Merger

Sonic girls making new words

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These girls are taking words that already exist and combining them to make a new word with a new meaning.

Kodak Black Social Artifact Golden Boy

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He uses a dialect that is familiar with the rap community, and has an accent that is usually associated with the Haitian community. His delivery of the language he uses gives him his swagger, and gives him a style that stands out from other artists. Examples of his lyrics include saying things like "dat" instead of "that", or "witchu" instead of with "with you".

Pidgin English from Nigeria

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A video of two Nigerian Men who explain and give example of language divergence and Pidgin English.

5th Grade Class Starts American Sign Language Club to Better Communicate with Deaf Classmate

Students at an elementary school in Illinois have started learning ASL signs to communicate with a hearing-impaired student in their class. [Published on 02-25-2016]

Posted by Jamie Schnee on March 4, 2016

Tags:
American Sign Language;
Accommodation;
Crossing;
Acquisition;
Merger;
Youth

Hongkongers mix English and Cantonese into new language, Kongish

This articles talks about the introduction of the new language, "Kongish." Kongish is the mixture of the Cantonese and English languages. This new language is a form of code-mixing the two languages. You will find people speaking this language in Hong Kong; they are using it to create a new identity for themselves. This new identity classifies them as individuals who speak both Cantonese and English, and not someone who is from China. [Published on 01-21-2016]

Posted by Meaghan Kuhlmann on February 21, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Language Shift;
Merger

Pera Code Mixing

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A little girl explains why she combines the Turkish and English language in her speech. She explains that she combines the two languages because she uses both languages, but at times it is hard for her to think of the words in English so she reverts to the Turkish term. It gives great examples of specific terms that she tends to revert to the Turkish term and the reason why she does.

Posted by Meaghan Kuhlmann on February 21, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Crossing;
Language Shift;
Merger;
Multilingualism

Linguistic- Code Switching

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This video gives the breakdown of code-switching in America. It talks about all the different types of English that exist in US. It also addresses why and individual partitakes in this linguistic practice; a word translation doesn't come to mind so they revert to the word in another language, or they are purposely excluding others from understanding. Code Switching if referred to different terms depending on the language mixture; Spanglish, Chinglish, etc.

Posted by Meaghan Kuhlmann on February 21, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Merger;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice;
Multilingualism

How Y’all, Youse and You Guys Talk: Personal Dialect Map Activity

"What does the way you speak say about where you’re from? Answer all the questions below to see your personal dialect map."

Posted by Sara Mulliner on December 23, 2013

Tags:
American English;
Chain shift;
Merger

How Y’all, Youse and You Guys Talk: Personal Dialect Map Activity

"What does the way you speak say about where you’re from? Answer all the questions below to see your personal dialect map. About This Quiz Most of the questions used in this quiz are based on those in the Harvard Dialect Survey, a linguistics project begun in 2002 by Bert Vaux and Scott Golder. The original questions and results for that survey can be found on Dr. Vaux's current website. The data for the quiz and maps shown here come from over 350,000 survey responses collected from August to October 2013 by Josh Katz, a graphics editor for the New York Times who developed this quiz. The colors on the large heat map correspond to the probability that a randomly selected person in that location would respond to a randomly selected survey question the same way that you did. The three smaller maps show which answer most contributed to those cities being named the most (or least) similar to you."

Posted by Sara Mulliner on December 23, 2013

Tags:
American English;
Chain shift;
Merger

Password Plus: Don't Piss Marcia Off

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On this episode of the game show Password Plus, Marcia Wallace used "furry" to prompt her partner to say "Harry" (or for her, the homonym "hairy.") The judges rejected this, pointing out the "Harry" and "hairy" have different pronunciations. But not for Marcia, who is from the midwest, as she correctly points out.

Posted by Kara Becker on November 4, 2013

Tags:
Merger;
Prescriptivism

Greg and Donny have an accent

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Would-Be Robbers Walk Away Empty Handed

Feel/fill merger in Utah causes miscommunication during a robbery.

Posted on August 27, 2012

Tags:
Utah English;
Merger