Stigma

What your speaking style, like, says about you | Vera Regan | TEDxDublin

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This is a nice Ted Talk that shares information about the use of the word "like" in Ireland and what conclusions can be drawn about the people who use it. Vera Regan opens with an example about the common use of "like" by teenage girls. The important points of her talk expand to a larger scale about sociolinguistic stigmas and the general population's tendency to stereotype based on language use.

Posted by Lindsay Roush on July 1, 2018

Tags:
Stigma

Is "talking white" really a thing

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This is a clip in which two people are blindfolded and asked to determine if people are white or black only by their voice. The speaker is given a song to read aloud as the listeners try to determine if “talking white is really a thing”. There is a belief that people will inherently sound different simply because of their ethnicity. This puts the stereotypes to the test and shows how different vocal inflections are perceived

Posted by Olivia Rodriguez on June 30, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent;
Stigma

Ear Hustle Podcast

This podcast, "Ear Hustle" discusses the reality of life in prison, created in a prison by prisoner Earlonne Woods and a prison volunteer and artist named Nigel Poor. The first episode, "Cellies" describes the meaning of the word "Ear Hustle" which is synonymous with eavesdropping. Prison language and the language used outside of prison is highly various. This is just an example of various language used in prison and the connection to prison culture. [Published on 06-14-2017]

Posted by Tatiana Cosper on April 27, 2018

Tags:
Indexicality;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting;
Slang;
Stigma

Why are Disney villains gay/queer?

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This video addresses a problem in Disney films not addressed in Lippi-Green's 2012 paper: queer-coding of Disney villains. Disney commonly gives its villains stereotypically gay features, teaching children to associate homosexuality and immorality. While the video does not provide audio, I've provided some further links to queer-coded villains: King Candy (from Wreck-It Ralph): https://youtu.be/MVVeugPVD2Q Scar (from The Lion King: https://youtu.be/-8wgXRNYcPM

Posted by Aidan Malanoski on April 16, 2018

Tags:
Gay Mens Language;
Sexual Orientation;
Stigma

The Cost of Code Switching

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This is a 10 minute TedX video addressing the complexities of style shifting/code switching in America, specifically AAE speakers being expected to conform to "standard forms" to survive in America. This talk addresses issues of police brutality, racism, and expectations of who is expected to style shift/code switch and why.

MSNBC's Thomas Roberts Busts Out His Baltimore Accent

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In this video, a Maryland-born reporter gives an example of "Baltimorese," an accent of English found among many white working-class individuals in the Baltimore metropolitan area. This video also gives an example of language prejudice, as the reporter from Maryland expresses his own dislike for the accent, and the two other reporters mock the accent to some extent. Given that Baltimorese is a working-class accent, this prejudice against the language is likely a proxy for some prejudice against working class people.

Posted by Aidan Malanoski on February 28, 2018

Tags:
Baltimore English;
Socioeconomic Status;
Accent;
Stigma;
o fronting

Fox News clip sampled on DAMN.

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This clip is a really clearly delineated example of "language as proxy" for racism. It's really clear in the tone of the broadcasters when reading Kendrick's lyrics that their issue is not only with the content but with the stigmatized aspects of AAVE. I also wanted to bring up this clip/the album DAMN. because it's a great example of a lot of the themes talked about in the film Talking Black in America, particularly regarding hip-hop. The way Kendrick puts his music, which deals with issues of race and is basically the way he was able to survive violence in dialogue with white people saying "hip hop is doing more damage than racism" is really masterful and gives me chills.

Video Proves Logan Paul Did Many More Utterly Offensive Things In Japan

Logan Paul is an online personality from America that basically just makes video blogs. Recently he went to Japan and vlogged about his time there. He came under fire almost immediately for positing a video of him in the Suicide Forest where someone had just committed suicide. In the week following, people also watched other videos of his time in Japan where he basically disrespects anything and anyone. At one point he breaks a game boy on purpose and brings it back to the salesman saying it was “much-o, broken-o”. Him and his friends also get together and yell “arigato” before running around — which shows he probably had no idea what it meant but yelled it because it translates to “thank you” in English. Though the things he did were disrespectful to Japanese culture for a number of reasons these things discussed linguistically showed the shallow amount of knowledge he had on the place he was visiting and the lack of care he had for the people there. I see this as a form of speech communities - because Logan Paul is from a very laid-back, privileged, English speaking community online and went to Japan but changed nothing, therefore observably offending members of the speech communities in Japan. [Published on 01-05-2018]

Posted by Darby VanHoutan on January 14, 2018

Tags:
Chinglish;
Japanese;
Code-switching;
Stigma

Key & Peele: School Bully

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Comedians Key and Peele act out a skit vocalizing the true thoughts and meanings behind the stereotypical school bully threats and phrases. While humorous, the skit displays how one’s words and language can be used to hurt, secretly signal one’s own emotions, and even the stereotyping of bullies and the struggles that lead to their outward aggression.

Posted by Josh Lewis on January 7, 2018

Tags:
Enregisterment;
Indexicality;
Stigma

Empowering Identity with Language

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A YouTube blogger named Finn talks about how language can power and disempower identities. Specifically he talks about how trans individuals need to use confident language when talking about their identity. He points out the faults of expressions and phrases commonly used by the Transgender community that feed into the disempowered dialogue used by non-trans individuals. The way that we talk about ourselves not only influences the way we feel about ourselves but also how we allow others to talk about us.

Posted by Natoshea Cate on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Stigma

Difference Between Men and Women

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A short clip from the TV show, “Friends” posted in June of 2017. The video explains the generalizations society has for the way men and women speak. The women in the video tend to over exaggerate the situation, in which they grab glasses and a bottle of wine to discuss the kiss. Whereas, the men in the latter part of the video are eating pizza casually talking about the kiss in a matter of five seconds with a few words each. The actions in the video describe the generalizations society gives men and women’s communication styles.

Posted by Sara Strand on October 4, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Gender;
Stigma

"Pink or Blue" Video

A video essay set to a poem on gender. It was commissioned to open the Saatchi showcase in Cannes the film uses 3D technology to allow the viewer to switch between two different versions of the film depending which set of glasses they view it through. Much of the video and poem deals with how language and performance affect one's social interactions. [Published on 07-01-2017]

Posted by Janet Sebastian-Coleman on September 4, 2017

Tags:
Femininity;
Masculinity;
Biological Sex;
Gender;
Gender Binary;
gender non-conforming;
Stigma

Maori words for mental health revised and added onto

New Zealand wanted to expand the mental health language to not have ‘sometimes condescending’ English terms and to use more nonjudgmental terms to better describe people with mental health problems.

Posted by Amanda Steinhauser on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Stigma

Nail Salon

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In this video a comedian is talking about her time at a nail salon, all the while impersonating the women who work at the nail salon. She uses an accent to do so. Although she is using it as a joke, is stereotypes Vietnamese nail salon workers to be both pushy but also unaware. By doing this she further emphasizes a separation between the English customers and non-English workers. In watching the video, it is easy to think that the workers are uneducated because it seems as though they don't understand English, but there is no effort being done on the customers side to really communicate in their language. Here, English is being depicted as a more educated language, creating stigma for the women working.

Posted by Jackie B on July 2, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Race,Ethnicity;
Monolingualism;
Stigma

Die Antwoord's Evil Boy: A Dynamic Crossroad of Language, Culture, and Rap in South Africa

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Die Antwoord is a controversial rap group from Cape Town, South Africa fronted by Ninja Yolandi Vi$$er. Speaking from a post-apartheid perspective, this group offers an underrepresented view of young, lower-middle class, white Afrikaans - a subculture known as "Zef." Historically, Zef has been considered a derogatory term describing someone who was white, poor, and "trashy." However, Die Antwoord and others have looked to transform this into a self-reflective, somewhat satirical, parody that Ninja described as being "apocalyptic debris that we’ve stuck together." In this music video, they display their unique code-switching between Afrikaans and English, as well as Xhosa - the Bantu language of the Xhosa people. Adding to their mixed-bag controversial nature, is the relationship of the Afrikaans languages’ association with apartheid. Through dynamic language and visual use, this video reflects the complex sociocultural and sociolinguistic interactions that occur in this region. The lyrical narrative told is a statement on the clash between traditional tribal circumcision rituals, and the modern subcultures that seem to offer an alternative path to "manhood." This can be heard in the verse by the guest rapper Wanga, sung in his native tongue: "Mamelapa umnqunduwakho! (listen here, you fucking asshole) Andifuni ukuyaehlatini! (I don't want to go to the bush with you) Sukubammba incanca yam! (don't touch my penis) Andi so stabani! (I’m not a gay) Incanca yam yeyamantobi! (this penis is for the girls) Incanca yam iclean! (my penis is clean) Incanca yam inamandla! (my penis is strong) Ndiyinkwekwe enkulu! (I am a big boy) Angi funi ukuba yeendota! (don't want to be a man) Evil boy 4 life! yebo! (yes) Evil boy 4 life!" Through the use of polyglossic code-switching, performativity, sociocultural and racial integration, and a revamping of contextual meanings, Die Antwoord is doing its part to redefine what it means to be young and Zef in South Africa, and what a socioculturally- and sociolinguistically-complex rebellion sounds like.

British Villains -Tom Hiddleston en Jaguar F-Type Coupé

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This Jaguar car commercial adds to an ideology that an English accent sounds villainous. Indexically and through performativity the actor, Tom Hiddleston, describing how to successfully sound "villainous". This commercial is a part of a series featuring other British actors describing how to sound "villainous".

British Villains -Tom Hiddleston en Jaguar F-Type Coupé

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This Jaguar car commercial adds to an ideology that an English accent sounds villainous. Indexically and through performativity the actor, Tom Hiddleston, describing how to successfully sound "villainous". This commercial is a part of a series featuring other British actors describing how to sound "villainous".

Faith Salie Vocal fry

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Faith Salie in this video reflects on her experiences as a Rhodes scholar and comedian. Salie talks about societal perceptions of a dichotomy between intelligence and comedic ability. The misconception of vocal fry being an indication of lower intelligence falls apart amidst her clear academic success.

Posted by Sean McAlister on May 9, 2017

Tags:
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma

John McWhorter: Txtng is killing language. JK!!!

This is a TED talk by John McWhorter in which he is explaining that writing is just a representation in the way we talk. He explains that there is an emergent complexity in fingered speech (texting). There is a new kind of "language" that is being created now that speech is in continuous change and therefore a new structure is created. [Published on 02-01-2013]

Posted by Eira Nylander Torallas on May 6, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Slang;
Stigma

Why Do Girls Have Creaky Voices?

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This sociolinguistic artifact covers the topic of "Vocal Fry" or the new way young women talk in which the tone and sound of their voice sounds creaky. People don't exactly enjoy hearing someone talk using vocal fry, and studies have proved that girls who interviewed for a job and spoke using vocal fry were deemed more untrustworthy than those who didn't, and were viewed more negatively than men who used vocal fry, which relates to gender differences in spoken language and language use. What is particularly interesting is why vocal fry is so common among young women. This artifact suggests that linguists think that women tend to be the "vocal trailblazers" because they are more sensitive and receptive of social interactions and more likely able to pick up on settle vocal cues such as a "fry", again accounting for the gender differences in spoken language and language use. Also, there is a theory that vocal fry is simply a form of in-group communication between young girls.  

Posted by Mary Grace Adkins on May 3, 2017

Tags:
Womens Language;
Stigma;
r vocalization;
Creaky Voice;
Pitch

Substitute Teacher

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This a skit from Key and Peele about language barriers between ethnicities. The teacher pronounces the students name differently and each student is confused. When the teacher is confronted with this knowledge he gets upset that they mock his pronunciation of their names. This relates to linguistic anthropology because it showcases language barriers between different ethnicities.

Posted by Garion Morgan on April 29, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Language Shift;
Stigma

Boston Accent Movie Trailer

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This is a fake movie trailer that appeared on "Late Night with Seth Meyers". It makes fun of the Boston accent and movie portrayals of the accent and Boston culture. It also makes fun of people's reactions to the accent including a British actor trying to do a Boston accent and fake newspaper reviews of the movie.

Posted by Janet Sebastian-Coleman on March 11, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Boston English;
Accent;
Stigma

My Fair Lady - Why Can't The English?

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This song called "Why can't the English?" from the movie My Fair Lady. In this song Henry Higgins starts the song off by singing: "Look at her, a prisoner of the gutter, Condemned by every syllable she utters By right she should be taken out and hung, For the cold-blooded murder of the English tongue." referring to Hepburn. With this, followed by a lot of remarks that are similar in nature, he is implying very strongly that there is a Standard English language that should be spoken by all English people, and if anyone doesn't, "by right" they could be hung. He says most people are never "taught" and instead learn other stigmatized varieties of English and refers to these as murderers of the English tongue. He is in this way implying that there is a legitimate use of proper English language, and that is the standard variety that he speaks. therefore considering himself as a "better Englishman", and more educated, in this way making a social class distinction between him and the others. He is also implying that there should be unity of the nation as mentioned by Bourdieu in "The Production and Reproduction of Legitimate Language". Higgins refers to the English speaking people of England as Englishmen, but also mentions that non-standard speaking varieties are "painful to your ears" and is afraid they will never be able to get "one common language".

Diversity Training with Pam and Dwight

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This is a video from the show "The Office". This is a short clip from an episode where the staff receives diversity training. It shows us how people can be culturally ignorant. The scene involves Pam and Dwight and they both have a card on their head in which the other person must use the other to guess what their card is. Dwight's word was Asian, and Pam helped him by saying that she didn't feel this way but stereotypical they are bad drivers. This resulted in Dwight guessing it the answer was women. This was culturally insulting to those of Asian decent because they have been given this stereotype when it is not true that all Asians are bad drivers. This also attacked women which is unnecessary too considering not all women are poor drivers.

Posted by Danielle Wismer on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Femininity;
Masculinity;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma

African-American ASL

Variations that have developed and been maintained by White and Black signers of ASL are examined to reveal surprising cultural implications [Published on 09-07-2012]

There's nothing controversial about code-switching

The article, on face, is only about code-switching, but the article goes on to address the standard language ideology which contends that it only happens and/or is negative when African American speakers engage in code-switching. Thus, the article also addresses, although somewhat shallowly, the issues of power and/or racism. [Published on 05-04-2016]

Posted by Mitchell Wagenheim on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Code-switching;
Stigma

Linguist Says You Can Use ‘Like’ More. He’s, Like, Wrong.

This article demonstrates the, potentially discriminatory, language ideology contending that the word "like" is overused in society today. [Published on 11-01-2013]

Posted by Mitchell Wagenheim on July 26, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Stigma

Unapologetically Southern

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In this video, Chad Prather, a man who identifies himself as a Southern Gentleman. "Rants" in defense of his southern "accent" or dialect. Here we can see a man defending his own way of communication against attacks (in the form of social media messages and comments) from people who hold the language ideology that his accent proves that he is not intelligent.

The Brain Doubts Accent

Follows along with Matsuda, Mari J. 1991. Most of the info related to accent bias has already been covered in class, but the article points out that difficult-to-process language can sometimes lead to more attention in the listener. [Published on 09-21-2010]

Posted by Hunter Gill on April 25, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Stigma

THE: Linguistic bias in publishing is a 'myth'

Discussion of a "pervasive" view that non-native English speakers face systematic discrimination in the realm of academic publishing. The article focuses on arguments that claims of discrimination are unfounded and cites a recent study suggesting that there is little evidence to support these claims. [Published on 03-24-2016]

Posted by Shannon Pearson on April 21, 2016

Tags:
Multilingualism;
Stigma

Spain's “linguistic discrimination” debated in the European Committe on Civil Liberties for the first time

The Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs of the European Parliament discusses claims of language discrimination against speakers of Catalan in Spain, a topic which has previously gone largely unaddressed. Some politicians and non-government organizations note reports of frequent and serious instances of discrimination, claiming racist/supremacist motivation, while other officials downplay or deny those claims, attributing them to a Catalonian nationalist agenda. [Published on 03-17-2016]

Posted by Shannon Pearson on April 21, 2016

Tags:
Multilingualism;
Politics and Policy;
Stigma

Professional Educator: Grades, Showing Up On Time Are A Form Of White Supremacy

This education consultant takes issue with values that are taught in schools as beneficial for success but which she says are selected to favor white people, including language-related expectations of students. She suggests some unusual methods to "move away from all these aspects of white privilege in education." [Published on 04-16-2016]

Posted by Shannon Pearson on April 17, 2016

Tags:
whiteness;
Education;
Multilingualism;
Prescriptivism;
Stigma

Response to "What it Means to Sound Gay" (LanguageLog)

Reed professor Sameer ud Dowla Khan's open letter response to NPR interview with filmmaker and speech pathologist from film project "Do I sound gay?" (transcript of interview found at link). Sameer describes how linguistic features do not necessarily link directly to social category (as is seen in indexical models) to problematize the concept of "natural"-ness in speech. (Compare with research done by Gaudio, Rudolph. 1994. Sounding gay: pitch properties in the speech of gay and straight men; especially re:criticisms of other studies made in introduction pp. 34-41). [Published on 07-10-2015]

Alumnus's anthology rescues 'tattered' isiXhosa language

A man from Rhodes University in South Africa uses a poetry anthology to discuss HIV/AIDs in his native isiXhosa language, and hopes to rebuild isiXhosa as a language which lays in 'tatters' due to years of apartheid oppression in South Africa. [Published on 03-07-2016]

Posted by Jasmine E. Thompson on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Politics and Policy;
Stigma

Language, Race, and White Public Space

This article talks about the use of language in comparison to race. It talks about the negative stereotypes that are directed to Chicanos and Latinos by talking about "Mock Spanish".

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism;
Slang;
Stigma

Potty-Mouthed Princesses Drop F-Bombs for Feminism by FCKH8.com

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This video uses young girl cussing to show that there are more problems in society than little girls cussing. The fact that they are talking the way they are is shocking, which is done to make people actually listen to the bigger point.

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Youth;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Sexism;
Slang;
Stigma

Why the f*** shouldn't women swear?

This article talks about sexism in the fact that there is an idea that women should not curse. For example, it mentions that people tell female rapper, Nicki Minaj that she should not cuss, but the same is not said to male rappers, like Eminem or Lil Wayne [Published on 11-04-2014]

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma

Swing County USA: Hispandering

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This video talks about Hispandering in the United States. It details moments on the campaign trail where Presidential candidates, Democratic and Republican, engage in Hispandering. Many of the candidates refer back to their parents and their experiences as immigrants.

"Do I Sound Gay?" A Documentary about Gay Speech

This is a documentary about the speech of gay men and how they view their language not only in terms of their own identity, but also in terms of how they are portrayed in society. [Published on 09-07-2014]

Posted by Caroline Wright on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Gay Mens Language;
Sexual Orientation;
Communities of Practice;
Stigma

"Vocal Fry" speaking with Faith Salie

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This video explains "vocal fry" which is prevalent among young women. Vocal fry is described as a 'creaky voice' or a vibratory sound.

Posted by Kristi Sparks on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Femininity;
Womens Language;
Stigma

Alumnus's anthology rescues 'tattered' isiXhosa language

A man from Rhodes University in South Africa uses a poetry anthology to discuss HIV/AIDs in his native isiXhosa language, and hopes to rebuild isiXhosa as a language which lays in 'tatters' due to years of apartheid oppression in South Africa. [Published on 03-07-2016]

Posted by Jasmine E. Thompson on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Politics and Policy;
Stigma

Does Not Speaking Spanish Make You Less Latino? Pero Like Ep.4

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This article discusses speech communities and how the language you speak does or does not define your culture. In this example, the video is discussing if not speaking Spanish makes you less Latino.

Posted by Courtney Dickerson on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Change;
Language Shift;
Youth;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice;
Education;
Stigma

CNN Election Center

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In this video there are many different types of sociolinguistic artifacts, and in any kind of SNL skit they have to make it more dramatic to bring out the commentary. Yet, within this clip you see many types of tags used within the first few minutes. For example, Donald Trump is the first person to be impersonated, but within the short clip that he is in he shows tags of "Race/Ethnicity, Sexism, Gender, Politics and Policy". And for Hillary Clinton she is showing many of the same character traits as well. Within all of these impersonators they are all trying to benefit themselves in some way that looks appealing to the audience.

Ernestine Johnson Performs 'The Average Black Girl' on Arsenio Hall Show

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Ernestine Johnson's performance of "The Average Black Girl" shows the stereotype of talking white vs talking black. Here is a good example of the relationship between race and language.

Posted by Courtney Dickerson on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Gender;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma

SNL - Sexual Harassment and You

In this Saturday Night Live skit the are discussing how the work place used to just be guys and was easier that way, now that it is filled with women as well law suits happen more often. They send this geeky guy to ask a girl on a date and he gets rejected and then a 'handsome' guy does the same thing and grabs her boob and gets accepted. This video is full of stigma's, gender issues, masculinity issues and sexism at the beginning.

Posted by Madison Rigdon on March 4, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Variation;
Masculinity;
Gender;
Sexism;
Stigma

Dad Learns Internet Slang

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A son is teaching his father words that are commonly used on the internet and seeing what he thinks they mean. It is very interesting to see how different generations think of these words as two completely different things.Throughout this video of course slang is being used but I think stigmas are brought up throughout this video as well. The refer to Justin Bieber as having swag and then describe it as, hat turned sideways, pants sagged low, etc.

Posted by Madison Rigdon on March 4, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Accent;
Internet Language;
Slang;
Stigma

President Obama - Hispandering

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In Obama's Cinco de Mayo speech it is clear that hispandering is taking place. He invited a crowd of what appeared to be people of hispanic background. What Obama is speaking about is clear, he wants immigration laws and reform to continuously be adjusted and bettered. Each time Obama said the term 'tequila' he changed the way he said it to sound more hispanic and the crowd went nuts so he continued to say it to please the people there. He used code-switching to his advantage in this speech.

Posted by Madison Rigdon on March 2, 2016

Tags:
Spanglish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Style-shifting;
Stigma

Chalamette, LA- A Study in Dialect Marginalization

A specific study of the stigmatization of a particular dialect in a suburb of New Orleans. [Published on 03-01-2016]

Posted by Mark Beal on March 1, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
American English;
Stigma

28 Reasons to Hug a Black Guy

In this Saturday Night Live skit they are discussing Black history month in class and the teacher lets three of her students come up to give the class a lesson on what it means. The first thing they start to do is rap which is stigmatizing blacks. Next they start talking about slavery and how "white" people need to show them love for this month because this is the only time a year they get love which brings in the issue of race and ideology and much more. [Published on 02-25-2016]

Posted by Madison Rigdon on February 25, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma

A Politician Walks Into King Taco ... A Look At The Political Term 'Hispandering'

Article regarding "Hispandering" in the current political presidential race. [Published on 12-08-2015]

Posted by Katherine Helms on February 23, 2016

Tags:
Politics and Policy;
Stigma

Key & Peele - Negrotown

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In this Key and Peele video, the stigmas attached to African Americans are shown. A white police officer begins to arrest a black man walking in an alley who is doing nothing wrong. When they enter 'Negrotown' he begins singing a song in which he says "here you can walk the streets without being stopped, harassed or beat." This brings in race and ideology about how African Americans are still being treated unfairly.

Posted by Madison Rigdon on February 21, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma

3 Ways To Speak English

This is a TED talk about this women who breaks down the english language saying there are three ways to speak. She is saying that the way you speak comes from your background and the culture you experienced growing up. You can speak differently based on where you are. For example in the work community people have been taught to be polite and say "hello" but around your friends the vernacular changes to maybe a "whats good" meaning the same as hello or hi. Jamilia Lyiscott is putting on a performance for people conveying different identities. She also says the word "articulate" multiple times representing language ideologies.

If you don't have anything nice to say, SAY IT IN ALL CAPS

An episode of This American Life on internet trolls, which includes a segment on the criticisms of female TAL contributors who use creaky voice, with an interview with Penny Eckert. [Published on 01-23-2016]

Posted by Kara Becker on February 8, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Gender;
Stigma;
Creaky Voice

G'day mate: 'Lazy' Australian accent caused by "alcoholic slur' of heavy-drinking early settlers

A newspaper article reporting on an opinion piece written by a communications professor at Melbourne's Victoria University suggesting that the Australian accent resulted from the slurring of speech of early (drunk) settlers. [Published on 10-27-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on November 2, 2015

Tags:
Ideology;
Australian English;
Stigma

Debate about who gets to use a word

cw: discussion of racial slur This is a CNN interview between a white commentator and a black rapper named Trinidad. They're debating about use of the n-word. I find the controversy about who gets to use certain words fascinating. I hear a power & privilege conversation most often, as well as an "in-group" vs "out-group" conversation. [Published on 03-17-2015]

Posted by Chase Doremus on March 17, 2015

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma;
Lexicon

Thug Kitchen: Literary Blackface

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"Now, the Hollywood couple behind online blog turned vegan cookbook are in the limelight for a clumsily adopted, expletive-charged “thug” persona reminiscent of hypermasculine Black men. Thug is a heavily loaded word and while it is not explicitly synonymous with African Americans, it recently adopted new meaning and performs as a colloquial version of the n word. Did I mention the founders of Thug Kitchen are white? Yes, white. The authors kept their identities anonymous for quite some time." -http://www.forharriet.com/2014/10/dear-creators-of-thug-kitchen-stop.html#axzz3S8EWrMRn

Posted by Katie Farr on February 18, 2015

Tags:
Power;
Race,Ethnicity;
Socioeconomic Status;
Stigma

Pidgin: The Voice of Hawaii

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An excerpt from the documentary Voices of Hawaii, profiling the accent discrimination case of James Kahakua et al. in the late 1980s, where speakers of accented English were denied jobs as broadcasters for the National Weather Service.

Posted by Kara Becker on December 8, 2014

Tags:
Hawaiian Pidgin;
Accent;
Stigma

What Does It Mean To Be 'Articulate'?

NPR segment interviewing a Trinidadian woman about her relationship with stigmatized language in Academia. They interview her about a spoken word poem about her experience as a "tri-tongued orator," after being called 'articulate.' The spoken word performance is also featured. [Published on 11-14-2014]

Posted by Genevieve Medow-Jenkins on November 17, 2014

Tags:
Stigma

Julia Gillard's voice

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A discussion of Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard's speech, which has been criticized as sounding too "broad" or lower-class.

Posted by Kara Becker on November 10, 2014

Tags:
Australian English;
Socioeconomic Status;
Stigma

Dear Jagoffs, Pittsburgh officially has the ugliest accent in America

Pittsburgh is the official winner of Gawker's "America's Ugliest Accent" context. [Published on 10-20-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 27, 2014

Tags:
Pittsburgh English;
Accent;
Stigma

Which English you speak has nothing to do with how smart you are

A Slate guest post by linguist Anne H. Charity Hudley addressing issues of language discrimination in U.S. schools based on the use of nonstandard varieties and features. She argues in favor of embracing language diversity in the classroom. [Published on 10-14-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 15, 2014

Tags:
American English;
African American English;
Variation;
Education;
Stigma

Is the Pittsburgh accent ugly?

A radio interview with linguist Scott Kiesling about the Pittsburgh accent, which has made it to the semi-finals in Gawker's "ugliest accent" competition. The other three semi-finalists are Boston, Providence, and Scranton, PA. [Published on 10-14-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 15, 2014

Tags:
Pittsburgh English;
Stigma

What's Wrong with "America's Ugliest Accent" Tournament

Slate.com's version of Joe Fruehwald's objections to the Gawker tournament where voters select "America's Ugliest Accent." [Published on 10-02-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 2, 2014

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
American English;
Accent;
Stigma

Nefertiti Menoe: Speaking White

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A video by artist Nefertiti Menoe on the criticism of minority speakers as 'speaking white.' She disagrees with this characterization, saying "having proper diction doesn't belong to the Caucasian race." The video sparked the long-time debate over accusations of speaking 'white' in the U.S.

America's Ugliest Accents: Something's Ugly Alright

Sociolinguistic Josef Fruehwald responds to the Gawker "Ugliest Accent" tournament, highlighting the use of language as a proxy for discrimination against speakers from various social and geographic groups. [Published on 10-01-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 1, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Accent;
Stigma

Gator fan fails miserably with Jameis Winston "scrong" sign

A response to a sign making fun of football player Jameis Winston's pronunciation of the word "strong," with palatalization in the initial cluster. Many football fans have stigmatize the player as illiterate and uneducated. [Published on 09-13-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on September 17, 2014

Tags:
African American English;
Stigma

Henry Cho, Asian American comedian with Southern accent

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Henry Cho is a Korean American comedian from Knoxville, Tennessee. He talks in his act about belonging to certain groups, using his own experiences as a Korean American southern English-speaking person as sources of comedy. The stereotypical cultural correlates of his appearance and his speech may be in conflict for some viewers.

American Tongues: New Orleans

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A clip from the documentary American Tongues featuring speakers of New Orleans English, who discuss being judged for sounding uneducated. "If you keep your mouth shut you'd be perfect."

Posted by Kara Becker on September 1, 2014

Tags:
New Orleans English;
Socioeconomic Status;
Stigma

American Tongues: Linguistic Insecurity

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A clip from the documentary American Tongues profiling speakers with linguistic insecurity, including a speaker from Brooklyn who takes accent reduction classes to reduce her New York City accent.

Vocal Fry doesn't harm your career prospects

A critique of the Anderson et al. study that found that females using creaky voice were judged less desirable. The author points out that the matched guise approach involved speakers who were taught to produce more creaky guises, so that the creak is an imitation. Further, the creaky utterances were longer and had lower pitch, raising questions about what listeners were reacting to. [Published on 06-06-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 12, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma;
Creaky Voice

Study: Women with creaky voices deemed less hireable

The Washington Post reports a research study that found that women who used creaky voice were judged by listeners to be less competent, less educated, less trustworthy, less attractive, and less hireable. The research team concludes that speakers should "should undertake conscious effort to avoid vocal fry in labor market settings." [Published on 06-02-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 11, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma;
Creaky Voice

A call for respecting dialect diversity

A 2014 opinion piece profiling the work of Walt Wolfram and colleagues at N.C. State who have a dialect diversity program designed to raise awareness about dialect diversity and the way language is used as a proxy to discriminate

Posted by Kara Becker on March 9, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Education;
Monolingualism;
Stigma

America's Ugliest Accents

The Kroll Comedy Show spooks speakers from Philadelphia and Pittsburgh in one sketch, and Gawker calls them "America's ugliest accents."

Posted by Kara Becker on March 9, 2014

Tags:
Philadelphia English;
Pittsburgh English;
Accent;
Stigma

Hagar the Horrible: I don't get no respect

A blog page that contains a comic strip from Hagar the Horrible where Hagar's negative concord is stigmatized.

Posted by Kara Becker on September 16, 2013

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Stigma;
Negative Concord

The Grammar Rules Behind 3 Commonly Disparaged Dialects

A 2013 piece highlighting three features of three stigmatized U.S. dialects - a-prefixing in Appalachian English, "liketa" in Southern English, and remote past BIN in African American English

Rachel Jeantel's Language in the George Zimmerman Trial

A guest post on Language Log by John Rickford on the media's reaction to the use of AAE in the testimony of Rachel Jeantel in the 2013 George Zimmerman trial.

Posted by Kara Becker on July 11, 2013

Tags:
Rickford, John;
African American English;
Stigma

Stereotypes of an Appalachian Dialect

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A speaker of an Appalachian dialect discusses stereotypes of his dialect.

Posted by Rob Troyer on July 2, 2013

Tags:
Appalachian English;
Stigma

Historian David Starkey makes some questionable remarks about language and race in the wake of the 2011 London riots

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In the summer of 2011, London (and then other parts of the UK) experienced civil unrest in the wake of a fatal police shooting. In this video, historian and broadcaster David Starkey connects the unrest to non-standard British English vernaculars, and contributes another entry in the long history of links between 'bad language' and disorder, crime, and Bad Things.

Teaching Tolerance: Sound Effects

A 2013 article in the Southern Poverty Law Center's "Teaching Tolerance" publication about addressing linguistic diversity in the classroom.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 1, 2013

Tags:
American English;
African American English;
Education;
Stigma

George Lopez: Spanglish

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A 2008 routine by comedian George Lopez on the use of Spanglish

Posted by Kara Becker on March 12, 2013

Tags:
Spanglish;
Code-switching;
Stigma

When Presidents say "Y'all:" The Strange Story of Dialects in America

A 2013 Atlantic interview with Walt Woflram on dialects and politics.

Saying no to "gizit" is plain prejudice

A 2013 contribution to The Independent by sociolinguist Julia Snell, arguing against the sentiments in a letter by a teacher in a primary school in Teesside, U.K. that students should remove features of Teesside dialect from their spoken speech in order to succeed in school.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 10, 2013

Tags:
British English;
Stigma

Creaky Voice: Yet Another Example of Young Women's Linguistic Ingenuity

A 2013 Atlantic article on the "vocal fry" phenomenon.

Posted on January 16, 2013

Tags:
Creaky Voice;
Womens Language;
Youth;
Stigma

NY Times: Unlearning to Tawk like New Yorker

A 2010 article on New Yorkers' opinions of their accents, with a profile of some speakers who seek out dialect coaching to lose their accents.

Posted on October 30, 2012

Tags:
New York City English;
Stigma;
Accent

Them Hillibillies

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From the Indiana State Museum; full title "Since them hillbillies moved down to the holler."

The Third Sex: The Truth About Gender Ambiguity

Discussion of the hardships faced by intersexed individuals, including sex reassignment surgery, gender identity, and societal stigma.

Racism (Linguistic Profiling) Caught on Tape

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White office manager at Tennessee car rental company makes racist remarks over the phone after wrongly guessing the race of the customer based on linguistic profiling.