Borrowing

The Anglish Moot

This fandom article contains information about the Anglish movement, its principles, and its community. The Anglish movement is a form of English linguistic purism; followers of this movement either wish to make every word in the English language based on German roots, or just speak it as such. They purposefully omit any words of the English language that have Latin or Greek roots, either because they think this is how English was "meant" to be, because they think it's cool and historically interesting, or because they think it's easier. This site has a lot of information for anyone who wants to learn about how the idea came about or how it's used, but it's pretty difficult to navigate. This video explains the linguistic aspects thoroughly but concisely and has examples of what it would sound like: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIo-17SIkws Here is also a Reddit page dedicated to followers of Anglish: https://www.reddit.com/r/anglish/ [Published on 03-10-2019]

Posted by Maria Panopoulos on March 10, 2019

Tags:
English;
German;
Borrowing;
Prescriptivism

Don Omar - Danza Kuduro ft. Lucenzo

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The song Danza Kuduro is an example of the effect globalization has had on language. It is sung in both Portuguese and Spanish, with the music video also utilizing English, by Don Omar, a Latin American pop star, and Lucenzo, a French-Portuguese artist. Borrowing from African culture, the kuduro itself is a type of dance that originated in Africa becoming popular in Angola, a Portuguese colony. The song was number one on the charts in Argentina, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland, showcasing how the song transcended language barriers and how globalization has impacted language use.

Posted by Madison McGuire on January 14, 2019

Tags:
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Borrowing;
Variation;
Accent;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

Resistance to Borrowing: Léo Ferré's "La Langue Française"

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Léo Ferré's "La Langue Française" (1962) exemplifies standard language ideologies that consider foreign loanwords a threat to a language's 'purity' or even its very existence, the joke of the song centering on the irony of the singer declaring that he loves to speak French as he crams borrowings from English into everything he says.

Posted by Amber Burns on November 6, 2018

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
French;
Borrowing;
Contact

For Me Formidable, French & English code-switching

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This song utilizes code-switching between English and French to make use of puns and access prestige in both languages. It questions constraint models with its intra-sentential switches that produce ungrammatical expressions in both English and French.

Posted by Ally Watson on September 27, 2018

Tags:
Code-switching;
Borrowing

Palabra Mi Amor - A French song that’s mostly English and Spanish!

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The French band Shaka Ponk is known for their multilingual lyrics, as they code switch in Spanish, French, English, and Esperanto. This song is semi-exceptional as they use more French than in their other songs. (For a song with Esperanto, listen to Eh La Mala Lama Laico). They use a non standard variety of English while singing (copula deletion), and you can also see adoption of English loanwords into their French vernacular.

Posted by Michaella Joseph on September 27, 2018

Tags:
Performativity;
Singlish;
Code-switching;
Borrowing;
Multilingualism;
Slang;
Copula Absence

Japanese/English Code Switching / Borrowing

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Nihonglish Gairaigo -- English words sprinkled throughout the speech... although this is was created mostly as a showcase of intonation, it seems to be a bit of a social commentary on language use and foreigners.

Posted by Manamaya on September 27, 2018

Tags:
Japanese;
Code-switching;
Borrowing

Made In-Medine

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This song is "Made In" by the French-Algerian Kabyle rapper Medine. The lyrics are mostly in French, with code switching to English and briefly to Arabic. The song is about being proud of one's ethnic/cultural heritage and/or immigrant identity. The song celebrates diverse origins and experiences, and the code switching helps to support that message and lend the lyrics a global feeling.

Posted by Cecilia Bahls on September 26, 2018

Tags:
Code-switching;
Borrowing;
Race,Ethnicity;
Hip Hop Nation

The North Riding of Yorkshire

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This video shows how the Yorkshire Dialect relates to language contact we discussed in class. As it can be observed, the dialect uses words from Old Norse caused by warfare and migrations.

Posted by Andrew Farinella on December 4, 2017

Tags:
British English;
Borrowing

Maz Jobrani: Comedy TedTalk in Qatar

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Maz Jobrani is an Iranian-American who does a lot of comedy to bridge Americans with the Middle East, and to bring awareness of Middle Easterners.

Differences between English, Korean, Japanese, and Chinese

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The four speakers compare word pronunciations across languages with the general discourse held in Korean. Terms involving English morph to and from other languages depending on phonetic inventories. Also, note that the social practice of taboo words in Korean carries over when other languages a have a taboo Korean word in the comparisons leading to a humorous moment.

Posted by Justin Connolly on June 28, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Code-switching;
Borrowing;
Variation

"Stop Trying to Make 'Fetch' Happen"

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"Mean Girls" has provided us with an excellent example of the shortcomings of trying to attribute the success of certain linguistic features and usages solely to language-internal factors. The term 'Fetch', which would appear to offer extensive linguistic utility and and appeal, finds its success limited by the asymmetric, structural power differential between Regina George and Gretchen. As sociolinguists we must consequently keep in mind the need to contextualize speech features within wider historical and political movements (see Milroy and Milroy 1985: 13, "Prescription and Standardization" in Authority in Language).

Posted by Alex Li on March 30, 2017

Tags:
Power;
Borrowing

Pidgin English from Nigeria

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A video of two Nigerian Men who explain and give example of language divergence and Pidgin English.

But What Does Bae Actually Mean?

In this article, the author explores the history and rise of the word "bae" in popular culture, noting that the term has actually been around much longer than its 2014 introduction to the mainstream. Many who grew up hearing and speaking AAVE have used "bae" in conversation for years, and the term has been commercialized to a point where it has lost its original vibe and is now being "sold back" to its original users. [Published on 03-07-2016]

Hooked on Ebonics

The article dives into several important concepts as they relate to the understanding of Ebonics. The author explains that there are rules and variety within Ebonics that demonstrate its value as a variety of English. The author also addresses that Ebonics is not just "a black thing" and that many whites, Hispanics and Asian Americans all engage in AAVE.

AAVE: Stop Appropriating It

This is a question I've been thinking about throughout 212. We talk about how everyone exhibits variation in their language, but a really important concept in social justice work right now is appropriation. This tumblr author asks people to stop "appropriating" AAVE and lists several lexical/discursive items that people who are not black should avoid/never use. If we pick up linguistic features from our peers, and our peers use these features, how can we avoid appropriating another culture's heritage. [Published on 04-01-2014]

Posted by Chase Doremus on April 21, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Borrowing;
Race,Ethnicity

Rock Me Amadeus

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This is the song I chose for my music project--it shows a number of English borrowings and code-switches between German and English.

Posted by Maren Fichter on September 30, 2014

Tags:
Code-switching;
Borrowing;
Contact;
Globalization

Melville's use of "rendezvous"

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An excerpt from Melville's "Typee" with the borrowed word rendezvous.

Posted on September 11, 2014

Tags:
Borrowing;
French

France protects itself from dreaded English language

A Daily Mail (a British publication) article on the restrictions on English borrowings into French put forth by the Academie Francaise in France. [Published on 03-12-2008]

Posted by Kara Becker on September 8, 2014

Tags:
English;
French;
Borrowing

How to Say Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Skwomesh)

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My housemate just got back from vacation in Canada and asked me how to pronounce "7" because she'd seen it on a road sign. I find it telling that a writing system not necessarily suited to the Squamish language is used for road signs (no glottal stop on an English typewriter). Having lived in the PNW for the past few years and being constantly surrounded by such names has made me wonder how true those names are to their originals, and what that means about the relationships between America/the English language and these native languages' speakers.

Posted by Maren Fichter on September 5, 2014

Tags:
Power;
Borrowing;
American Indian;
Contact;
Squamish

How to say "Google" in every language (almost)

A 2012 Atlantic article with an interactive map showing that the verb "to google" has been borrowed into many of the world's languages.

Posted by Kara Becker on March 5, 2013

Tags:
English;
Borrowing