Education

article on something similar to Contrastive Analysis

An article about problems faced by AAE-speaking students and a similar educational strategy to that discussed in the Rickford article; I do think the same concerns voiced about Contrastive Analysis in general, and definitely the older applications of it Rickford criticizes, apply to this form. [Published on 07-16-2014]

How Language Shapes the Way We Think

Here is a video link to cognitive scientist Lera Boroditsky explaining how language shapes the way we think on Ted Talks. The video explains how people map out space in their minds and languages to keep them oriented. English speaker would say "right", "left", "behind", "in front", etc., while the Aboriginal community would use cardinal directions to describe the location or directionality whenever they need to. It also talks about the grammatical gender in many different ways. Language can make us have deep effects on what we see, such as color and visualization. [Published on 04-11-2018]

Speech Communities and Ideology from "The Breakfast Club"

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This video shows how each family is their own speech community and that each speech community has their own language ideology. The parents and the children have certain ways to talking to each other that seem normal and necessary in the situation. Also, the teachers are their own speech community with their own language ideology based around how they talk to the students as we can interpret from the line "you see us as you want to see us".

Posted by Harlan Shoemaker on June 17, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Youth;
Communities of Practice;
Education

School of Rock First Day

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This is a clip from the movie School of Rock when Jack Black who plays Newy Finn has his first day as a substitute teacher. The language that he uses and the way he communicates is very out of role than what a student would expect from a teacher. Teachers are expected to all be in one speech community and Jack Black shows that he is not part of that speech community that most teachers are in.

Posted by Kayla Schulz on September 26, 2017

Tags:
Power;
Standard Language Ideology;
Style-shifting;
Education

10 ASL Signs All Police Officers Should Know

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A deaf youtuber shares 10 signs that would be beneficial for police officers to know. Their knowledge of these signs would increase cooperation, breakdown linguistic barriers, and relieve anxiety for both the police officer and the person being detained.

Posted by Emily Jacobs on July 26, 2017

Tags:
Power;
American Sign Language;
Education

Anne Curzan: What makes a word "real"?

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In this video Anne Curzan reviews how a word can be introduced to language, how words can begin to move out of the language, and how the usage of words change and alter through time. Curzan also covers how people use dictionaries and resources in order to stay caught up but, editors of dictionaries are struggling to keep up with our vocabulary and have to gabble on which words will actually survive.

Posted by Spencer Q. on June 26, 2017

Tags:
Language Shift;
Youth;
Education;
Slang

Why Germans Can Say Things No One Else Can

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This video talks about language and it's ability to allow for thought, emotion, and the expression of feelings. It talks specifically about the German language and how they have a wide variety of words they can use to better describe a situation or feeling other languages might not be able to do as effectively. It explains many examples of this, along with the appropriate meaning in English. Having a different set of words to think with and use allows for a wide variety of unique knowledge one can obtain. This video just scratches the surface of the importance of language, and how language in our lives can change the way we think and interpret the world around us.

Baby Talk

This is an article that talks about how “baby talk” is the best way for infants to acquire language skills. It discusses the argument that talking to infants like that may be condescending; however, studies have shown that it is an excellent way for them to learn their language. It also discusses how babies are ready to learn language in the last trimester when their ears are fully developed. They are already listening to their mother and the sounds around them. The use of repetition and slower speech is helpful with infants in learning language patterns. [Published on 12-06-2016]

Posted by Stephanie Maxwell on February 27, 2017

Tags:
Motherese;
Acquisition;
Youth;
caregiving;
Education

Burger King - World Literacy Month

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This video was used by Burger King to raise awareness for World Literacy Month. The video shows a variety of people in a Burger King drive thru line. As the customers get up to the menu they realize that all of the food items are written in gibberish. They cannot understand what is written and are told to go to the window where they are told that 1 out of 5 people in the world cannot read. This call to awareness shows how difficult it is for people with not only language barriers but people who cannot read. It demonstraits the difficulties to get through the day for many people facing this problem.

Posted by Danielle Wismer on October 2, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Language Shift;
Education;
Globalization

Berenstain Bears Reconnect Sioux To Native Language

Berenstain Bears cartoons help teach and revive the Lakota language. [Published on 09-26-2006]

Posted by Kristen Noel on July 29, 2016

Tags:
Sociolinguistic Interview;
Education

Professional Educator: Grades, Showing Up On Time Are A Form Of White Supremacy

This education consultant takes issue with values that are taught in schools as beneficial for success but which she says are selected to favor white people, including language-related expectations of students. She suggests some unusual methods to "move away from all these aspects of white privilege in education." [Published on 04-16-2016]

Posted by Shannon Pearson on April 17, 2016

Tags:
whiteness;
Education;
Multilingualism;
Prescriptivism;
Stigma

Modern Educayshun

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This short video written and directed by Neel Kolhatkar is very satirical, but also very effective in proving his point. This video suggests that the political correctness and hypersensitivity of today’s society actually might have some harmful effects. This video shows how the dangers of this type of language may occur in a very exaggerated way.

Posted by Matt McLaughlin on March 11, 2016

Tags:
Grammaticalization;
Language Shift;
Education;
Linguistic Relativity

Child Language Acquisition

This article talks about development in children's language and what is typical and what is abnormal. Different children develop language differently and at different paces, this explains that most abnormalities are not a concern.

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Critical Period;
Education

Students Learn to "Toggle" Between Dialects

This article is about the role code-switching plays in the success of low income students. Students that engage in code-switching tend to achieve more academically than students that do not code-switch.

Posted by Elizabeth McCrindle on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Style-shifting;
Education

How to Speak INTERNET

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A group of three British guys basically put together a video "guide" to understanding all of today's internet slang. From "YOLO," to ""FML," they cover a handful of different types of internet slang and explain what they all mean in the non internet world.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
English;
Code-switching;
Youth;
Education;
Internet Language;
Slang

Ax VS. Ask

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The video is an example of the "ax" vs. "ask" problem. This short video shows President Obama saying "ax" instead of "ask" while he addresses a crowd on education. I just wanted to portray how this issue in English isn't just due to lack of education and upbringing, as even President Obama uses the term "ax",

Posted by Jeremy Gutovitz on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ebonics Controversy;
Education

Hooked on Ebonics

The article dives into several important concepts as they relate to the understanding of Ebonics. The author explains that there are rules and variety within Ebonics that demonstrate its value as a variety of English. The author also addresses that Ebonics is not just "a black thing" and that many whites, Hispanics and Asian Americans all engage in AAVE.

Luis Von Ahn- Massive Online Scale

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This video explains how one company plans to make learning a second language free. By setting a goal of translating the web into every major language for free, these researchers created the website Duolingo. Students are presented with sentences that vary in difficulty depending on their level of understanding. This program has found that students translating material are as proficient as paid translators. This could be a glance into the future of affordable bilingual education.

Why these UK school kids love learning languages

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This group of students talk about why they feel it is important to learn a different language.These students are amazing in the sense that they seem so grown up and ready to take on the world, and language is one very powerful tool to help them do just that!

Does Not Speaking Spanish Make You Less Latino? Pero Like Ep.4

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This article discusses speech communities and how the language you speak does or does not define your culture. In this example, the video is discussing if not speaking Spanish makes you less Latino.

Posted by Courtney Dickerson on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Change;
Language Shift;
Youth;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice;
Education;
Stigma

Boise State linguists preserve endangered languages

This article gives perspective from a linguists point of view when discussing endangered languages. There are so many languages that people speak in our world and so many of them are going extinct. As the author discusses in the article, these cultures are not dead and their languages should be preserved as much as they can. [Published on 02-16-2016]

Posted by Courtney Dickerson on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Communities of Practice;
Education;
Globalization

How to understand the differences between British and American English

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The video does a great job at comparing words and the differences in meanings they can portray whether being interpreted from someone from the U.S OR U.K. It shows the power of the interpretation of language and how it can cause an interaction to be positive or negative. It shows the importance of linguistic relativity and the social context individuals are a part of.

Rather Be ASL Cover Music Video

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A teacher, Brittany Adams, creates her own version of popular music videos using American Sign Language (ASL) as a way to connect with her students and make learning enjoyable and fun, as well as raise awareness in hopes that others will want to learn ASL as a way to communicate.

Little Triggers

An Excerpt from Neil Gaiman's collection of short stories 'Trigger Warning' Gaiman uses the introduction, to discuss the book's title. He discusses how the phrase is commonly being used to warn people about content that "could upset them and trigger flashbacks or anxiety or terror," He wonders if the phrase could be applied to his own writing which can often be haunting or spooky. He also wonders whether these warnings are appropriate at all. [Published on 10-23-2014]

Posted by Jared Nietfeld on March 1, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Education

Tense Present: Democracy, English and the Wars Over Usage

David Foster Wallace reviews 'A Dictionary of Modern American Usage'. In so doing, Wallace explores how language rules are developed and on what authority they are created. Near the end he tells a story about trying to convince students to write in what he calls SWE "Standard Written English" or "Standard White English". [Published on 04-01-2001]

Garrard McClendon on Black English - Ebonics

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Garrad McClendon addresses the dangers of the African American language. Although he believes the African American language is beautiful, he feels strongly that the African Americans in the US need to learn how to code-switch. They need to learn when it is appropriate to talk in slang and when it is necessary to code-switch to "proper" English. Garrad also addresses the issues that teachers need to become more aggressive in correcting children's language at a young age and not be afraid of doing so. The children's future is dependent on being taught proper English and being correct when they don't use it.

Multilingualism on cognitive development

This article talks about how children who are bilingual gain an advantage at problem solving versus a child who is monolingual. [Published on 02-11-2016]

Posted by Kelley Lane on February 11, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Education;
Monolingualism;
Multilingualism

Using the Vernacular to Teach the Standard

Text from a 1998 talk by linguist John Rickford, which presents data on the failure of schools to teach SAE when they ignore the vernacular, and demonstrates how a knowledge of the grammar of AAE is important for teaching speakers of it. Factors in class. [Published on 03-25-1998]

DYSA African American English (or Ebonics) in the classroom

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A clip from the documentary "Do You Speak American?" profiling the use of contrastive analysis exercises to teach children who speak both SAE and AAE in the LA Unified School District.

Posted by syd on December 8, 2014

Tags:
African American English;
Education

Language Crisis: The American Indian Reality

Walt Wolfram's article in the Huffington Post profiling language revitalization efforts for the Cherokee language in North Carolina. [Published on 11-14-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on November 19, 2014

Tags:
Language Shift;
Education

Which English you speak has nothing to do with how smart you are

A Slate guest post by linguist Anne H. Charity Hudley addressing issues of language discrimination in U.S. schools based on the use of nonstandard varieties and features. She argues in favor of embracing language diversity in the classroom. [Published on 10-14-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 15, 2014

Tags:
American English;
African American English;
Variation;
Education;
Stigma

Is Learning a Foreign Language Really Worth It?

This is a Freakonomics podcast on the economic worth of learning a foreign language, addressing the "return on investment" of language learning (or, will all of those hours you spent in Spanish class really help you financially in the future?). Of particular interest are sections from 0:58-4:00, which poses the question to be addressed in the podcast, and has a few nice examples of ideologies about language learning and bilingualism from (probably wealthy, upperclass) kids, and 13:10-18:23, which reveals the actual monetary value of language learning. It is important to note that this podcast is mainly from the perspective of a native English speaker learning a foreign language, although native speakers of other languages learning English are mentioned towards the end.

Posted by Helen Seay on September 9, 2014

Tags:
Ideology;
Socioeconomic Status;
Education;
Acquisition

The importance of dual immersion programs

A discussion of the merits of bilingual education, including dual immersion, that includes comments from sociolinguist Phillip Carter. [Published on 04-12-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on April 21, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Spanish;
Education;
Multilingualism

A call for respecting dialect diversity

A 2014 opinion piece profiling the work of Walt Wolfram and colleagues at N.C. State who have a dialect diversity program designed to raise awareness about dialect diversity and the way language is used as a proxy to discriminate

Posted by Kara Becker on March 9, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Education;
Monolingualism;
Stigma

Why this bilingual education ban should have been repealed long ago

Sociolinguist Phillip M. Carter makes the case for repealing Proposition 227 in California, which essentially banned bilingual education in the state in 1998.

Posted by Kara Becker on March 5, 2014

Tags:
California English;
Spanish;
Education;
Multilingualism

Do You Speak American: AAE in Ann Arbor, MI

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A clip from the 2004 documentary Do you Speak American that covers the "Black English case," or "King case," in which the parents of African American English-speaking children won a case brought against Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary in Ann Arbor, MI in the late 1970s.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 15, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Education;
Politics and Policy

Teaching Tolerance: Sound Effects

A 2013 article in the Southern Poverty Law Center's "Teaching Tolerance" publication about addressing linguistic diversity in the classroom.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 1, 2013

Tags:
American English;
African American English;
Education;
Stigma

Fo Teach Pidgin o Not Fo Teach Pidgin: Das da Question

A 2013 article profiling linguists' work to introduce educational materials in Hawaiian Creole English.

Posted by Kara Becker on March 20, 2013

Tags:
Hawaiian Pidgin;
Education

LA Language World: Where Chicano English Gets Respect

An article on the site LA Language World that discusses LA Unified's Academic English Mastery program, which teaches children to bridge their Chicano English to Standard English.

Posted on November 13, 2012

Tags:
Chicano English;
Education

Prescription and African American English

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A 2006 Fox News Chicago story about Garrard McClendon and his visits to classrooms with African American students where he highlights their grammatical "mistakes."

Arizona Education Loses the Accent of America

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Romanian immigrant reflects on Arizona's elimination of educators with accents.