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Mark Zuckerberg speaks fluent Mandarin during Q&A in Beijing

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Mark Zuckerberg, the creator and owner of Facebook, speaking fluent Mandarin in a Question and Answer forum. This clip shows how the ability to communicate with people from other parts of the world, in their native tongue can go along way and make a powerful connection.

Posted by Chandler Butler on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Contact;
Linguistic Relativity;
Multilingualism

Why Germans Can Say Things No One Else Can

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This video talks about language and it's ability to allow for thought, emotion, and the expression of feelings. It talks specifically about the German language and how they have a wide variety of words they can use to better describe a situation or feeling other languages might not be able to do as effectively. It explains many examples of this, along with the appropriate meaning in English. Having a different set of words to think with and use allows for a wide variety of unique knowledge one can obtain. This video just scratches the surface of the importance of language, and how language in our lives can change the way we think and interpret the world around us.

Die Antwoord's Evil Boy: A Dynamic Crossroad of Language, Culture, and Rap in South Africa

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Die Antwoord is a controversial rap group from Cape Town, South Africa fronted by Ninja Yolandi Vi$$er. Speaking from a post-apartheid perspective, this group offers an underrepresented view of young, lower-middle class, white Afrikaans - a subculture known as "Zef." Historically, Zef has been considered a derogatory term describing someone who was white, poor, and "trashy." However, Die Antwoord and others have looked to transform this into a self-reflective, somewhat satirical, parody that Ninja described as being "apocalyptic debris that we’ve stuck together." In this music video, they display their unique code-switching between Afrikaans and English, as well as Xhosa - the Bantu language of the Xhosa people. Adding to their mixed-bag controversial nature, is the relationship of the Afrikaans languages’ association with apartheid. Through dynamic language and visual use, this video reflects the complex sociocultural and sociolinguistic interactions that occur in this region. The lyrical narrative told is a statement on the clash between traditional tribal circumcision rituals, and the modern subcultures that seem to offer an alternative path to "manhood." This can be heard in the verse by the guest rapper Wanga, sung in his native tongue: "Mamelapa umnqunduwakho! (listen here, you fucking asshole) Andifuni ukuyaehlatini! (I don't want to go to the bush with you) Sukubammba incanca yam! (don't touch my penis) Andi so stabani! (I’m not a gay) Incanca yam yeyamantobi! (this penis is for the girls) Incanca yam iclean! (my penis is clean) Incanca yam inamandla! (my penis is strong) Ndiyinkwekwe enkulu! (I am a big boy) Angi funi ukuba yeendota! (don't want to be a man) Evil boy 4 life! yebo! (yes) Evil boy 4 life!" Through the use of polyglossic code-switching, performativity, sociocultural and racial integration, and a revamping of contextual meanings, Die Antwoord is doing its part to redefine what it means to be young and Zef in South Africa, and what a socioculturally- and sociolinguistically-complex rebellion sounds like.

Expanding Past English May Lead to Great Discoveries in Other Languages

Patricia Ryan stresses the importance of language globalization and how we must expand our linguistic abilities and knowledge past English in order to advance our society as a whole. She discusses how the limitation of acquiring only one language may be causing us to miss out on discovering incredible ideas that are stuck in a different language, which enforces the necessity of multilingualism and shines a light on the rapidly increasing rate of dying languages. [Published on 12-01-2010]

Posted by Bri Smith on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Acquisition;
Contact;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

Swing County USA: Hispandering

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This video talks about Hispandering in the United States. It details moments on the campaign trail where Presidential candidates, Democratic and Republican, engage in Hispandering. Many of the candidates refer back to their parents and their experiences as immigrants.

Language in prison: Solitary linguistic confinement

This article describes the importance of language and communication for human health and sanity. The effects of non communication and language between human beings is extremely detrimental to a persons sanity. They come to the conclusion that human interaction is a basic human right, just as necessary as food or water, but that it is not treated as such in prisons across the world. [Published on 04-16-2013]

Posted by Ainise Havili on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Communities of Practice;
Contact;
Slang

What is Language?

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This video gives an extensive definition of what is language and how it affects each of us individually.

Posted by Katherine Helms on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Contact;
Language Revitalization

Words that sound dirty in other languages

The article details how a word that is innocuous in one Language is very offensive in another. [Published on 01-02-2015]

Posted by Brian Pener on March 5, 2016

Tags:
Contact;
Globalization;
Linguistic Relativity

Language Could Diagnose Parkinson's, ALS and Schizophrenia before Lab Tests

A recent study shows the use, or lack of, certain words by patients could be diagnostic indicators of a future disease or ailment. [Published on 02-01-2016]

Posted by Jamie Schnee on March 4, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Change;
Language Shift;
Variation;
Contact

Hawaiian Pidgin: The Voice of Hawaii

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Hawaiian laypeople and scholars give a brief historical and social context to the pidgin used in Hawaii (referred to as just "Pidgin"). They explain that Pidgin, though originating as a very basic form of communication between workers over a hundred years ago, is now the basis of a strong speech community

Posted by Christy Williams on February 22, 2016

Tags:
Hawaiian Pidgin;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Contact

Bon Cop, Bad Cop

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A clip from Bon Cop, Bad Cop, a 2006 Canadian movie that bases much of its humor on the use of Canadian French and English in Canada.

Posted by Lucas Dazin on December 9, 2014

Tags:
Canadian English;
Code-switching;
French;
Contact

Tok Pisin Songs

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A clip from a documentary about Papua New Guinea that includes songs in Tok Pisin.

Posted by Allesandra Geffen on October 14, 2014

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Contact

Rock Me Amadeus

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This is the song I chose for my music project--it shows a number of English borrowings and code-switches between German and English.

Posted by Maren Fichter on September 30, 2014

Tags:
Code-switching;
Borrowing;
Contact;
Globalization

Hawaiian Creole English and cultural content in "Mr. Sun Cho Lee" (Contact Languages in Music)

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This song, first released in 1975 by Keola and Kapono Beamer, reveals stereotypes of the diverse ethnic backgrounds of Hawai'i residents, and contains several features of Hawaiian Creole English (often called "Pidgin" but is really a creole).

Posted by Emma Rennie on September 30, 2014

Tags:
Hawaiian Pidgin;
Race,Ethnicity;
Contact

How to Say Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Skwomesh)

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My housemate just got back from vacation in Canada and asked me how to pronounce "7" because she'd seen it on a road sign. I find it telling that a writing system not necessarily suited to the Squamish language is used for road signs (no glottal stop on an English typewriter). Having lived in the PNW for the past few years and being constantly surrounded by such names has made me wonder how true those names are to their originals, and what that means about the relationships between America/the English language and these native languages' speakers.

Posted by Maren Fichter on September 5, 2014

Tags:
Power;
Borrowing;
American Indian;
Contact;
Squamish

NPR Article on Russia and Nearby Countries/Languages

"Ethnic Russians" in Ukraine and Estonia are defined/described by their language ], especially in relation/contrast to the language spoken by the relevant nation. [Published on 09-04-2014]

Posted by Allesandra Jade Geffen on September 4, 2014

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity;
Contact;
Monolingualism

Chinook Wawa Language Revitalization

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A 2010 video of Chinook Wawa (or Chinook Jargon) language learners in Portland, Oregon, having varying levels of conversation in the language in an attempt to revitalize it.

Posted by Kara Becker on May 5, 2014

Tags:
Contact;
Chinook Wawa

The making of "jive" talk in the movie Airplane

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The 1980 film Airplane contains a classic comedic scene of AAVE representation. This clip shows interviews with the film's writers and the actors who actually created the dialogue in the film.

Posted by Rob Troyer on August 1, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
whiteness;
Contact

NY TImes: Linguist finds a language in its infancy

A 2013 article about Light Warlpiri, a new language created by children living in Northern Australia.

Posted by Kara Becker on July 15, 2013

Tags:
Contact;
Multilingualism

Radiolab: Words

A episode from the WNYC program Radiolab about language, covering topics like the emergence of Nicaraguan Sign Language, the critical period, and issues of language and cognition.

American Tongues: Cajun English

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A clip from the documentary American Tongues featuring two speakers of Cajun English who code-switch between Cajun English and French