does not mean where the person was born, or where they grew up, but usually is trying to ask where their family origins/heritage lies. It is a funny phenomenon that occurred mainly due to a lack of any other 'politically correct' way of asking someone (usually a stranger) where their family origins are.

Posted by Damian Vu on July 26, 2017

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent

The Many Amazing Voices Of Critical Role

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The linguistic artifacts that can be found on Geek and Sundry's Critical Role are amazing to ponder on. A group of incredibly talented voice actors have come together and created a symphony of hundreds of unique voices over the course of one hundred episodes.

Posted by Zachary Belcher on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Accent;
Creaky Voice;
falsetto

Bo Burnham's "Country Song"

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Bo Burnham talks about how modern country music isn’t honest anymore, that the country artists say many stereotypical “country” phrases that people can connect to, and continues by singing a song that makes fun of modern country songs. This song shows language ideologies of people who live in the south by singing with a southern accent and saying that the singers use rural nouns and simple adjectives in their music, suggesting that they are unintelligent.

Posted by Katie on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Accent

So You Like Dags?

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In this video, the assumptions the narrator reaches about the use of the gypsies' language comes from his beliefs about gypsies as a group. The narrator assumes that gypsies are untrustworthy, and that this is why they speak in a manner that is difficult for him to understand.

Posted by Sam Zeller on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
Accent

Ed Sheeran tries American Accents

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In this video, British singer Ed Sheeran is asked by a fan during a Q&A session to do his best "American Accent". He goes on to say that he can do three different ones, starting with the "Valley Girl from California" one, then moving to the "Regular" one and ending with the "Southern Draw" one. Since English is obviously one language in and of itself, but different English speaking countries have different accents. For example, Ed has a British English accent. But there are also Australian English accents, Irish English accents, and so on. There are different accents for different parts of the world, but there are also sub-accents in different parts of the same country, as shown here by Mr. Sheeran.

Posted by Lauren Drummond on July 21, 2017

Tags:
Southern English;
American English;
British English;
English;
Accent

Maz Jobrani: Comedy TedTalk in Qatar

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Maz Jobrani is an Iranian-American who does a lot of comedy to bridge Americans with the Middle East, and to bring awareness of Middle Easterners.

Family Guy - Stewie Griffin & Eliza Pinchley.

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Some popular TV shows that are based on more offensive humor are great places to find examples of problems with language such as hegemony and accents. This example shows how the american baby is upset with the thick British accent of the girl and demands that she learns the proper accent and pronunciation of English. It is a bit ironic that he too has a bit of a British accent but continues to throw insults about her language ideologies and the accent associated with the way she speaks the same language he is speaking. This example shows how even when groups use hegemony to get others to conform to their ideals that they are a bit ignorant to the flaws of their own ideals and would rather focus on others "wrong doings".

Posted by Zach Beckmann on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
British English;
Cockney English;
Accent

People Around the World Try an American Accent

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In this video, a handful of people from all over the world attempt their best shot at an American accent. Some are good while others, not so good. However, the portrayal of American stereotypes is extremely evident throughout the attempts at an accent. This shows how the language ideologies and styles of multiple American communities can ultimately create many "speech Communities".

Movie Accent Expert Breaks Down 32 Actors' Accents

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This artifact depicts american actors attempting, some achieving and some failing, an English accent as if they were from a different country or a different time period. The expert comments on how each actor achieves these accents and how they sometimes diverge from their targeted accent because of their first language, that is, English. These accents include some that relate to socioeconomic classes in the English language, and english accents from different geological location around the world. It's interesting to observe how each actor interprets and practices for each of these accents.

Posted by Thomas Boatright on June 23, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Accent

People Around The World Try An American Accent

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After completing a assignment over #hispandering, I was curious about the flip side, mock English. In this video, individuals from around the world give their impression of an American accent, typically using common phrases and terms associated with the particular accent. I personally have a midwestern accent and use y'all more than I probably should, however, I did not take offense to the individuals in the video who attempted a midwestern accent.

Posted by Cooper Seely on June 23, 2017

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Accent;
Linguistic Relativity

"Spanish Radio" - Gabriel Iglesias

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Comedian Gabriel Iglesias "Spanish Radio" skit relates to language ideologies regarding the Spanish language. Iglesias, who speaks Spanish and English, creates a humorous effect on how people from the "motherland" of Mexico speak rather fast, even for himself. Iglesias has the ability to speak two different languages (bilingualism) and codeswitches between the two languages in a lot of his skits. The skit can relate to our standard language ideology in that the Spanish speaking language is fast and hard to understand and he presents that concept through mock Spanish.

Posted by Samantha Farrell on June 23, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Spanglish;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Accent

A Few Things to Know About American Sign Language

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Similar to the different accents that exist in the English language, different styles of sign language express different cultural upbringings. This video is a short personal account into a few individual’s experiences with sign language and its perception from none deaf people. Explaining issues like the use of the term “hearing impaired”, is considered more offensive than being labeled deaf because it does not recognize deaf people as a “linguistic minority”. The point is that deaf people have a culture. One of the speakers talks about how slang has influenced ASL specifically in the African-American cultural community. Being deaf does not exclude people from existing in a living language that adapts and changes to fit the times. Rich with the impact of various cultures.

The Italian Man Who went to Malta.

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Warning: explicit language This hilarious video exhibits people who have different accents and ways of saying the same words in English. Because of this, there is a lot of miscommunication. There is also linguistic relativity happening in that these people speaking the same language have different meanings for the same words pronounced differently. All in all, quite a funny predicament.

Posted by John Agulia on May 11, 2017

Tags:
Accent;
Linguistic Relativity

British Villains -Tom Hiddleston en Jaguar F-Type Coupé

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This Jaguar car commercial adds to an ideology that an English accent sounds villainous. Indexically and through performativity the actor, Tom Hiddleston, describing how to successfully sound "villainous". This commercial is a part of a series featuring other British actors describing how to sound "villainous".

British Villains -Tom Hiddleston en Jaguar F-Type Coupé

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This Jaguar car commercial adds to an ideology that an English accent sounds villainous. Indexically and through performativity the actor, Tom Hiddleston, describing how to successfully sound "villainous". This commercial is a part of a series featuring other British actors describing how to sound "villainous".

Outsiders' Views of English Speakers

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This video is one point of view of how non-native English speakers view English. The main point of the video was the focus on how English speakers are perceived based on gender roles, accents, and the cultural views of English speakers. The intonation from both the male and female actor show the gender roles of language. The girl tends to be speaking softly and gently while the boy is a little bit more outgoing in his speech. When they start to argue again the roles come into play with the girl's voice going higher in pitch and sharper in tone. The classic American type of accent is also prevalent in the blurry sentences that are spoken by either actors. The scene also played what one might call a normative view on American dinners between couples; low light, soft talking, homemade meal and then an argument. All of this just screamed stereotypical America.

British People Attempting Their Best American Accent

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This is titled "British People Attempting Their Best American Accent," which really encapsulates the main point of the video. Essentially, aside from a handful of outliers, the attempts at accents reflected stereotypes that some British people tend to think Americans hold. The accents revolved around "Southern," "Californian/Surfer," and "Hyper-Metropolitan" accents. The words included by those speaking generally reflected stereotypes involving surfing and smoking weed (for the Californian/Surfer), eating cheeseburgers, shopping, and gossip (Hyper-Metropolitan), and drinking beer and shooting guns (Southern). The participants were not asked to do a specific kind of "American accent," either, they merely did an accent that they deemed to be what is "the American accent." How Americans are perceived by these participants was evident in their style of speech and words chosen to reflect typical American conversation along; one could also possibly argue that this reflects that some British people group all of the American identities into one conglomerate identity which they deem to be wholly "American." Thinking about this more outside of the video, I feel that this could be true in terms of how Americans think of other cultures as well, like how Americans think of the British identities.

Chelsea Handler Criticizes First Lady For Having An Accent

This news article/video is about how comedian Chelsea Handler put down First Lady Melania Trump for having an accent. Chelsea Handler stated that she would never have Melania Trump on her show because "she barley speaks English." However, the article quickly points out that the First Lady actually speaks at least five languages, including French, Slovene, Italian, German, and English. This portrays how language ideologies are used in everyday life and how it influences individuals' attitudes, beliefs, opinions and knowledge about language. In linguistic anthropology language ideologies are a set of shared beliefs, such as the appropriate language use or how language should be used by particular groups. Chelsea Handler has a negative attitude towards Melania Trump's accent because in the U.S., there is the idea or belief that powerful leaders in politics should not possess "foreign accents." Chelsea Handler's comment about not wanting Melania Trump on her show portrays the idea that English is the dominant language. In the United States the popular ideology in regards to the English-only Movement is very prevalent in today's society. [Published on 01-24-2017]

Posted by Marissa Khalil on May 3, 2017

Tags:
Power;
Standard Language Ideology;
Accent;
Politics and Policy

John Oliver and Jimmy Fallon Talk Accents

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There are a few instances in this video that relate to or bring up some sort of sociolinguistic/sociocultural linguistic norm or topic, but the main one that sticks out comes up at about 1:00, a minute into the video. John Oliver, who is an English comedian, writer, producer, political commentator, actor, media critic, and television host of the HBO political talk show Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. He is asked about his 18-month-old son and whether or not he will have an English accent or not. Oliver goes on for a bit poking fun at American accents after explaining that his son will most likely NOT have an English accent, where he jokingly says, when talking to Tonight Show host Jimmy Fallon who has an American Accent, "the way you make words sound hurts my ears", and when explaining how he will speak in a different manner, he again jokingly says he will be speaking "worse". The main example he presents though is at the 1:50 minute mark when talking about the difference between American and English accents and whether it makes it harder to communicate in America. Oliver goes on to explain that for people without an American accent, automated machines are a "real problem". He jokingly makes a comparison in which he says when dealing with automated machine people without American accents are "battered down into submission by the machine until you talk like a sedated John Wayne" after which he does an impression of...a sedated John Wayne, in which he speaks with a stereotypical American accent. This last bit is very interesting because even though he talks about it in joking, light-hearted manner, he brings up strong evidence for people without American accents being "battered down into submission" to not use their accents. In these situations, people without American accents are forced to accommodate their speech and change it to sound more American which also relates to Style-Shifting. To me, there is also a slight bit of globalization too in a similar way to what I just mentioned. It is most likely indirectly but it is pushing towards just a plain American accent to be used.

Posted by Hayden Balduf on May 2, 2017

Tags:
Accommodation;
Style-shifting;
Accent;
Globalization

35 Accents in the English Language

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In this video Nicola Foti tries to speak in 35 different accents in the English language. He speaks with several regional accents while classifying his own accent as a general American accent, he’s from New Jersey. His California valley girl accent consists of him using vocal fry and up talk. And his Midwestern accent doesn’t sound too similar to how people talk around here. Several of the comments seem to agree that his take on their accents doesn’t really match how the people actually speak.

Posted by Christina on April 28, 2017

Tags:
Accent

Movie Accent Expert Breaks Down 32 Actors' Accents

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This video picks apart different actors movie accents and talks about whether they are appropriate to the dialect they are portraying. It gives insight into what unique phonological features make an accent sound authentic, and the relevant social context that can affect a person's way of speaking. This video pick apart different actors movie accents and talks about whether they are appropriate to the dialect they are portraying. It gives insight into what unique phonological features make an accent sound authentic, and the relevant social context that can affect a person's way of speaking. tags: accents, linguistics, dialects, acting, phonology

Posted by Emma Young on April 27, 2017

Tags:
Accent

Flight of the Concords' Kiwi or Aussie Accents

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In this clip, two New Zealanders who live in the United States are very biased against Australians. They make a point of explaining the difference between the two nationalities' accents, and for comedic affect, they choose a sentence that has very few vowel changes, only a pitch change. In Niedzielski (1999), they saw that preconceived notions of nationality affect how listeners perceive accents. This happened with Aziz Ansari's American character, where he assumed they were Australian and therefore indexed their accents as such. In Hay and Drager (2010) they explored the perception of differences in Australian and New Zealand accents, and, as seen in the clip, it really comes down to preconceived biases, such as concept priming in Hay and Drager or previous biases against Australians.

Posted by Michaella Joseph on March 31, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Australian English;
New Zealand English;
Accent

What’s the big deal about mocking someone’s accent?

A discussion of prejudice against certain accents from the perspective of someone in the UK. This mirrors many of the things we have seen about the US -- people less willing to rent apartments, more willing to think someone's guilty of a crime, etc. if they speak in a different accent. It also talks about the "politics of transcription" in the way 'non-standard' accents are transcribed, for example, in subtitles, and suggests that mocking people's accents is seen as a more socially acceptable form of prejudice since it's "not a big deal."

Boston Accent Movie Trailer

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This is a fake movie trailer that appeared on "Late Night with Seth Meyers". It makes fun of the Boston accent and movie portrayals of the accent and Boston culture. It also makes fun of people's reactions to the accent including a British actor trying to do a Boston accent and fake newspaper reviews of the movie.

Posted by Janet Sebastian-Coleman on March 11, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Boston English;
Accent;
Stigma

Hillary Clinton - Southern Accent

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In this clip from an interview with the South Carolina Democratic Chairman, Jaime Harrison, Hillary Clinton accommodates her speech style by speaking with a Southern accent. The accent is a speech style that only appears in speeches with Southern audiences.

Posted by Callie Hawkins on March 8, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Accommodation;
Style-shifting;
Accent

My Fair Lady - Why Can't The English?

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This song called "Why can't the English?" from the movie My Fair Lady. In this song Henry Higgins starts the song off by singing: "Look at her, a prisoner of the gutter, Condemned by every syllable she utters By right she should be taken out and hung, For the cold-blooded murder of the English tongue." referring to Hepburn. With this, followed by a lot of remarks that are similar in nature, he is implying very strongly that there is a Standard English language that should be spoken by all English people, and if anyone doesn't, "by right" they could be hung. He says most people are never "taught" and instead learn other stigmatized varieties of English and refers to these as murderers of the English tongue. He is in this way implying that there is a legitimate use of proper English language, and that is the standard variety that he speaks. therefore considering himself as a "better Englishman", and more educated, in this way making a social class distinction between him and the others. He is also implying that there should be unity of the nation as mentioned by Bourdieu in "The Production and Reproduction of Legitimate Language". Higgins refers to the English speaking people of England as Englishmen, but also mentions that non-standard speaking varieties are "painful to your ears" and is afraid they will never be able to get "one common language".

Why Do People In Old Movies Talk Weird?

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The history of the transatlantic accent.

Posted by Nicole Niesen on February 28, 2017

Tags:
American English;
British English;
Socioeconomic Status;
Accent

Tanto and Lone Ranger

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This is a clip from Lone Ranger, featuring scenes with the famous Tonto. It shows how Tonto talks versus the cowboys/other Americans. It also shows a very skewed view of how Native Americans interact and how they speak English (broken sentences and a sense of "inproper" English).

Posted by Maddie Scheer on February 22, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
American Indian;
Accent

Movie Accent Expert Analyzes Movie Accents

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Erik Singer, a dialect coach in the film industry, goes through 32 different movie accents, giving commentary on how well each actor did in regards to authenticity.

Posted by Reggie Valk on February 15, 2017

Tags:
Accent

The Man Of Many Languages

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A polyglot man who can speak at least 15 languages and he wants to learn all languages in the world. He explains why and how speaking another language can give you a different perspective on life.

Posted by Yanan Fu on October 12, 2016

Tags:
German;
Accent;
Multilingualism

Kodak Black Social Artifact Golden Boy

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He uses a dialect that is familiar with the rap community, and has an accent that is usually associated with the Haitian community. His delivery of the language he uses gives him his swagger, and gives him a style that stands out from other artists. Examples of his lyrics include saying things like "dat" instead of "that", or "witchu" instead of with "with you".

Why I keep speaking up, even when people mock my accent

Animator and Narrator, Safwat Saleem, reflects on his experience with the "pre-existing notion of normal" at a young age and how he is still challenged by that notion today. Throughout his life Saleem has faced criticism due to society's idea of what is "normal" and what is "good" and has let it negatively affect his career and esteem. Saleem explains how he has overcome those challenges and now chooses to use his accent and work to help shape and transform a more accepting society. [Published on 02-01-2016]

Posted by Samantha Blaesing on October 2, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Youth;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent

Why Linguists are Fascinated by the American Jewish Accent

In this article, the various features of what is commonly thought of as the American Jewish accent are detailed. This accent is most commonly associated with comedians such as Mel Brooks, Larry David, and Don Rickles. The accent, while not as common as it used to be, is still recognizable to listeners by the word order and intonation it borrows from Yiddish, as well as its "sing-songy" quality. [Published on 09-26-2016]

Ignorance in the Office

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This is a short clip from the Office where two characters are told by their boss to treat the other person like the race on their forehead (index card). One person is supposed to give hints while the other person must guess who is on their own card.

Posted by Sophia Smith on July 29, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent;
Sexism

3 Types of English

This TedTalk features Jamila Lyiscott, who describes the "three Englishes" she speaks on a daily basis, which is determined by her surrounding environment and who she is with. Her detailed breakdown of the different "tongues" she speaks shows the correlation between language, culture, and race, as well as how society and culture effect language acquisition/usage. [Published on 02-01-2014]

Jon Stewart - Daily Show - Accents

Clips from Jon Stewart's "The Daily Show" of him performing different accents throughout many different episodes. [Published on 08-29-2011]

Posted by Halie Carr on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent

The Foreigner's Guide to Irish Accents

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Video shows how tightly a language can be held to a very small geographic region, even when in close proximity to others of a different dialect.

Code switching

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In this video Key and Peele explain why they use code switching in their daily lives and in their comedy, i think this applies well with what we're learning but if you watch some of their other videos and look for the code switching it makes it a little more interesting and funny at the same time. you can actually see how code switching is integrated into other people's lives more deeply than others, or even compare it to your own life for example. you can also apply this to what we learned in the other chapter just a couple days ago, the one that detailed the bay city high school teens interaction with someone of the opposite color and how they changed their tone of pitch and the way they talked while explaining the situation to another person.

Melania Trump Echoes Michelle Obama in Convention Speech

As the title suggests, presidential hopeful, Donald Trump's wife Melania Trump gave her first major political speech last night. Many found striking similarities between her speech last night and that of First Lady Michelle Obama's earlier DNC speech. These similarities bring up the question of "shared values" or plagiarism. Also notable are factors such as Melania's native language not being English: how did this affect the speech and the way it was received? [Published on 07-18-2016]

Posted by Erika Huff on July 19, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Power;
Accent;
Politics and Policy

Unapologetically Southern

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In this video, Chad Prather, a man who identifies himself as a Southern Gentleman. "Rants" in defense of his southern "accent" or dialect. Here we can see a man defending his own way of communication against attacks (in the form of social media messages and comments) from people who hold the language ideology that his accent proves that he is not intelligent.

Happy Valley creator calls for more northern accents on TV and radio

Sally Wainwright, a British writer, said that there should be more representation of northern England accents in British media, and described some of the qualities of northern English speech that she finds appealing. She also labels southern English as "posh." This might be an example of Ochs' (1993) model of indexicality, where certain linguistic features index social meaning, which then index a social category. It's also part of a larger discussion about media representation. [Published on 04-04-2016]

Posted by Oskar Söderberg on April 5, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
British English;
Accent

Asian American Slang

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This video depicts slang words used in particular by Asian Americans. This shows the combination of the two cultures of Asia and America. Many of these slang words have Asian roots and are influenced by American culture which gives rise to a whole new word with different meanings. This blend of cultures has given rise to many new languages and words throughout history.

Posted by Matt McLaughlin on March 11, 2016

Tags:
Chinglish;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

Hugh Laurie: the British slang vs the American

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This is a video clip from an episode of Ellen where British actor Hugh Laurie comes on the show. They play a game of "American vs. English slang" where they test each other on whether they understand different types of American and British slang. They go back and forth with each other and test each other's knowledge of what the different types of slang mean.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
American English;
British English;
English;
Accent;
Slang

What does English sound like to a foreigner

This article describes and provides a video about what non Americans, or british people hear when they hear english being spoken. Complete gibberish. And when an Italian artist records a song completely in English but doesn't know how to use our grammatical syntax and structure, it still sounds like nonsense. [Published on 05-06-2013]

Posted by Ainise Havili on March 7, 2016

Tags:
American English;
Grammaticalization;
Accent

Fresh Prince: Carlton plays "Gangster"

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A clip from Fresh Prince of Bel-air, where Carlton plays a character called C-note, a "gangster" version of himself, and code-switches his language pattern.

Posted by Lily Siebert on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent;
Slang

Fred Armisen Can Do Any Southern Accent

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Comedian Fred Armisen walks through various southern accents and distinguishing characteristics.

Posted by Lily Siebert on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Southern English;
Accent

Clinton's drawl, Trump's 'yuuge' N.Y. accent and campaign 'code-switching'

The article discusses several politicians' adressee-based style shifting while speaking to different groups of people. Gives an example of monophthongization from Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama using elements of AAE. The article also talks about differences between the styles of Jeb Bush and George W. Bush. [Published on 03-05-2016]

How American accents are changing

A detailed map of how American accents are changing.

Dad Learns Internet Slang

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A son is teaching his father words that are commonly used on the internet and seeing what he thinks they mean. It is very interesting to see how different generations think of these words as two completely different things.Throughout this video of course slang is being used but I think stigmas are brought up throughout this video as well. The refer to Justin Bieber as having swag and then describe it as, hat turned sideways, pants sagged low, etc.

Posted by Madison Rigdon on March 4, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Accent;
Internet Language;
Slang;
Stigma

Hillary Clinton and her Evolving Accent

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Hillary Clinton demonstrates styleshifting during her many years in public life.

Posted by Mark Beal on March 3, 2016

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Accent;
Politics and Policy

Bernie Sanders' Accent

A description of Bernie Sanders' accent. Includes brief discussions of vowel-raising and vocalization of r in New York City English, as well as of terminal t enunciation, which is linked to Jewish dialects of English. The decline in New York City English usage over time and its usage as linked to socioeconomic status are also discussed (compare with Labov, William. 1972. Language in the Inner City.; and Mathers, Patrick-André. 2012. The social stratification of /r/ in New York City: Labov's department store study revisited). [Published on 02-18-2016]

Study: At 'Rate My Professors,' A Foreign Accent Can Hurt A Teacher's Score

Posted before, but very much related to this last paper that we read (specifically the section starting on page 1353). The issue of accent supposedly impeding communication, as described in the paper, is one that, 20 years later, still exists. As the article says: "This isn't a new issue, it's just one that has never really been solved." [Published on 03-05-2015]

Posted by Jessica Hutchison on April 29, 2015

Tags:
English;
Accent

Can "Y'all" Mean Just One Person?

This blog post explores the idea of the singular "y'all". The post entertains the idea that this form of "y'all" comes from a style-shift used around non-Southerners in an attempt to differentiate themselves and assert their identity (similar to Kara's Jersey vowels being more commonly heard outside of Jersey). [Published on 10-03-2014]

Posted by Molly Worden on March 9, 2015

Tags:
Southern English;
Style-shifting;
Accent

Problems with Labov's Department Store Study

This comic plays with a potential problem in Labov's department store RA study.

How Y’all, Youse and You Guys Talk

This is a quiz on the NY Times website based on the Harvard Dialect Survey. It gives you a map of which places in the US speak most similar to you. I thought of this when we were talking about conceptions of American dialects.

Posted by Gregor McGee on February 19, 2015

Tags:
American English;
Variation;
Accent;
Lexicon

Brit Language: Peter Sellers' Complete Guide to the British Aisles

Comic Peter Sellers does a wide-ranging parody of accents in Britain and elsewhere.

Posted by Kara Becker on December 19, 2014

Tags:
British English;
Accent

Pidgin: The Voice of Hawaii

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An excerpt from the documentary Voices of Hawaii, profiling the accent discrimination case of James Kahakua et al. in the late 1980s, where speakers of accented English were denied jobs as broadcasters for the National Weather Service.

Posted by Kara Becker on December 8, 2014

Tags:
Hawaiian Pidgin;
Accent;
Stigma

Can You Guess the Accent?

Buzzfeed pulled the audio files from George Mason University's speech accent archive (all of which use the "please call stella" script) and created a quiz based on the ability to correctly identify accents. [Published on 10-30-2014]

Posted by Ashley Brandt on October 30, 2014

Tags:
Accent

Dear Jagoffs, Pittsburgh officially has the ugliest accent in America

Pittsburgh is the official winner of Gawker's "America's Ugliest Accent" context. [Published on 10-20-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 27, 2014

Tags:
Pittsburgh English;
Accent;
Stigma

Kathy Bates' American Horror Story Accent, explained by a linguist

A linguist's response to the internet controversy over actress Kathy Bates' attempt to produce a Baltimore accent on the TV show American Horror Story. [Published on 10-22-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 22, 2014

Tags:
Baltimore English;
Accent;
o fronting;
u fronting

Can you pick out the Northwest accent? (And yes, we have one!)

An article asking "Think we don’t have an accent here in the Pacific Northwest?" These reporters assert that "Scientists say we do, in fact, have an accent, though our native ears may not always pick up on it." They include audio clips of three people saying the same sentence, and they offer "tell-tale signs of the Northwest accent." [Published on 10-15-2014]

Posted by Robin Tovey on October 16, 2014

Tags:
Pacific Northwest English;
Accent

What's Wrong with "America's Ugliest Accent" Tournament

Slate.com's version of Joe Fruehwald's objections to the Gawker tournament where voters select "America's Ugliest Accent." [Published on 10-02-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 2, 2014

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
American English;
Accent;
Stigma

America's Ugliest Accents: Something's Ugly Alright

Sociolinguistic Josef Fruehwald responds to the Gawker "Ugliest Accent" tournament, highlighting the use of language as a proxy for discrimination against speakers from various social and geographic groups. [Published on 10-01-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 1, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Accent;
Stigma

Queen's English changing!

We talked in class about apparent-time vs. real-time studies, and I thought this was a very interesting example of the latter, focused entirely on one person--the Queen of England. Because of her televised christmas broadcasts, recordings of her have been public consistently since the 1950s. If you compare the Queen's accent in her 1957 christmas broadcast (http://youtu.be/mBRP-o6Q85s) to the one from 2013 (http://youtu.be/6E4v4Dw5Ags), you can here an enormous difference. This short article says that her accent is moving closer to the standard speech of the area, and that "It demonstrates that the monarchy, at least as far as the spoken accent is concerned, isn't isolated from the rest of the community." It would be very interesting to look at recordings from between then and now, and see how quickly these changes happened.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on September 18, 2014

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
British English;
Accent

Texans trying to pronounce Wisconsin city names

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A fun little video about different pronunciations between Texas and Wisconsin. (note: some of the city names are hard to pronounce for Wisconsinites too).

Posted by Shiloh on September 16, 2014

Tags:
Northern Cities;
Texas English;
Accent;
Northern Cities Shift

Accent Challenge: Norwich

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A young woman from Norwich, England completes the Accent Challenge in 2011.

Posted by Kara Becker on September 8, 2014

Tags:
Trudgill, Peter;
Norwich English;
Accent

Ducks quack in regional accents

A researcher known as "Dr. Quack" reports that recordings of "Cockney" ducks from London differ in their quacking from "Cornish" ducks. [Published on 06-01-2004]

Posted by Kara Becker on September 5, 2014

Tags:
British English;
Cockney English;
Accent

America's Ugliest Accents

The Kroll Comedy Show spooks speakers from Philadelphia and Pittsburgh in one sketch, and Gawker calls them "America's ugliest accents."

Posted by Kara Becker on March 9, 2014

Tags:
Philadelphia English;
Pittsburgh English;
Accent;
Stigma

What accents sound like to me

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A Finnish speakers uses phonology to imitate a number of foreign language "accents"

Posted by Kara Becker on March 9, 2014

Tags:
Accent

Mapping how America Talks

The Atlantic compiled audio recordings from the Harvard Dialect Survey and the maps of Jonathan Katz from the same dataset into a video.

Posted by Kara Becker on December 10, 2013

Tags:
American English;
Accent;
Lexicon

"We're sinking!"

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A commercial for Berlitz in which a German coast guard trainee misunderstands a call for help from a sinking American ship.

Posted by Meredith Tamminga on June 19, 2013

Tags:
Accent;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

Academics "Talk Posh" to Protect Their Careers

A 2013 sociology study in Britain found that academics play down their regional accents for fear of judgment as well as career roadblocks.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 4, 2013

Tags:
British English;
Socioeconomic Status;
Accent

Mocking Foreign Accents and the Privilege of Sounding White

A 2012 blog post about the asymmetrical reception of speakers with "accents" and connections to race and the hegemony of whiteness.

Posted by Kara Becker on March 5, 2013

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent

American Talk: The cast of Harry Potter

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The cast of Harry Potter read phrases related to American culture in their best American accents

Posted on November 13, 2012

Tags:
American English;
British English;
Accent

With a "Nasal Drawl:" On accents

A 2012 article in the Chronicle of Higher Education about the characterization of speakers as having a "nasal drawl," which perhaps simply means "funny accent."

Posted on November 13, 2012

Tags:
Accent

Singapore English: The accent tag

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A young Singapore female pronouncing words from a list of words designed to compare accents of English

Posted on November 12, 2012

Tags:
Singapore English;
Singlish;
Accent

NY Times: Unlearning to Tawk like New Yorker

A 2010 article on New Yorkers' opinions of their accents, with a profile of some speakers who seek out dialect coaching to lose their accents.

Posted on October 30, 2012

Tags:
New York City English;
Stigma;
Accent

The Dialectizer

This website "translates" any web page into a variety of "dialects:" Redneck, Jive, Cockney, Elmer Fudd, Swedish Chef, Moron, Pig Latin, and Hacker.

Prisecolinensinenciousol

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This is a parody song by Adriano Celentano for the Italian TV programme Mileluci, sung in gibberish meant to sound like American English.

Posted on October 2, 2012

Tags:
American English;
Accent

"California" Accent

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A short YouTube submission from a native Californian, first in his native accent, then in a hyper-sytlized "California" accent.

Posted on October 2, 2012

Tags:
California English;
Accent

How to speak with an American Accent

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A commercial advertising accent reduction services designed to enhance speakers' American accents.

The California Accent is Hella a Thing

This 2012 piece on Jezebel describes the voices of California Project currently in progress at Stanford. It includes an embedded clip of the SNL skit "The Californians," and the video "Shoes."

Posted on September 19, 2012

Tags:
California English;
Accent

Greg and Donny have an accent

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Barbara Johnstone on Pittsburghese

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A lecture by Barbara Johnstone for a popular audience on Pittsburghese, or English in Pittsburgh.

NPR: Psychology Behind the Sudden Southern Drawl

A 2006 piece on NPR about Bill Clinton's use of a heavier Southern accent in a moment of anger, with guest Walt Wolfram, who explains the phenomenon of style-shifting.

The Leonard Lopate Show: Regional Accents

A 2009 segment of WNYC's the Leonard Lopate show on American regional accents, with guests Natalie Schilling-Estes and Kara Becker.

Posted on September 15, 2012

Tags:
American English;
Accent;
Schilling, Natalie

NPR: Palin's Accent Examined

A 2008 NPR interview with William Labov about Sarah Palin's Alaskan accent.

Outer Banks English

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An excerpt of the dialect of the Carolina Outer Banks from the documentary Voices of North Carolina.http://www.talkingnc.com

Posted on September 11, 2012

Tags:
Outer Banks English;
Accent

Fair Housing PSA

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PSA highlighting linguistic discrimination.

Arizona Education Loses the Accent of America

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Romanian immigrant reflects on Arizona's elimination of educators with accents.

Dude: Stanford Linguists Probe California Accent

Penelope Eckert and fellow researchers in California examine how English is spoken and perceived in different cities around the state in efforts to refute the stereotype that California English is accentless and homogenous.