Ideology

Vocal Fry

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=To0otqt0cQc This video over emphasizes the difference of women with and without vocal fry. Vocal fry is becoming more and more common in young women, this small clip just explains the difference of vocal fry.

Posted by Emily Jacobson on July 1, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Womens Language

Rethinking Grammar: How We Talk

We as people judge the way that others speak, we assume intelligence based on the way that people speak. African American Vernacular tends to be associated with not being very smart [Published on 10-21-2015]

Speech Communities and Ideology from "The Breakfast Club"

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This video shows how each family is their own speech community and that each speech community has their own language ideology. The parents and the children have certain ways to talking to each other that seem normal and necessary in the situation. Also, the teachers are their own speech community with their own language ideology based around how they talk to the students as we can interpret from the line "you see us as you want to see us".

Posted by Harlan Shoemaker on June 17, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Youth;
Communities of Practice;
Education

Culture Surrounding the Use of American Sign Language (ASL)

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American Sign Language (ASL) is often regarded as a language that is “less than” when compared to English, or more mainstream languages but the Deaf culture continues to express their pride on their unique visual language. Deaf children are socialized into using the language in ways that fit with the cultural norms of the Deaf community ensuring that the language will be used for years to come.

Posted by Carissa Bell on May 13, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
American Sign Language

Ideology from Friends

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An excerpt from a Friends episode where Phoebe attempts a "posh" British accent.

Posted by Taylor Edwards on May 11, 2018

Tags:
Ideology

Revolutionary War - SNL

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SNL skit about the differences in the ideologies of Philadelphians and New Englanders and it also shows the differences in their accents.

Posted by Zach Stanley on May 11, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Philadelphia English;
Boston English;
New England

Mock Spanish

This poster is an example of mock Spanish with the phrase Cinco de Drinko.

Posted by Macie Rouse on May 11, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Mock Spanish

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This is an example of Mock Spanish with the phrase Cinco de Drinko.

Posted by Macie Rouse on May 11, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

White man speaking Nigerian pidgin English

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This artifact present a white men in Nigeria bounding with Nigerian people and using a language easy for them to understand.

Posted by Bekang on May 10, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Language Shift;
Communities of Practice

Performativity, Ideology, Power and Disability

In this article, it shows how the performativity of the writer matters when discussing the r-word, and how the word harms people like the persons being quoted. Ideology is represented in that those who are quoted discuss the usage of the r-word and how it is inappropriate. Power is represented in the dichotomy between abled and non-abled persons discussed in the article, while also mentioning that the r-word is exclusionary. One quote also notes the r-word dehumanizes people. Trigger Warning: The r-word is written out in full in the article

Posted by Matthew Ferrel on May 10, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Power

For Best Hookup Results, Use Your Words

A young woman voices her frustrations with partners who feel it necessary to say certain words/phrases that get into her head so that they can get into her pants. [Published on 01-12-2018]

Posted by Jenna Giele on May 10, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Gender

Masculinity and Femininity in Disney's Mulan

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The song “I’ll Make A Man Out of You” from the 1998 classic Mulan shows gender stereotypes and battling them. Mulan is a Disney classic that confronts battling feminine stereotypes head on and throughout the movie the protagonist Mulan shows that she can do anything a man can do. In this song specifically, the gender stereotypes of being a man in the war and what a man should be able to do and be is explained to a very catchy rhythm. Along with this throughout the song, Mulan shows how she is strong and she can fight just the same as them, but because of the laws, she must do this all while dressed as a man to blend in.

Disney Rejection Letter, 1938

Photo of a rejection letter sent by Disney in 1938, stating that: "women do not do any of the creative work in connection with preparing the cartoons for the screen, as that work is performed entirely by young men. For this reason girls are not considered for the training school." This aligns with Lippi-Green's (2012) findings that Disney presents a clear, firm division between genders in lifestyle and life choices, and is a salient example of this ideology of division found in the real world.

Posted by Luna Albertini on April 17, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender Binary

Why Do Cartoon Villains Speak in Foreign Accents?

This article examines the issue of accent in children's media, particularly the accents of cartoon villains. It addresses many of the themes found in Lippi-Green (2012), and indeed cites her work, along with the work of researchers Calvin Gidney and Julie Dubrow. [Published on 01-04-2018]

Posted by Aidan Malanoski on April 16, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
Accent

Portuguese Words Spanish Speakers Can't Pronounce

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This video is a good example of how difficult boundaries can be to draw around "language" or "dialect," especially when you're using mutual intelligibility. It shows the similarity and differences between Portuguese and Spanish as Spanish speakers try to pronounce written Portuguese words, evidenced by the commentary of the Spanish speakers, especially "I understand what you're saying, I don't know how you say it." This distinction is especially hard to draw when you take into account the ideology held between and of cultures, and the political investment that may exist in making nations distinct, and this ideology of difference is also demonstrated in the views expressed by the speakers.

Posted by Luna Albertini on April 16, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Spanish

Cantonese v Mandarin: When Hong Kong languages get political

This article is about the language battle between Cantonese and Putonghua (Mandarin Chinese). Even though Hong Kong returned to China in 1997, the social rejection of Putonghua still takes place in Hong Kong. In this case, it illustrates the effect of language ideologies. People in Hong Kong reject to speak Putonghua because they question their Chinese identity. Their interpretation of language is that speaking Putonghua makes people lost the identity but speaking Cantonese could protect their culture and history. Importantly, this is the way to clarify the identity. People in Hong Kong believe that Hong Kong is not a part of China, and Cantonese is not one of the dialects of Chinese. Also, they argue Cantonese is the standard "Chinese." [Published on 06-29-2017]

Posted by Jialin Zhang on March 4, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Mandarin Chinese

Pheobe Buffay Language Ideology and British Accent

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This clip is part of the movie series “Friends”. In this clip Phoebe is trying to impress her boyfriend’s family by changing her accent. She thinks because her boyfriend’s family is rich, she needs to speak like them and dress like them. This demonstrates a language ideology that British accent is regarded as used by upper class community. When she changes her accent back to her speech community ‘New York' accent she says many things that did not impress her boyfriend’s family and goes back to the British speech community accent to try to impress them again.

Posted by Omaima Alenezi on March 3, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
British English;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting;
Accent

Fox News clip sampled on DAMN.

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This clip is a really clearly delineated example of "language as proxy" for racism. It's really clear in the tone of the broadcasters when reading Kendrick's lyrics that their issue is not only with the content but with the stigmatized aspects of AAVE. I also wanted to bring up this clip/the album DAMN. because it's a great example of a lot of the themes talked about in the film Talking Black in America, particularly regarding hip-hop. The way Kendrick puts his music, which deals with issues of race and is basically the way he was able to survive violence in dialogue with white people saying "hip hop is doing more damage than racism" is really masterful and gives me chills.

Implementation of Hebrew as a Standard Language in pre-1948 Palestine

This article discusses the revernacularization of Hebrew into a standard language in Palestine, and then gives examples of how political and interest groups carried out this implementation at a local level through an examination of the 1930s and 1940s city documents of a small Jewish settlement, Raanana. [Published on 01-01-2008]

Spanish phrases Gringos need to stop abusing!

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The women in this video describe all the ways non-Spanish speakers use Mock Spanish. They describe it as sometimes being a way to connect with others. However, the overuse of Mock Spanish can become disrespectful and insulting.

Posted by Kaman Dhanoa on January 15, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Professor's Universal Translator

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In Futurama, the creator of the Universal Translator states that the machine, which translates English to French, only speaks an incomprehensible language. This shows the language ideology of French sounding like nonsense and not able to be understood. He describes French as being gibberish.

Posted by Kaman Dhanoa on January 8, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
French;
Accent

People Around The World Try An American Accent

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In this video, people from different countries do their impression of the English language in the United States. Many of them project different language ideologies according to the accent they sound out, whether it be: southern, Minnesotan, New York, or a Wisconsin accent. With their impressions they link their cultural ideologies with what they say. For example, one guy does an impression of a Wisconsin accent and while projecting his best impression he talks about cheese, a cultural item often associated with the state.

Posted by Mikaela Butts on January 8, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
American English;
Style-shifting

AI Programs Exhibit Racial & Gender Biases

The article addresses the occurrence of AI algorithms picking up on racial and gender prejudices in their data and "learning" them. This is an artifact of the way language is used by humans, showing that it is in fact socioculturally embedded. AI programs were found to be adapting implicit biases held by humans, associating words such as "female" or "woman" with the home, positive words such as "happy" with European American names, and negative words with African American names. [Published on 08-13-2017]

Posted by Kari Huynh on December 16, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Gender;
Race,Ethnicity

Women Aren't Ruining Food

This article by Jaya Saxena talks about the gender encoded words used to describe foods associated with either men or women, and how that affects perception of the foods in society. [Published on 10-30-2017]

Posted by Reagan Kanter on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Sexism

Empowering Identity with Language

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A YouTube blogger named Finn talks about how language can power and disempower identities. Specifically he talks about how trans individuals need to use confident language when talking about their identity. He points out the faults of expressions and phrases commonly used by the Transgender community that feed into the disempowered dialogue used by non-trans individuals. The way that we talk about ourselves not only influences the way we feel about ourselves but also how we allow others to talk about us.

Posted by Natoshea Cate on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Stigma

Sign Fail

This is an example of a too common problem with translations of signage into Spanish. It is also a prime example of Mock Spanish. Although the intent is to convey a simple message "exit only" to a Spanish speaker, the act of adding an "o" to the end of exit does not do this and indirectly indexes the reader for not being able to speak English and needing a translated sign. The correct translation for this sign would be solo salida...even if they were trying to say "exit here", they were not even close. [Published on 02-05-2015]

Posted by Karen Lewis on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Mock Spanish

Philadelphian Accent - Indexing and Ideologies (PhillyTawk: Da Accent inna Media)

Philadelphian and self-proclaimed “accent nerd” Sean Monahan makes Youtube videos about the accents in the Mid-Atlantic region. In this video he talks about representations of the Philadelphian accent in movies and TV (or lack thereof), then it cuts to a montage of Philadelphians speaking to hear the difference between actors and native speakers. This video is a great example of indexicality and language ideologies at play. Sean is very proud of the accent that indexes him as a Philadelphian but aware that the lack of accurate representations of the dialect makes it hard for outsiders to recognize it. In the beginning of the video he even mentions people on the west coast though he had a speech impediment – this reveals a language ideology they have about how English “should” sound. [Published on 12-15-2017]

Posted by Heaven Snyder on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Philadelphia English;
Variation;
Accent

Zoella's Controversial Tweets from 2010

Gender stereotypes and sexuality appear to cross over in a few aspects, including negative connotations. This quote seems to suggest that spitting is associated with "macho" heterosexual men according to gender stereotypes; whereas gay men are not "macho" enough to be taken seriously when exhibiting the same actions.

Posted by Brittni Groothoff on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Sexual Orientation;
Gender

Why Chinese people cannot speak proper English

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In this video, the speaker who is a Chinese American explains why Chinese people cannot speak proper English. Because how Chinese people learn English, and how "sound-like" translations influence on the way Chinese people learning English.

Posted by Jin Han on December 14, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice

Comedian Darren Knight aka Southern Momma and the big snow storm

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Comedian Darren Knight's rendition of how southern mothers react to a snow storm in the south.

Posted by Richardson Chickaway on December 13, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Southern English

10 Things You Should Never Say To A British Person

The website shows the type of languages better to avoid using to British people. It also illustrate the reasons to avoid by explaining their cultural background and thoughts. By a negative approach, it shows some shared beliefs on the community. [Published on 12-13-2017]

Posted by Alan Lin on December 13, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity

Bounce for Men pure sport

A picture of bounce for men that’s supposed to make you seem masculine. It gives you a scent that makes it seem like you climbed a mountain or just played a game of football.

Posted by Wyatt Ratzlaff on December 13, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender

Spanish Words "White" People Can't Say

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A comedic take on "white" people trying to pronounce Spanish words and their struggle in the performance of a basic Spanish lexicon—even in words that share a striking spelling resemblance to its English cognate. Some noteworthy examples appear when the participants are asked to pronounce “refrigerador” and “negar,” with some subjects showing visible apprehension to merely attempt the latter.

Ta-Nehisi Coates on words that don't belong to everyone

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This clip specifically looks at uses of language and the contexts and ideologies surrounding them that create speech communities. Ta-Nehisi Coates implies certain terms from particular speech communities and cultures cannot be used by outsiders appropriately.

Posted by Haley Bajorek on December 7, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice

Talking While Female

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This video shows how there are different ideologies according to women's voices. There is the not-so popular vocal fry, which in this video, says is considered less trustworthy. There are also other examples, like; the uptalk, the high voice, the low voice, etc. It is unbelievable that women have to consider changing their voices, so they don't fall into the ideology of their original voice.

Posted by Elizabeth Gaitan on December 5, 2017

Tags:
Ideology

Trump's Hispanic Accent

This is another example of Hispandering by none other than our current president, Donald Trump. He gets a laugh out of some of the people in the crowd but the look on Melania Trump's says it all... why Donald, why? It is a short video that not only captures hispandering and a total disregard for offending Puerto Ricans and other Hispanics, but it depicts Trump's belief in what's right and wrong to say in a Presidential Address. Getting laughs to show your support for hurricane-stricken Peurto Rico doesn't seem very presidential. [Published on 10-06-2017]

Posted by Kolin Sanders on December 5, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Accent

Welcome to Hell SNL Skit

The SNL skit in this article goes into the topic of how dangerous the world is for women and how men have not been aware of it until now in line with the sexual harassment cases. The title of the song is called "Welcome to Hell." It tries to break language/gender ideologies by describing the how females see the world as "Hell", but in the light cheerful way that women are "supposed" to speak due to current social linguistic ideology now. [Published on 12-03-2017]

Posted by Naomi Phan on December 3, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Femininity;
Gender;
Race,Ethnicity

The Pronoun They

This article explains how we have gender pronouns in the English language. By drawing examples from how English developed, McCulloch provides information of why gender pronouns are important and are used today. #Ideology #Lexicon #Performativity #Gender non conforming #Gender binary [Published on 06-02-2014]

Posted by Jane Wallerstedt on November 9, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Gender Binary;
gender non-conforming;
Lexicon

Jacqueline Kennedy's political speech Nov. 21, 1963

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This film clip showed First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy speaking to a Texas Latino audience on November 21, 1963. Three years earlier in the 1960 Presidential campaign, a young Jack Kennedy and his political team recognized the potential of the Latino voters in the Republican held state of Texas. They decided to utilize Jacqueline Kennedy’s fluency in Spanish and a few months before the vote, she spoke to a Texas Latino crowd, persuading them to support her husband. It worked and Kennedy won the race by carrying Texas. Returning to Texas in 1963, President Kennedy allowed his wife to once again take the stage and speak Spanish, the first time a sitting United States President had honored a Hispanic group. The next day, JFK was assassinated in Dallas Texas.

Posted by Mary Jo Frazier on October 8, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Mock Spanish;
Multilingualism;
Politics and Policy

Steve Martin vs. the word "hamburger"

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This link shows an excerpt from the movie "Pink Panther" where Steve Martin plays the role of someone from another country. A woman attempts to teach him what she thinks is the "correct" way to pronunciate the word "hamburger". This video is a good example of how people in different language barriers pronounce words much differently.

Posted by Libby Ferguson on October 3, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity

Mandana Seyfeddinipur's TED Talk on Endangered Languages

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This is a TED Talk video of Mandana Seyfeddinipur, a linguist and the director of the Endangered Lanuages Documentation Programme at SOAS University of London, sharing her perspective on endangered languages. Seyfeddinipur shares how globalization, climate change, urbanization and political unrest are causing the extinction of languages at a rate equivalent to the loss of biological diversity during the mass extinction of the dinosaurs. She also emphasizes how such change can negatively impacts cultural diversity and decreases social resilience.

I GET THE BAG Gucci Mane ft. Migos

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This is a new Hip-Hop video with Gucci Mane and rap group the Migos called I Get The "Bag". When people are talking about getting a "Bag" now of days it's just another way of saying getting money or bossing up that's just your "bag". Bag can be used in many different ways it's a new thing that has been used frequently. It's an African american slang word coming from rap culture.

Posted by Steven Sims Jr. on September 28, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

Broad City

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For my sociolinguistic artifact I've chosen a brief clip from the popular show, Broad City. This clip is relevant to the course because it references language ideologies and addresses the issue of "Standardized English," or language. The clip shows how different pronunciation and ways of saying words can index cultural and social values.

Posted by Kara Toney on July 30, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Standard Language Ideology

Maori words for mental health revised and added onto

New Zealand wanted to expand the mental health language to not have ‘sometimes condescending’ English terms and to use more nonjudgmental terms to better describe people with mental health problems.

Posted by Amanda Steinhauser on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Stigma

So You Like Dags?

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In this video, the assumptions the narrator reaches about the use of the gypsies' language comes from his beliefs about gypsies as a group. The narrator assumes that gypsies are untrustworthy, and that this is why they speak in a manner that is difficult for him to understand.

Posted by Sam Zeller on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
Accent

Asterisk*

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Asterisk* is a spoken word poem written and performed by Oliver Renee Schminkey. This piece first appeared as the closing act of The Naked I: Insides Out produced by 20% Theater Company in Minneapolis, MN. The artist, who identifies as gender queer, eloquently and powerfully describes what it is like to live in a world that neither affirms nor denies their gender identity. It exemplifies how prescriptive language that is set in ideology can be limiting and discriminatory.

Posted by Kendra Ogdon on July 24, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Gender Binary;
gender non-conforming;
Prescriptivism

Racial Slurs- Clerks 2

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Warning- strong language and frequent use of racial slurs. In this scene from the movie "Clerks 2", in which the characters discuss the use of racial slurs, specifically the term "porch monkey", reflects some of the different attitudes towards "racist" language in society. Randal (played by Jeff Anderson) plays the ignorant white man in the scene, and his attitude towards the other, outraged characters in the scene represents opposing ideologies that are present throughout society. Randal isn't intentionally being offensive or racist, but offensive language is more of a perspective issue than one of intent. Just like society as a whole, Randal is stubborn in his defense of the term "porch monkey", claiming that its not racist, and that he can "take it back." At one point Randal describes his grandmothers racist remarks as "cute" and says "that's the way people talked back then", excusing racism as a social norm. Randal's friend and co-worker Dante (played by Brian O'Halloran) at one point says, "And even if it could be saved, you can't save it because you're not black." This statement is interesting because white people are notorious for being entitled when it comes to other races or cultures, whether it be Cinco de Mayo, or white people's use of African American Vernacular English. As funny as this scene is, it also sheds an interesting light on the issue of racism in the US and how different people feel about what is and isn't racist.

Posted by Alexander Winzenburg on June 30, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

ASL Interpretation of Music

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The video starts by explaining some basics of ASL. It goes on to discuss the complexities of interpreting music in ASL and the language ideologies associated with ASL and deafness. I think this video also addresses issues of language and power when it discusses how ASL is subordinate to spoken language at things like music events, which limits access for those who are part of the ASL speech community.

Posted by Grace Bridges on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
American Sign Language

Family Guy - Stewie Griffin & Eliza Pinchley.

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Some popular TV shows that are based on more offensive humor are great places to find examples of problems with language such as hegemony and accents. This example shows how the american baby is upset with the thick British accent of the girl and demands that she learns the proper accent and pronunciation of English. It is a bit ironic that he too has a bit of a British accent but continues to throw insults about her language ideologies and the accent associated with the way she speaks the same language he is speaking. This example shows how even when groups use hegemony to get others to conform to their ideals that they are a bit ignorant to the flaws of their own ideals and would rather focus on others "wrong doings".

Posted by Zach Beckmann on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
British English;
Cockney English;
Accent

Differenze Linguistiche Meme

This meme features the translation of the same word in many different languages. All but one of the translations are usually the same. By comparing the words that sound similar with one that sounds different, the meme promotes the language ideology that the language with the different translation is incorrect. The faces beside the translations are also indexical to ideologies that already exist about the languages in the meme. In the linked image, all of the faces are calm except the one beside the German translation, which is angry. This indexes the common ideology that German is a harsh, angry language.

Posted by Nicole Johnson on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Multilingualism

People Around the World Try an American Accent

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In this video, a handful of people from all over the world attempt their best shot at an American accent. Some are good while others, not so good. However, the portrayal of American stereotypes is extremely evident throughout the attempts at an accent. This shows how the language ideologies and styles of multiple American communities can ultimately create many "speech Communities".

Man Insults Puerto Rican for Speaking Spanish

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In this video, a man named Mike starts a racist rant against another man for speaking Spanish. Hector Torres, the guy speaking Spanish, was simply communicating to his mother in her mother tongue. Mike spends most of the video insulting Hector, and he even calls Hector a “spic”, which is a racist derogatory slur against Hispanics. Further, when Hector asked what he did wrong, Mike yells, “Talking that fucking stupid Spanish around here when everybody else is fucking English-speaking American.” His emphasis on separating Hector as a "spic" that speaks Spanish and everyone else as an English-speaking American is an attempt to alienate Hector because of his race and the language he speaks. We can infer from the video that Mike attributes to English some sense of national pride; he subscribes to the ideology of a single, exclusive national language that everyone in America has to speak.

Posted by Brian Quiroz on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Race,Ethnicity

Grief Bacon

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In this video, it depicts a German named Flula who teaches German colloquialisms. This illustrates the differences between cultures. The German culture has many words that cannot necessarily translate equivocally to English. The Germans combine words that are meaningless when translated directly to English. In this video, Flula talks about Kummerspeck, which directly translates to Grief Bacon, or the weight one gains during a period of grief.

Posted by Michael Frets on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
German

British English vs. American English

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This video depicts a great example of how language ideology plays a role in how you learn to speak and what sounds “natural” to you whether it be “correct” or not. I think this simple example with two different styles of the same language proves the bigger issue of trying to understand how words can or cannot directly translate in two different languages and how some things that are normal in one language can be offensive in other languages, I think it all has to do with ideology and how your society molds the way that you speak and what is viewed as correct in your community.

Posted by Kayla R on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
British English;
English

Why Germans Can Say Things No One Else Can

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This video talks about language and it's ability to allow for thought, emotion, and the expression of feelings. It talks specifically about the German language and how they have a wide variety of words they can use to better describe a situation or feeling other languages might not be able to do as effectively. It explains many examples of this, along with the appropriate meaning in English. Having a different set of words to think with and use allows for a wide variety of unique knowledge one can obtain. This video just scratches the surface of the importance of language, and how language in our lives can change the way we think and interpret the world around us.

Dr. Pepper Ten-It's not for Women

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There are a lot of T.V. advertisements that are quite sexist still today. This Dr. Pepper commercial advertisement from a few years back greatly displays language ideology due to the fact that they quote in the commercial "Dr. Pepper Ten-It's not for women". It displays that certain items, specifically something as simple as a drink should be drank by men only. This is not only sexist, but it displays for men the masculinity that they should have and the toughness factor that women "don't" have. Women have been displayed horribly in advertisements for centuries, and it only seems to be getting worse. Commercial advertisements are seen by millions of people and a lot of people are affected by the language displayed in them. The ideology and meaning behind advertisements like this one is a powerful display. This advertisement makes women feel powerless and as though certain items are only for men, although this isn't truly the case. Overall, there are much more advertisements directed towards men than for women. Advertisements such as this one, use language ideologies to reach out to a certain group of people and tend to deliberately leave others behind.

Posted by Megan George on June 22, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Sexism

Vanderbilt's Football Team does Srat Better than a Real Sorority

This is a video made by the Vanderbilt football team mocking how sororities use videos that follow the same format for recruitment purposes. They run and frolic in matching shirts and talk about how their “sisterhood” brings them together. This is stereotypical sorority behavior, in almost every recruitment on the internet girls do the same actions in a different order during the videos. The football team on the other hand is thought of as hyper masculine, the men who play are buff and tough and would NEVER be caught acting feminine. In the video when the football players talk they have a pronounced “female” way of talking by using filler words, like when the “president” is talking about how the anchor is their symbol he says, “how…how like great friends we are, we’re just anchored together”. This video was posted to a website Total Sorority Move, a satirical site about Greek life. The video demonstrates different ideologies about Greek life such as everyone partying all the time and students involved in Greek life having zero non-greek friends. This video stays true to these stereotypical ideologies only showing the football team (as sorority girls) and zero people outside of the team. They all wear matching outfits and talk in the same mocking accent. Overall this video is used as a satire of sorority recruitment videos through the gendered “sorority girl” stereotype and language. [Published on 04-20-2017]

Posted by Hannah Nitz on May 11, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender

Massive Online Community Collaboration: Reddit's "Place" Experiment

Reddit did an experiment on April 1st 2017 involving a blank canvas where users of the popular forum site could collaborate within a structure of only a few rules. The rules were simple, take a pixel of any color out of 16 choices, and place it on the blank canvas, then wait 5 minutes before placing another, single pixel. The experiment was literally titled "Place.” The experiment itself was not a linguistic one, but due to the nature of open forum as well as the Reddit community structure, we see a manifestation of linguistic practice on a grand scale. Place was only open for seventy-two hours, and the limit of one pixel every five minutes per user meant that people had to come together en mass to create the grand masterpiece that ultimately ensued. What we see is a massive community of practice coming together to discuss, and make decisions based upon both shared, and conflicting ideologies as to what should be done to the canvas. A war between the color red, and the color blue began, until green swooped in as well, and collaborators had to decide whether or not to cover the canvas in one color, or allow the art that other collaborative groups were creating to maintain its existence. Not to mention the shear existence of an artistic rendering in Place means massive collaboration within other forums had to exist first, no one person could possibly make a complex rendering come to fruition without the help of many, possibly hundreds of other people. Therefore, communication was rampant, and for seventy-two hours people who would typically avoid each other, or otherwise attempt to rip each other apart, as is the nature of the Internet, came together to put aside ideology for a moment in order to create something beautiful. [Published on 04-16-2017]

"Why Explaining 'The N-Word' To Non-Black People Is So Damn Exhausting"

Article on Cultural Perceptions of the N-Word. Deals with which groups have responsibility or control over a word (and if they can have this control). This also shows lay-person perspective on key socio-linguistic issues. [Published on 05-09-2017]

British Villains -Tom Hiddleston en Jaguar F-Type Coupé

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This Jaguar car commercial adds to an ideology that an English accent sounds villainous. Indexically and through performativity the actor, Tom Hiddleston, describing how to successfully sound "villainous". This commercial is a part of a series featuring other British actors describing how to sound "villainous".

British Villains -Tom Hiddleston en Jaguar F-Type Coupé

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This Jaguar car commercial adds to an ideology that an English accent sounds villainous. Indexically and through performativity the actor, Tom Hiddleston, describing how to successfully sound "villainous". This commercial is a part of a series featuring other British actors describing how to sound "villainous".

“Do You Understand the Words That Are Coming Out of My Mouth? - Rush Hour (1/5) Movie CLIP

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This is a clip from the movie Rush Hour where Agent Carter misunderstood that Jackie Chan (Lee) cannot understand English; therefore he got frustrated and started to change his tone and volume while talking to him. This clip touches on the issue of performativity, racial and linguistic ideologies, Standard Language Ideology and Language socialization. Chris Tucker in the movie was expecting Jackie Chan to be able to speak English, and he also used forms like “speaka” and said “Mr. Rice-a-Roni don’t even speak American”. Based on this example and also the rising tone and increasing volume, it shows how Tucker had the linguistic ideologies of if he speaks louder and slower then the other person is going to understand him. He also used terms that shows his own identity such as “speaka”, and he also said, “speak American” to show his ideology of American equals English only.

Non-inclusive Language Could Elicit Bad Grades

This article from CNN discusses how students at Hull University are being encouraged to use gender-sensitive language. Cardiff Metropolitan University also extended a "Guide to Inclusive Language." The appearance of gender-neutral language on college campuses reflects a changing ideology of how we view gender. However, the article states that these standards “may not last long” so there is a sense of language phenomenon associated with it. [Published on 04-06-2017]

Posted by Elaine Kelley on May 9, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender

Outsiders' Views of English Speakers

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This video is one point of view of how non-native English speakers view English. The main point of the video was the focus on how English speakers are perceived based on gender roles, accents, and the cultural views of English speakers. The intonation from both the male and female actor show the gender roles of language. The girl tends to be speaking softly and gently while the boy is a little bit more outgoing in his speech. When they start to argue again the roles come into play with the girl's voice going higher in pitch and sharper in tone. The classic American type of accent is also prevalent in the blurry sentences that are spoken by either actors. The scene also played what one might call a normative view on American dinners between couples; low light, soft talking, homemade meal and then an argument. All of this just screamed stereotypical America.

Press One for English

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This music video features a clearly Anglo couple singing in thick Southern U.S. accents about the need to speak English in the United States. It clearly showcases many examples of languages ideologies and subtle racism. The video indexes a strong relationship between an American identity and English ability by using many flags, referencing the U.S. military, and blatantly saying "English is the language of the land." They also support the dominance of English, associating it with the opportunities of America, even ironically saying that "We share this land of liberties, so please speak English". Language is closely tied to one's identity, and it is a great abuse to force language upon another person. It's also very difficult to learn another language, especially to full proficiency, once one has passed puberty. Despite these facts, the lyric "You chose to come, now choose to speak English", insists that to be accepted as an American, you must alter a fundamental aspect of your being. The song goes on to associate different languages with "others", saying " I don't live in China, Mexico, no foreign place," and frequently implying that to speak another language is to be lesser, especially in the U.S. These attitudes surrounding English are what create the English hegemony in the U.S., but just because it is the norm doesn't mean it is positive. Many nations are multilingual and there are massive benefits, but this song maintains that it is absurd to have "subtitles in 5 languages" and that as an American, "why should I have to press one for English?". English is massively dominant in the U.S., despite the present of many other varieties over time. The dominance of English is closely tied to the systematic oppression of various ethnic groups in the U.S. over time.

"10 Reasons Lifting is a Religion".

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Dom Mazzetti is an iconic Youtuber for the lifting community in general. Some categories of lifters who watch these videos for enjoyment are: Powerlifters, Bodybuilders, Weightlifters, Powerbuilders, and more. Dom has created a series of satire Youtube videos for the lifting community that he calls "Broscience". These videos show heavy use of stereotypical "male gym speak" and every video shows a new satirical example of how to be the most "alpha", or the most "manly man", in your gym. These videos show language ideology in the weight room and free weight area in a gym and how to become a normality within this society by the words that you use when with fellow weight lifting members. Dom plays along gender and sex language ideology by performatively using (thus showing) differences in language use between the stereotypical “muscle head” male compared to the normality of speech in society.

Posted by Jessica Coogle on May 7, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender

John McWhorter: Txtng is killing language. JK!!!

This is a TED talk by John McWhorter in which he is explaining that writing is just a representation in the way we talk. He explains that there is an emergent complexity in fingered speech (texting). There is a new kind of "language" that is being created now that speech is in continuous change and therefore a new structure is created. [Published on 02-01-2013]

Posted by Eira Nylander Torallas on May 6, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Slang;
Stigma

Political Speech Comparison

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In this clip from "The Daily Show" Trevor Noah compares the speech of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. He comments on the surprise of hearing a politician "speak in full sentences", but also comments on how after listening to Donald Trump for so long a fruitful and complex political discussion is difficult to continue paying attention to.

Posted by Janet Sebastian-Coleman on May 4, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Power

Key & Peele - Office Homophobe (Language of Homosexuality)

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In many ways, Key and Peele focus on the concepts of stereotypes. In this video, the example is the perception of what is considered homosexual. Throughout the clip, it is demonstrated with one that has more focused effeminate inflection in his voice and does often associate heavily explicit material that manifests on the notion of language of homosexuality. Not only that, but the words and actions seem to be taken offense based on the entire argument of being persecuted for the actions of explicit material in the workplace. By the end, it shows that both individuals are homosexual with one following the stereotypes of language and body language of what societies perception of a homosexual and a more rea based homosexual in the same workplace. This demonstrates the notion many people have a perception of what is considered “natural” in language and people when focusing on the stereotype put effort to build around a language that deviates from the “norm.” Linguistically people have built perceptions about the culture behind various cultures and let the bias remain unchanged until something challenges the ideology. Here it is the perceptions of actions, body language, and various tones and words used that look to stereotype homosexuality.

Posted by Scott Bagley on May 4, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gay Mens Language;
Sexual Orientation

Mad Men: Challenging Male Hegemony

This image is from the pilot episode of the TV series Mad Men and involves a character named Don Draper and a potential business partner Rachel Menken. In the scene, Don is pitching a business venture to Rachel, whom in a prior scene was wrongly assumed by Don to be a man due to her status in the business world. Rachel forcefully disagrees with Don’s pitch and asserts dominance over him, as she has the power to decline the business deal. Don becomes increasingly agitated and eventually abruptly exits in the meeting stating, “I’m not gonna let a woman talk to me like this”, as shown in the image above. Because Rachel is a woman in a dominant position, she comes across as being a “bitch”, whereas if she were a man, she would come across as confident and assertive. This is due to gendered ways of speaking that have been socially constructed based on ideologies and through socialization. Women’s language is expected to be cooperative and supportive while men’s is expected to be competitive and dominating. Furthermore, girls are socialized to maintain intimacy and criticize without appearing aggressive, while boys are socialized to assert dominance over situations. However, roles were reversed in the business meeting between Don and Rachel, challenging the language ideologies and male hegemonic society. This role reversal and challenge of male hegemony and its associated language ideologies sparked irritation in Don, causing him to react in a distasteful way and insult Rachel, thus furthering the notion that men are seen as superior to women.

Shameless: Mickey and Gender Expectations

These photos are from multiple scenes found in the TV series Shameless. The photos involve a character named Mickey Milkovich, a troubled, poor teenager who radiates the “tough guy” and delinquent persona but also happens to be gay, along with his boyfriend Ian Gallagher. The quotes on the left demonstrate Mickey’s attempt in hiding his sexuality through harsh, derogatory language that is often associated with men. Girls are expected to show polite, clean language while boys can often get away with obscene language due to the ideologies involving expectations of how women and men should speak. These ideologies are socially constructed based on gender stereotypes and are reinforced through socialization. Boys are socialized to assert dominance and stray away from emotion that is typically associated with women, which is what is being displayed in these images. Mickey initially hides behind these language ideologies that are rooted in a largely heteronormative and male hegemonic society due to the fear of intolerance within society and of challenging these ideologies to ultimately lose the masculine, “tough guy” persona he is expected to portray. However, the photos on the right show, although at times still obscene in language use, a changed Mickey that eventually speaks out against these ideologies through publicly coming out as gay with his boyfriend, Ian.

The 100 Language Ideology

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In the episode series, The 100, there are three groups of people, the mountainmen, the ark, and the grounders. The mountainmen and the Ark have both been living in conditions with a school system and a more systematic type of life in general. They both speak Standard English and after 97 years apart come back together and can communicate. The grounders, who live on the ground in a less "civilized" way in the modern worlds eyes, speak a language called “Trigedasleng”, which is supposed to be a descendant of modern English. The grounders have to speak English in order to communicate with the mountainmen and the ark. There is a language ideology within the show that seems similar to the English-only ideology around today. This idea that English is the best language and should be the language to communicate with others as well as the most civilized language (Crawford, 2000). I have attached a video of the language spoken by the grounders and one can also see how they are depicted within the show in accordance to the ideology that they are “less civilized”.

Posted by Molly C Schmidt on May 3, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
English

English = civilized language

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In the episode series, The 100, there are three groups of people, the mountainmen, the ark, and the grounders. The mountainmen and the Ark have both been living in conditions with a school system and a more systematic type of life in general. They both speak Standard English and after 97 years apart come back together and can communicate. The grounders, who live on the ground in a less "civilized" way in the modern worlds eyes, speak a language called “Trigedasleng”, which is supposed to be a descendant of modern English. The grounders have to speak English in order to communicate with the mountainmen and the ark. There is a language ideology within the show that seems similar to the English-only ideology around today. This idea that English is the best language and should be the language to communicate with others as well as the most civilized language (Crawford, 2000). I have attached a video of the language spoken by the grounders and one can also see how they are depicted within the show in accordance to the ideology that they are “less civilized”.

Posted by Molly C Schmidt on May 3, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
English

Airplane-I Speak Jive

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This scene from Airplane depicts an overly dramatized version of AAVE to the point where other white people, besides one elderly lady, cannot understand what the speakers are saying. Beyond this being an example of linguistic ideologies at work it also serves as social commentary on how AAVE was perceived in the time the movie was made.

Posted by Paige Lechtenberg on May 2, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity

Modern Family Accent Mocking

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Phil Dunphy, the fun loving dad in Modern Family, demonstrates accent mocking for the sake of entertainment within the newest episode of the show. Having been invited to a "roaring 20s" themed wedding, Dunphy slides into is "gangster Chicago accent" to fit the period. Completely unlike his natural accent, this Chicago accent is highly theatrical and contains language he feels to be appropriate for that time period. Using a Chicago accent to portray and old-timey gangster demonstrates an ideology held about this accent and this region.

Posted by Bailey Hogan on May 2, 2017

Tags:
Ideology

Boys' keypads Versus Girls' keypads

This image of “boys’ keypads versus girls’ keypads” shows ideologies about gender and texting. Apparently on a woman’s keypad, there are only three not-so-much-informative words: hm, ok, and oh, while boys seem to text normally, at least in words or sentences. It also shows a phonological feature of women’s texting habits like “hmmmmm, okkkkkk, ohhhhhh” which seems unnecessary when conveying information. In the place of the punctuation button, women apparently use two emojis: smile and wink. This may indicate two things: women’s talk is more cooperative, emotional and encouraging; or women’s talk is mostly not genuine, since whatever others text, women only reply with a happy emoji. Compared to the ideologies that women talk more than men, this keyboard image seems to show women scarcely text anything more than three non-informative words and emojis. However, they both portray a negative image of women’s talk: not too much content. The anecdote also portrays a binary distinction between girls’ talk and boys’ talk, and ignores the varieties of how women/men actually talk in real life.

Posted by Mengting Jiang on May 1, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Gender;
Gender Binary;
Womens Language

Boys' keypads Versus Girls' keypads

This image of “boys’ keypads versus girls’ keypads” shows ideologies about gender and texting. Apparently on a woman’s keypad, there are only three not-so-much-informative words: hm, ok, and oh, while boys seem to text normally, at least in words or sentences. It also shows a phonological feature of women’s texting habits like “hmmmmm, okkkkkk, ohhhhhh” which seems unnecessary when conveying information. In the place of the punctuation button, women apparently use two emojis: smile and wink. This may indicate two things: women’s talk is more cooperative, emotional and encouraging; or women’s talk is mostly not genuine, since whatever others text, women only reply with a happy emoji. Compared to the ideologies that women talk more than men, this keyboard image seems to show women scarcely text anything more than three non-informative words and emojis. However, they both portray a negative image of women’s talk: not too much content. The anecdote also portrays a binary distinction between girls’ talk and boys’ talk, and ignores the varieties of how women/men actually talk in real life.

Posted by Mengting Jiang on May 1, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Gender;
Gender Binary;
Womens Language

Substitute Teacher

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This a skit from Key and Peele about language barriers between ethnicities. The teacher pronounces the students name differently and each student is confused. When the teacher is confronted with this knowledge he gets upset that they mock his pronunciation of their names. This relates to linguistic anthropology because it showcases language barriers between different ethnicities.

Posted by Garion Morgan on April 29, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Language Shift;
Stigma

Mitchell on Manners

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This is the first of a four part series exploring linguistic interactions surrounding manners and their culturally-defined meanings. The program describes how cultural norms determine what is considered polite or rude, such as what questions you can ask another person and how you should address people who are older or younger than you. Manners in Western Europe are explained to be standards set by the ruling and higher class members of society who sought to further establish their superiority over the lower classes, who couldn't afford eight different knives for a singular meal. The discussants also speak about a possible delineation between "etiquette" and "manners." The later portions of the program discuss expectations of social interaction, such as not constantly looking at one's phone while accompanied by another person and to ensure that there are no awkward pauses during a conversation.

Louis CK 2015 - Racism and Sexism are very different

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In this video, Louis C.K. discusses gender issues and being self aware. When doing an impression of a couple of female college students, he uses vocal fry to get the message across to the audience. Not only is the content of what she is supposedly saying in this situation shallow and stereotypical, but he also uses the glottal, creaking sound of lower-register speech oscillation typical of vocal fry. By using this register to do his impression, and in making his impression of a college girl appear dumb and not self aware, he is perpetuating the dominant stereotype that vocal fry is used by young women only, and that it indexes a set of negative attributes. He does this again when describing the USA as a 'terrible girlfriend to the world'. He uses the same register to describe a United States that remembers everything bad that ever happened to it, but does not acknowledge its own faults and mistakes. Tags: Gender, Women's language, Ideology, Femininity, Sexism, Indexicalityhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-Y17YG63B4 Louis CK 2015 - Racism and Sexism are very different In this video, Louis C.K. discusses gender issues and being self aware. When doing an impression of a couple of female college students, he uses vocal fry to get the message across to the audience. Not only is the content of what she is supposedly saying in this situation shallow and stereotypical, but he also uses the glottal, creaking sound of lower-register speech oscillation typical of vocal fry. By using this register to do his impression, and in making his impression of a college girl appear dumb and not self aware, he is perpetuating the dominant stereotype that vocal fry is used by young women only, and that it indexes a set of negative attributes. He does this again when describing the USA as a 'terrible girlfriend to the world'. He uses the same register to describe a United States that remembers everything bad that ever happened to it, but does not acknowledge its own faults and mistakes.

Posted by Sierra Hurd on April 28, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Sexism

Trump Relies on Mock Spanish to Talk About Immigration (OPINION)

This blog post is about how non-Spanish speaking white peoples' use of "mock Spanish" is a form of covert racism that is used as a unconsciously strategic effort to silently dominate the folks who are imagined to speak the language, but to do so through attempts at silliness, humor and acting "cool” or "with it". [Published on 10-20-2016]

"Fancy-speak"

A box for a chocolate lava cake from Domino's Pizza which refers to French as "fancy-speak" which relates to our discussion of language ideologies. [Published on 03-15-2017]

Posted by Adrian Leary on April 15, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
American English;
French

Fry & Laurie comedy sketch

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Stephen Fry & Hugh Laurie perform a comedy sketch satirizing attitudes about language change.

Posted by Lucas Fagen on March 27, 2017

Tags:
Prescriptivism;
Ideology

Boston Accent Movie Trailer

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This is a fake movie trailer that appeared on "Late Night with Seth Meyers". It makes fun of the Boston accent and movie portrayals of the accent and Boston culture. It also makes fun of people's reactions to the accent including a British actor trying to do a Boston accent and fake newspaper reviews of the movie.

Posted by Janet Sebastian-Coleman on March 11, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Boston English;
Accent;
Stigma

Mock Spanish in 'The Mexican' Trailer

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This trailer for the 2001 movie “The Mexican” starring Brad Pitt and Julia Roberts, demonstrates Brad Pitt’s character utilizing mock Spanish saying words like “el trucko” and “towno” in an interaction with Hispanic men. He also attempts Spanglish in another interaction saying a phone call is “muy muy important.”

Posted by Callie Hawkins on March 9, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Spanglish;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

Teen Slang: What's, like, so wrong with like?

This article is about the use of 'like' and other fillers and the way it is deemed inappropriate. It is commonly used among teens as a way of 'belonging', and is used in certain contexts. The article also goes on to say that someone might not like the use of fillers because they are not part of the speech community it's used in. [Published on 09-28-2010]

Posted by Beth Westerman on March 8, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Communities of Practice;
Slang

My Fair Lady - Why Can't The English?

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This song called "Why can't the English?" from the movie My Fair Lady. In this song Henry Higgins starts the song off by singing: "Look at her, a prisoner of the gutter, Condemned by every syllable she utters By right she should be taken out and hung, For the cold-blooded murder of the English tongue." referring to Hepburn. With this, followed by a lot of remarks that are similar in nature, he is implying very strongly that there is a Standard English language that should be spoken by all English people, and if anyone doesn't, "by right" they could be hung. He says most people are never "taught" and instead learn other stigmatized varieties of English and refers to these as murderers of the English tongue. He is in this way implying that there is a legitimate use of proper English language, and that is the standard variety that he speaks. therefore considering himself as a "better Englishman", and more educated, in this way making a social class distinction between him and the others. He is also implying that there should be unity of the nation as mentioned by Bourdieu in "The Production and Reproduction of Legitimate Language". Higgins refers to the English speaking people of England as Englishmen, but also mentions that non-standard speaking varieties are "painful to your ears" and is afraid they will never be able to get "one common language".

The new Standard Swedish - sound experiment showing how Sweden sounds today

A Swedish linguistics professor has helped design a new kind of Riksvenska, or Standard Swedish, which more closely reflects the way people speak in 2017. [Published on 01-31-2017]

Posted by Nicole Niesen on February 27, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
Change

Trevor Noah - American Sports

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Trevor Noah is a South African comedian who jokes about Americans intensive, almost excessive obsession with every thing to do with sports. He goes on to contrast it to how soccer, the worlds most popular sports. The multicultural comparison shows how America is different from the rest of the world. They way he speaks also puts emphasis on the knowledge of the topic.

Posted by Jesus Leos on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Language Shift;
Multilingualism

Woman kicked out of Quebec hospital for speaking english

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Two reporters from the Sun News discuss the Quebec French language ideologies that have begun spurring discrimination towards other linguistic communities within the region.

Posted by Sarah Patton on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
French;
Communities of Practice

Watch the second presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton

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Certain ideologies have been established without actually speaking, such as handshaking. In the recent debate it was apparent as the candidates met on the debate stage there was no such exchange. Throughout the debate Mr. Trump displayed numerous was to establish power, both through gestures and verbal exchange. Mr. Trump stood throughout and when Senator Clinton was speaking he often stood behind her. This could be interpreted as a stand of power. Mr. Trump interrupted and made comments while Senator Clinton was talking that could have been an attempt to establish power. Mr. Trump’s continued reference to “locker room talk” could appear to be gender based.

Posted by Madison Curnow on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Gender

Do You Speak American?

Scholar and author, John G. Fought, focuses on how different dialect uses around the country affect the pronunciation of words and formation of speech patterns. Fought explains how the history of the United States has shaped language and has helped develop speech communities into what they are today. The media's role in what is considered "American" in regard to language is also described by Fought, touching on its key part in influencing specific dialect in different regions.

Posted by Samantha Blaesing on October 11, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Southern English;
Perceptual Dialectology;
Communities of Practice

"Token Black Woman" -Issa Rae

This gif comes from an episode of the show "Insecure" that aired recently on HBO. The show is based on Issa Rae, an African American woman, trying to navigate her way through her 20's. Rae works for a non profit called "We Got Ya'll," which helps children of color from low income communities to be successful in school. The non-profit was created by a white woman and Rae is the only black woman working there. Rae refers to herself as the "token black woman." This gif shows a white co-worker asking Rae the meaning of "on fleek." Her co-worker is assuming that because Rae is black, that she is familiar with this language. This is an example of her co-worker's language ideologies. Unfortunately for her co-worker, due to indirect indexicality, making this assumption actually makes her appear racist. Rae spoke about the show, saying that the series will examine "the complexities of 'blackness' and the reality that you can’t escape being black." Rae also said, in regards to the potential mainstream reaction to the series: "We’re just trying to convey that people of color are relatable. This is not a hood story. This is about regular people living life."

Posted by Erica Hageman on October 6, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

"That Mexican Thing"

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During the Vice Presidential Debate, Tim Kaine referred to some of the demeaning comments Donald Trump has made in the past, regarding Latinos. In response, Mike Pence said, "Senator, you whipped out that Mexican thing again." Whether Pence meant to be offensive to the Latino community or not, he most certainly was. Recently, Trump has tried to redeem himself with the Latino community, but with his VP referring to Latino issues as a "Mexican thing," it is apparent that Trump is engaging in hispandering.

Posted by Erica Hageman on October 5, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Race,Ethnicity;
Politics and Policy

He is Mi and I am Yu

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This is a clip from the movie Rush Hour 3 where Agent Carter is confused because of translations between Chinese and English. This clip touches issues on multilinguistic practices, translation, communication barriers, and so on. Because of the differences Agent Carter was getting frustrated making the situation worse.

Black Girls: The Cycle Continues

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In the video titled “Black Girls: The Cycle Continues.” we see a group of young black females taking turns speaking their mind's over an apparent issue, which has upset them. This is a good example of slang terminology and language ideologies of a speech community.

Japanese Gendered Language: How to Talk Like a Girl or Boy

This article discusses gendered language in Japanese, which includes the origin of "feminine language" (which started off as a form of "vulgar" language that schoolgirls were using) and how gendered language can be used as a form of self-identity or as a way to rebel against the strict standards of Japanese language. In the language ideology of Japanese, there have historically been opinions on who can use what type of language and how, but this article demonstrates that these ideologies are changing today. [Published on 02-05-2014]

Posted by Alex Parnell on October 4, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Communities of Practice

Donald Trump Couldn't Stop Interrupting Hillary

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During the presidential debate this year, Donald Trump interrupted Hillary 51 times versus her 17 times of interrupting him. Studies have shown that this is a gender related difference. Men tend to interrupt women more than vice versa. It is a way of showing their masculinity and power. Instead his interrupting of Hillary was viewed as rude and demeaning by most. This is also an example of the changes occurring in political discourse. Trump uses language and engages in behavior that defies some of our political language ideologies.

Posted by Erica Hageman on October 2, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Sexism

Who is really “American”?

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People from North, South and Central America discuss the use of the term “American” as an identifier by people from the United States. "Americans" have a linguistic ideology about what it means to be one and seem to ignore the fact that it excludes people from all other regions in the Americas.

How WSJ Used an Algorithm to Analyze ‘Hamilton’ the Musical

Joel Eastwood and Erik Hinton wrote an algorithm to analyze the different types of rhymes used in the tony Award Winning Broadway Musical "Hamilton", and reveal their Hip-Hop influences. [Published on 06-06-2016]

Ignorance in the Office

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This is a short clip from the Office where two characters are told by their boss to treat the other person like the race on their forehead (index card). One person is supposed to give hints while the other person must guess who is on their own card.

Posted by Sophia Smith on July 29, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent;
Sexism

The Power of Language

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I believe that this clip demonstrates the power that is in language. Language can be used to influence and audience and can be altered in such a way to make something seem more appealing. Language is often used as a way of creating ideologies, especially in politics. In this video Bill Maher shows us that political parties are constantly trying to find the best wording to get their ideologies across to their audience and get the best response.

Posted by Eden Franklin on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Politics and Policy

Use of AAE in Marketing: Jet Blue Example

Jet Blue utilized the term "fleek" in their marketing, which arose from "Black twitter" and is typically considered African American English. It backfires and is deemed as inauthentic, and lots call into question whether it is "professional". This relates to language ideologies; we have certain expectations of who should be speaking in what way, as well as shared ideologies within a particular community of practice. [Published on 02-23-2015]

Posted by Brandiss Drummer on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Communities of Practice

Hillary Clinton: Blaspandering?

Do we need a new term for black pandering, like hispandering has? In this clip, fox news sounds off on Hilary's speech regarding white privilege. Although her intent is good, like examples of hispandering, her language of "we" and "our" vs. "you" helps to reflect and reinforce ideologies of otherness. [Published on 04-13-2016]

Posted by Brandiss Drummer on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

Word association with a person

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Watch as Fox News anchors talk about bernie sanders and spend almost forty percent of the conversation about Bernie Sanders, trying to fit in the word Socialist as many times as possible to to connect the word Socialist with Bernie Sanders.

Posted by Hayden Ball on July 21, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Rapid Anonymous

Body Language Conversation

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This video shows us how important appropriate body language is. We could be saying one thing with our mouths but out body language could be saying the exact opposite.

Posted by Daniella Donofrio on July 20, 2016

Tags:
Ideology

How the Five

Love has it's own language, you have to learn how to communicate with a significant other. You wouldn't communicate with your significant other the same way that you would communicate with a friend or sibling, this is very important in an emotional relationship. [Published on 10-05-2015]

Posted by Daniella Donofrio on July 20, 2016

Tags:
Ideology

Melania Trump Echoes Michelle Obama in Convention Speech

As the title suggests, presidential hopeful, Donald Trump's wife Melania Trump gave her first major political speech last night. Many found striking similarities between her speech last night and that of First Lady Michelle Obama's earlier DNC speech. These similarities bring up the question of "shared values" or plagiarism. Also notable are factors such as Melania's native language not being English: how did this affect the speech and the way it was received? [Published on 07-18-2016]

Posted by Erika Huff on July 19, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Power;
Accent;
Politics and Policy

Unapologetically Southern

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In this video, Chad Prather, a man who identifies himself as a Southern Gentleman. "Rants" in defense of his southern "accent" or dialect. Here we can see a man defending his own way of communication against attacks (in the form of social media messages and comments) from people who hold the language ideology that his accent proves that he is not intelligent.

Coca Cola por el orgullo de ser latino

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In this video that is supposed to celebrate Hispanic Heritage month Coca Cola has been accused of hispandering. This is evident in that the men and women in the video are discussing their pride in their heritage and family names as they are printed on the side of Coca Cola cans. Not only did Coke decide to put the names on the cans but they made them temporary tattoos. Many latinos have condemned the video as a pathetic attempt to bring in more latino customers. They have also said the tattoos could play into latino stereotypes. Check it out and decide for yourself.

Posted by Ariana Moll on March 14, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
American English;
Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Should Holocaust Denial be Criminalized?

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Fascinating example of rhetorical devices and traditions at the Oxford Union...Question is whether holocaust denial should be criminalized. Proponents narrow the scope of the debate, opponents broaden the issue well beyond holocaust denial. Also, I love the fact that at the Oxford Union, the speakers are introduced by their opposition in the debate...great device that illustrates the philosophy of this great institution.

Posted by Scott Russell on March 11, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Discourse

International Body Language

The article shows how body language is an important expression of language. It identifies how important it is when studying cultural languages to understand how body language is used. [Published on 05-14-2013]

Posted by Steven Goldstein on March 11, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Code-switching;
Acquisition

What is Hispandering?

The article explains what Hispandering is and how politicians are exposing it. It provides evidence to the strong relationship that culture and language have. It also shows how culture identification is a large factor to how language is interpreted. [Published on 03-10-2016]

Posted by Steven Goldstein on March 11, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Code-switching;
Linguistic Relativity

Mock Spanish in Scrubs

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A popular T.V. comedy depicting a doctor using Spanish as a way to demean the Hispanic nurse he is speaking to.

Posted by Amanda Salamanca on March 10, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

Gender Has/Has Not Been Hijacked by White MiddleClass

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Portion of a very interesting debate at the Oxford Union regarding whether feminism has been hijacked by "white middle class" women. Engages so many topics,including race, poverty, feminism/gender politics.

Posted by Scott Russell on March 10, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Socioeconomic Status;
Politics and Policy;
Sexism

Alumnus's anthology rescues 'tattered' isiXhosa language

A man from Rhodes University in South Africa uses a poetry anthology to discuss HIV/AIDs in his native isiXhosa language, and hopes to rebuild isiXhosa as a language which lays in 'tatters' due to years of apartheid oppression in South Africa. [Published on 03-07-2016]

Posted by Jasmine E. Thompson on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Politics and Policy;
Stigma

Why the f*** shouldn't women swear?

This article talks about sexism in the fact that there is an idea that women should not curse. For example, it mentions that people tell female rapper, Nicki Minaj that she should not cuss, but the same is not said to male rappers, like Eminem or Lil Wayne [Published on 11-04-2014]

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma

Does language shape how we think? Linguistic relativity & linguistic determinism

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This video explains and simplifies what linguistic relativity and linguistic determinism is.

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
Linguistic Relativity

Swing County USA: Hispandering

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This video talks about Hispandering in the United States. It details moments on the campaign trail where Presidential candidates, Democratic and Republican, engage in Hispandering. Many of the candidates refer back to their parents and their experiences as immigrants.

Gay Men React to Lesbian Slang

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This video shows a bunch of different gay men trying to decipher what different types of lesbian slang mean. They also go in to what their own gay slang is as well while trying to understand lesbian slang.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gay Mens Language;
Sexual Orientation;
Womens Language;
Slang

Key & Peele - Obama Meet & Greet

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This Key & Peele comedy sketch humorously depicts Obama and the different ways he talks to black and white people after a speech. There's a lot of code switching going on in this sketch. There's a handful funny references in here as well, from rap to slang.

How to Speak INTERNET

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A group of three British guys basically put together a video "guide" to understanding all of today's internet slang. From "YOLO," to ""FML," they cover a handful of different types of internet slang and explain what they all mean in the non internet world.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
English;
Code-switching;
Youth;
Education;
Internet Language;
Slang

Pardon my Spanglish

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A comedian joins Spanish CNN to talk about his new book about Spanglish. The comedian and the anchor switch between English and Spanish throughout the video, talking in Spanglish. While there's a good deal more Spanish being spoken in the video, there's also English, just not as much as Spanish. The intro of the video is a great example of Spanglish, as is the whole interview for the most part.

Friends: Joey acting nineteen

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In this clip from the TV show FRIENDS, the character Joey is pretending to be a teenager to prove he can land an acting gig as a younger guy. He uses a bunch of what he thinks is teenager slang while trying to convince Chandler that he can do it. This is a good example of slang, especially in regards to youth and the area in which the show is set (NYC).

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
New York City English;
Youth;
Slang

Black Folks Slang

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A black comedian basically goes through a handful of different types of "black folks slang" and explains what they really mean. He does this through a couple different ways, from using the slang in a sentence, to describing exactly what it means, to even showing tweets that use a particular type of "black folks slang." He also does it in a humorous way which makes it easier to understand and more engaging.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
African American English;
whiteness;
Internet Language;
Slang

Hugh Laurie: the British slang vs the American

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This is a video clip from an episode of Ellen where British actor Hugh Laurie comes on the show. They play a game of "American vs. English slang" where they test each other on whether they understand different types of American and British slang. They go back and forth with each other and test each other's knowledge of what the different types of slang mean.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
American English;
British English;
English;
Accent;
Slang

Code Switching

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This video uses stop motion art to explain why people use code switching. It offers multiple scenarios and situations in which people use code switching and gives a handful of examples why people do so and when. The interesting part about the video is that it's done solely using stop motion drawings.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Code-switching

The 5 Big Advantages to Learning Multiple Languages

This website gives you the 5 biggest reasons why learning a another language besides your own is definitely in your best interest. From the brain power to, the language structure of each language, all reasons are perfectly applicable.

Posted by Ainise Havili on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Communities of Practice;
Multilingualism

Gangs: Slang, Words, Symbols

This article contains the language used between the intricate structures of gangs in American communities. One could say gangs are like their own society with a language of their own, only used by members within it. They have grown and evolved throughout the years due to drugs and the growing popularity of fire arms. Because of this the linguistic structure of street gangs have also evolved into, sometimes, very complicated language structure. [Published on 03-01-2011]

Posted by Ainise Havili on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Code-switching;
Youth;
Slang

Alumnus's anthology rescues 'tattered' isiXhosa language

A man from Rhodes University in South Africa uses a poetry anthology to discuss HIV/AIDs in his native isiXhosa language, and hopes to rebuild isiXhosa as a language which lays in 'tatters' due to years of apartheid oppression in South Africa. [Published on 03-07-2016]

Posted by Jasmine E. Thompson on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Politics and Policy;
Stigma

"I'm sorry, Pope Francis, this America and we speak English!"

Discussion of Pope Franics's use of language prior to his visit to the United States. The Pope chose to use Spanish for the majority of his visit, which some say was his taking on a political stance on the US policy on immigration and an 'English only' country. [Published on 09-18-2015]

Posted by Jasmine E. Thompson on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Spanish;
Politics and Policy;
Religion

Using language illegally

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Language can be used illegally, as is the recent case of states creating illegal regulations that effectively close abortion clinics. Language such as "must provide" in terms of surgical centers with regard to abortion clinics has been found to be illegal.

Posted by Jasmine E. Thompson on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Entextualization;
Ideology;
Politics and Policy

CNN Election Center

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In this video there are many different types of sociolinguistic artifacts, and in any kind of SNL skit they have to make it more dramatic to bring out the commentary. Yet, within this clip you see many types of tags used within the first few minutes. For example, Donald Trump is the first person to be impersonated, but within the short clip that he is in he shows tags of "Race/Ethnicity, Sexism, Gender, Politics and Policy". And for Hillary Clinton she is showing many of the same character traits as well. Within all of these impersonators they are all trying to benefit themselves in some way that looks appealing to the audience.

How to understand the differences between British and American English

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The video does a great job at comparing words and the differences in meanings they can portray whether being interpreted from someone from the U.S OR U.K. It shows the power of the interpretation of language and how it can cause an interaction to be positive or negative. It shows the importance of linguistic relativity and the social context individuals are a part of.

10 Surprising Ways to Offend People in Other Countries

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The video explores how the use of body language can mean one thing to a culture and a completely different thing to another. It provides good evidence to show that language can be communicated in other ways than verbal cues. It also shows the importance of the environment and the socialization process.

If Asians said the Stuff White People Say

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The video is a complete spoof but it does a great job of identifying how the Asian population can be categorized into one giant category. It illustrated linguistic discrimination and shows how the social context you live in cam influence a cultures way of thought.

Posted by Steven Goldstein on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice;
Linguistic Relativity

17 Reasons Americans Should Be Embarrassed They Only Speak English

This article gives insight onto why only being able to speak English, as is common to a majority of American's, is not a good thing. This article expresses how, as American's we should strive to learn other languages instead of expecting others to know ours. [Published on 03-19-2014]

The Evolution of Dude

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How the meaning of the word dude has radically changed over 130 years.

Posted by Brian Pener on March 5, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Change;
Slang

Hillary Clinton "Hispandering" Pummeled On Twitter

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A news reporter talks about Hillary Clinton and her "Washington games." He mentions that now because of the internet, she is no longer able to continue the same political approach as she has in the past. He also calls her out on her calm that she is just like the Latinos abuela, and how far off she really is with this claim.

Chalamette, LA- A Study in Dialect Marginalization

A specific study of the stigmatization of a particular dialect in a suburb of New Orleans. [Published on 03-01-2016]

Posted by Mark Beal on March 1, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
American English;
Stigma

who talks more men or women

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Ellen takes a poke at women talking more than men 20K vs 7K whereas a recent study shows it is about even at 16K a piece but a good piece showing the first points of men not talking as much as women.

Posted by Michael Allan on February 26, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Standard Language Ideology

"The Day Beyonce Turned Black"

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Within this SNL skit, there are many different forms of language used. For this skit, it is explaining how caucasian people tend to look at the world in a over dramatic way. Throughout the skit, there are race, gender, & sexualities between white and blacks. This skit has a comical view on different political problems that we have in this country today, and what the children of our culture are growing up in.

28 Reasons to Hug a Black Guy

In this Saturday Night Live skit they are discussing Black history month in class and the teacher lets three of her students come up to give the class a lesson on what it means. The first thing they start to do is rap which is stigmatizing blacks. Next they start talking about slavery and how "white" people need to show them love for this month because this is the only time a year they get love which brings in the issue of race and ideology and much more. [Published on 02-25-2016]

Posted by Madison Rigdon on February 25, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma

Carlton

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This particular clip shows the comparisons of what some specific groups might think of how someone should be because of color and class when it is society who defines these boundaries.

india vs mexico

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This clip shows how different countries or races think or talk about other countries. The same thing he says here Americans typically say about Mexico.

Posted by Michael Allan on February 23, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Race,Ethnicity

Key & Peele - Negrotown

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In this Key and Peele video, the stigmas attached to African Americans are shown. A white police officer begins to arrest a black man walking in an alley who is doing nothing wrong. When they enter 'Negrotown' he begins singing a song in which he says "here you can walk the streets without being stopped, harassed or beat." This brings in race and ideology about how African Americans are still being treated unfairly.

Posted by Madison Rigdon on February 21, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma

Key & Peele - White-Sounding Black Guys

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Key & Peele - Jordan and Keegan find themselves having to adjust their blackness on a daily basis by dialing up there voices. This ties in perfect for language ideology because it turns out to be much more than just language. It's the cultural system of ideas about social and linguistic relationships.

Posted by Shane Bessette on February 16, 2016

Tags:
Ideology

Cultural Hegemony

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A wonderfully concise description of hegemony, with real world examples of things we see in our everyday life that we may overlook. This idea relates to language in how our society favors standard English and those who utilize it.

Posted by Amanda Salamanca on February 16, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Standard Language Ideology;
Slang

Monoglot Philosophy at Work

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Presidential candidate Donald Trump discusses his views on bilingualism during a recent campaign speech.

Posted by Mark Beal on February 15, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology

We Can Do IT

This sign was an empowerment for women to join the workforce and was widely re-popularized in the 80's Women's Movement promoting equality in the workplace. [Published on 09-22-2014]

Posted by Michael Allan on February 12, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Femininity

3 Ways To Speak English

This is a TED talk about this women who breaks down the english language saying there are three ways to speak. She is saying that the way you speak comes from your background and the culture you experienced growing up. You can speak differently based on where you are. For example in the work community people have been taught to be polite and say "hello" but around your friends the vernacular changes to maybe a "whats good" meaning the same as hello or hi. Jamilia Lyiscott is putting on a performance for people conveying different identities. She also says the word "articulate" multiple times representing language ideologies.

British Accents: Call Centre English

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Some great discussion about language ideologies, and Diglossia, two variants of the same language.

Posted by Mark Beal on February 7, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
British English;
Cockney English

Germans Versus Other Languages

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A skit comparing the German language to other languages, this video shares many language ideologies, especially the language ideology of the German language being an angry language.

Posted by Samuel Schmidgall on January 29, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
German

Do Women REALLY Talk More Than Men?

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This video is a great example of ideology and how it can be generally accepted; even with evidence to the contrary.

Posted by Amanda Salamanca on January 28, 2016

Tags:
Ideology

"Like Totally Whatever"

A poem detailing the ideologies related to some features of young women's language, and the effect this sort of policing can have on young women.

Posted by Gregor McGee on November 24, 2015

Tags:
Ideology;
Womens Language;
Prescriptivism

G'day mate: 'Lazy' Australian accent caused by "alcoholic slur' of heavy-drinking early settlers

A newspaper article reporting on an opinion piece written by a communications professor at Melbourne's Victoria University suggesting that the Australian accent resulted from the slurring of speech of early (drunk) settlers. [Published on 10-27-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on November 2, 2015

Tags:
Ideology;
Australian English;
Stigma

Black vs. African-American

An article written from an individual perspective that complicates the issue of using the terms Black and African-American as blanket terms by reversing the criteria that we discussed in class. [Published on 08-27-2015]

Posted by Manon Gilmore on September 6, 2015

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity

Trevor Noah -- African American

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Trevor Noah's standup--he talks about moving from South Africa to the U.S. and his preparation for being Black in America. He also gives us some performances of AAE.

Posted by Richard Adcock on September 2, 2015

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity

Debate about who gets to use a word

cw: discussion of racial slur This is a CNN interview between a white commentator and a black rapper named Trinidad. They're debating about use of the n-word. I find the controversy about who gets to use certain words fascinating. I hear a power & privilege conversation most often, as well as an "in-group" vs "out-group" conversation. [Published on 03-17-2015]

Posted by Chase Doremus on March 17, 2015

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma;
Lexicon

More Language Imitation

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This has much less to do with English specifically, but I thought it was really cool. This woman imitates what a number of languages sound like to foreigners, and she does it really well! Again, there are sometimes actual words involved (like 'bonsoir' in the French one) but it's almost all nonsense.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on September 18, 2014

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology

Skwerl

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Related to what we were talking about in class today (Prisecolinensinenciousol), I thought this video does a really good job of sounding like American English. There are a few times that they use real English words, but most of it is gibberish.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on September 18, 2014

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
American English

Is Learning a Foreign Language Really Worth It?

This is a Freakonomics podcast on the economic worth of learning a foreign language, addressing the "return on investment" of language learning (or, will all of those hours you spent in Spanish class really help you financially in the future?). Of particular interest are sections from 0:58-4:00, which poses the question to be addressed in the podcast, and has a few nice examples of ideologies about language learning and bilingualism from (probably wealthy, upperclass) kids, and 13:10-18:23, which reveals the actual monetary value of language learning. It is important to note that this podcast is mainly from the perspective of a native English speaker learning a foreign language, although native speakers of other languages learning English are mentioned towards the end.

Posted by Helen Seay on September 9, 2014

Tags:
Ideology;
Socioeconomic Status;
Education;
Acquisition

Henry Cho, Asian American comedian with Southern accent

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Henry Cho is a Korean American comedian from Knoxville, Tennessee. He talks in his act about belonging to certain groups, using his own experiences as a Korean American southern English-speaking person as sources of comedy. The stereotypical cultural correlates of his appearance and his speech may be in conflict for some viewers.

Black vs. African American

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A 2008 video on the use of the terms "black" and "African American" as terms of self-reference. I use this with the reading: Smitherman, Geneva. 1991. "What is African to me?" Language, ideology and African American. American Speech.

Val Systems: Pretentious /ae/ hole

The blog post provides a clip from the popular NPR show "Car Talk, with two native Bostonians as hosts. In the clip, one hosts relates being teased by his daughter for his trap-bath split, saying it sounds pretentious.

Posted on September 19, 2012

Tags:
Boston English;
trap-bath split;
Change;
Ideology

Dude: Stanford Linguists Probe California Accent

Penelope Eckert and fellow researchers in California examine how English is spoken and perceived in different cities around the state in efforts to refute the stereotype that California English is accentless and homogenous.