Semantics

The Doge Meme

Fun Fact: it is the 12 year anniversary of the term doge. An internet famous canine known to many, one of the original meme phenomenons: the "doge." Originating with a picture of perplexed Shiba Inu, this picture was one of the first to get the meme movement going. Somehow, this photo of a dog evolved into the same picture with a smorgasbord of random phrases on it in juvenile neon comic sans font. Phrases such as "very wow" "such fun" "so perplex" "much doge" which are obviously not grammatically correct, nor do they make any sense, but for some reason everybody understands and laughs along. There are countless versions of the doge that apply to any situation, and the use of doge language is still relevant and understood 12 years later. [Published on 02-06-2014]

Posted by Hannah Clevenger on July 1, 2017

Tags:
Youth;
Internet Language;
Slang;
Semantics

Plan Now to Avoid Post - Brexit Languages Crisis

There is a focus right now on the education system of the UK, with areas most at risk being language performance. If a crisis was to emerge in language performance from the UK split areas of official practice; such as trade, could be jeopardized. There are plans as of right now to push and ensure the emphasis on particularly language skills to ensure the enhancement post Brexit. This plan includes residency and a national plan to better primary education to even the post graduate level. With the quality of education slipping in the UK as it is, and a nation wide crisis within the linguistics field, the Brexit could only worsen the matter with children potentially receiving a lacking education. The goal of these reforms and education plan is to ensure a quality education to students at all levels, and hopefully encourage the emergence of language skill teachers and even linguistics majors. [Published on 10-16-2016]

Stunning animated game helps teach endangered Aboriginal language

In recent times there has been a resurgence for Australians to get in touch with their families native languages, possibly noticing that once their family members die off, there is no one left to speak it. With this game being released, it's hopes are to draw enough attention to Merra, by interactively engaging players with words, and icons to keep the language alive. There are only a handful of people in the world that speak Merra, and the creator related with his own native Indigenous language being almost lost within his family as well. Hopefully this game takes off and is successful enough to spur other similar games that bring attention to Indigenous Australian languages globally. [Published on 10-06-2016]

Latinos Guess Urban Dictionary Terms

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This video is interesting because it is asking Latinos specifically what they think certain slang words mean that are often used today. The words are slang words that most young adults and teenagers know but a few of the words were aimed at the Latino community. An interesting aspect of the video was that they included slang words related to the presidential race of 2016 and you can see how the Latinos react to certain words or what they assume one might mean.

Posted by Rachael Demjanik on October 12, 2016

Tags:
Spanish;
Slang;
Semantics

The Specialized Language of Sports

This is a link to a blog post describing the specialized language of sports. This post highlights the various terminology used in a variety of sports. The author describes some of his favorite terms in both American sports as well as terms used in European countries. He likes these terms for the actual sound the words make when uttered. Tags: Community of practice, British, French, Portuguese, Italian, Slang, semantics [Published on 08-11-2010]

Posted by Emily Blessing on September 26, 2016

Tags:
English;
French;
Communities of Practice;
Slang;
Semantics

Who is really “American”?

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People from North, South and Central America discuss the use of the term “American” as an identifier by people from the United States. "Americans" have a linguistic ideology about what it means to be one and seem to ignore the fact that it excludes people from all other regions in the Americas.

Linguistic study proves more than 6,000 languages use similar sounds for common words

A study from Cornell recently found that 6000 languages around the world used similar phonemes in words that represent the same thing. The researchers found that words used to describe “nose” are likely to have the sounds “neh” or “oo” in them, and words for “sand” are likely to begin with the “s” sound to name a couple. [Published on 09-13-2016]

Posted by Madeline Hamlin on September 26, 2016

Tags:
Semantics

The Office “I declare bankruptcy” Michael Scott

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Michael Scott, the lead role in The Office, is seen here proclaiming that he is declaring bankruptcy. The comedy of this statement is that he believes that saying “I declare bankruptcy!” in front of others will officially clear him from his financial obligations. He even goes as far as performing the card cutting ritual he associates with his “bankrupt” status. His co-worker, Oscar, has to inform him that this performance does not have the power to change his current financial standing in the way he intended.

Posted by Allison Maxfield on September 26, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Performativity;
Semantics

Jamila Lyiscott: 3 ways to speak English

Jamila Lyiscott performs her powerful spoken-word essay "Broken English," where she uses distinct flavors of the English that she speaks to explore the complicated history and present-day identity that each language represents, and what it means to be "articulate." [Published on 06-19-2014]

Posted by Jordan Huntley on September 18, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Code-switching;
Ebonics Controversy;
Semantics

Brits And Americans Don't Speak The Same Language In The Kitchen

The Author, a U.K. native moves to the United States. She attempts to make cookies with her child and learns, due cultural disconnect in wordage, she is actually making biscuits. [Published on 10-13-2011]

Posted by Kristen Noel on July 29, 2016

Tags:
American English;
English;
Globalization;
Semantics

The Semantics of "Literally"

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This clip from the television show Frasier demonstrates discourse over the semantics of the word "literally".

Posted by Jamie Schnee on February 27, 2016

Tags:
Discourse;
Semantics

conflicting definitions of "terrorism"

Describes different definitions of "terrorism" in use by U.S. government agencies, the general U.S. public, and other places.

Posted by Beth Young on July 9, 2013

Tags:
Lexicon;
Semantics;
Politics and Policy