Change

Basic Chinese Character Parts - Movement Radicals

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This video talks about a development of Chinese character, and how these character become a word. In addition, it shows how same character have different pronunciation.

Posted by Wanling Zhang on June 29, 2018

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Change

Language Death- How do languages die?

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This in an informational video about language death and language extinction. This video gives several examples of languages that have become extinct, and how languages become dead and/or extinct. He also goes into detail about the different kinds of language death which include, gradual, bottom-to-top, sudden, and radical. To offer a more clear understanding, the video also describes case studies of language death.

Posted by Erin Hay on May 7, 2018

Tags:
Change;
Language Shift

Grammar gripes: why do we love to complain about language?

This article discusses the nature of prescriptivism and how modern technologies are contributing to language change [Published on 03-11-2018]

Posted by Liv Johnson on March 19, 2018

Tags:
Change;
Internet Language;
Prescriptivism

Hillary Clinton's accent evolution (1983–2015)

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A video about one individual, Hillary Clinton's intense and possibly intentional accent changes throughout her life. I thought it was an interesting case study in individual language change, and why someone might want to change the way the speak.

'He', 'She', 'They' and 'Us'

This article appeared on The New York Times Insider and discusses transgender issues and the use of a person’s preferred pronoun rather than the conventional or binary pronouns commonly used when reporting a news story. The Washington Post, The Associated Press, and The New York Times policy for use of unconventional pronouns is discussed. [Published on 04-05-2017]

Posted by Chance Friesen on July 16, 2017

Tags:
Change;
Gender Binary;
gender non-conforming;
Pronouns

Icelanders Seek to Keep Their Language Alive and Out of 'the Latin Bin'

Icelanders are becoming concerned that their language is being overridden by the English language. The current official language in Iceland is Old Norse. It has changed in incredible amount over more than a thousand years and is now a unique dialect. Nowadays English is becoming more prominent due to the tourism industry and devices with automated voices in English. Only about 400,000 people speak it now, and with the vast globalization Icelanders as well as linguistic experts are in fear that Old Norse will have the same fate as Latin. [Published on 04-22-2017]

Posted by Eden Hailemariam on May 11, 2017

Tags:
Power;
English;
Change;
Language Shift

Language Lessons Told Through Twitter

This article it explains how social media particularly twitter not only can change language, but can provide a proper input on the evolution of language. [Published on 10-26-2012]

Posted by Max Pitney on May 9, 2017

Tags:
Change;
Slang

Hurt BAE

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This video shows a younger couple discussing the infidelity on part of the male in the relationship, while a variety of older viewers watch the conversation. The video shows the differences in how younger generations communicate versus older generations, and the changes in how we communicate. Throughout the video, you see and hear the various reactions from the group and hear their thoughts and perception of the situation based on the conversation between the couple and the memes that were posted on the internet about the video.

Posted by Stephanie Maxwell on March 9, 2017

Tags:
Power;
Change;
Gender

The new Standard Swedish - sound experiment showing how Sweden sounds today

A Swedish linguistics professor has helped design a new kind of Riksvenska, or Standard Swedish, which more closely reflects the way people speak in 2017. [Published on 01-31-2017]

Posted by Nicole Niesen on February 27, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
Change

Plan Now to Avoid Post - Brexit Languages Crisis

There is a focus right now on the education system of the UK, with areas most at risk being language performance. If a crisis was to emerge in language performance from the UK split areas of official practice; such as trade, could be jeopardized. There are plans as of right now to push and ensure the emphasis on particularly language skills to ensure the enhancement post Brexit. This plan includes residency and a national plan to better primary education to even the post graduate level. With the quality of education slipping in the UK as it is, and a nation wide crisis within the linguistics field, the Brexit could only worsen the matter with children potentially receiving a lacking education. The goal of these reforms and education plan is to ensure a quality education to students at all levels, and hopefully encourage the emergence of language skill teachers and even linguistics majors. [Published on 10-16-2016]

Pidgin English from Nigeria

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A video of two Nigerian Men who explain and give example of language divergence and Pidgin English.

Always #LikeAGirl Girls Emojis

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This YouTube video sponsored by Always debates that the emojis used on smart phones are not representative of women. It says some of these may even be sexist. Emojis are wildly popular in today’s society and this issue may go unnoticed by many people. See for yourself as this video interviews women and asks their opinions on the subject.

The Ebonics Controversy in my Backyard

This article talks about Ebonics and Code-Switching, It explains what happened when the Ebonics controversy broke out.

Does Not Speaking Spanish Make You Less Latino? Pero Like Ep.4

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This article discusses speech communities and how the language you speak does or does not define your culture. In this example, the video is discussing if not speaking Spanish makes you less Latino.

Posted by Courtney Dickerson on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Change;
Language Shift;
Youth;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice;
Education;
Stigma

The Evolution of Dude

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How the meaning of the word dude has radically changed over 130 years.

Posted by Brian Pener on March 5, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Change;
Slang

35 American accents

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In this short video, this gentleman displays the ability to use 35 American accents. It is pretty impressive that there are so many dialects of American English.

Language Could Diagnose Parkinson's, ALS and Schizophrenia before Lab Tests

A recent study shows the use, or lack of, certain words by patients could be diagnostic indicators of a future disease or ailment. [Published on 02-01-2016]

Posted by Jamie Schnee on March 4, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Change;
Language Shift;
Variation;
Contact

The Linguistic Sex Appeal of the Unicorn

Mark Peters discusses how the word unicorn is beginning to be used to describe unique, desirable and highly unattainable business goals. He also discusses the appeal of other similar terms such as just bump, couch surfing, and cyberbully. [Published on 02-21-2016]

Posted by Jared Nietfeld on March 1, 2016

Tags:
American English;
Change

Sapir-Whorf Picture

This is an image that helps explain the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis. The image is an example of how thoughts can be determined by the language in which you speak. This example shows eskimos being perplexed at the fact that language has so many variations for the word "no." The local area newspaper is titled "English have 10 times as many negative words," showing that certain words can have a wide variety of meaning in different cultures/languages.

Posted by Jeremy Gutovitz on February 24, 2016

Tags:
Change

Bernie Sanders' Accent

A description of Bernie Sanders' accent. Includes brief discussions of vowel-raising and vocalization of r in New York City English, as well as of terminal t enunciation, which is linked to Jewish dialects of English. The decline in New York City English usage over time and its usage as linked to socioeconomic status are also discussed (compare with Labov, William. 1972. Language in the Inner City.; and Mathers, Patrick-André. 2012. The social stratification of /r/ in New York City: Labov's department store study revisited). [Published on 02-18-2016]

The Linguistics of YouTube Voice

This article focuses on YouTube stars, and how they capture a viewer's attention by changing their speech and accommodating to their audience. [Published on 12-07-2015]

Posted by Jamie Schnee on February 21, 2016

Tags:
Accommodation;
Style-shifting;
Change;
Variation

Teenager Girls: The Real Disruptors of Language

Details historical evidence that young women have always been a driving force behind language change, including some changes previously credited to Shakespeare, for example. [Published on 08-07-2015]

Posted by Gina Ruggeri on February 16, 2016

Tags:
Change;
Youth;
Womens Language

Washington Post accepts singular they

The Washington Post's style guide now accepts singular they. [Published on 12-10-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on December 14, 2015

Tags:
Change;
Gender;
Prescriptivism

In defense of "textspeak:" A socio-linguist says emojis and LoLs are modernizing English

A description of some forms of internet language and how the contribute to change in American English. [Published on 05-04-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on May 14, 2015

Tags:
American English;
Change;
Internet Language

xkcd: Quotative Like

The webcomic xkcd offers a humorous take on language change and the use of "like" as a quotative complementizer.

Posted by Abby Mosing on March 12, 2015

Tags:
Change;
Youth;
Prescriptivism

How using 'they' as a singular pronoun can change the world

This is an article that discusses the importance of using singular 'they' and addresses issues related to its "correctness". [Published on 02-03-2015]

Posted by Gregor McGee on February 20, 2015

Tags:
English;
Change;
Grammaticalization;
Gender;
gender non-conforming

What makes a word "real"?

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A TED talk about the change and creation of words in the English language and how they eventually get added into the dictionaries.

Posted by Clark Chang on February 18, 2015

Tags:
Change;
Prescriptivism

Fuhgeddaboudit: New York Accent On Its Way Out, Linguists Say

This is just a short article that looks at the inevitability of language change. Although it mostly talks about neutralization, I feel as though other processes and possible future developments are left out in a way that makes it more sensational for the average reader, especially New Yorkers. [Published on 02-02-2015]

Posted by Tyler Helton on February 3, 2015

Tags:
New York City English;
American English;
Change

Speech markers reveal details about your age, sex, and lifestyle, scientists claim

A daily mail article discussing research that finds gender and age-based differences in the use of fillers [Published on 10-06-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 8, 2014

Tags:
Change;
Gender;
Gender Binary;
Discourse Marker

Translating Philly-ese

A 2014 article on the changing Philadelphia dialect.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 19, 2014

Tags:
Philadelphia English;
Change

XKCD: Misusing Slang

A XKCD comic about language change, youth, and slang.

Posted by Kara Becker on August 27, 2013

Tags:
Change;
Youth;
Slang

Beckhams talk more posh, say researchers

A 2013 report on research from the University of Manchester that David and Victoria Beckham have decreased h-dropping and l-vocalization in their speech.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 18, 2013

Tags:
British English;
Change

Raleigh has lost its drawl, y'all

A 2013 profile of linguist Robin Dodsworth's research on change away from the Southern Shift in Raleigh, NC.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 8, 2013

Tags:
Southern English;
Change

Philly's Accent is Changing

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A video interviewing William Labov and colleagues about their project on change in Philadelphia English

Posted by Kara Becker on April 4, 2013

Tags:
Labov, William;
Philadelphia English;
Change

Fox News: No Maw 'New Yawk'

A 2010 article on the change away from raised THOUGHT in New York City English.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 1, 2013

Tags:
New York City English;
Change

The Philly accent is fading

One of a few 2013 articles covering the newly published research by Labov and colleagues on the transition of the Philadelphia dialect from southern- to northern-influenced.

Posted by Kara Becker on March 27, 2013

Tags:
Labov, William;
Philadelphia English;
Change

The Queen's Christmas Broadcast 1984

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I use this with the following reading: Harrington, Jonathan et al. 2000. Monophthongal vowel changes in Received Pronunciation: An acoustic analysis of the Queen's Christmas Broadcast.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 13, 2013

Tags:
British English;
Received Pronunciation;
Change

The Queen's Christmas Broadcast 1957

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I use this with the following reading: Harrington, Jonathan et al. 2000. Monophthongal vowel changes in Received Pronunciation: An acoustic analysis of the Queen's Christmas Broadcast.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 13, 2013

Tags:
British English;
Received Pronunciation;
Change

North American English Dialects

A 2013 piece on Iowa Public Radio on North American English dialects.

Posted on February 1, 2013

Tags:
Change;
American English

The Queen's Christmas Broadcast 1985

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I use this with the following reading: Harrington, Jonathan et al. 2000. Monophthongal vowel changes in Received Pronunciation: An acoustic analysis of the Queen's Christmas Broadcast.

One News: Kiwi Accent

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A 2007 segment from One News in New Zealand on the changing Kiwi accent, with comments from Allan Bell.

Posted on October 31, 2012

Tags:
New Zealand English;
Change;
Bell, Allan

These days, the twang ain't no thang

A radio segment from Austin's KUT about the recession of Texas dialect features and ones in New York City as well.

NCLLP: Charlotte

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A clip from the documentary Voices of North Carolina on language in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Posted on October 4, 2012

Tags:
Southern English;
Change;
NCLLP

Yoo talkin' to us? Researching whether New York is losing its distinctive accent

A 2012 New York Post article by Kara Becker on the changing nature of the NYCE accent.

Posted on September 28, 2012

Tags:
New York City English;
Change

Val Systems: Pretentious /ae/ hole

The blog post provides a clip from the popular NPR show "Car Talk, with two native Bostonians as hosts. In the clip, one hosts relates being teased by his daughter for his trap-bath split, saying it sounds pretentious.

Posted on September 19, 2012

Tags:
Boston English;
trap-bath split;
Change;
Ideology

Oy Gevalt? New Yorkese an Endangered Dialect?

A New York Times article from 1994 on the decline of the NYCE accent.

Posted on September 14, 2012

Tags:
New York City English;
Change

FDR's Inaguaural Speech and /r/ - Fear Itself

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An example of FDR's /r/less, upper class New York City variety. An interesting spot to look at r vocalization, as the iconic phrase "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself" includes two coda /r/ environments that we don't expect to vocalize, given that they are intervocalic.

Southern Dialects: Talkin' Tar-Heel

Transcript of interview with Walt Wolfram in which many aspects of Southern English are discussed. Audio available on website.

(r) in New York City English

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The classic graph from Labov (1966) showing stratification by socioeconomic class and speaker style for coda r vocalization in New York City English

R Grammar Gaffes Ruining the Language? Maybe Not

Improper grammar usage is becoming more and more prevalent in the world, yet it may not necessarily be a bad thing.

Posted on August 27, 2012

Tags:
English;
Prescriptivism;
Change

Hello, New New England

New England dialect characteristics are becoming less distinct, and the division between eastern and western dialects is shifting both regionally and generationally.

Posted on August 26, 2012

Tags:
New England;
Change

Northern Cities Vowel Shift: How Americans in the Great Lakes Are Revolutionizing English

A 2012 Slate article on the Northern Cities Shift and the diversification of American regional dialects.