Slang

World of dave: Guessing Konglish words.

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Dave, an American Youtuber who lives in Korean uses his youtube channel to teach Korean to English speakers and English to Koreans. In this video, his brother is visiting and he makes him guess the meaning of Konglish words. Konglish words, as you might be able to guess by the name, English words only used in Korean, but not really. It is a bit of a slang language as most Konglish words are spoken an American accent but are not the same words used in American English. The Koreans made their own words based on the properties of the item, idea or place. Some words are also based on American slang terms, such as sum, this is based on the slang for "something" which means there is a relationship between two people that are not an official couple.

Posted by Cassie Russ on October 9, 2018

Tags:
American English;
Code-switching;
Slang

Palabra Mi Amor - A French song that’s mostly English and Spanish!

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The French band Shaka Ponk is known for their multilingual lyrics, as they code switch in Spanish, French, English, and Esperanto. This song is semi-exceptional as they use more French than in their other songs. (For a song with Esperanto, listen to Eh La Mala Lama Laico). They use a non standard variety of English while singing (copula deletion), and you can also see adoption of English loanwords into their French vernacular.

Posted by Michaella Joseph on September 27, 2018

Tags:
Performativity;
Singlish;
Code-switching;
Borrowing;
Multilingualism;
Slang;
Copula Absence

How to Speak Internet 101

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This artifact contains terms and phrases that are used on the Internet and provides an explanation and briefing of what context these terms can be used in. The video explains Internet "slang" terms.

Posted by Nirali Desai on July 1, 2018

Tags:
Internet Language;
Slang

Rethinking Grammar: How We Talk

We as people judge the way that others speak, we assume intelligence based on the way that people speak. African American Vernacular tends to be associated with not being very smart [Published on 10-21-2015]

Workplace Norms Conveyed Through Rap

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The Office is a popular show on NBC from which we can apply linguistic concepts to. In this short clip Dwight and Michael compose a rap for new members of the office that have relocated from another geographical area. This rap is used to introduce the new hires to the social workplace norms that typically take place at Dunder Mifflin. Dwight and Michael utilize rap and rhyming to make the song seem more comical and appealing to the individuals they have never met before. They also try hard to make their office seem "cool" and "inviting."

Posted by Sydney Chappell on June 30, 2018

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Communities of Practice;
Hip Hop Nation;
Slang

Teens Tell All About Slang

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This video emphasizes a new language habit of teenagers in todays' world. What I mean is using slang. Slang is highly informal and often used in colloquial speech. It is a part of a language that is usually outside of standard usage and that may consist of both newly coined words and phrases and of new or extended meanings attached to established terms. This video helps you to understand some slangs with a good explanation of the reason for these changes.

Posted by Wenqi Zang on June 17, 2018

Tags:
English;
Variation;
Youth;
Internet Language;
Slang

Teaching My Mom Slang Terms of 2017

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Lori Loughlin, also known as Aunt Becky from the sitcom Full House, learns slang terms of 2017 from her teenage daughter.

Posted by Emma Pound on May 11, 2018

Tags:
Slang

South African Rugby Slang

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In the video, Welsh players try to find and dissect the meaning behind the slang and colloquialisms of the South African language and rugby terms for various things. The reason behind this is due to the terms being unique to South African community and rugby community. These terms are special to the rugby group and the known meaning only known to the South African country as seen throughout the length of the video

Posted by Caleb Moore on May 11, 2018

Tags:
Communities of Practice;
Slang

"Dangerous" Teenage Texting Slang

This article covers a viewpoint of parents on slang used over text by teenagers. The article provides lists of acronyms to provide insight in what teens are saying and ways for parents to "decode". It is interesting to see that communication has adapted so much to the point where an older generation needs a "decoding" list in order to understand conversations of younger generations. It also shows the difference in speech communities between two sets of age groups. [Published on 06-12-2017]

Posted by Deonne Rodriguez on May 3, 2018

Tags:
Youth;
Communities of Practice;
Internet Language;
Slang

Chancletas

This meme highlights the multifunctionality of a word within and across various languages. It also displays the importance of context when using a word as well as how a word can index both cultural identity and community membership.

Ear Hustle Podcast

This podcast, "Ear Hustle" discusses the reality of life in prison, created in a prison by prisoner Earlonne Woods and a prison volunteer and artist named Nigel Poor. The first episode, "Cellies" describes the meaning of the word "Ear Hustle" which is synonymous with eavesdropping. Prison language and the language used outside of prison is highly various. This is just an example of various language used in prison and the connection to prison culture. [Published on 06-14-2017]

Posted by Tatiana Cosper on April 27, 2018

Tags:
Indexicality;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting;
Slang;
Stigma

The Meaning of "Za": Pizza or Lasagna?

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This video is an SNL sketch in which two courtroom attorneys argue over the meaning of a specific word used by the defendant. This argument revolves around the question: Does "Za" mean pizza or lasagna? Because the two attorneys have differing language ideologies and are a part of different speech communities, they interpret the word "Za" differently and therefore each believe the defendant belongs to their speech community and uses "Za" the way it means to them. This video also plays on linguistic indexicality, which is the way in which language references or points us to certain aspects of the world; in this case the pronunciation of "Za" pointed one attorney towards lasagna and the other towards pizza.

Posted by Bridgette Befort on March 4, 2018

Tags:
Indexicality;
Communities of Practice;
Slang

New Slang

This article talks about how slang in incorporated with each new generation. We were talking about this in class and this is a little bit more.

Posted by Tiffany Chang on February 22, 2018

Tags:
Slang

The Kardashians' Language

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In this video (at around time 1:25), Millie Bobby Brown talks about the particular way the Kardashians speak, including slang terms that are used by the family members and viewers of their show.

Posted by Andrea Sodergren on December 7, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Communities of Practice;
Slang

How the triplet flow took over rap

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Although the usage of triplets (i.e. the “Migos” flow) has become very popular as of late, and is currently heard on just about every rap track that hits the Billboard 100, the usage of triplets in rap is not something new. It has its roots in Midwestern and Southern rap communities in the 80s onward. In rap, a triplet is essentially like setting your verse to 3/4 time - three beats per bar rather than 4. In rap, it can be used as a sort of verbal trick - it could slow down a song by throwing off the expected rhythm our brain is expecting to hear or even speed it up. Listening to verses in triplets can also make the rappers’ flow feel cleaner. Lyrically, the songs can be flexible or rigid, allowing a diverse range of rap styles to be done over the beat.

19 Words Your Kids Use, Explained

An article from 2014 explaining several key slang words and phrases that youth were using at the time, many of which seem relevant today including “bae” and “shade.” The article further displays how language continues to evolve, as the words people use as youths can make their ways into their adult speech and thus possibly garner mass acceptance across a community of speech or practice. [Published on 10-07-2014]

Posted by Jeremy Pafford on October 7, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Youth;
Communities of Practice;
Slang;
Lexicon

I GET THE BAG Gucci Mane ft. Migos

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This is a new Hip-Hop video with Gucci Mane and rap group the Migos called I Get The "Bag". When people are talking about getting a "Bag" now of days it's just another way of saying getting money or bossing up that's just your "bag". Bag can be used in many different ways it's a new thing that has been used frequently. It's an African american slang word coming from rap culture.

Posted by Steven Sims Jr. on September 28, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

Philippine English vs. Australian English

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"Philippine English vs. Australian English" is a funny YouTube video by a Filipino husband and his Australian wife illustrating the differences between the two different dialects of English. By comparing different words and terms between the two dialects, the differences are sometimes profound, incomprehensible, and often very funny!

The Game-Spanglish

This is a song the is by the rapper, The Game, and the song is titled "Spanglish". Growing up in Compton, California, The Game was subjected to many interactions with gang members and other individuals; this includes many hispanics. I found it interesting that this song includes a good amount of mock spanish, which i relevant to our final paper. In the song, Game switch back and forth between spanish to english and describes his life growing up in Compton along with the love for his city. [Published on 07-25-2017]

Posted by Parker Johnson on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Spanish;
Mock Spanish;
Socioeconomic Status;
Slang

The Doge Meme

Fun Fact: it is the 12 year anniversary of the term doge. An internet famous canine known to many, one of the original meme phenomenons: the "doge." Originating with a picture of perplexed Shiba Inu, this picture was one of the first to get the meme movement going. Somehow, this photo of a dog evolved into the same picture with a smorgasbord of random phrases on it in juvenile neon comic sans font. Phrases such as "very wow" "such fun" "so perplex" "much doge" which are obviously not grammatically correct, nor do they make any sense, but for some reason everybody understands and laughs along. There are countless versions of the doge that apply to any situation, and the use of doge language is still relevant and understood 12 years later. [Published on 02-06-2014]

Posted by Hannah Clevenger on July 1, 2017

Tags:
Youth;
Internet Language;
Slang;
Semantics

Mexican Slang with Salma Hayek

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This video is of Mexican, multilingual actress Salma Hayek describing and translating Spanish slang terms into English. She attempts to translate words and phrases literally, but then provides more nuanced and accurate translations. She employs some code-switching in her commentary, and the video helps illustrate elements of Spanish-speaking Mexican identities and speech communities.

Posted by Grace Bridges on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Multilingualism;
Slang

Keye & Peele - Proud Thug

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In this Key and Peele skit called “Proud Thug”, comedians Michael Keegan-Key and Jordan Peele portray stereotypical Hispanic gangsters. They use terms like “holmes”, “homie” and “esé” to refer to each other. On top of the heavy Spanish accents, they use some broken English, double negatives, slang, and a lot of cursing to communicate in a way that Hispanic “gangstas” are expected to.

Posted by Samantha Mackey on June 26, 2017

Tags:
Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

Anne Curzan: What makes a word "real"?

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In this video Anne Curzan reviews how a word can be introduced to language, how words can begin to move out of the language, and how the usage of words change and alter through time. Curzan also covers how people use dictionaries and resources in order to stay caught up but, editors of dictionaries are struggling to keep up with our vocabulary and have to gabble on which words will actually survive.

Posted by Spencer Q. on June 26, 2017

Tags:
Language Shift;
Youth;
Education;
Slang

American Vs. British Slang

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The video I found is what the different slangs that people use in America and British. In the video, the two girls, Kaelyn who’s from America and Lucy who comes from England gave a pop quiz to each other about throw out several slangs and ask what the other person expecting the meanings of the slang words or phrases to show us how different language use in different cultures. For example, "packing heat" means carrying a gun and the word "slayed" means you own it. We can also hear the differences about American and British accent. There is a mass of different types of languages and within those languages, there are a lot of accents in those cultures. Some of them are influenced by genetic and geographical reasons, and some others are learned in particularly social setting. I think all of us are learning new knowledges frequently.

Posted by Rui Wei on June 26, 2017

Tags:
American English;
British English;
English;
Slang

Miraculous Accent

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Language is miraculous. It is diverse because of various regions, there comes accents. Siobhan Thompson imitates 17 different accents in Britain, exploring which region may speak these accents and who are the people that speak these accents. She presents typical stars or movie actors and demonstrates accents like RP, Received Pronunciation, the standard BBC English; Heightened RP, generally spoken in movies or television; London; East Anglia; West County; Northern Welsh and the like. United Kingdom is not among one of those countries with the large territory but it has more than 17 kinds of accents. How can you believe the millions of accents spoken around the world? Besides the amazing of the large numbers of accents, the diverse culture and language behind the accents are also amazing. It is easy to find that people who speak different accents sometimes have their own slang, which represents for their unique culture.

Posted by Junhong Chen on June 26, 2017

Tags:
British English;
Slang

HIP HOP SLANGS

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This is about a Guy who is trying to explain rap slang. Based on the video he is a white male trying to explain the hip hop cultures slang. The thing that I found really interesting about the video is his persona that presents the word. How he tries to explain the word with “appropriate English”. I noticed that this related to our class because we talked about how we appropriate certain styles of language over the other. Even though rap slang is only used by a small group of people it seem to be represented a an inferior way of speak based on the presentation of this video. When they gave examples it was looked at as silly. Just a really interesting video especially when you relate it to this topic.

Posted by Simeon Perkins on May 12, 2017

Tags:
Language Shift;
Hip Hop Nation;
Slang

Kroll Show - Rich Dicks - Dunch

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In this Kroll Show skit, Rich Dicks, Drunch, the two men, Wendy and Aspen, embellish their “rich” lifestyle by the purchasing a restaurant. They get the name of their restaurant by combining “dinner” and “lunch.” Customers who are are in the same socioeconomic community as them elongate words and use a higher pitched tone resulting in intonation after a statement. Additionally, they insert “r” in several words, like in Liam Nersen(Neeson),  carsh (cash), and hur (here), resulting in a /ar/, /ʌr/ or a hooked schwa sound. To differentiate the socioeconomic status between the characters, the chef in the skit does not follow the same language performance as Wendy and Aspen.

Covert Racism Found in Grey's Anatomy

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During this scene of Grey’s Anatomy, Amelia approaches Maggie, who is African American, about a situation where she felt like she may have come off racist. There are several points during their conversation in which anthropological elements are highlighted. One major example is presented when Maggie talks about about how people assume things about her based on her race. She mentions that she approached an airline ticket booth with a first class ticket and the attendant said, “We aren’t boarding coach yet.” Although this isn’t an overtly racist statement, the subtle racist ideas are still present. This example is similar to the statement “You can turn the air conditioning on if you want to” that we talked about during lecture. When we make implicit statements like these, we are giving power to racist ideas without coming out and using actual racist language. We let our assumptions do the talking and reinforce the racial stereotypes that already exist in our society.

Posted by Brianna Johnson on May 10, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

Language Lessons Told Through Twitter

This article it explains how social media particularly twitter not only can change language, but can provide a proper input on the evolution of language. [Published on 10-26-2012]

Posted by Max Pitney on May 9, 2017

Tags:
Change;
Slang

Barack Obama - Code Switcher

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Code switching is a large part of a public figures publicity arsenal. Being able to switch mannerisms, linguistic traits, and other factors of a depiction of self is incredibly important in the formulation of a diverse and accepting group of constituents. Being able to maintain all the code switching when prompted is also necessary for maintaining those groups, because being able to appear like you know exactly what they’re experiencing shows commitment and understanding. Barack Obama was known through various examples to show his ability to code switch based on the community he was visiting, whether it be rural North Carolina church, or USA basketball locker rooms. In this clip, we see his interactions with various players, male and female, and the coaching staffs. Take note how he changes the way he speaks based on their perceived race and whether they are a coach or a player. In addition, the status of the individuals he is addressing changes the way he speaks. For example, the way he talks to LeBron James (superstar) and Anthony Davis (rookie at the time) are different, even though they are both power forwards for the USA Men’s basketball team. Furthermore, in his recounting of the story about Joe Biden’s daughter, we see his use of different speech techniques with a coach who is white when compared to interactions with a black player. Finally, the handshake at the beginning of the video with Kevin Durant is a great example of an on the fly code switch.

Posted by Ben Orlowski on May 8, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice;
Slang

John McWhorter: Txtng is killing language. JK!!!

This is a TED talk by John McWhorter in which he is explaining that writing is just a representation in the way we talk. He explains that there is an emergent complexity in fingered speech (texting). There is a new kind of "language" that is being created now that speech is in continuous change and therefore a new structure is created. [Published on 02-01-2013]

Posted by Eira Nylander Torallas on May 6, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Slang;
Stigma

Invisible Man - Thug Notes Summary and Analysis

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thug notes is a youtube series about a well read "thug" how wishes to share the gift of classic literature with his fellow gangster.

Posted by kyle clawson on May 4, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Code-switching;
Slang

Dogs Are Doggos: An Internet Language Built Around Love For The Puppers

An article describing the evolution of "doggolingo" across the internet over the past few years. It does cite linguists as commenting on the trends. Comments on the lexical and onomatopoetic nature of the "lingo." [Published on 04-23-2017]

Posted by Melanie Stoddard on April 24, 2017

Tags:
Internet Language;
Slang;
Lexicon

At UMass lecture, Stanford professor tackles prejudice against African-American English in courtrooms

A woman’s testimony in court is accused of being “unintelligible” because she speaks a different dialect of English, specifically African American English. The slang terms or speech patterns that she uses do not sound grammatically correct to the courtroom, but back home, it is normal speech. Rickford interestingly notes in the article that since interpreters for foreign languages are used in the courtroom, we should also use those resources of dialects of English that are not as easily interpreted by conventional speakers of the language.

Teen Slang: What's, like, so wrong with like?

This article is about the use of 'like' and other fillers and the way it is deemed inappropriate. It is commonly used among teens as a way of 'belonging', and is used in certain contexts. The article also goes on to say that someone might not like the use of fillers because they are not part of the speech community it's used in. [Published on 09-28-2010]

Posted by Beth Westerman on March 8, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Communities of Practice;
Slang

Bailando-Enrique Iglesias Lyrics

These lyrics contain the lyrics from the song Bailando by Enrique Iglesias where he uses Spanish and English throughout the entire song.

Posted by Kayla Springs on February 20, 2017

Tags:
Spanglish;
English;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Language Shift;
Multilingualism;
Slang

An Illustrated Guide To Weird British Expressions

If you asked someone what’s Great Britain's most peculiar trait, they’d probably tell you it’s their odd choice of expressions. Here's a curation of a series of strange, weird and odd British expressions illustrated. [Published on 11-07-2016]

Posted by Marilyn Vinch on November 9, 2016

Tags:
Slang

President Obama's Anger Translator

President Obama gets an anger translator. This video is comedic twist to a typical presidential speech.

(Almost) Every time they say "BOY" on Monster Factory (Eps. 1-23)

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This is exactly what it says in the title--a clip show of every time the hosts of Polygon's video series Monster Factory say the word "boy". What is significant about the use of "boy" in this context is that it is non-standard. Most speakers of American English do not refer to grown men as boys in the same way that these same speakers refer to grown women as girls. Moreover, the hosts are both brothers, lending to their similar styles of speaking as well as senses of humor. I also included "internet language" and "slang" as tags due to the growing use of "boy" to describe grown men across the internet as the show gains popularity within gaming circles.

Posted by Katie Allen on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Gender;
Gender Binary;
Internet Language;
Slang

Slangs

Using Slang words creates social identity. New slangs are forms consistently are called the “human poetry”. Slangs can bring a wider message through in small words such as “hangry”, meaning angry due to hungry. [Published on 05-20-2013]

Posted by cyndi lin on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Slang

Black Folks Slang

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This video is a tutorial on several slang words used by people in the black community. The video explains what these words mean in English and gives examples of the slang words used in a sentence in order to understand the context of them. This video is shows the use of African American English and speech communities.

Posted by Chrissy McLeod on October 14, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice;
Slang

Key & Peele Substitute Teacher

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This is kind of a funny skit that Key and Peele did for comedy central, where the African American substitute teacher is having difficulties pronouncing the names of his white students. It's an example of the different linguistic styles that some people use including AAVE.

Posted by Nadia Mahmud on October 13, 2016

Tags:
Slang

Latinos Guess Urban Dictionary Terms

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This video is interesting because it is asking Latinos specifically what they think certain slang words mean that are often used today. The words are slang words that most young adults and teenagers know but a few of the words were aimed at the Latino community. An interesting aspect of the video was that they included slang words related to the presidential race of 2016 and you can see how the Latinos react to certain words or what they assume one might mean.

Posted by Rachael Demjanik on October 12, 2016

Tags:
Spanish;
Slang;
Semantics

The Importance of Code Switching

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Edward Moore explains the importance of Code Switching for success. He emphasizes that people of color need to know how to function in different environments. From "the block" to the board room.

Black Girls: The Cycle Continues

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In the video titled “Black Girls: The Cycle Continues.” we see a group of young black females taking turns speaking their mind's over an apparent issue, which has upset them. This is a good example of slang terminology and language ideologies of a speech community.

Sh%t Southern Women Say, Episode 1

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This comical satire highlights common phrases and slang frequently used by southern women. These iconic sayings can also index their southern roots.

Posted by Allison Maxfield on October 4, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Womens Language;
Communities of Practice;
Slang

Kodak Black Social Artifact Golden Boy

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He uses a dialect that is familiar with the rap community, and has an accent that is usually associated with the Haitian community. His delivery of the language he uses gives him his swagger, and gives him a style that stands out from other artists. Examples of his lyrics include saying things like "dat" instead of "that", or "witchu" instead of with "with you".

The Specialized Language of Sports

This is a link to a blog post describing the specialized language of sports. This post highlights the various terminology used in a variety of sports. The author describes some of his favorite terms in both American sports as well as terms used in European countries. He likes these terms for the actual sound the words make when uttered. Tags: Community of practice, British, French, Portuguese, Italian, Slang, semantics [Published on 08-11-2010]

Posted by Emily Blessing on September 26, 2016

Tags:
English;
French;
Communities of Practice;
Slang;
Semantics

“Things You Do Online That’d Be Creepy In Real Life”

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This video draws attention to how social media has gone further than just coining new slang terms; it has created a new language with entirely different governing rules. It points out the significant differences in styles of communication between face-to-face contact and social media interactions. The most striking examples are the performative declarations that would seem strange if spoken in front of a live audience. Here we see just how easily we take for granted this major shift in our everyday life.

Posted by Allison Maxfield on September 26, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Communities of Practice;
Internet Language;
Slang

Twitch Speak the Language of Twitch Chat

This short article attempts to delve into the appeal of twitch.tv's brand of emoji language and how it has developed into its own language community that spans multiple continents. [Published on 08-08-2014]

Posted by Robb Woodward on July 29, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Communities of Practice;
Internet Language;
Slang

3 Types of English

This TedTalk features Jamila Lyiscott, who describes the "three Englishes" she speaks on a daily basis, which is determined by her surrounding environment and who she is with. Her detailed breakdown of the different "tongues" she speaks shows the correlation between language, culture, and race, as well as how society and culture effect language acquisition/usage. [Published on 02-01-2014]

Pidgin English from Nigeria

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A video of two Nigerian Men who explain and give example of language divergence and Pidgin English.

How to Speak Hip

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This is the intro to a 13 part "album" instructing listeners on how to speak and understand "hip" language. Those who want to appear "cool" to this subculture that includes hipsters, juvenile delinquents, jazz musicians, etc.

Code-Switching: Obama's 'Nigga' Moment Makes Civil Rights History

The article includes the quote from President Obama "Yo, Barry, you did it my nigga!" which ended the President's final White House Correspondents Dinner. The importance of this is the switch between what could be considered formal English and AAVE. The article also addresses the question of language ideologies by responding to the idea that it was inappropriate for the term "my nigga!" to be included in the speech. Furthermore, that language ideology is rooted in racist ideologies, so the utterance is also a response to power structures. [Published on 05-02-2016]

Yo skater!

This sign photo was posted by a TripAdvisor user who visited North Vancouver. The sign is aimed at skateboarders. By using slang language that indexes stereotypical skateboarders and the style in which they are perceived to generally speak, the Parks Department attempts to be humorous by exaggeratedly targeting the skater community, but in the process is trying to make a directed message with this style.

Posted by Jill Vesta on July 23, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Slang

30 Trendy Internet Slang Words and Acronyms You Need To Know To Fit In

Do you ever read an acronym and have absolutely no idea what it means? Seems to be happening more and more lately! Especially with teens and young adults. Here is your key to internet slang! [Published on 07-15-2015]

Posted by Daniella Donofrio on July 20, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Internet Language;
Slang

Keith Ape - 잊지마 (It G Ma) (feat. JayAllDay, Loota, Okasian & Kohh)

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Music video depicting East Asian (Korean and Japanese) rappers using CRAAVE. This video was highly controversial because many felt the rappers were appropriating black culture, especially since the song itself was based off of an African American hip-hop song ("U Guessed It" by OG Maco).

Posted by Maren Bilby on March 15, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Japanese;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

Ebonics Dictionary

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In this video stand up comedian Steve Harvey explains the complexity of Ebonics. Although he is African American Steve Harvey's stand up routine plays into certain African American stereotypes while pointing out the differences between American English and AAVE.

Facebook Wants to Build a Glossary of New Slang

With the rise of social media in our everyday lives where traditional language conventions are not always used, there have been new forms of slang and internet slang coming about daily. This article shows how Facebook wants to detect the uses of slang on their website and create a dictionary to give meaning to all of these new words. This technology will attempt to predict cool slang words before they are “cool”.

Posted by Matt McLaughlin on March 11, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Accommodation;
Linguistic Relativity;
Slang

'Thug Life' and the Effect of Hip-Hop on Language

This audio talks about how hip hop influence today's language. The word "Thug" is discussed and explained how the words meaning has changed over time.

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Grammaticalization;
Hip Hop Nation;
Slang

The Ebonics Controversy in my Backyard

This article talks about Ebonics and Code-Switching, It explains what happened when the Ebonics controversy broke out.

Language, Race, and White Public Space

This article talks about the use of language in comparison to race. It talks about the negative stereotypes that are directed to Chicanos and Latinos by talking about "Mock Spanish".

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism;
Slang;
Stigma

Potty-Mouthed Princesses Drop F-Bombs for Feminism by FCKH8.com

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This video uses young girl cussing to show that there are more problems in society than little girls cussing. The fact that they are talking the way they are is shocking, which is done to make people actually listen to the bigger point.

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Youth;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Sexism;
Slang;
Stigma

Don't Stop the Party - Pitbull lyrics

These lyrics contain the lyrics from the song Don't Stop the Party by artist Pitbull, where he uses Spanish and English throughout the song.

Formation - Beyonce

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In this video, singer Beyonce uses her lyrics and video to demonstrate her frustration with society, police brutality, and racism.

Posted by Zana Pascoe on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Race,Ethnicity;
Hip Hop Nation;
Slang

Gay Men React to Lesbian Slang

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This video shows a bunch of different gay men trying to decipher what different types of lesbian slang mean. They also go in to what their own gay slang is as well while trying to understand lesbian slang.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gay Mens Language;
Sexual Orientation;
Womens Language;
Slang

Key & Peele - Obama Meet & Greet

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This Key & Peele comedy sketch humorously depicts Obama and the different ways he talks to black and white people after a speech. There's a lot of code switching going on in this sketch. There's a handful funny references in here as well, from rap to slang.

How to Speak INTERNET

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A group of three British guys basically put together a video "guide" to understanding all of today's internet slang. From "YOLO," to ""FML," they cover a handful of different types of internet slang and explain what they all mean in the non internet world.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
English;
Code-switching;
Youth;
Education;
Internet Language;
Slang

Friends: Joey acting nineteen

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In this clip from the TV show FRIENDS, the character Joey is pretending to be a teenager to prove he can land an acting gig as a younger guy. He uses a bunch of what he thinks is teenager slang while trying to convince Chandler that he can do it. This is a good example of slang, especially in regards to youth and the area in which the show is set (NYC).

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
New York City English;
Youth;
Slang

Black Folks Slang

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A black comedian basically goes through a handful of different types of "black folks slang" and explains what they really mean. He does this through a couple different ways, from using the slang in a sentence, to describing exactly what it means, to even showing tweets that use a particular type of "black folks slang." He also does it in a humorous way which makes it easier to understand and more engaging.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
African American English;
whiteness;
Internet Language;
Slang

Hugh Laurie: the British slang vs the American

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This is a video clip from an episode of Ellen where British actor Hugh Laurie comes on the show. They play a game of "American vs. English slang" where they test each other on whether they understand different types of American and British slang. They go back and forth with each other and test each other's knowledge of what the different types of slang mean.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
American English;
British English;
English;
Accent;
Slang

Language in prison: Solitary linguistic confinement

This article describes the importance of language and communication for human health and sanity. The effects of non communication and language between human beings is extremely detrimental to a persons sanity. They come to the conclusion that human interaction is a basic human right, just as necessary as food or water, but that it is not treated as such in prisons across the world. [Published on 04-16-2013]

Posted by Ainise Havili on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Communities of Practice;
Contact;
Slang

But What Does Bae Actually Mean?

In this article, the author explores the history and rise of the word "bae" in popular culture, noting that the term has actually been around much longer than its 2014 introduction to the mainstream. Many who grew up hearing and speaking AAVE have used "bae" in conversation for years, and the term has been commercialized to a point where it has lost its original vibe and is now being "sold back" to its original users. [Published on 03-07-2016]

Hooked on Ebonics

The article dives into several important concepts as they relate to the understanding of Ebonics. The author explains that there are rules and variety within Ebonics that demonstrate its value as a variety of English. The author also addresses that Ebonics is not just "a black thing" and that many whites, Hispanics and Asian Americans all engage in AAVE.

Family Guy Stereotypes

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This video is a combination of stereotypes that have aired on family guy over the years. Many of these stereotypes have to do with race and language in society today.

Gangs: Slang, Words, Symbols

This article contains the language used between the intricate structures of gangs in American communities. One could say gangs are like their own society with a language of their own, only used by members within it. They have grown and evolved throughout the years due to drugs and the growing popularity of fire arms. Because of this the linguistic structure of street gangs have also evolved into, sometimes, very complicated language structure. [Published on 03-01-2011]

Posted by Ainise Havili on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Code-switching;
Youth;
Slang

Parents confused by children's use of internet slang

This article describes the difficulties parents have understanding the language being used by their children on the internet. As the new generation grows up and more generations begin we start to see a change in linguistic tendencies and cultures catch on. And with the ever-growing world of the internet, we can expect these changes in slang to come as frequent as every month. [Published on 05-01-2015]

Posted by Ainise Havili on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Internet Language;
Linguistic Relativity;
Slang

Fresh Prince: Carlton plays "Gangster"

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A clip from Fresh Prince of Bel-air, where Carlton plays a character called C-note, a "gangster" version of himself, and code-switches his language pattern.

Posted by Lily Siebert on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent;
Slang

Be Free

Rapper J. Cole uses his words to express the danger of African Americans and the struggle that they go through. He uses his words as symbols and powerful words to paint the picture of the pain.

Grandmas Attempt To Define Modern Slang Words [LABS] | Elite Daily

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Grandmas try to decipher what modern slang words mean. Here you can see how age and culture can determine your language use. I think we can also see how slang plays into language and how misunderstood slang can be.

Posted by Courtney Dickerson on March 5, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Slang

When Dirty words first appeared in English

A chart of when slang terms for genitalia and sex first appeared in English. [Published on 12-19-2014]

Posted by Brian Pener on March 5, 2016

Tags:
Grammaticalization;
Slang

Internet Language

This article goes over the beginning unique language on the Internet. It also goes over grammar that is unique the Internet. [Published on 01-22-2015]

Posted by Brian Pener on March 5, 2016

Tags:
Grammaticalization;
Language Shift;
Internet Language;
Slang

The Evolution of Dude

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How the meaning of the word dude has radically changed over 130 years.

Posted by Brian Pener on March 5, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Change;
Slang

Dad Learns Internet Slang

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A son is teaching his father words that are commonly used on the internet and seeing what he thinks they mean. It is very interesting to see how different generations think of these words as two completely different things.Throughout this video of course slang is being used but I think stigmas are brought up throughout this video as well. The refer to Justin Bieber as having swag and then describe it as, hat turned sideways, pants sagged low, etc.

Posted by Madison Rigdon on March 4, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Accent;
Internet Language;
Slang;
Stigma

How Others Interpret Slang

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This is video shows different members of society, whether it be by age, gender or race, trying to identify what different slang terms mean.

Posted by Katherine Helms on March 3, 2016

Tags:
Hip Hop Nation;
Slang

Altering Chris Rock's Oscars monologue to conform to "standard" english

88th Academy Awards host Chris Rock used his opening monologue to hit on a number of important issues facing people of color in the film industry. Time included a transcript of Rock's speech to go along with a clip, and, interestingly, they have taken his words and "corrected" his grammar. For instance, in the video, Rock jokes, "in the 'in memoriam' section, it's going to be black people that was shot by the cops on their way to the movies." However, his words are transcribed as "...were shot by the cops on their way to the movies." Rock's leveling of verb forms is seen as "non-standard," and "corrected" for publication. [Published on 02-28-2016]

English or Ebonics

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This is a video that show the code-switching involved between proper english vs. slang.

Posted by Kelley Lane on February 28, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching;
Ebonics Controversy;
Slang

"The Day Beyonce Turned Black"

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Within this SNL skit, there are many different forms of language used. For this skit, it is explaining how caucasian people tend to look at the world in a over dramatic way. Throughout the skit, there are race, gender, & sexualities between white and blacks. This skit has a comical view on different political problems that we have in this country today, and what the children of our culture are growing up in.

Sh*t People From Hawaii Say

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Content Notes: Obscenities A humorous introduction to Hawaiian Pidgin by local celebrity Ryan Higa. This video demonstrates Pidgin being used in its social context, giving viewers unfamiliar with it an understanding of its importance in forming identity in the Hawaiian speech community.

Posted by Christy Jo Williams on February 22, 2016

Tags:
Hawaiian Pidgin;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

Jewish American uses of Yiddish

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This Video contains Jewish Americans using select Yiddish words and Slang words such as JAP(Jewish American Princess).

Posted by Brian Pener on February 22, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Jewish;
Slang

The Linguistics of AAVE

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This video discusses the history of AAVE, "African American Vernacular English. It address the origin, the pronunciations, and how it is used. The video gives great examples of AAVE and the translation of what it means in "proper" English.

Posted by Meaghan Kuhlmann on February 21, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Grammaticalization;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

Cultural Hegemony

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A wonderfully concise description of hegemony, with real world examples of things we see in our everyday life that we may overlook. This idea relates to language in how our society favors standard English and those who utilize it.

Posted by Amanda Salamanca on February 16, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Standard Language Ideology;
Slang

The Bae factor

This picture is a perfect example of how our youth have started taking common words of endearment and changing it out of laziness but to mean the same thing as the original word.

Posted by Kelley Lane on February 11, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Slang

Jawn - It's the new 'Yo'

A profile of the slang term "jawn," unique to Philadelphia, which is used in a the new Rocky movie. [Published on 12-01-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on December 1, 2015

Tags:
Philadelphia English;
Slang

Extremely British

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A satirical trailer mocking the apparent incomprehensibility of UK English varieties, notably, those featured in crime dramas for US viewers (possibly aiming toward Cockney). A claim by a film critic, "Extremely British" and USA Today reports, "I don't think I heard a single consonant." Intro ling, intro phonetics classes loved it.

Posted by Andrea Kortenhoven on October 30, 2015

Tags:
Indexicality;
Cockney English;
Variation;
Socioeconomic Status;
Slang

Philippine "Gay Lingo"

The following quote from the Bourdieu reading reminded me of Swardspeak (or Bekimon), an argot/slang used by queer communities in the Philippines (where I was born and raised): "it is not space which defines language but language which defines its space" (44) (Citation: Bourdieu, Pierre. 1991. Language and Symbolic Power.) Swardspeak has indeed created a distinct space for gay communities in the Philippines, helping them resist cultural assimilation. The linked Wikipedia article has more information as well as great examples of Swardspeak constructions. Here's a clip of how it sounds. It's from a hit talk show; the host, Vice Ganda, a queer comedian/TV personality, makes his guests reenact a scene from their movie in standard Tagalog and then in Swardspeak. It's mostly in Tagalog, but I think it's pretty easy to tell how different Swardspeak is. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfZ91K2MS6g

Posted by Korina Yoo on February 19, 2015

Tags:
Power;
Code-switching;
Slang

"This is her, right?" "This is me, right?"

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Catherine Tate as teen Londoner Lauren, performing the quotative "this is + SPEAKER" among other features associated with urban young Londoners of low socio-economic class.

Posted by Amelia Wolf on December 1, 2014

Tags:
Youth;
Socioeconomic Status;
Slang

Time Magazine's "Which Words Should We Ban?"

The banned word poll consists mainly of slang found in youth culture and in AAE, and while the article suggests the words in question are new and over-exposed, the lexical items in AAE have long been in use. The descriptions for the words and slang mock those who use them, heavily targeting African American youth. [Published on 11-12-2014]

Posted by Amelia Wolf on November 17, 2014

Tags:
African American English;
Youth;
Prescriptivism;
Slang;
Lexicon

When Slang Becomes a Slur

Linguist Geoffrey Nunberg, who testified in the trademark trial over the name of the football team the Washington Redskins, argues that the term remains a slur and that the team name should be changed. [Published on 06-23-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 25, 2014

Tags:
Entextualization;
American Indian;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang;
Lexicon

NYTimes: Like, Degrading the Language? No Way

An op-ed by John McWhorter arguing that many recent innovations in American English - including "like," "totally," and "because X," are positive developments, and even enhance politeness strategies. [Published on 04-05-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on April 7, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Slang;
Discourse Marker

A brief history of Dude

A 2013 article in the Atlantic on the evolving meanings of the term of address "dude," with quotes from Scott Kiesling

Posted by Kara Becker on October 24, 2013

Tags:
Youth;
Masculinity;
Slang;
Lexicon

XKCD: Misusing Slang

A XKCD comic about language change, youth, and slang.

Posted by Kara Becker on August 27, 2013

Tags:
Change;
Youth;
Slang

Accommodation and Elongation in Texting

An investigation into what inspires soooo many people to toss extra letters into their text messages

Posted by Christina Lee Gremore on February 24, 2013

Tags:
Indexicality;
Femininity;
Womens Language;
Slang;
Discourse

Cockney Rhyming Slang

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A 2008 segment on Cockney Rhyming Slang

Posted on November 8, 2012

Tags:
Cockney English;
Slang

"No Homo" in hip hop

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A 2008 video post on the slang term "No Homo," defined as a "defense mechanism" used within hop hop culture by men wo want to confirm their heteromasculinity.

What's your English, South Africa?

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A short video made in preparation for the World Cup in South African in 2010, with young South Africans discussing their unique English varieity

Posted on November 5, 2012

Tags:
South African English;
Slang

Ellen: British vs. American slang

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Ellen Degeneres and Hugh Laurie quiz each other on American and British slang

NPR: The Lost Gay Language of Britain's 60s

A 2003 interview with linguist Paul Baker about his book on Polari, a "secret" code used by gay men in the U.K. in the 1960s.

Posted on October 9, 2012

Tags:
Gay Mens Language;
Lexicon;
Slang

Dude: Bolling Cartoon

(Enlarge image)

Posted on October 4, 2012

Tags:
Gender;
Masculinity;
Youth;
Slang

A Short Class in Manglish: 88, 3Q

Mandarin Chinese written internet-slang is becoming more popular; however, there is also growing opposition to the inclusion of English words and phrases into the Chinese language. By Patti Waldmeir.

Southern Dialects: Talkin' Tar-Heel

Transcript of interview with Walt Wolfram in which many aspects of Southern English are discussed. Audio available on website.

Obama's English

Discussion of Obama's use of AAE in his acceptance speech at the 2012 Democratic National Convention and the significance of style-shifting.