Code-switching

World of dave: Guessing Konglish words.

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Dave, an American Youtuber who lives in Korean uses his youtube channel to teach Korean to English speakers and English to Koreans. In this video, his brother is visiting and he makes him guess the meaning of Konglish words. Konglish words, as you might be able to guess by the name, English words only used in Korean, but not really. It is a bit of a slang language as most Konglish words are spoken an American accent but are not the same words used in American English. The Koreans made their own words based on the properties of the item, idea or place. Some words are also based on American slang terms, such as sum, this is based on the slang for "something" which means there is a relationship between two people that are not an official couple.

Posted by Cassie Russ on October 9, 2018

Tags:
American English;
Code-switching;
Slang

Seasons (feat. Mozzy, Sjava, Reason)

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Song featuring inter-speaker codeswitching as well as intra-speaker codeswitching and congruent lexicalization.

Posted by Arthur Garrison on September 28, 2018

Tags:
Code-switching

Dilarya Bagapova "Soldier"/Диляра Вагапова "Солдат"

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This is a video of Tatar singer Dilarya Vagapova performing a half-Tatar half-Russian reggae song 'Soldier', originally a Russian song by a Ukrainian band, on the Russian version of the Voice. She uses the switch between Tatar and Russian to reinforce her own ethnic identity and to also display her knowledge of multiple codes, including international ones (as the song contains some English lyrics). наслаждайтесь!

Posted by Isaac Gray on September 28, 2018

Tags:
Code-switching

For Me Formidable, French & English code-switching

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This song utilizes code-switching between English and French to make use of puns and access prestige in both languages. It questions constraint models with its intra-sentential switches that produce ungrammatical expressions in both English and French.

Posted by Ally Watson on September 27, 2018

Tags:
Code-switching;
Borrowing

Stand By Me - Prince Royce

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Released in 2010, this version of 'Stand By Me' sung by Prince Royce utilizes code-switching between Spanish and English.

Posted by Liliana on September 27, 2018

Tags:
Spanglish;
Code-switching

Palabra Mi Amor - A French song that’s mostly English and Spanish!

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The French band Shaka Ponk is known for their multilingual lyrics, as they code switch in Spanish, French, English, and Esperanto. This song is semi-exceptional as they use more French than in their other songs. (For a song with Esperanto, listen to Eh La Mala Lama Laico). They use a non standard variety of English while singing (copula deletion), and you can also see adoption of English loanwords into their French vernacular.

Posted by Michaella Joseph on September 27, 2018

Tags:
Performativity;
Singlish;
Code-switching;
Borrowing;
Multilingualism;
Slang;
Copula Absence

Japanese/English Code Switching / Borrowing

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Nihonglish Gairaigo -- English words sprinkled throughout the speech... although this is was created mostly as a showcase of intonation, it seems to be a bit of a social commentary on language use and foreigners.

Posted by Manamaya on September 27, 2018

Tags:
Japanese;
Code-switching;
Borrowing

Tant Que J'ai Soleil (Staring at the Sun - French Version) - MIKA

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A song by French-speaking British artist MIKA, who is known for releasing songs in English, French, and occasionally both, as this example demonstrates. It features examples of inter- and intra-sentential codeswitching and has an all-English counterpart against which it can be compared.

Posted by Adrianne Leary on September 27, 2018

Tags:
English;
French;
Code-switching;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

Made In-Medine

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This song is "Made In" by the French-Algerian Kabyle rapper Medine. The lyrics are mostly in French, with code switching to English and briefly to Arabic. The song is about being proud of one's ethnic/cultural heritage and/or immigrant identity. The song celebrates diverse origins and experiences, and the code switching helps to support that message and lend the lyrics a global feeling.

Posted by Cecilia Bahls on September 26, 2018

Tags:
Code-switching;
Borrowing;
Race,Ethnicity;
Hip Hop Nation

Chinglish Phrases

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This video gives examples of Chinglish (Chinese and English) phrases found in everyday life.

Posted by Danielle Fleming on August 1, 2018

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Code-switching

The British Chinese

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This video is about British born Chinese and how they identify themselves. It also talks about the different kind of speech communities they are apart of.

Posted by Aaron McIntyre on July 2, 2018

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

Rethinking Grammar: How We Talk

We as people judge the way that others speak, we assume intelligence based on the way that people speak. African American Vernacular tends to be associated with not being very smart [Published on 10-21-2015]

Communities of Practice, Ideology, Spanglish -Code switching.

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Spanglish is becoming normal behavior in Latino communities' speeches. This humor video shows real examples that are very similar to what happens at my restaurant Cielito Lindo -Mexican restaurant- every day. Many phrases mixing linguistic patterns happens such as "Fui a Walmart a comprar unos shoes pero estaban sold out"

Posted by Reidel Rodriguez Ruedas on May 11, 2018

Tags:
Spanglish;
Code-switching;
Communities of Practice

Larry the Cable Guy: My fake southern accent

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Larry the Cable Guy explains where he picked up his southern accent and gives examples of code-switching.

Posted by Josh Searle on May 11, 2018

Tags:
Indexicality;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting

Diglossia- How Pope Francis Relates

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Pope Francis’ native language is Spanish; however, he primarily speaks Italian when he is around other members of the Vatican and in smaller public appearances. The Pope uses High Code of Diglossia while speaking to the public during mass announcements and church mass service; he does this by speaking traditional Latin (as well as Hebrew and Greek) as did those before him. This diglossia of language will remain until further notice, as this has been stated as a stable tradition of the Vatican and Catholic Church. Diversity of language allows Pope Francis the ability to be broadened with those of whom he is addressing at the moment of speaking publicly and in private.

Posted by Stephanie Ottinger on May 9, 2018

Tags:
Code-switching;
Multilingualism

Code-switching with Drake

In this sketch from Saturday Night Live, the cast and special guest star Drake depict a fictionalized version of Drake's bar mitzvah. This event brings together his African-American family from his father's side, and his Jewish and white family from his mother's side. Drake expertly code switches between the two groups, greeting his mother's family with "Shabbat shalom," and his father's with "whasssssup." Drake goes on to deliver a rap in which he talks about knowing what a W2 is, which indexes Drake's membership in the Jewish community and its perceived expertise in dealing with money.

Posted by Madylan Womack on May 9, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching;
Jewish;
Race,Ethnicity

Ear Hustle Podcast

This podcast, "Ear Hustle" discusses the reality of life in prison, created in a prison by prisoner Earlonne Woods and a prison volunteer and artist named Nigel Poor. The first episode, "Cellies" describes the meaning of the word "Ear Hustle" which is synonymous with eavesdropping. Prison language and the language used outside of prison is highly various. This is just an example of various language used in prison and the connection to prison culture. [Published on 06-14-2017]

Posted by Tatiana Cosper on April 27, 2018

Tags:
Indexicality;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting;
Slang;
Stigma

Hinglish - Code Switched Hindi + English

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The Portsmouth College, UK has started a course for Hinglish language. Hinglish is the mixed/code switched version of Hindi and English, and is the popular street language in India.

Posted by Kanad Sakhadeo on April 26, 2018

Tags:
Indian English;
Code-switching;
Language Shift;
Race,Ethnicity

Excerpt from Donald Glover's

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I used these four songs, a clip from "Weirdo," and this interview of Donald Glover's coronal stop deletion.

Justin Bieber forgets the words to Despacito

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This is the video I referred to in my final project proposal in which Justin Bieber forgets the chorus to Despacito, a song by Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee. Bieber sings in both English and Spanish in the popular remix of the song. To me, this indicates that Bieber, while not a competent Spanish speaker, was able to use the language performatively to obtain some sort of social capital, essentially creating content for both English and Spanish speaking audiences for his own benefit. I’ve tagged this video as code-switching, but I think it’s more the failure to do so that makes this example interesting.

Posted by Elaina Wittmer on April 12, 2018

Tags:
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

Jackie Aina's Review of Inclusive Fenty Beauty

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Jackie Aina is a popular black makeup artist and YouTuber who frankly discusses issues of race. She also frequently employs some features of African American English along with Standard English, unlike some other popular black beauty YouTubers who use more Standard English in their videos.

Posted by Michaella Joseph on March 9, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting;
Gender

The Cost of Code Switching

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This is a 10 minute TedX video addressing the complexities of style shifting/code switching in America, specifically AAE speakers being expected to conform to "standard forms" to survive in America. This talk addresses issues of police brutality, racism, and expectations of who is expected to style shift/code switch and why.

Moana Reo Maori

This article discusses the immense popularity of the Maori dub of Moana, showed at 30 free theaters across New Zealand. Maori has historically been a highly stigmatized language in New Zealand, and many speakers of the boomer generation were discouraged from speaking Maori when they were younger. Much like Hungarian in the Gal (1978) paper dealing with a Hungarian/German bilingual community, Maori is in danger of extinction as younger speakers use it less and less to attain prestige through English. However, this film is part of an effort to give Maori covert and explicit prestige among younger speakers through its association with a cool, hip film.

Posted by Isaac Gray on March 7, 2018

Tags:
Code-switching;
Language Revitalization

Pheobe Buffay Language Ideology and British Accent

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This clip is part of the movie series “Friends”. In this clip Phoebe is trying to impress her boyfriend’s family by changing her accent. She thinks because her boyfriend’s family is rich, she needs to speak like them and dress like them. This demonstrates a language ideology that British accent is regarded as used by upper class community. When she changes her accent back to her speech community ‘New York' accent she says many things that did not impress her boyfriend’s family and goes back to the British speech community accent to try to impress them again.

Posted by Omaima Alenezi on March 3, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
British English;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting;
Accent

Video Proves Logan Paul Did Many More Utterly Offensive Things In Japan

Logan Paul is an online personality from America that basically just makes video blogs. Recently he went to Japan and vlogged about his time there. He came under fire almost immediately for positing a video of him in the Suicide Forest where someone had just committed suicide. In the week following, people also watched other videos of his time in Japan where he basically disrespects anything and anyone. At one point he breaks a game boy on purpose and brings it back to the salesman saying it was “much-o, broken-o”. Him and his friends also get together and yell “arigato” before running around — which shows he probably had no idea what it meant but yelled it because it translates to “thank you” in English. Though the things he did were disrespectful to Japanese culture for a number of reasons these things discussed linguistically showed the shallow amount of knowledge he had on the place he was visiting and the lack of care he had for the people there. I see this as a form of speech communities - because Logan Paul is from a very laid-back, privileged, English speaking community online and went to Japan but changed nothing, therefore observably offending members of the speech communities in Japan. [Published on 01-05-2018]

Posted by Darby VanHoutan on January 14, 2018

Tags:
Chinglish;
Japanese;
Code-switching;
Stigma

Hey Ma

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Pitbull, J Balvin, and Camila Cabello made a bilingual version of the song Hey Ma. This song is an example of code-switching with them switching between Spanish and English throughout the song. They do this to bring in a larger audience and be more inclusive and show off their heritage.

Posted by Elise Burk on January 14, 2018

Tags:
English;
Spanish;
Code-switching

Code switching between Mandarin, Cantonese, and English

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In this video, multiple examples are collected where the celebrities in a Hong Kong award presenting occasion used code-switching between Cantonese, Mandarin, and English. These cases show the speakers' identification in the special communities where the three languages are constantly used together by the speakers and understood by its members in the community. It is an approach to declare the speakers' membership in the community and to present an international profile of the event.

Posted by Yang Liu on January 13, 2018

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Code-switching

I know you Want Me

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This artifact is of the Song "I know you want me" by Pitbull and is an example of code switching because he uses Spanish and English to sing the song, Pitbull also tries to incorporate his version of the Spanish heritage into the song by switching between Spanish and English to reach out to his audience of both languages.

Posted by Talia Musser on January 7, 2018

Tags:
Spanglish;
English;
Code-switching;
Multilingualism

Code-switching in the song "Exotic"

This artifact is the song “Exotic” by Priyanka Chopra ft. Pitbull, and this is an example of code-switching because they sing in Hindi and English, which is because of Priyanka Chopra and her Indian roots and her attempt to add some of her culture and language to this song. The song also mentions various cities/countries around the world. Thus, the song’s use of Hindi and English expresses code-switching and shows her reaching out to a larger and more diverse audience.

Posted by Millie Shah on December 17, 2017

Tags:
English;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

For the Love of Spanish

In this opinion piece, a contributor for the New York Times recounts an exchange he heard upon arriving at an airport in Puerto Rico: specifically, the use of Spanglish. He tells about the growing prevalence of Spanglish and its variations within different Spanish countries.

Posted by Andrea Ortiz on December 14, 2017

Tags:
Spanglish;
Code-switching

Cooking Glossary

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This video defines common cooking terms used in kitchens and recipes. Many French phrases are used intermittently with English. Additionally, some culinary terms can mean other things in English. For example, 'pat' can be used to reference an amount of butter, but is typically a verb.

Posted by Jozsef Szucs on December 11, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Communities of Practice

Dave/Erina trying Super Spicy Yeobki Tteokbokki

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In this video Dave (the man) and Erina (the woman) are trying a super spicy Korean rice cake dish. In the video both are using Korean, neither being their native languages, but through the experience of eating the food we see an instance of code-switching from both parties due to the spiciness; Erina to Japanese, and Dave to English.

Posted by Chelsea Morris on December 8, 2017

Tags:
American English;
Japanese;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity

When You're Latino & You Suck At Spanish

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This video depicts a young Latina woman who struggles to fit into a bilingual speech community. Her peers code switch between English and Spanish, expect her to do the same, and tease her when she cannot.

Posted by Stefanie Weiland on November 20, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Communities of Practice

Camila Cabello - Havana (Spanglish Solo Version)

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Camila's Havana song is one of many examples of popular songs that are using Spanglish. Spanglish, an example of how code-switching, is becoming popular in the music industry. It is interesting to see how artists are proud and secure to show that they are bilingual. I feel, in a way, these artists are using code-switching to grab audience's attention and to show their roots (Hispanic/Asian/ etc.).

Posted by Elizabeth Gaitan on November 18, 2017

Tags:
English;
Spanish;
Code-switching

Code-Switching Made Fun

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This video puts the concept of "code-switching" into perspective, as it illustates what code-switching is, how it is used, and when it is used. The illustration is a fun and easy way to display what this concept means. #codeswitching #explanation #linguisticdifferences

Posted by Libby Ferguson on October 11, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching

You Should Watch The Way You Punctuate Your Text Messages - Period

This article shows and interesting way of performativity in regards to the way texting has evolved over time. [Published on 12-20-2015]

Posted by Morgan Amsel on October 11, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Code-switching

Why don't Chinese students speak English

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The video Why don't Chinese students speak English statements the reasons why Chinese students don’t speak English from the youtubers’ perspective. The video starts with a daily scenario of a few Chinese students speaking Chinese in the elevator. It makes the three American guys feeling awkward because what the Chinese people are talking about. I agree with the claim that that it is easier to solve problems in native language. It ends with a scenario that two Americans try to speak Chinese in an elevator when some Chinese people is present but they finally give up and speak their native language English. This video is related with code-switching and language globalization.

Posted by Nan Zhao on October 10, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Globalization

Code Switching

This is a video showing a young boy and his sister speaking to each other in Korean. Their father asks the boy some questions in English, and the boy responds to him in English. This is a perfect example of code-switching between the English and Korean languages.

Posted by Janay Jacobs on October 10, 2017

Tags:
Chinglish;
Code-switching;
Language Shift;
Multilingualism

Mock Spanish in The Mexican

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This is a clip from the movie, “The Mexican,” in which Brad Pitt’s character, Jerry, travels to Mexico to claim an antique pistol. While there, Jerry gets stranded and needs a ride. Some Hispanic men drive by and Jerry uses Mock Spanish to ask the men for help. Specifically, Jerry says, “I need a lift in your el trucko to the next towno.”

Posted by Brittany Outler on October 10, 2017

Tags:
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

President Obama's Speech at the 2015 White House Correspondents' Dinner

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This is a video of Comedian Keegan-Michael Key playing his iconic character Luther during President Obama’s speech at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner back in 2015. President Obama uses two distinguishable language varieties; one of which being formal, confident, and intricate English that he speaks as the President of the United States and the other holding characteristics of aggressiveness, slang, and straight-forwardness. President Obama successfully used Anger Translator as a form of code-switching to not only deliver his message with clarity and power but also with sense of humor that motivated the audience to focus throughout the entire duration of the speech.

Moana - How Far I'll Go

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This version of the song “How Far I’ll Go” in the 2016 Disney movie, Moana, features a combination of 24 various languages. The clip details code-switching which can be described as the practice of alternating between two or more languages. Typically, code-switching is done in conversation but this example offers a better understanding for monolingual persons as adaptations of this song can be found in nearly any language.

Posted by Sarah Holladay on October 2, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

Vin Diesel Says I Am Groot in Multiple Languages

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In this clip from The Tonight Show, Vin Diesel says the same phrase in multiple languages, as he learned to do for his role in Guardians of the Galaxy. Interestingly enough, the language spoken by his character Groot is one that uses only those three words, with variation in tone that indicates different meanings and emotions.

Posted by Garrett Girard on July 27, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Code-switching;
Variation;
Multilingualism

Hold Up! Time for an Explanatory Comma

This episode from NPR's Code Switch podcast reminds me of Bell's discussion of audience design. Code Switch is a podcast by journalists of color where they discuss race and identity. Sometimes, the topics they discuss are out of context for those who have different socialization. In the episode below, they talk about having to use what they call an "Explanatory comma" in order to accommodate the different backgrounds of their listeners. [Published on 12-14-2016]

Posted by Becca Sanchelli on June 29, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice

Differences between English, Korean, Japanese, and Chinese

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The four speakers compare word pronunciations across languages with the general discourse held in Korean. Terms involving English morph to and from other languages depending on phonetic inventories. Also, note that the social practice of taboo words in Korean carries over when other languages a have a taboo Korean word in the comparisons leading to a humorous moment.

Posted by Justin Connolly on June 28, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Code-switching;
Borrowing;
Variation

Mexican Slang with Salma Hayek

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This video is of Mexican, multilingual actress Salma Hayek describing and translating Spanish slang terms into English. She attempts to translate words and phrases literally, but then provides more nuanced and accurate translations. She employs some code-switching in her commentary, and the video helps illustrate elements of Spanish-speaking Mexican identities and speech communities.

Posted by Grace Bridges on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Multilingualism;
Slang

Code Switching-Korean Drama

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This video talks about code switching, which means people sometimes use more than one language in a conversation. I found it very interesting, because I usually do code switching. I speak Chinese to my friend, and speak English to my professors. In this video, it introduces us why people would use more than one language or dialect in a conversation. Sometimes people act different around different people, such as we always use formal English to talk to teachers, but we will use causal or personalized English to talk to our friends. Also, when people are sharing a secret, they are more likely to use a different language, because they don't want the people around them to understand it.

Posted by Zizhen Pei on June 26, 2017

Tags:
English;
Code-switching

Code Switching

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This video talks about code switching, which means people sometimes use more than one language in a conversation. I found it very interesting, because I usually do code switching. I speak Chinese to my friend, and speak English to my professors. In this video, it introduces us why people would use more than one language or dialect in a conversation. Sometimes people act different around different people, such as we always use formal English to talk to teachers, but we will use causal or personalized English to talk to our friends. Also, when people are sharing a secret, they are more likely to use a different language, because they don't want the people around them to understand it.

Posted by Zizhen Pei on June 26, 2017

Tags:
English;
Code-switching

Code Switching in Anime- Durarara!!

Between the times stamps of 13:37-15:01, there is a scene from the Anime "Durarara!!", that holds a conversation between two different people from different backgrounds, using code switching nonchalantly. The character with black hair who is punched, is a native Japanese. The darker, bigger guy is a native Russian who moved to Japan to work. The conversation starts off with a bit of English, then dives straight into Russian, and then ends with Japanese. Code switching was used here to show how depending on who you are talking to, the languages you can speak may automatically be used with people you think who would understand that language best. [Published on 06-25-2010]

Posted by Patrick Wong on June 23, 2017

Tags:
Japanese;
Code-switching

Code Switching in Anime - Durarara!!

In this scene from the Anime "Durarara!!", a conversation between two different people from different backgrounds, uses code switching nonchalantly. The character with black hair who is punched, is a native Japanese. The darker, bigger guy is a native Russian who moved to Japan to work. The conversation starts off with a bit of English, then dives straight into Russian, and then ends with Japanese. Code switching was used here to show how depending on who you are talking to, the languages you can speak may automatically be used with people you think who would understand that language best. [Published on 06-25-2010]

Posted by Patrick Wong on June 23, 2017

Tags:
Japanese;
Code-switching

"Spanish Radio" - Gabriel Iglesias

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Comedian Gabriel Iglesias "Spanish Radio" skit relates to language ideologies regarding the Spanish language. Iglesias, who speaks Spanish and English, creates a humorous effect on how people from the "motherland" of Mexico speak rather fast, even for himself. Iglesias has the ability to speak two different languages (bilingualism) and codeswitches between the two languages in a lot of his skits. The skit can relate to our standard language ideology in that the Spanish speaking language is fast and hard to understand and he presents that concept through mock Spanish.

Posted by Samantha Farrell on June 23, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Spanglish;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Accent

Die Antwoord's Evil Boy: A Dynamic Crossroad of Language, Culture, and Rap in South Africa

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Die Antwoord is a controversial rap group from Cape Town, South Africa fronted by Ninja Yolandi Vi$$er. Speaking from a post-apartheid perspective, this group offers an underrepresented view of young, lower-middle class, white Afrikaans - a subculture known as "Zef." Historically, Zef has been considered a derogatory term describing someone who was white, poor, and "trashy." However, Die Antwoord and others have looked to transform this into a self-reflective, somewhat satirical, parody that Ninja described as being "apocalyptic debris that we’ve stuck together." In this music video, they display their unique code-switching between Afrikaans and English, as well as Xhosa - the Bantu language of the Xhosa people. Adding to their mixed-bag controversial nature, is the relationship of the Afrikaans languages’ association with apartheid. Through dynamic language and visual use, this video reflects the complex sociocultural and sociolinguistic interactions that occur in this region. The lyrical narrative told is a statement on the clash between traditional tribal circumcision rituals, and the modern subcultures that seem to offer an alternative path to "manhood." This can be heard in the verse by the guest rapper Wanga, sung in his native tongue: "Mamelapa umnqunduwakho! (listen here, you fucking asshole) Andifuni ukuyaehlatini! (I don't want to go to the bush with you) Sukubammba incanca yam! (don't touch my penis) Andi so stabani! (I’m not a gay) Incanca yam yeyamantobi! (this penis is for the girls) Incanca yam iclean! (my penis is clean) Incanca yam inamandla! (my penis is strong) Ndiyinkwekwe enkulu! (I am a big boy) Angi funi ukuba yeendota! (don't want to be a man) Evil boy 4 life! yebo! (yes) Evil boy 4 life!" Through the use of polyglossic code-switching, performativity, sociocultural and racial integration, and a revamping of contextual meanings, Die Antwoord is doing its part to redefine what it means to be young and Zef in South Africa, and what a socioculturally- and sociolinguistically-complex rebellion sounds like.

Mock Asian in Song Sung by Jennifer Murphy

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The woman in this video uses both code-switching and direct indexicality to emulate a sort of acquisition of Asian culture in her becoming of a "ninja." She switches between her native Anglo-American dialect and a stereotypical East Asian accent when she uses more “proper” and “improper” grammar, respectively. The most prevalent of this is the omission of grammatical morphemes (“I want to be ninja” omitting “a” and “I almost a ninja,” omitting the word “am”), a characteristic of Mock Asian as defined by Elaine Chun (Ideologies of Legitimate Mockery, 2004). The usage of her overly stereotypical mimicking of an East Asian accent is a direct indexicality of non-native English-speaking Asians having “improper” grammar as well as enforcing a stereotype that implies that all East Asians are ninjas, another aspect of Mock Asian as defined by Chun, in her use of Chinese imagery ("take Chow down to Chinatown") when referring to a piece of Japanese culture. The instrumentals that change from a rock track to an Asian-sounding track that is reminiscent of "Chopsticks" every time she assumes her Mock Asian identity in the performance, another piece of Mock Asian according to Chun.

Posted by Aiyana Moyer on May 9, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity

Disney's Frozen: Let It Go - 25 Languages

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One special version of the Song “Let it go”, featured in Disney’s Frozen, is the multilingual version, which incorporates 25 languages. Different language versions show the song gains global popularity. This song in 25 languages embodies the linguistic concept of “code switching”. But it doesn’t mean the stratification of language. Instead, such a successful fusion of 25 languages in one song reflects communication among different language. Different languages are mutual related and inclusive, because this fusion is so harmonious with 25 languages cooperating to achieve one theme of the song. The original version is English, but the song is widely adapted in different language, which is against the idea of centralizing or decentralizing force in language as well.

Posted by Jiaying XU on May 8, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

"El Messy Look": Mock Spanish and Code-switching in AXE Commercial

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Axe's new commercial for their "Messy Look" hair styling cream is a perfect example of the ways in which Mock Spanish is still prevalent in our society in 2017. Jane Hill, the inventor of the term, states in "Language, Race, and White Public Space" that one practice of Mock Spanish is "taking elements of Spanish morphology" such as the suffix -o and using Spanish modifiers such as "el" to create "jocular and pejorative" terms. In Axe's commercial, the actor refers to the product as "El Messy Look". Then, while giving instructions on using the cream, he says "First-o, take a finger to the cream..." At the end of the commercial, after showing off his confidence and "cultural awareness", the actor mishears the female bartender who actually speaks Spanish when she asks him a question, showing his ignorance. However, the bartender smiles at him, further enforcing Hill's ideas about Mock Spanish directly indexing the speaker as having desirable qualities, while simultaneously indirectly indexing the idea that Spanish is somehow less valuable than English.

Posted by Laurel Nagengast on May 8, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Power;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

Barack Obama - Code Switcher

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Code switching is a large part of a public figures publicity arsenal. Being able to switch mannerisms, linguistic traits, and other factors of a depiction of self is incredibly important in the formulation of a diverse and accepting group of constituents. Being able to maintain all the code switching when prompted is also necessary for maintaining those groups, because being able to appear like you know exactly what they’re experiencing shows commitment and understanding. Barack Obama was known through various examples to show his ability to code switch based on the community he was visiting, whether it be rural North Carolina church, or USA basketball locker rooms. In this clip, we see his interactions with various players, male and female, and the coaching staffs. Take note how he changes the way he speaks based on their perceived race and whether they are a coach or a player. In addition, the status of the individuals he is addressing changes the way he speaks. For example, the way he talks to LeBron James (superstar) and Anthony Davis (rookie at the time) are different, even though they are both power forwards for the USA Men’s basketball team. Furthermore, in his recounting of the story about Joe Biden’s daughter, we see his use of different speech techniques with a coach who is white when compared to interactions with a black player. Finally, the handshake at the beginning of the video with Kevin Durant is a great example of an on the fly code switch.

Posted by Ben Orlowski on May 8, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice;
Slang

British People Attempting Their Best American Accent

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This is titled "British People Attempting Their Best American Accent," which really encapsulates the main point of the video. Essentially, aside from a handful of outliers, the attempts at accents reflected stereotypes that some British people tend to think Americans hold. The accents revolved around "Southern," "Californian/Surfer," and "Hyper-Metropolitan" accents. The words included by those speaking generally reflected stereotypes involving surfing and smoking weed (for the Californian/Surfer), eating cheeseburgers, shopping, and gossip (Hyper-Metropolitan), and drinking beer and shooting guns (Southern). The participants were not asked to do a specific kind of "American accent," either, they merely did an accent that they deemed to be what is "the American accent." How Americans are perceived by these participants was evident in their style of speech and words chosen to reflect typical American conversation along; one could also possibly argue that this reflects that some British people group all of the American identities into one conglomerate identity which they deem to be wholly "American." Thinking about this more outside of the video, I feel that this could be true in terms of how Americans think of other cultures as well, like how Americans think of the British identities.

Invisible Man - Thug Notes Summary and Analysis

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thug notes is a youtube series about a well read "thug" how wishes to share the gift of classic literature with his fellow gangster.

Posted by kyle clawson on May 4, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Code-switching;
Slang

The New York Jewish Accent

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The idea of the Jewish-American accent highlights the ways in which language associates with a specific group of people and can sometimes be used as a way to stereotype a group of people. Generally, the Jewish accent is tied with the Brooklyn/New York accent, as the boroughs of New York are a big place for Jewish populations. Especially in mainstream media, like “Seinfeld” and “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” have perpetuated the idea of the New Yorker Jew. The idea of code-switching and mixing languages is also prominent in the accent, as Jewish people are more likely to use Yiddish words in their everyday language. In the first media, Larry David amps up his Jewish slang and emphasizes his accent/Yiddish knowledge even more to make the other man know that he is Jewish. In the second video about Bernie Sanders, his accent is in part tied to his Judaism, as well as his hometown. Certain words and phrases, along with the accent, are sometimes tied almost to a learned part of language in Jewish families, especially in more religious households. (For another video of interest, see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waeXBCUkuL8 [from 3:06])

Ed Sheeran's "Bibia Be Ye Ye"

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“Bibia Be Ye Ye” is the title of a track on Ed Sheeran’s new album. In the song, the verses are sung in English while the chorus is in Twi, a dialect of the Akan language. Akan is a major native language of Ghana. While Sheeran was writing his new album, he vacationed in Ghana for a few weeks and linked up with a popular musician (Fuse ODG) while there. His time there inspired him to add part of their culture and language to his album. As most of his fame comes from American and European entertainment cultures, the mixing in of an African language adds more multicultural and multilingual recognition on a global superstar scale. The language borrowing could also be viewed as a form of language appropriation though, where Sheeran is using only a few chosen words of Twi to liven up his song, which he still translates back to English in the video’s lyrics description.

Posted by Abby Woods on May 1, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

This Is How I Talk-SNL

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The SNL skit "This is How I Talk" plays off of linguistic and societal norms attributed to different groups of people (in this case black and white people) to create a humorous situation. The situation is funny because Louis C.K. who is an extremely white individual and a speaker of Standard English, pretends to be a native speaker of African-American Vernacular English to avoid letting his new boss know that he was making fun of her. This is unusual because AAVE is strongly associated with race, so to see a white man using this speech type is so out of the ordinary as to be humorous. Later on in the clip, Brenda switches to SE in order to find out for sure if Louis C.K.'s character is only pretending to speak AAVE natively. While she is speaking, she says that "this is my real voice. See, I went to a good college..." indicating the common conception that AAVE is not an "academic" form of speech and reinforcing the social hierarchy that is related to American dialects.

Russell Peters - Red, White, and Brown

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Russell Peters is a famous Stand up comic who is known for his portrayals of other cultures and ability to mimic their accents. Russell is a world traveled individual who has shows in Bangkok, Dubai, Europe and America. He draws on his life interactions to really capture a moment or interaction and portray it in a humorous way. In this clip he is setting up a power hierarchy of cheapness and claiming that cheap is good thing to the minority and an insult to the Hegemonic identity in America. “Cheap” in this sense is going against the dominant cultural belief of cheap is an attribute that is unfavorable. This is showing the intermingled power struggle between the dominant class and others and how pushing back against ideologies is occurring. The voices used in separating the characters also indicate indexicality and Language socialization. The voices used help guide and reaffirm how we preserve different culture groups to sound. His experience and worldliness is also a point of power. Most people are not as traveled as Russell Peters and cannot truly understand the differences in cultures he is portraying however through him we get a glimpse of the other. He has the power in the setting and his perception of life is the one we are subjected to. His viewpoint on life is guided by humor and stereotyping for a broader audience in order to showcase cultural differences and how they interact and intermingle within the world.

Posted by Luke Engleman on April 27, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Power;
Code-switching

Do You Speak American?

This is an article and analytical piece by Robert MacNeil, an employee of PBS since the 1980s. He talks about how moving to America and adopting American grammatical policies in order to work for television. [Published on 2005]

Mock Spanish in 'The Mexican' Trailer

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This trailer for the 2001 movie “The Mexican” starring Brad Pitt and Julia Roberts, demonstrates Brad Pitt’s character utilizing mock Spanish saying words like “el trucko” and “towno” in an interaction with Hispanic men. He also attempts Spanglish in another interaction saying a phone call is “muy muy important.”

Posted by Callie Hawkins on March 9, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Spanglish;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

Tim Kaine Speech in Spanish

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Tim Kaine made a campaign speech done entirely in Spanish. The speech was done in Phoenix, AZ and was given to invited Latino groups. This is the first time a vice presidential candidate has given a speech entirely in Spanish.

Anjelah Johnson-Nail Salon

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This video is a stand-up comedy act about an experience in a nail salon. Johnson’s voice changes as she impersonates a nail technician. This video shows code switching between Vietnamese and English. She does an excellent job imitating her visit at the salon by the facial expressions, accent, and specific word choice.

Posted by Lauren Snyder on March 7, 2017

Tags:
Chinglish;
Code-switching

Similarities Between Spanish And Arabic

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This video shows two young women comparing some of the most commonly used words in Arabic and Spanish. Approximately 9% of the Spanish language is thought to have derived from Arabic due to the Islamic invasion of Spain by the Moors in 711. Through this invasion, we have the two languages mixing and creating what is modern day Spanish. You can hear the similarities between the two languages, and visually see how the Romanized spelling of Arabic looks like Spanish. I would also consider this code switching, because the words are first introduced in English, and then a count of 1, 2, 3 is given for each girl to say the word at the same time. It also shows the concept of mutual intelligibility with some words, and a modern-day proof of how the Spanish language was assimilated into what it is now from Arabic, because the Spaniards acquired words and syntax of their captor's language. You see how each girl and speakers of either language can understand what the other is saying without any type of special prior knowledge.

Posted by Ashley Smith on February 25, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Acquisition;
Language Shift

Jamila Lyiscott: 3 ways to speak English

Jamila Lyiscott is a “tri-tongued orator;” in her powerful spoken-word essay “Broken English,” she celebrates — and challenges — the three distinct flavors of English she speaks with her friends, in the classroom and with her parents. As she explores the complicated history and present-day identity that each language represents, she unpacks what it means to be “articulate.” [Published on 02-01-2014]

Tanto and Lone Ranger

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This is a clip from Lone Ranger, featuring scenes with the famous Tonto. It shows how Tonto talks versus the cowboys/other Americans. It also shows a very skewed view of how Native Americans interact and how they speak English (broken sentences and a sense of "inproper" English).

Posted by Maddie Scheer on February 22, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
American Indian;
Accent

Bailando-Enrique Iglesias Lyrics

These lyrics contain the lyrics from the song Bailando by Enrique Iglesias where he uses Spanish and English throughout the entire song.

Posted by Kayla Springs on February 20, 2017

Tags:
Spanglish;
English;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Language Shift;
Multilingualism;
Slang

Fresh Prince Code-switching

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Carlton code-switching on the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. Carlton switches between his usual proper English to AAVE.

Posted by BreAnna Engeman on October 16, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching

Tim Kaine VP speech

TIm Kaine did a VP speech in Miami, in July of 2016. As he gets in to his introduction, he begins speaking in Spanish for a split second, as he greets the diverse crowd. He switches back to english, and switches back through out the speech. Tim Kaine even calls his running mate a "companero de alma" or "soul mates" in the presidential tussle

Posted by Jesus Leos on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching

Code Switching

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Comedic duo Key & Peele doing a skit on their TV show regarding code switching. The video shows the two each on their cell phone and as soon as they get close to each other the immediately start changing their speaking patterns to sound tougher.

Posted by Jonathan Salazar on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching

Youth soccer coach booted for speaking Spanish to players

This is an article about a youth soccer coach being ejected for speaking Spanish to his players. The referees ejected him for simply speaking Spanish during a game. This is an obvious attempt to discriminate against this coach and his team. The coach code-switched between Spanish and English and this was deemed unacceptable because they "want everybody to understand". Yet, they say they have no rule against speaking Spanish. [Published on 12-20-2012]

Posted by Tyler Craig on October 15, 2016

Tags:
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity

Code-Switching Baby

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This video shows a young child speaking in German with his father for most of the video until he looks up and sees his mother, with him immediately switching to Japanese upon seeing her. This shows how code-switching is prevalent even in younger multilingual speakers and is used as a way to communicate with different people. Although the child in this video is very young, he still is aware enough to know that his father understands German best and that his mother responds best to Japanese.

Posted by Alex Parnell on October 11, 2016

Tags:
German;
Japanese;
Code-switching;
Youth;
Multilingualism

Five Reasons Why People Code Switch

This article explains what code-switching is and gives five common reasons why people use code-switching. Some of the reasons explained are because the speaker wanted to fit in, use their other language to get something, say something secretively, or because code-switching can help explain certain concepts better than in a single language. In order to emphasize these reasons, the author provides several stories from different people explaining situations where they used code-switching. [Published on 04-13-2013]

Posted by Alex Parnell on October 11, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Multilingualism

"Engrish" in the anime Jojo's bizarre adventure

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This video is a compilation of samples of "Engrish" from Jojo's Bizarre Adventure. "Engrish" is the term used for English used in what is perceived as an "incorrect" or "awkward" way. Primarily this term is applied to English translations. The most famous of these would be from the intro of the game Zero Wing. The Japanese version has the villain saying: "With the cooperation of Federation Forces, all your bases now belong to us." However, the english translation became "All your base are belong to us". This term has developed a broader meaning, being used to describe code switching in Anime. Often times these phrases seem almost nonsensical, such as "hail to you", other times the accent is incredibly think and difficult to understand.

Posted by Matthew Mena on October 11, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Received Pronunciation;
Japanese;
Code-switching

The Importance of Code Switching

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Edward Moore explains the importance of Code Switching for success. He emphasizes that people of color need to know how to function in different environments. From "the block" to the board room.

I 'don't code- switch' to hide my identity. I 'code-switch' to celebrate it.

This article is about an Indian American man who uses code switching to celebrate his many identities. His prides himself on being able to use the certain languages in appropriate settings. For example he says at any given time his family speaks in at least three languages- Marathi, Hindi, and English.

Posted by Chrissy McLeod on October 5, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
American Indian;
Multilingualism

Inner White Girl

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This video shows how comedy has taken advantage of code switching. This is comedy but it exemplifies the power of speech. When the character speaks AAVE they are stereotyped as untrustworthy and dishonest. The style of speech is indexical in social positioning. Even though the skit was meant to be funny it has been criticized as degrading and insulting.

Posted by Madison Curnow on October 4, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Power;
African American English;
Code-switching

Strange Wilderness- Spanish accent

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This is a clip from "Strange Wilderness" and in this clip they are mocking Mock Spanish. It's a completely over the top clip. There is obviously overt stereotyping displayed in the clip and attempt to condescend the Latino race. Its a legitimate question as to how many people would realize (because the clip is so over the top and backfires so extraordinarily) that this indeed a mockery of Mock Spanish.

Posted by Tyler Craig on October 4, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

Spanglish with George Lopez

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I have included a link to a video of Comedian George Lopez doing stand up comedy and talking about how Spanglish will always be used in America. This is interesting to me not only because of doing research paper on mock Spanish but also because I am Hispanic and have heard my relatives talk just how he does in the video.

Posted by Jonathan Salazar on October 3, 2016

Tags:
Spanglish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

Jamila Lyiscott: 3 ways to speak English

Jamila Lyiscott performs her powerful spoken-word essay "Broken English," where she uses distinct flavors of the English that she speaks to explore the complicated history and present-day identity that each language represents, and what it means to be "articulate." [Published on 06-19-2014]

Posted by Jordan Huntley on September 18, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Code-switching;
Ebonics Controversy;
Semantics

Guatemala: Speaking in K'iche language to describe how to make food

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Juliana is speaking to the camera in K'iche. She is describing how to make pepian and other food in Guatemala. She is mixing her Spanish with her dialect, which according to the poster of the video she is speaking two different dialects: K'iche and Uspanteco.

Posted by Rony Villeda on July 29, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching

Cespedes receives Home Run Derby trophy

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Pedro Gomez, an American born reporter translates for Spanish speaking MLB players. This specific example is at the 2014 Home Run Derby where Gomez translates for Yoenis Cespedes.

Posted by William Parmelee on July 29, 2016

Tags:
American English;
Spanish;
Code-switching

Maya man Speaking Yucatec Spanish

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A man in San Francisco speaks Yucatec Spanish. According to the video, he is speaking slowly so we are able to understand him. 10% of what he is speaking is Spanish and he is describing what you will see when you visit his town of Oxkutzcab.

Posted by Rony Villeda on July 29, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching

"7 things Hillary Clinton has in common with your abuela" Hispandering and Codeswitching

This article, titled "7 things Hillary Clinton has in common with your abuela" is an article on Hillary Clinton's official website and lists 7 ways in which Hillary and "your abuela" (AKA your grandmother) are similar and share the same values/priorities. It is quite clear that the article is an example of Hispandering, and it includes a great deal of codeswitching. [Published on 12-22-2015]

Posted by Morgan Wiley on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

The office: Andy talks baby talk.

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Clip from the show The Office. The greatest character of all time, Michael Scott, confronts Andy about his baby talk around the office. Andy confronts Michael about his Elvis impersonation.

Posted by Haley Mahon on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Code-switching;
Motherese;
Style-shifting;
Youth

The Art of the Code Switch: Obama Morphs for his Audience Just Like You Do.

Obama reflects on a conversation he remembers hearing his dad have with a native from Alabama. He recalls him using words such as "aint" "warsh" instead of wash and so forth. Even his fathers body language changed. Upon asking him, he tells his son that "I wasn't always a lawyer who went to sleep at his white friends bakehouse, son." [Published on 10-03-2012]

Posted by Haley Mahon on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Style-shifting

7 things Hillary Clinton has in common with your abuela

Hillary Clinton compares herself to Hispanic grandma's in order to win Hispanic votes in the elections.This is an illustration of hispandering which is commonly used by politicians. Also Hillary Clinton uses "Abuela" instead of grandma in order to make it hold more significant meaning to it. Also the switch from English to Spanish is a great example of "code-switching". [Published on 12-22-2015]

Posted by Ahmad Ali on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Politics and Policy

Pidgin English from Nigeria

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A video of two Nigerian Men who explain and give example of language divergence and Pidgin English.

Bilingual children switching between English and Spanish

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This video includes children in a one on one setting switching between spanish and english, during various exercise. It features bilingual children in an office setting. The focus is on literacy and acquisition of bilingual children.

Posted by BreAnna Engeman on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Spanglish;
English;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Acquisition;
Youth;
Multilingualism

Code-Switching: Obama's 'Nigga' Moment Makes Civil Rights History

The article includes the quote from President Obama "Yo, Barry, you did it my nigga!" which ended the President's final White House Correspondents Dinner. The importance of this is the switch between what could be considered formal English and AAVE. The article also addresses the question of language ideologies by responding to the idea that it was inappropriate for the term "my nigga!" to be included in the speech. Furthermore, that language ideology is rooted in racist ideologies, so the utterance is also a response to power structures. [Published on 05-02-2016]

There's nothing controversial about code-switching

The article, on face, is only about code-switching, but the article goes on to address the standard language ideology which contends that it only happens and/or is negative when African American speakers engage in code-switching. Thus, the article also addresses, although somewhat shallowly, the issues of power and/or racism. [Published on 05-04-2016]

Posted by Mitchell Wagenheim on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Code-switching;
Stigma

Variety of Spanish Accents

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Joanna Rants uses analogies to compare different Spanish accents.

Posted by Caitlin Ogren on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Spanglish;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

Jon Stewart - Thank Donald Trump

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Jon Stewart mocks the 'inspiration' of new Latino voters for Donald Trump's run for presidency.

Code Switching, Mock Spanish, and Kevin Hart

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Kevin Hart is explaining what it's like to be in prison. He takes on numerous different forms and voices to show the different type of people in prison.

The Foreigner's Guide to Irish Accents

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Video shows how tightly a language can be held to a very small geographic region, even when in close proximity to others of a different dialect.

Code switching

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In this video Key and Peele explain why they use code switching in their daily lives and in their comedy, i think this applies well with what we're learning but if you watch some of their other videos and look for the code switching it makes it a little more interesting and funny at the same time. you can actually see how code switching is integrated into other people's lives more deeply than others, or even compare it to your own life for example. you can also apply this to what we learned in the other chapter just a couple days ago, the one that detailed the bay city high school teens interaction with someone of the opposite color and how they changed their tone of pitch and the way they talked while explaining the situation to another person.

Code-Switching and Performativity in MMA

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UFC Mixed Martial Arts fighter John Lineker is interviewed following his 07-13-16 victory in the promotion's first event in South Dakota, responding primarily in Portuguese. Lineker code-switches to English at the end of the interview to direct a message to the champion (U.S. mixed martial artist Dominick Cruz) of his weight division. His promise of "coming for" the champion demonstrates a performative illocutionary act: by directing these words to Cruz, he is simultaneously performing the very action of threatening and talking about this action.

Posted by Jill Vesta on July 21, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
American English;
Code-switching

BET Comic Travina Springer Lesson on Code-Switching

This comic provides several examples of code-switching that she learned upon entering a new school. (A new linguistic community.)

Rey's English Accent in Star Wars VII

A look at Rey's accent in "The Force Awakens" as a clue to her identity and parentage. Includes a discussion of style-shifting in the Star Wars universe as being representative of intersentential Code-Switching, as well as a discussion of what different codes are (generally) used to index. [Published on 12-23-2015]

Posted by Erika Enge on April 27, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching

Bilingual Talks

YouTuber Hyunwoo Sun's segment Bilingual Talks, where two speakers of two languages have a conversation either with each speaker using a different language, or with the speakers switching back and forth between languages.

Posted by Maren Bilby on April 7, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Style-shifting

International Body Language

The article shows how body language is an important expression of language. It identifies how important it is when studying cultural languages to understand how body language is used. [Published on 05-14-2013]

Posted by Steven Goldstein on March 11, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Code-switching;
Acquisition

What is Hispandering?

The article explains what Hispandering is and how politicians are exposing it. It provides evidence to the strong relationship that culture and language have. It also shows how culture identification is a large factor to how language is interpreted. [Published on 03-10-2016]

Posted by Steven Goldstein on March 11, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Code-switching;
Linguistic Relativity

Clinton and Sanders Univision Debate and Hispandering

Hispandering is brought up (with a negative connotation) to Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders during the Univision Democratic Debate in election 2016. [Published on 03-10-2016]

Posted by Jasmine E. Thompson on March 10, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Spanglish;
Code-switching;
Politics and Policy

Mock Spanish in Scrubs

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A popular T.V. comedy depicting a doctor using Spanish as a way to demean the Hispanic nurse he is speaking to.

Posted by Amanda Salamanca on March 10, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

The Ebonics Controversy in my Backyard

This article talks about Ebonics and Code-Switching, It explains what happened when the Ebonics controversy broke out.

Don't Stop the Party - Pitbull lyrics

These lyrics contain the lyrics from the song Don't Stop the Party by artist Pitbull, where he uses Spanish and English throughout the song.

Key & Peele - Obama Meet & Greet

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This Key & Peele comedy sketch humorously depicts Obama and the different ways he talks to black and white people after a speech. There's a lot of code switching going on in this sketch. There's a handful funny references in here as well, from rap to slang.

Students Learn to "Toggle" Between Dialects

This article is about the role code-switching plays in the success of low income students. Students that engage in code-switching tend to achieve more academically than students that do not code-switch.

Posted by Elizabeth McCrindle on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Style-shifting;
Education

How to Speak INTERNET

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A group of three British guys basically put together a video "guide" to understanding all of today's internet slang. From "YOLO," to ""FML," they cover a handful of different types of internet slang and explain what they all mean in the non internet world.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
English;
Code-switching;
Youth;
Education;
Internet Language;
Slang

Pardon my Spanglish

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A comedian joins Spanish CNN to talk about his new book about Spanglish. The comedian and the anchor switch between English and Spanish throughout the video, talking in Spanglish. While there's a good deal more Spanish being spoken in the video, there's also English, just not as much as Spanish. The intro of the video is a great example of Spanglish, as is the whole interview for the most part.

Code Switching

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This video uses stop motion art to explain why people use code switching. It offers multiple scenarios and situations in which people use code switching and gives a handful of examples why people do so and when. The interesting part about the video is that it's done solely using stop motion drawings.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Code-switching

Speaking "Mexican" and the use of "Mock Spanish" in Children's Books

This article explains how underrepresented African American and Latino's are in the world of children's literature. The author focuses on the book Skippyjon Jones, which exemplifies the problem the author is describing. The main character speaks English and his alter-ego speaks Mock-Spanish. There is code switching back and forth in this book as the characters move from English to Mock Spanish in the context on a single conversation. Also, the main character in this book (speaking English) is a white Siamese cat and the alter-ego is a brown Chihuahua. The color of each animal can be seen as symbolizing the color of the skin. [Published on 05-05-2014]

Code-switching

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This video explains some of the main reasons why people engage in code switching. Code switching can be used in many different ways, but the primary function of this practice is to switch between two languages in a single conversation.

Gangs: Slang, Words, Symbols

This article contains the language used between the intricate structures of gangs in American communities. One could say gangs are like their own society with a language of their own, only used by members within it. They have grown and evolved throughout the years due to drugs and the growing popularity of fire arms. Because of this the linguistic structure of street gangs have also evolved into, sometimes, very complicated language structure. [Published on 03-01-2011]

Posted by Ainise Havili on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Code-switching;
Youth;
Slang

African American Vernacular English (AAVE)

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A humorous look at the interpretation of AAVE from the movie Airplane! ca. 1980.

Posted by Mark Beal on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Ebonics Controversy

10 Surprising Ways to Offend People in Other Countries

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The video explores how the use of body language can mean one thing to a culture and a completely different thing to another. It provides good evidence to show that language can be communicated in other ways than verbal cues. It also shows the importance of the environment and the socialization process.

Obama Code-Switches at the Voting Booth

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President Obama is interrupted while voting and code-switches while talking to a woman.

Posted by Lily Siebert on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching

Fresh Prince: Carlton plays "Gangster"

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A clip from Fresh Prince of Bel-air, where Carlton plays a character called C-note, a "gangster" version of himself, and code-switches his language pattern.

Posted by Lily Siebert on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent;
Slang

Clinton's drawl, Trump's 'yuuge' N.Y. accent and campaign 'code-switching'

The article discusses several politicians' adressee-based style shifting while speaking to different groups of people. Gives an example of monophthongization from Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama using elements of AAE. The article also talks about differences between the styles of Jeb Bush and George W. Bush. [Published on 03-05-2016]

Meet the Man Who Speaks 15 Languages

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Alex Rawlings speaks 15 different languages, and he explains how speaking another language can provide a different perspective on life. "Languages open doors that you never knew were there."

Posted by Kristi Sparks on March 5, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Linguistic Relativity;
Multilingualism

35 American accents

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In this short video, this gentleman displays the ability to use 35 American accents. It is pretty impressive that there are so many dialects of American English.

Frito Bandito

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In doing research for my final paper for my linguistics class I ran across this old time video. Hispandering 60's style.

Posted by Tricia Roberson on March 4, 2016

Tags:
Perceptual Dialectology;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Multilingualism

Dating a Latina

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Dating a Latina: Perception vs Reality. This video is funny, some may be able to relate to it. This video exhibits Spanish, American English, and Code Switching.

Time to say goodbye

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Andrea and Sarah Brightman were invited to perform the duet 'Time To Say Goodbye (Con Te Partirò). I love this song and I do not even know what they are saying, until code-switching occurs. I do not know the language that they are singing in?

Posted by Mylls Cheffey on March 3, 2016

Tags:
Power;
American English;
Code-switching

El Maco

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This is a perfect example of mock spanish. This ad is mixed with overt racism. I am surprised that McDonald's publicity team let this one go.

Posted by Tricia Roberson on March 3, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

President Obama - Hispandering

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In Obama's Cinco de Mayo speech it is clear that hispandering is taking place. He invited a crowd of what appeared to be people of hispanic background. What Obama is speaking about is clear, he wants immigration laws and reform to continuously be adjusted and bettered. Each time Obama said the term 'tequila' he changed the way he said it to sound more hispanic and the crowd went nuts so he continued to say it to please the people there. He used code-switching to his advantage in this speech.

Posted by Madison Rigdon on March 2, 2016

Tags:
Spanglish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Style-shifting;
Stigma

Polyglots Might Have Multiple Personalities

Nathan Collins reports that psychologists at Hong Kong Polytechnic University have found that people who speak multiple languages adopt the personality traits associated with the language they are currently speaking. [Published on 05-01-2011]

Posted by Jared Nietfeld on March 1, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
English;
Code-switching

Ted Cruz/ Hispandering

Ted Cruz displays Hispandering during an interview, on Bloomberg. This involves explaining how he has the ability to relate to being Hispanic. There is a bit of code switching also, toward the end of the interview. [Published on 04-30-2015]

Posted by Mylls Cheffey on February 29, 2016

Tags:
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

code-switching and hispandering

This site has a good audio clip that really delves into the hispandering issue and the code-switching.

Posted by Kelley Lane on February 28, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Language Shift;
Multilingualism;
Politics and Policy

spanglish

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This is a clip that I think does a good job of demonstrating Spanglish from the view point of someone who is Hispanic.

Posted by Kelley Lane on February 28, 2016

Tags:
Spanglish;
Code-switching;
Multilingualism

English or Ebonics

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This is a video that show the code-switching involved between proper english vs. slang.

Posted by Kelley Lane on February 28, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching;
Ebonics Controversy;
Slang

Hispandering at the Nevada Caucus

Grace Parra demonstrates code-switching as she describes "hispandering" in the 2016 Nevada Presidential Caucus. Parra also highlights changes in different dialects. [Published on 02-22-2016]

Posted by Jamie Schnee on February 27, 2016

Tags:
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

Sh*t People From Hawaii Say

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Content Notes: Obscenities A humorous introduction to Hawaiian Pidgin by local celebrity Ryan Higa. This video demonstrates Pidgin being used in its social context, giving viewers unfamiliar with it an understanding of its importance in forming identity in the Hawaiian speech community.

Posted by Christy Jo Williams on February 22, 2016

Tags:
Hawaiian Pidgin;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

Hawaiian Pidgin: The Voice of Hawaii

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Hawaiian laypeople and scholars give a brief historical and social context to the pidgin used in Hawaii (referred to as just "Pidgin"). They explain that Pidgin, though originating as a very basic form of communication between workers over a hundred years ago, is now the basis of a strong speech community

Posted by Christy Williams on February 22, 2016

Tags:
Hawaiian Pidgin;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Contact

Jewish American uses of Yiddish

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This Video contains Jewish Americans using select Yiddish words and Slang words such as JAP(Jewish American Princess).

Posted by Brian Pener on February 22, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Jewish;
Slang

Garrard McClendon on Black English - Ebonics

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Garrad McClendon addresses the dangers of the African American language. Although he believes the African American language is beautiful, he feels strongly that the African Americans in the US need to learn how to code-switch. They need to learn when it is appropriate to talk in slang and when it is necessary to code-switch to "proper" English. Garrad also addresses the issues that teachers need to become more aggressive in correcting children's language at a young age and not be afraid of doing so. The children's future is dependent on being taught proper English and being correct when they don't use it.

Hongkongers mix English and Cantonese into new language, Kongish

This articles talks about the introduction of the new language, "Kongish." Kongish is the mixture of the Cantonese and English languages. This new language is a form of code-mixing the two languages. You will find people speaking this language in Hong Kong; they are using it to create a new identity for themselves. This new identity classifies them as individuals who speak both Cantonese and English, and not someone who is from China. [Published on 01-21-2016]

Posted by Meaghan Kuhlmann on February 21, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Language Shift;
Merger

Pera Code Mixing

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A little girl explains why she combines the Turkish and English language in her speech. She explains that she combines the two languages because she uses both languages, but at times it is hard for her to think of the words in English so she reverts to the Turkish term. It gives great examples of specific terms that she tends to revert to the Turkish term and the reason why she does.

Posted by Meaghan Kuhlmann on February 21, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Crossing;
Language Shift;
Merger;
Multilingualism

Linguistic- Code Switching

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This video gives the breakdown of code-switching in America. It talks about all the different types of English that exist in US. It also addresses why and individual partitakes in this linguistic practice; a word translation doesn't come to mind so they revert to the word in another language, or they are purposely excluding others from understanding. Code Switching if referred to different terms depending on the language mixture; Spanglish, Chinglish, etc.

Posted by Meaghan Kuhlmann on February 21, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Merger;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice;
Multilingualism

How Code-Switching Explains The World

This NPR article addresses the linguistic practices of code switching and how prevalent it is in today's society. NPR's approach is not as true to the linguistic anthropologist term because it looks at different linguistic practices and behaviors of individuals when interacting with different groups or in different settings. It looks at at broader range than just the mixture of two different languages.

Posted by Meaghan Kuhlmann on February 21, 2016

Tags:
American English;
Code-switching;
Language Shift;
Communities of Practice

"English Only" chants at Nevada Democratic caucuses

At the 2016 Nevada Democratic caucus, civil rights activist Dolores Huerta was heckled and booed off stage by a group of alleged Bernie Sanders supporters, who chanted "english only" when she attempted to translate the ballot for the Spanish-speaking caucus participants. Link to tweet from Ms. Huerta: https://twitter.com/DoloresHuerta/status/701184235315400705 [Published on 02-20-2016]

What Matters- Code Switching: Communication That Matters

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A great video on a more educational aspect of code switching and how important it is to understand the implications of this valuable language tool.

Posted by Amanda Salamanca on February 16, 2016

Tags:
Power;
African American English;
Code-switching

Washington Redskins NBA Commercial

In this advertisement created by the National Congress of American Indians, the narrator takes the viewer through a number of "names" for Native Americans in the United States, including tribal names and other words that could be used to define the communities, before ending with an appeal that Native Americans would never describe themselves as "redskins." [Published on 06-10-2014]

Youth codeswitching

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This is an example of a child having a conversation with both his parents in 3 different languages.

Posted by Kelley Lane on February 11, 2016

Tags:
French;
Code-switching;
Youth;
Multilingualism

Code-switching example

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This is a perfect example of a child being put in a very unique linguistic environment. This video depicts code-switching for a boy at a very young age. While discussing a hole found in a pair of shorts, the boy uses Indonesian, French and English to talk to his parents.

Posted by Jeremy Gutovitz on February 7, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Youth

Sign Language Exchange Between Starbucks Barista and Customer Inspires Others

A Starbucks Barista initially trying to take an order in English then code-switching to ASL to communicate. This video also includes specific language used only in Starbucks, for example the sizes of the orders. [Published on 11-04-2015]

This Is How I Talk

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In another sketch pitting Louis C.K. as the awkward, middle-class white man, this SNL bit presents a new Sprint employee caught imitating his boss's style. He convinces her that this is how "[his] momma done taught [him] to talk." This forces him into affecting an AAVE style for the five years of his employment.

Posted by Matt Bernobich on December 4, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching

When Politicians Lose Their Accents

Clip from All Things Considered discussing the way in which politicians, such as those currently running for president, tend to shift accents depending on audience/context. One of the politicians the clip mentions is governor of Wisconsin, Scott Walker, who has allegedly traded his "Wisconsin twang" for a more standard way of speaking in order to appeal to the nation at large. [Published on 04-18-2015]

Posted by Jessica Hutchison on April 26, 2015

Tags:
Code-switching;
Style-shifting

DYSA African American English (or Ebonics) in the classroom

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This video shows an example of an approach in the classroom that involves teaching young speakers of AAE to translate speech into standard English. It seems like a cool strategy to teach kids in this way because it isn't detracting from the legitimacy of their own code, while also providing them with knowledge that will be useful in school.

Posted by Jasmine Huang on March 30, 2015

Tags:
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity

Culcha Candela- I like it

This is a German band that sings in various codes, this song is an example of code switching between Spanish, German and English. [Published on 03-19-2015]

Posted by Terra on March 19, 2015

Tags:
Code-switching

MISS KO 葛仲珊 - CALL ME

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Miss Ko is an American-Taiwanese rapper who code-switches in her lyrics, sometimes mid-sentence. It seems like the purpose of her code-switching is to create a "cool" identity. Most of the words or phrases in English are what I would associate with such an identity: references to American celebrities or slang like "main squeeze", "homie", or "holla at me". The bulk of the song is in Chinese, but she supplements English in order to (from my reading) present herself a certain way.

Posted by Gregor McGee on March 17, 2015

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Code-switching

Björk's variating accent: A study on her ability to code switch depending on her current identity.

This paper analyzes Björk's English accent and how it seems to change depending on her current identity or potentially how much she feels she needs to emphasize her Icelandic heritage.

Posted by Molly Worden on March 10, 2015

Tags:
Code-switching

Philippine "Gay Lingo"

The following quote from the Bourdieu reading reminded me of Swardspeak (or Bekimon), an argot/slang used by queer communities in the Philippines (where I was born and raised): "it is not space which defines language but language which defines its space" (44) (Citation: Bourdieu, Pierre. 1991. Language and Symbolic Power.) Swardspeak has indeed created a distinct space for gay communities in the Philippines, helping them resist cultural assimilation. The linked Wikipedia article has more information as well as great examples of Swardspeak constructions. Here's a clip of how it sounds. It's from a hit talk show; the host, Vice Ganda, a queer comedian/TV personality, makes his guests reenact a scene from their movie in standard Tagalog and then in Swardspeak. It's mostly in Tagalog, but I think it's pretty easy to tell how different Swardspeak is. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfZ91K2MS6g

Posted by Korina Yoo on February 19, 2015

Tags:
Power;
Code-switching;
Slang

Bon Cop, Bad Cop

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A clip from Bon Cop, Bad Cop, a 2006 Canadian movie that bases much of its humor on the use of Canadian French and English in Canada.

Posted by Lucas Dazin on December 9, 2014

Tags:
Canadian English;
Code-switching;
French;
Contact

"Ask" versus "Ax"

This article examines the social stigma of using "ax" instead of "axe". NPR labels "Ax" as a distinguishable feature of AAE that many associate with being "poor, black, and uneducated". Garrard McClendon of Chicago State University stated that his parents were "well aware" of the stigma, and taught him that "there's a time and place to use it", encouraging purposeful code switching. Comedians Key and Peele joke that being half black and half white causes them to use both depending on whether they are with friends ("ax") or being pulled over ("ask"). This feature, however, dates back over 1000 years. Jesse Sheidlower, president of the American Dialect Society, says it is in the first English translation of the bible as "axe". Professor John Rickford of Stanford remarks, "so at that point it wasn't a mark of people who weren't highly educated", and that we can't be sure where the popularity of "ax" stopped yet stayed put in the American South and Caribbean. He says it could be "the empire striking back: taking language that has been imposed and making it our own". Rickford also notes, "I don't think any linguist is recommending that you get rid of your vernacular, because you need it - in a sense - for your soul". This article highlights the significance of linguistic versatility; the use of "ax" is only as "right" or "wrong" as a person labels it - and there are multiple opinions! [Published on 12-03-2013]

Denice Frohman's "Accents" (2013)

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Code-switching, Puerto Rican Spanish and English

Posted by Erin Appleby on October 16, 2014

Tags:
Spanglish;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting

Rock Me Amadeus

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This is the song I chose for my music project--it shows a number of English borrowings and code-switches between German and English.

Posted by Maren Fichter on September 30, 2014

Tags:
Code-switching;
Borrowing;
Contact;
Globalization

MISS KO 葛仲珊 - CALL ME (Mandarin-English Codeswitching)

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Music for Project 1 on contact varieties, this is a Taiwanese-American hip-hop artist who uses Mandarin and English in her songs. (to varying degrees, if you want a youtube adventure check out her other videos)

Posted by Syd Low on September 30, 2014

Tags:
Chinglish;
Code-switching;
Hip Hop Nation

Spoken Word on Code-Switching

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Jamila Lyiscott's spoken word poem describing her observations of her own code switching between Patois, AAE, and Standard English. She discusses the sociohistorical background to her codes and what it is to live through their use and legitimates them by describing linguistic rules governing the varieties.

Posted by Allesandra Geffen on September 30, 2014

Tags:
Jamaican Creole;
African American English;
Code-switching

Insect Triggers Dramatic Code Switch

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An African-American news reporter shifts from a very standard style into a considerably more vernacular one when a bug flies into his mouth.

Posted by Daniel Ezra Johnson on June 26, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching

What's the New What? Spanglish is the new Adspeak

A short radio segment profiling the use of Spanglish (really a little bit of Spanish) in advertising.

Posted by Kara Becker on March 20, 2013

Tags:
Spanglish;
Code-switching

Key & Peele: Phone Call

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Two comedians code-switch between Standard English and African American English

Posted by Kara Becker on March 12, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching

Die Antwoord

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Code-switching by the South African group Die Antwoord

Posted by Kara Becker on March 12, 2013

Tags:
South African English;
Code-switching

George Lopez: Spanglish

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A 2008 routine by comedian George Lopez on the use of Spanglish

Posted by Kara Becker on March 12, 2013

Tags:
Spanglish;
Code-switching;
Stigma

Chris Rock on Race in the 2008 Election

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Chris Rock uses contrastive AAE and SE to highlight a political point about the role of race in the 2008 election.

Posted by Sydney Alysse Negus on February 26, 2013

Tags:
Performativity;
African American English;
Code-switching

The battle of African American English in The Boondocks

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The American animated series, The Boondocks, which focuses on an African American family, the Freemans, who move from Chicago to live in a white suburban area. The main characters for this series, are Huey and Riley both played by Regina King, an African American actress. Riley and Huey have been painted as the yin and yang of Black urban maleness, now look how both use AAE differently.

Code-switching: How to talk so men will listen

A website based on a book of the same title, offering guidance for women who want to "code-switch" out of women's language.

American Tongues: Cajun English

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A clip from the documentary American Tongues featuring two speakers of Cajun English who code-switch between Cajun English and French

NPR: Code-swtiching: Are we all guilty?

A 2010 NPR piece about the criticism of President Obama's "negro dialect," with a broader discussing of both style-shifting and code-switching.