Style-shifting

Workplace Norms Conveyed Through Rap

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The Office is a popular show on NBC from which we can apply linguistic concepts to. In this short clip Dwight and Michael compose a rap for new members of the office that have relocated from another geographical area. This rap is used to introduce the new hires to the social workplace norms that typically take place at Dunder Mifflin. Dwight and Michael utilize rap and rhyming to make the song seem more comical and appealing to the individuals they have never met before. They also try hard to make their office seem "cool" and "inviting."

Posted by Sydney Chappell on June 30, 2018

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Communities of Practice;
Hip Hop Nation;
Slang

Learning Language Out of Comfort Level

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This is a clip from an Indian movie 'English Vinglish'. The protagonist, a small snack entrepreneur, secretly enrolls in an English speaking course to stop her husband and daughter mocking her lack of English skills. She goes out of her comfort level and tries to learn new language. This clip shows her newly gained self-confidence and self-respect when she gives a speech in English during a relative's wedding.

Posted by Parthvi Patel on June 29, 2018

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language

Larry the Cable Guy: My fake southern accent

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Larry the Cable Guy explains where he picked up his southern accent and gives examples of code-switching.

Posted by Josh Searle on May 11, 2018

Tags:
Indexicality;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting

Ear Hustle Podcast

This podcast, "Ear Hustle" discusses the reality of life in prison, created in a prison by prisoner Earlonne Woods and a prison volunteer and artist named Nigel Poor. The first episode, "Cellies" describes the meaning of the word "Ear Hustle" which is synonymous with eavesdropping. Prison language and the language used outside of prison is highly various. This is just an example of various language used in prison and the connection to prison culture. [Published on 06-14-2017]

Posted by Tatiana Cosper on April 27, 2018

Tags:
Indexicality;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting;
Slang;
Stigma

Excerpt from Donald Glover's

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I used these four songs, a clip from "Weirdo," and this interview of Donald Glover's coronal stop deletion.

Oprah and Natalie Portman

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Oprah speaking with Natalie Portman. A video I used in my analysis of Oprah's style shifting.

Posted by Camryn Shiroma on March 23, 2018

Tags:
Style-shifting

Oprah and Elie Wiesel

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A video of Oprah speaking with a Holocaust survivor that I used in my analysis of her style shifts.

Posted by Camryn Shiroma on March 23, 2018

Tags:
Style-shifting

Jackie Aina's Review of Inclusive Fenty Beauty

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Jackie Aina is a popular black makeup artist and YouTuber who frankly discusses issues of race. She also frequently employs some features of African American English along with Standard English, unlike some other popular black beauty YouTubers who use more Standard English in their videos.

Posted by Michaella Joseph on March 9, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting;
Gender

The Cost of Code Switching

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This is a 10 minute TedX video addressing the complexities of style shifting/code switching in America, specifically AAE speakers being expected to conform to "standard forms" to survive in America. This talk addresses issues of police brutality, racism, and expectations of who is expected to style shift/code switch and why.

"I thought you said you was a top"

Taedatea is a black gay youtuber/online personality. This video explores the intersection of styles, both gendered and racialized. Initially, Tae briefly employs a rising, high-pitched style, which is immediately read by the interlocutor over the phone as a 'bottom' (and therefore feminine, as 'bottoming' is a highly gendered and stereotyped action) style. Tae quickly switches into a style that is both deeper and uses more features of AAE, which is designed to present 'masculinity'. This linguistic self-presentation is a good example of style-shifting as a means of constructing a masculine, top identity, and reinforces many of our recent readings which present style-shifting as " continual construction of a persona or personae and variables as resources for this construction" (Eckert, 2004) [Published on 04-01-2017]

Pheobe Buffay Language Ideology and British Accent

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This clip is part of the movie series “Friends”. In this clip Phoebe is trying to impress her boyfriend’s family by changing her accent. She thinks because her boyfriend’s family is rich, she needs to speak like them and dress like them. This demonstrates a language ideology that British accent is regarded as used by upper class community. When she changes her accent back to her speech community ‘New York' accent she says many things that did not impress her boyfriend’s family and goes back to the British speech community accent to try to impress them again.

Posted by Omaima Alenezi on March 3, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
British English;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting;
Accent

People Around The World Try An American Accent

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In this video, people from different countries do their impression of the English language in the United States. Many of them project different language ideologies according to the accent they sound out, whether it be: southern, Minnesotan, New York, or a Wisconsin accent. With their impressions they link their cultural ideologies with what they say. For example, one guy does an impression of a Wisconsin accent and while projecting his best impression he talks about cheese, a cultural item often associated with the state.

Posted by Mikaela Butts on January 8, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
American English;
Style-shifting

Chrish - Indie girl introduces us to her kitchen (Vine)

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This vine parodies a female indie pop singer's voice.

Posted by Gregor McGee on November 28, 2017

Tags:
English;
Style-shifting;
Womens Language

Indie Pop Voice

An article detailing the vowels and other features that make up "Indie Pop Voice". [Published on 10-06-2015]

Posted by Gregor McGee on November 28, 2017

Tags:
English;
Style-shifting;
Womens Language

Lake Bell Calls Girls Out On "Sexy Baby Vocal Virus"

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This video clip shows Lake Bell on Conan O’Brien’s talk show. While discussing her upcoming movie, Bell goes into discussion about her annoyance with what she calls “sexy baby vocal virus” and vocal fry. Lake demonstrates what she means by each of these, as well as explains what they are. Both pitch and vocal fry are the main features of these vocal habits. Bell also makes a gender specific claim, that it is women who fall into this habit of speech. Also, during the clip, while talking about her new movie about voice overs, both Bell and O’Brien style-shift between voices and different ways of speaking, representing performativity.

Posted by Cassiti Wright on October 17, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Creaky Voice;
Pitch

Vocal Fry: The Rules

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A somewhat comedic look at what vocal fry is and a plea from the video's author to stop it. The narrator talks about vocal fry's spread across various mediums and how it may be a reaction to rising vocal intonation that went way too far.

Posted by Jeremy Pafford on October 16, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Style-shifting;
Youth;
Femininity;
Discourse Marker

This Is How I talk SNL Skit

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This is a skit from SNL in which Donald is a new employee at Sprint. The video starts off with him talking in his normal voice to his other coworkers and then his boss comes in and starts talking in African American slang. After she walks away, Donald starts impersonating the way she speaks and she walks back by and hears his impersonation. In order to not get fired, Donald talks that same way every time she’s around so she thinks that’s just the way he talks. Every time his boss would walk by, he would accommodate his speech style by shifting from his normal voice to African American slang.

Posted by Brittany Outler on October 9, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
African American English;
Accommodation;
Style-shifting

School of Rock First Day

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This is a clip from the movie School of Rock when Jack Black who plays Newy Finn has his first day as a substitute teacher. The language that he uses and the way he communicates is very out of role than what a student would expect from a teacher. Teachers are expected to all be in one speech community and Jack Black shows that he is not part of that speech community that most teachers are in.

Posted by Kayla Schulz on September 26, 2017

Tags:
Power;
Standard Language Ideology;
Style-shifting;
Education

Movie Accent Expert Breaks Down 31 Actors Playing Real People

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Not directly related to gender and language but it's fun and linguistic. This linguist critiques movie accents (this is the second video of his that I've seen) & often talks about how the usage of certain sounds or aspects of a person's speech help create a sense of the character as well as the setting, which I think goes along with some of the themes we've already started to address in the area of language as it constructs identity.

The Many Amazing Voices Of Critical Role

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The linguistic artifacts that can be found on Geek and Sundry's Critical Role are amazing to ponder on. A group of incredibly talented voice actors have come together and created a symphony of hundreds of unique voices over the course of one hundred episodes.

Posted by Zachary Belcher on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Accent;
Creaky Voice;
falsetto

Maz Jobrani: Comedy TedTalk in Qatar

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Maz Jobrani is an Iranian-American who does a lot of comedy to bridge Americans with the Middle East, and to bring awareness of Middle Easterners.

A Few Things to Know About American Sign Language

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Similar to the different accents that exist in the English language, different styles of sign language express different cultural upbringings. This video is a short personal account into a few individual’s experiences with sign language and its perception from none deaf people. Explaining issues like the use of the term “hearing impaired”, is considered more offensive than being labeled deaf because it does not recognize deaf people as a “linguistic minority”. The point is that deaf people have a culture. One of the speakers talks about how slang has influenced ASL specifically in the African-American cultural community. Being deaf does not exclude people from existing in a living language that adapts and changes to fit the times. Rich with the impact of various cultures.

Die Antwoord's Evil Boy: A Dynamic Crossroad of Language, Culture, and Rap in South Africa

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Die Antwoord is a controversial rap group from Cape Town, South Africa fronted by Ninja Yolandi Vi$$er. Speaking from a post-apartheid perspective, this group offers an underrepresented view of young, lower-middle class, white Afrikaans - a subculture known as "Zef." Historically, Zef has been considered a derogatory term describing someone who was white, poor, and "trashy." However, Die Antwoord and others have looked to transform this into a self-reflective, somewhat satirical, parody that Ninja described as being "apocalyptic debris that we’ve stuck together." In this music video, they display their unique code-switching between Afrikaans and English, as well as Xhosa - the Bantu language of the Xhosa people. Adding to their mixed-bag controversial nature, is the relationship of the Afrikaans languages’ association with apartheid. Through dynamic language and visual use, this video reflects the complex sociocultural and sociolinguistic interactions that occur in this region. The lyrical narrative told is a statement on the clash between traditional tribal circumcision rituals, and the modern subcultures that seem to offer an alternative path to "manhood." This can be heard in the verse by the guest rapper Wanga, sung in his native tongue: "Mamelapa umnqunduwakho! (listen here, you fucking asshole) Andifuni ukuyaehlatini! (I don't want to go to the bush with you) Sukubammba incanca yam! (don't touch my penis) Andi so stabani! (I’m not a gay) Incanca yam yeyamantobi! (this penis is for the girls) Incanca yam iclean! (my penis is clean) Incanca yam inamandla! (my penis is strong) Ndiyinkwekwe enkulu! (I am a big boy) Angi funi ukuba yeendota! (don't want to be a man) Evil boy 4 life! yebo! (yes) Evil boy 4 life!" Through the use of polyglossic code-switching, performativity, sociocultural and racial integration, and a revamping of contextual meanings, Die Antwoord is doing its part to redefine what it means to be young and Zef in South Africa, and what a socioculturally- and sociolinguistically-complex rebellion sounds like.

Vocal Fry

In this video the Kardashians use vocal fry by using words such as "like" and a higher pitched tone like the "valley girl" voice. In society media sometimes stereotypes girls as being materialistic, self absorbed, sassy, etc. The Kardashians are very popular with society and when they talk like this on television I think it gives society a sort of realization that women really do talk and act like that. This is not the case however, but I think we all know that. The Kardashians are very influential to young women in America and could potentially have vocal fry being used more frequently in the U.S. It also seems that the Kardashians have more layed back tones when at home but when in public it seems their style of speaking and tone of voice changes slightly. [Published on 03-12-2017]

Posted by Tiffany Bertoncino on May 10, 2017

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Gender;
Creaky Voice

Vocal Fry still an issue

In this video the Kardashians use vocal fry by using words such as "like" and a higher pitched tone like the "valley girl" voice. In society media sometimes stereotypes girls as being materialistic, self absorbed, sassy, etc. The Kardashians are very popular with society and when they talk like this on television I think it gives society a sort of realization that women really do talk and act like that. This is not the case however, but I think we all know that. The Kardashians are very influential to young women in America and could potentially have vocal fry being used more frequently in the U.S. It also seems that the Kardashians have more layed back tones when at home but when in public it seems their style of speaking and tone of voice changes slightly. [Published on 03-12-2017]

Posted by Tiffany Bertoncino on May 10, 2017

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Gender;
r vocalization

John Oliver and Jimmy Fallon Talk Accents

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There are a few instances in this video that relate to or bring up some sort of sociolinguistic/sociocultural linguistic norm or topic, but the main one that sticks out comes up at about 1:00, a minute into the video. John Oliver, who is an English comedian, writer, producer, political commentator, actor, media critic, and television host of the HBO political talk show Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. He is asked about his 18-month-old son and whether or not he will have an English accent or not. Oliver goes on for a bit poking fun at American accents after explaining that his son will most likely NOT have an English accent, where he jokingly says, when talking to Tonight Show host Jimmy Fallon who has an American Accent, "the way you make words sound hurts my ears", and when explaining how he will speak in a different manner, he again jokingly says he will be speaking "worse". The main example he presents though is at the 1:50 minute mark when talking about the difference between American and English accents and whether it makes it harder to communicate in America. Oliver goes on to explain that for people without an American accent, automated machines are a "real problem". He jokingly makes a comparison in which he says when dealing with automated machine people without American accents are "battered down into submission by the machine until you talk like a sedated John Wayne" after which he does an impression of...a sedated John Wayne, in which he speaks with a stereotypical American accent. This last bit is very interesting because even though he talks about it in joking, light-hearted manner, he brings up strong evidence for people without American accents being "battered down into submission" to not use their accents. In these situations, people without American accents are forced to accommodate their speech and change it to sound more American which also relates to Style-Shifting. To me, there is also a slight bit of globalization too in a similar way to what I just mentioned. It is most likely indirectly but it is pushing towards just a plain American accent to be used.

Posted by Hayden Balduf on May 2, 2017

Tags:
Accommodation;
Style-shifting;
Accent;
Globalization

Howard Stern on vocal fry

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This video is a voice recording of Howard Stern discussing vocal fry used by a contestant on the show the Bachelor. Stern discusses the use of vocal fry and refers to it as "an epidemic" that women are using where they begin to switch back in forth between a croaking voice and their "feminine voice"

Posted by Katie Vavuris on May 2, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Language Shift;
Femininity;
Pitch

Substitute Teacher

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This a skit from Key and Peele about language barriers between ethnicities. The teacher pronounces the students name differently and each student is confused. When the teacher is confronted with this knowledge he gets upset that they mock his pronunciation of their names. This relates to linguistic anthropology because it showcases language barriers between different ethnicities.

Posted by Garion Morgan on April 29, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Language Shift;
Stigma

Troy and Abed Being Normal Scene from Community

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In this scene Troy and Abed, who typically behave far from socially acceptable, try to be "normal" so they do not embarrass their friend Shirley at her wedding. They each change their voice to diminish any distinctive characteristics and accents as well choosing words and using grammar that supports what might be considered a "standard" form of English. They do their best not to be sarcastic and to talk to others in a way that follows social norms.

Do You Speak American?

This is an article and analytical piece by Robert MacNeil, an employee of PBS since the 1980s. He talks about how moving to America and adopting American grammatical policies in order to work for television. [Published on 2005]

Anjelah Johnson- nail salon

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This video is a stand-up comedy act about an experience in a nail salon. Her voice changes as she impersonates herself and a nail technician. This video shows code switching between Vietnamese and English. She does a very good job imitating her visit at the salon by the facial expressions, accent, and specific word choice.

Posted by Lauren Snyder on March 9, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting

Hillary Clinton - Southern Accent

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In this clip from an interview with the South Carolina Democratic Chairman, Jaime Harrison, Hillary Clinton accommodates her speech style by speaking with a Southern accent. The accent is a speech style that only appears in speeches with Southern audiences.

Posted by Callie Hawkins on March 8, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Accommodation;
Style-shifting;
Accent

New Girl - Schmidt & Winston Crack Scene

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In this scene, Schmidt tries to help Winston stay true to himself, and Winston suggests they can do this by getting cocaine. Schmidt tries to accommodate Winston by going to a rougher neighborhood. Schmidt tries to fit into the situation at hand, albeit often unsuccessfully, but his linguistic style-shifting is most apparent as he tries to get the "drug dealer's" attention.

Posted by Logan Bannister on March 5, 2017

Tags:
Accommodation;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity;
Socioeconomic Status

Language and culture

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This video shows the experience of three young people who have traveled to different places around the world. Their experiences show us how language shapes the perception and understanding of people. It is also shown that language is under major influence of culture and the ideology of different regions.

lesson 7.1 Tokyo vs Osaka Accent - same words, different sounds

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The differences in intonation between Osaka dialect and Tokyo dialect. Tokyo dialect is accepted as standard Japanese and is what is taught outside of Japan. In the video, the Osaka dialect speaker says that she is able to speak standard Japanese very well, but her pronunciation of "sensei" is what clued people in to her Osaka origins.

Posted by Katie Allen on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Performativity;
Japanese;
Style-shifting

Donald Trump’s strange speaking style, as explained by linguists

This article has linguists examine Donald Trumps speaking style. It examines his linguistic approach through many different angles and talks about why some people can relate to it more than others. It proves how language and power can play a pivotal role in politics and spreading a message. [Published on 09-26-2016]

Posted by Chris Robb on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Style-shifting;
Politics and Policy

Lying Words: Predicting Deception From Linguistic Styles

This article studies how our linguistic styles differ when we are telling a lie. It uses a “computer based-text analysis program” to study whether study participants were telling the truth or not. It was able to correctly identify the liars and truth tellers at a rate of 61% overall. This article shows how liars showed “lower cognitive complexity, used fewer self-references and other-references, and used more negative emotion words.” [Published on 06-01-2002]

Posted by Chris Robb on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Pronouns

Talk “Like a Man”: The Linguistic Styles of Hillary Clinton, 1992-2013

This article examines the changes in Hillary Clinton's linguistic style from the years of 1992-2013. Many people have claimed that she talks "like a man," and this article examines that theory. In the article Jennifer J. Jones proves how Hillary went to more of a masculine linguistic approach to a more feministic approach in 2007. There are many reasons for these changes that are reflected in this article. [Published on 08-17-2016]

The Importance of Code Switching

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Edward Moore explains the importance of Code Switching for success. He emphasizes that people of color need to know how to function in different environments. From "the block" to the board room.

"Token Black Woman" -Issa Rae

This gif comes from an episode of the show "Insecure" that aired recently on HBO. The show is based on Issa Rae, an African American woman, trying to navigate her way through her 20's. Rae works for a non profit called "We Got Ya'll," which helps children of color from low income communities to be successful in school. The non-profit was created by a white woman and Rae is the only black woman working there. Rae refers to herself as the "token black woman." This gif shows a white co-worker asking Rae the meaning of "on fleek." Her co-worker is assuming that because Rae is black, that she is familiar with this language. This is an example of her co-worker's language ideologies. Unfortunately for her co-worker, due to indirect indexicality, making this assumption actually makes her appear racist. Rae spoke about the show, saying that the series will examine "the complexities of 'blackness' and the reality that you can’t escape being black." Rae also said, in regards to the potential mainstream reaction to the series: "We’re just trying to convey that people of color are relatable. This is not a hood story. This is about regular people living life."

Posted by Erica Hageman on October 6, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

The performativity of different speech communities

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The video is a speech made by Donald Trump who used to be a host of a famous TV show but is now a candidate for president. It would be difficult to connect the image of a host with a candidate of president. It is obvious that the different speech communities that Donald Trump is a part of contribute to the different styles of speaking.

Posted by Jingshu Zhao on October 5, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Communities of Practice

Perfomativity of language in different speech communities

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The video is a speech made by Donald Trump. Trump used to be a host in a famous show. It would be difficult to connect the image of a host with a candidate of president. It is obvious that the different speech communities that Donald Trump are in contribute to the different styles of speaking.

“Things You Do Online That’d Be Creepy In Real Life”

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This video draws attention to how social media has gone further than just coining new slang terms; it has created a new language with entirely different governing rules. It points out the significant differences in styles of communication between face-to-face contact and social media interactions. The most striking examples are the performative declarations that would seem strange if spoken in front of a live audience. Here we see just how easily we take for granted this major shift in our everyday life.

Posted by Allison Maxfield on September 26, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Communities of Practice;
Internet Language;
Slang

Could your language affect your ability to save money?

Amazing Ted Talk by Keith Chen illustrating how "language" can help a person's ability to save money! EVERYONE should see this. It also gives a really good illustration on how different languages force you to say different things. [Published on 06-01-2012]

Jon Stewart - Daily Show - Accents

Clips from Jon Stewart's "The Daily Show" of him performing different accents throughout many different episodes. [Published on 08-29-2011]

Posted by Halie Carr on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent

The office: Andy talks baby talk.

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Clip from the show The Office. The greatest character of all time, Michael Scott, confronts Andy about his baby talk around the office. Andy confronts Michael about his Elvis impersonation.

Posted by Haley Mahon on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Code-switching;
Motherese;
Style-shifting;
Youth

The Art of the Code Switch: Obama Morphs for his Audience Just Like You Do.

Obama reflects on a conversation he remembers hearing his dad have with a native from Alabama. He recalls him using words such as "aint" "warsh" instead of wash and so forth. Even his fathers body language changed. Upon asking him, he tells his son that "I wasn't always a lawyer who went to sleep at his white friends bakehouse, son." [Published on 10-03-2012]

Posted by Haley Mahon on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Style-shifting

How to Speak Hip

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This is the intro to a 13 part "album" instructing listeners on how to speak and understand "hip" language. Those who want to appear "cool" to this subculture that includes hipsters, juvenile delinquents, jazz musicians, etc.

Jon Stewart - Thank Donald Trump

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Jon Stewart mocks the 'inspiration' of new Latino voters for Donald Trump's run for presidency.

Code Switching, Mock Spanish, and Kevin Hart

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Kevin Hart is explaining what it's like to be in prison. He takes on numerous different forms and voices to show the different type of people in prison.

Code switching

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In this video Key and Peele explain why they use code switching in their daily lives and in their comedy, i think this applies well with what we're learning but if you watch some of their other videos and look for the code switching it makes it a little more interesting and funny at the same time. you can actually see how code switching is integrated into other people's lives more deeply than others, or even compare it to your own life for example. you can also apply this to what we learned in the other chapter just a couple days ago, the one that detailed the bay city high school teens interaction with someone of the opposite color and how they changed their tone of pitch and the way they talked while explaining the situation to another person.

Bilingual Talks

YouTuber Hyunwoo Sun's segment Bilingual Talks, where two speakers of two languages have a conversation either with each speaker using a different language, or with the speakers switching back and forth between languages.

Posted by Maren Bilby on April 7, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Style-shifting

Students Learn to "Toggle" Between Dialects

This article is about the role code-switching plays in the success of low income students. Students that engage in code-switching tend to achieve more academically than students that do not code-switch.

Posted by Elizabeth McCrindle on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Style-shifting;
Education

Speaking "Mexican" and the use of "Mock Spanish" in Children's Books

This article explains how underrepresented African American and Latino's are in the world of children's literature. The author focuses on the book Skippyjon Jones, which exemplifies the problem the author is describing. The main character speaks English and his alter-ego speaks Mock-Spanish. There is code switching back and forth in this book as the characters move from English to Mock Spanish in the context on a single conversation. Also, the main character in this book (speaking English) is a white Siamese cat and the alter-ego is a brown Chihuahua. The color of each animal can be seen as symbolizing the color of the skin. [Published on 05-05-2014]

Code-switching

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This video explains some of the main reasons why people engage in code switching. Code switching can be used in many different ways, but the primary function of this practice is to switch between two languages in a single conversation.

Family Guy Stereotypes

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This video is a combination of stereotypes that have aired on family guy over the years. Many of these stereotypes have to do with race and language in society today.

Key & Peele - Obama's Anger Translator - Meet Luther

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In this video clip of Key & Peele, Peele's Obama is a very mild-mannered character who calmly addresses his audience, and Key's Luther interrupts Obama's speech to represent Obama's inner anger.

Posted by Kristi Sparks on March 7, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Clinton's drawl, Trump's 'yuuge' N.Y. accent and campaign 'code-switching'

The article discusses several politicians' adressee-based style shifting while speaking to different groups of people. Gives an example of monophthongization from Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama using elements of AAE. The article also talks about differences between the styles of Jeb Bush and George W. Bush. [Published on 03-05-2016]

35 American accents

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In this short video, this gentleman displays the ability to use 35 American accents. It is pretty impressive that there are so many dialects of American English.

Hillary Clinton and her Evolving Accent

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Hillary Clinton demonstrates styleshifting during her many years in public life.

Posted by Mark Beal on March 3, 2016

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Accent;
Politics and Policy

Dating a Latina

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Dating a Latina: Perception vs Reality. This video is funny, some may be able to relate to it. This video exhibits Spanish, American English, and Code Switching.

President Obama - Hispandering

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In Obama's Cinco de Mayo speech it is clear that hispandering is taking place. He invited a crowd of what appeared to be people of hispanic background. What Obama is speaking about is clear, he wants immigration laws and reform to continuously be adjusted and bettered. Each time Obama said the term 'tequila' he changed the way he said it to sound more hispanic and the crowd went nuts so he continued to say it to please the people there. He used code-switching to his advantage in this speech.

Posted by Madison Rigdon on March 2, 2016

Tags:
Spanglish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Style-shifting;
Stigma

The "White Voice" of Radio

This clip points out the style-shifting of the particular speaker, and attributes it to race, performativity, and accommodation to his audience. [Published on 02-02-2015]

Posted by Jamie Schnee on February 27, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Accommodation;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

DEA and AAVE

Shows some misconceptions that because of how people speak could lead to better understanding when tapping phones. Interesting not everyone speaks drug dealer dialect really shows how stereotyping is in thinking. [Published on 08-24-2010]

Posted by Michelle Allan on February 25, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

28 Reasons to Hug a Black Guy

In this Saturday Night Live skit they are discussing Black history month in class and the teacher lets three of her students come up to give the class a lesson on what it means. The first thing they start to do is rap which is stigmatizing blacks. Next they start talking about slavery and how "white" people need to show them love for this month because this is the only time a year they get love which brings in the issue of race and ideology and much more. [Published on 02-25-2016]

Posted by Madison Rigdon on February 25, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma

Racialism, Ebonics, and Style

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This video addresses common racial discrepancies in America through how "black" and "white" people talk. It also touches on style of speech being construed differently among races. It is a nice viewpoint on why people talk certain ways.

The Linguistics of YouTube Voice

This article focuses on YouTube stars, and how they capture a viewer's attention by changing their speech and accommodating to their audience. [Published on 12-07-2015]

Posted by Jamie Schnee on February 21, 2016

Tags:
Accommodation;
Style-shifting;
Change;
Variation

The Linguistics of AAVE

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This video discusses the history of AAVE, "African American Vernacular English. It address the origin, the pronunciations, and how it is used. The video gives great examples of AAVE and the translation of what it means in "proper" English.

Posted by Meaghan Kuhlmann on February 21, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Grammaticalization;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

language and social networks

social network factors of language variation

Posted by Maggie Kneidel on February 11, 2016

Tags:
Style-shifting

3 Ways To Speak English

This is a TED talk about this women who breaks down the english language saying there are three ways to speak. She is saying that the way you speak comes from your background and the culture you experienced growing up. You can speak differently based on where you are. For example in the work community people have been taught to be polite and say "hello" but around your friends the vernacular changes to maybe a "whats good" meaning the same as hello or hi. Jamilia Lyiscott is putting on a performance for people conveying different identities. She also says the word "articulate" multiple times representing language ideologies.

Beyonce - Formation

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In this song and music video, Beyonce addresses stereotypes of the African-American community and uses language and style-shifting to play on how the public perceives wealthy black individuals such as herself and her family. She also discusses her upbringing in the deep south and mentions how her family's "negro" and "Creole" heritages combine.

Posted by Dante Colombo on February 6, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Emmanual and Philip Hudson- Asking all of them questions

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Do men and women engage in conversation differently? This video by Emmanual and Phillp Hudson discredit the thought that men are straight forward with information rather that emotion or gossip. He is displaying the ability to understand gender language in the community that he is mocking, exploring ultra feminism and masculinity.

Posted by Mylls Cheffey on February 3, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting

Interview of Macklemore on 96.5

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Interview of Macklemore and producer Ryan Lewis by a white interviewer for a radio show. To be compared to the interview conducted by black and hispanic interviewers.

Posted by Manon Gilmore on November 24, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Macklemore Interview on 105.1 Radio

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This is an interview of the rapper Macklemore in which he discusses his music, influences, and personal beliefs with a black interviewer and a hispanic interviewer. To be compared to the interview of Macklemore and Ryan Lewis interviewed by a white person.

Posted by Manon Gilmore on November 24, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Key and Peele Rap Album Confession

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This Key and Peele sketch also makes use of a black AAE speaker and a white middle class establishment character. In contrast with Little Homie, this skit illustrates both Key and Peele's abilities to style shift according to the character they are portraying.

Posted by Manon Gilmore on October 17, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Key and Peele Little Homie

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This skit by Key and Peele casts the comedians as a black speaker of AAE and a white establishment character who makes use of a puppet that speaks AAE.

Posted by Manon Gilmore on October 17, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Obama's Eulogy of Reverend Pinckney

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This is an excerpt of the eulogy for Reverend Clementa Pinckney delivered by President Obama after the Charleston shooting at the Emanuel AME Church. He makes strategic use of preaching style to establish a rapport and sense of belonging with a black audience in a religious setting.

How Hillary Clinton's Southern Accent Came Out

A discussion of Hillary Clinton's style-shifting into Southern English, which has been much criticized. [Published on 06-02-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on July 8, 2015

Tags:
Southern English;
Style-shifting;
Politics and Policy

Tracking Hillary Clinton's use of every American accent east of the Mississippi

A series of clips that demonstrate Hillary Clinton's performance of some varieties of American English, particularly Southern English and Northern Cities English (her native variety) [Published on 05-01-2015]

When Politicians Lose Their Accents

Clip from All Things Considered discussing the way in which politicians, such as those currently running for president, tend to shift accents depending on audience/context. One of the politicians the clip mentions is governor of Wisconsin, Scott Walker, who has allegedly traded his "Wisconsin twang" for a more standard way of speaking in order to appeal to the nation at large. [Published on 04-18-2015]

Posted by Jessica Hutchison on April 26, 2015

Tags:
Code-switching;
Style-shifting

Can "Y'all" Mean Just One Person?

This blog post explores the idea of the singular "y'all". The post entertains the idea that this form of "y'all" comes from a style-shift used around non-Southerners in an attempt to differentiate themselves and assert their identity (similar to Kara's Jersey vowels being more commonly heard outside of Jersey). [Published on 10-03-2014]

Posted by Molly Worden on March 9, 2015

Tags:
Southern English;
Style-shifting;
Accent

Key & Peele - White-Sounding Black Guys

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Comedians Key and Peele talk about how they "adjust their blackness" by shifting their speaking style in response to their audience.

Posted by Abby Mosing on March 5, 2015

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Hatred of the word "moist": voluntary or involuntary?

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Since the How I Met Your Mother character, Lily's hatred of the word “moist” was revealed in 2007, I have encountered lots of people who also hate the word. Whether this was a voluntary choice is unclear. I do know of a few people who began hating it after seeing this episode of the show. Is this purely an expression of speaker agency discussed in the speaker design model? Are they modeling their linguistic likes and dislikes after Lily or did she just bring the so-called gross word to everyone’s attention? What is it about the word that makes people find it so distasteful? Dane Cook seems to think the dislike is related to gender. Check out this video of his stand-up bit about women hating the word: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nRMmrY_Qh4

Posted by Carly Goldblatt on March 5, 2015

Tags:
Style-shifting

Sounding gay, punk, or jock: What language says about your social group

Sociolinguist Doug Bigham discusses the use of linguistic resources in the construction of style, focusing on the construction of a gay style. [Published on 11-24-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on November 25, 2014

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Sexual Orientation

Post-creole continuum chart

So the article itself we've mostly covered, but the included chart is a great and clear example of the variety that can exists within a language that can potentially be explained as various levels of "decreolization" or varieties that have always existed with different features of the superstrate. [Published on 09-01-2014]

Posted by Syd Low on November 17, 2014

Tags:
Guyanese Creole;
Style-shifting

Denice Frohman's "Accents" (2013)

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Code-switching, Puerto Rican Spanish and English

Posted by Erin Appleby on October 16, 2014

Tags:
Spanglish;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting

XKCD: Appropriate Term

A XKCD comic highlighting the formality continuum of style-shifting.

Posted by Kara Becker on August 27, 2013

Tags:
Sociolinguistic Interview;
Style-shifting

Tawkin’ The Tawk: The Noo Yawk City Accent and the Race for City Hawl

A 2013 article in City and State on the New York City accents of the candidates for mayor.

Posted by Kara Becker on August 27, 2013

Tags:
New York City English;
Style-shifting;
Politics and Policy

MTV True Life: I'm a Boxer in Detroit

A reality TV show following two African-American teens in Detroit. Contains examples of numerous AAE features.

Posted by Katelyn L.I. Best on February 26, 2013

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
African American English;
Style-shifting

Having Trouble Being Black

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Two African American men employ code-switching while making a video, prompting one to accuse the other acting white.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 21, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

NPR: Code-swtiching: Are we all guilty?

A 2010 NPR piece about the criticism of President Obama's "negro dialect," with a broader discussing of both style-shifting and code-switching.

NPR: Psychology Behind the Sudden Southern Drawl

A 2006 piece on NPR about Bill Clinton's use of a heavier Southern accent in a moment of anger, with guest Walt Wolfram, who explains the phenomenon of style-shifting.

Southern Dialects: Talkin' Tar-Heel

Transcript of interview with Walt Wolfram in which many aspects of Southern English are discussed. Audio available on website.

Obama's English

Discussion of Obama's use of AAE in his acceptance speech at the 2012 Democratic National Convention and the significance of style-shifting.

(r) in New York City English

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The classic graph from Labov (1966) showing stratification by socioeconomic class and speaker style for coda r vocalization in New York City English