Globalization

Don Omar - Danza Kuduro ft. Lucenzo

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The song Danza Kuduro is an example of the effect globalization has had on language. It is sung in both Portuguese and Spanish, with the music video also utilizing English, by Don Omar, a Latin American pop star, and Lucenzo, a French-Portuguese artist. Borrowing from African culture, the kuduro itself is a type of dance that originated in Africa becoming popular in Angola, a Portuguese colony. The song was number one on the charts in Argentina, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland, showcasing how the song transcended language barriers and how globalization has impacted language use.

Posted by Madison McGuire on January 14, 2019

Tags:
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Borrowing;
Variation;
Accent;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

Tant Que J'ai Soleil (Staring at the Sun - French Version) - MIKA

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A song by French-speaking British artist MIKA, who is known for releasing songs in English, French, and occasionally both, as this example demonstrates. It features examples of inter- and intra-sentential codeswitching and has an all-English counterpart against which it can be compared.

Posted by Adrianne Leary on September 27, 2018

Tags:
English;
French;
Code-switching;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

Tokyo Bon 東京盆踊り2020 (Makudonarudo) Namewee 黃明志 ft. Meu Ninomiya 二宮芽生 @亞洲通吃2018專輯 All Eat Asia

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This is a song about how Japanese people speak English. In this song, many of the English words are put in the lyrics. People might find that there is a huge differences between Japanese and English pronunciation. And this video can also help people understand more about Japanese accent in speaking English.

Posted by zhiyi dong on June 29, 2018

Tags:
Japanese;
Globalization

Code-switching in the song "Exotic"

This artifact is the song “Exotic” by Priyanka Chopra ft. Pitbull, and this is an example of code-switching because they sing in Hindi and English, which is because of Priyanka Chopra and her Indian roots and her attempt to add some of her culture and language to this song. The song also mentions various cities/countries around the world. Thus, the song’s use of Hindi and English expresses code-switching and shows her reaching out to a larger and more diverse audience.

Posted by Millie Shah on December 17, 2017

Tags:
English;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

Usain Bolt Final Race Interview

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This is an interview with Usain Bolt, a Jamaican sprinter, after his final race. He is speaking in Jamaican Standard English, as opposed to Jamaican Patois.

Posted by Gregor McGee on October 29, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Globalization

Why don't Chinese students speak English

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The video Why don't Chinese students speak English statements the reasons why Chinese students don’t speak English from the youtubers’ perspective. The video starts with a daily scenario of a few Chinese students speaking Chinese in the elevator. It makes the three American guys feeling awkward because what the Chinese people are talking about. I agree with the claim that that it is easier to solve problems in native language. It ends with a scenario that two Americans try to speak Chinese in an elevator when some Chinese people is present but they finally give up and speak their native language English. This video is related with code-switching and language globalization.

Posted by Nan Zhao on October 10, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Globalization

John Oliver interviews the Dalai Lama

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“Last Week Tonight” host John Oliver interviewed the Dalai Lama, a Nobel Peace laureate and Tibet’s spiritual and political exiled leader. With a hint of investigative journalism, Oliver used his gift of humor to engage the Dalai Lama in broad discussions from conflicts with the Chinese Government to claims that drinking horse milk will cure alcoholism. The interview demonstrated a self-reflective Dalai Lama laughing at labels from the Chinese Government. This televised comedy show provoked the Chinese government so much that they proclaimed the interview to be politically motivated and propaganda for an anti-China separatist movement.

Posted by Mary Jo Frazier on October 2, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Globalization;
Politics and Policy;
Religion

Moana - How Far I'll Go

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This version of the song “How Far I’ll Go” in the 2016 Disney movie, Moana, features a combination of 24 various languages. The clip details code-switching which can be described as the practice of alternating between two or more languages. Typically, code-switching is done in conversation but this example offers a better understanding for monolingual persons as adaptations of this song can be found in nearly any language.

Posted by Sarah Holladay on October 2, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

Why Don't We All Speak the Same Language?

A part of Freakonomics' radio series "Earth 2.0" in which they discuss why humans have language and the costs and benefits of people speaking different languages. They also discuss what we should change if we were to "create" Earth again. [Published on 09-13-2017]

Posted by Melanie Stoddard on September 14, 2017

Tags:
Acquisition;
Globalization;
Monolingualism;
Multilingualism

Philippine English vs. Australian English

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"Philippine English vs. Australian English" is a funny YouTube video by a Filipino husband and his Australian wife illustrating the differences between the two different dialects of English. By comparing different words and terms between the two dialects, the differences are sometimes profound, incomprehensible, and often very funny!

Die Antwoord's Evil Boy: A Dynamic Crossroad of Language, Culture, and Rap in South Africa

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Die Antwoord is a controversial rap group from Cape Town, South Africa fronted by Ninja Yolandi Vi$$er. Speaking from a post-apartheid perspective, this group offers an underrepresented view of young, lower-middle class, white Afrikaans - a subculture known as "Zef." Historically, Zef has been considered a derogatory term describing someone who was white, poor, and "trashy." However, Die Antwoord and others have looked to transform this into a self-reflective, somewhat satirical, parody that Ninja described as being "apocalyptic debris that we’ve stuck together." In this music video, they display their unique code-switching between Afrikaans and English, as well as Xhosa - the Bantu language of the Xhosa people. Adding to their mixed-bag controversial nature, is the relationship of the Afrikaans languages’ association with apartheid. Through dynamic language and visual use, this video reflects the complex sociocultural and sociolinguistic interactions that occur in this region. The lyrical narrative told is a statement on the clash between traditional tribal circumcision rituals, and the modern subcultures that seem to offer an alternative path to "manhood." This can be heard in the verse by the guest rapper Wanga, sung in his native tongue: "Mamelapa umnqunduwakho! (listen here, you fucking asshole) Andifuni ukuyaehlatini! (I don't want to go to the bush with you) Sukubammba incanca yam! (don't touch my penis) Andi so stabani! (I’m not a gay) Incanca yam yeyamantobi! (this penis is for the girls) Incanca yam iclean! (my penis is clean) Incanca yam inamandla! (my penis is strong) Ndiyinkwekwe enkulu! (I am a big boy) Angi funi ukuba yeendota! (don't want to be a man) Evil boy 4 life! yebo! (yes) Evil boy 4 life!" Through the use of polyglossic code-switching, performativity, sociocultural and racial integration, and a revamping of contextual meanings, Die Antwoord is doing its part to redefine what it means to be young and Zef in South Africa, and what a socioculturally- and sociolinguistically-complex rebellion sounds like.

Disney's Frozen: Let It Go - 25 Languages

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One special version of the Song “Let it go”, featured in Disney’s Frozen, is the multilingual version, which incorporates 25 languages. Different language versions show the song gains global popularity. This song in 25 languages embodies the linguistic concept of “code switching”. But it doesn’t mean the stratification of language. Instead, such a successful fusion of 25 languages in one song reflects communication among different language. Different languages are mutual related and inclusive, because this fusion is so harmonious with 25 languages cooperating to achieve one theme of the song. The original version is English, but the song is widely adapted in different language, which is against the idea of centralizing or decentralizing force in language as well.

Posted by Jiaying XU on May 8, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

"Samurai English"

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This is a Japanese commercial of Nissin cup noodles. In this commercial, a CEO of a Japanese company made an announcement that they are going to made ENGLISH as an official language of his company although his employee were not fluent in English. This situation is represented as a historical war, probably in 1850s. Languages and fluency is presented as weapon and their strength: Japanese weapon was too weak same as their English language ability. This commercial represents the centrality of English, globally. It is funny because it is written ironically: the “Japanish” has strong Japanese accents and they can only say typical sentences which Japanese people learn in junior high schools. It also express irony toward globalization which is oriented in English. This commercial is focused on Japanese, but this form of globalization on happens everywhere.

Posted by Masako Fujita on May 8, 2017

Tags:
Japanese;
Globalization

Outsiders' Views of English Speakers

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This video is one point of view of how non-native English speakers view English. The main point of the video was the focus on how English speakers are perceived based on gender roles, accents, and the cultural views of English speakers. The intonation from both the male and female actor show the gender roles of language. The girl tends to be speaking softly and gently while the boy is a little bit more outgoing in his speech. When they start to argue again the roles come into play with the girl's voice going higher in pitch and sharper in tone. The classic American type of accent is also prevalent in the blurry sentences that are spoken by either actors. The scene also played what one might call a normative view on American dinners between couples; low light, soft talking, homemade meal and then an argument. All of this just screamed stereotypical America.

John Oliver and Jimmy Fallon Talk Accents

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There are a few instances in this video that relate to or bring up some sort of sociolinguistic/sociocultural linguistic norm or topic, but the main one that sticks out comes up at about 1:00, a minute into the video. John Oliver, who is an English comedian, writer, producer, political commentator, actor, media critic, and television host of the HBO political talk show Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. He is asked about his 18-month-old son and whether or not he will have an English accent or not. Oliver goes on for a bit poking fun at American accents after explaining that his son will most likely NOT have an English accent, where he jokingly says, when talking to Tonight Show host Jimmy Fallon who has an American Accent, "the way you make words sound hurts my ears", and when explaining how he will speak in a different manner, he again jokingly says he will be speaking "worse". The main example he presents though is at the 1:50 minute mark when talking about the difference between American and English accents and whether it makes it harder to communicate in America. Oliver goes on to explain that for people without an American accent, automated machines are a "real problem". He jokingly makes a comparison in which he says when dealing with automated machine people without American accents are "battered down into submission by the machine until you talk like a sedated John Wayne" after which he does an impression of...a sedated John Wayne, in which he speaks with a stereotypical American accent. This last bit is very interesting because even though he talks about it in joking, light-hearted manner, he brings up strong evidence for people without American accents being "battered down into submission" to not use their accents. In these situations, people without American accents are forced to accommodate their speech and change it to sound more American which also relates to Style-Shifting. To me, there is also a slight bit of globalization too in a similar way to what I just mentioned. It is most likely indirectly but it is pushing towards just a plain American accent to be used.

Posted by Hayden Balduf on May 2, 2017

Tags:
Accommodation;
Style-shifting;
Accent;
Globalization

Changing a National Language

This photo was taken in Chisinau, Moldova. The one on the left says, “Our Language” and the word Romania is handwritten below. The photo on the left says “I am Moldovan! I speak Moldovan!” Right now, Moldova is in a deep debate about the national language because of its several prevalent ethnic groups. Many people resent Russia and want the language eradicated, however there is still a significant number of Russian speakers. In addition, the recent change of the national language from Russian to Moldovan has sparked an entirely new challenge. Many want to be associated with Romania, become westernized, and speak Romanian. They argue that Moldovan and Romanian are simply dialectal differences. Others want to stay a part of Eastern Europe and retain their own specific national identity as Moldovan or Russian. The government recently changed all street signs, websites, and college classes to Moldovan, despite a large percentage of people unable to speak the language. Many people now associate Russian speakers with “the enemy” or of a lower status. This has alienated the non-Moldovan speakers and has caused immense political unrest.

Ed Sheeran's "Bibia Be Ye Ye"

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“Bibia Be Ye Ye” is the title of a track on Ed Sheeran’s new album. In the song, the verses are sung in English while the chorus is in Twi, a dialect of the Akan language. Akan is a major native language of Ghana. While Sheeran was writing his new album, he vacationed in Ghana for a few weeks and linked up with a popular musician (Fuse ODG) while there. His time there inspired him to add part of their culture and language to his album. As most of his fame comes from American and European entertainment cultures, the mixing in of an African language adds more multicultural and multilingual recognition on a global superstar scale. The language borrowing could also be viewed as a form of language appropriation though, where Sheeran is using only a few chosen words of Twi to liven up his song, which he still translates back to English in the video’s lyrics description.

Posted by Abby Woods on May 1, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

Language and culture

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This video shows the experience of three young people who have traveled to different places around the world. Their experiences show us how language shapes the perception and understanding of people. It is also shown that language is under major influence of culture and the ideology of different regions.

Plan Now to Avoid Post - Brexit Languages Crisis

There is a focus right now on the education system of the UK, with areas most at risk being language performance. If a crisis was to emerge in language performance from the UK split areas of official practice; such as trade, could be jeopardized. There are plans as of right now to push and ensure the emphasis on particularly language skills to ensure the enhancement post Brexit. This plan includes residency and a national plan to better primary education to even the post graduate level. With the quality of education slipping in the UK as it is, and a nation wide crisis within the linguistics field, the Brexit could only worsen the matter with children potentially receiving a lacking education. The goal of these reforms and education plan is to ensure a quality education to students at all levels, and hopefully encourage the emergence of language skill teachers and even linguistics majors. [Published on 10-16-2016]

Stunning animated game helps teach endangered Aboriginal language

In recent times there has been a resurgence for Australians to get in touch with their families native languages, possibly noticing that once their family members die off, there is no one left to speak it. With this game being released, it's hopes are to draw enough attention to Merra, by interactively engaging players with words, and icons to keep the language alive. There are only a handful of people in the world that speak Merra, and the creator related with his own native Indigenous language being almost lost within his family as well. Hopefully this game takes off and is successful enough to spur other similar games that bring attention to Indigenous Australian languages globally. [Published on 10-06-2016]

Burger King - World Literacy Month

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This video was used by Burger King to raise awareness for World Literacy Month. The video shows a variety of people in a Burger King drive thru line. As the customers get up to the menu they realize that all of the food items are written in gibberish. They cannot understand what is written and are told to go to the window where they are told that 1 out of 5 people in the world cannot read. This call to awareness shows how difficult it is for people with not only language barriers but people who cannot read. It demonstraits the difficulties to get through the day for many people facing this problem.

Posted by Danielle Wismer on October 2, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Language Shift;
Education;
Globalization

Brits And Americans Don't Speak The Same Language In The Kitchen

The Author, a U.K. native moves to the United States. She attempts to make cookies with her child and learns, due cultural disconnect in wordage, she is actually making biscuits. [Published on 10-13-2011]

Posted by Kristen Noel on July 29, 2016

Tags:
American English;
English;
Globalization;
Semantics

Expanding Past English May Lead to Great Discoveries in Other Languages

Patricia Ryan stresses the importance of language globalization and how we must expand our linguistic abilities and knowledge past English in order to advance our society as a whole. She discusses how the limitation of acquiring only one language may be causing us to miss out on discovering incredible ideas that are stuck in a different language, which enforces the necessity of multilingualism and shines a light on the rapidly increasing rate of dying languages. [Published on 12-01-2010]

Posted by Bri Smith on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Acquisition;
Contact;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

Pidgin English from Nigeria

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A video of two Nigerian Men who explain and give example of language divergence and Pidgin English.

Global Business Speaks English

A Harvard Business Review study from 2012 that revealed English is fast becoming the language of the business world through mandated corporate language initiatives meant to foster ease of communication amongst employees worldwide. [Published on 05-01-2012]

Posted by Kylie Smith on July 18, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Globalization

Asian American Slang

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This video depicts slang words used in particular by Asian Americans. This shows the combination of the two cultures of Asia and America. Many of these slang words have Asian roots and are influenced by American culture which gives rise to a whole new word with different meanings. This blend of cultures has given rise to many new languages and words throughout history.

Posted by Matt McLaughlin on March 11, 2016

Tags:
Chinglish;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

A Remote Amazonian tribe could fundamentally change our understanding of language

This article talks about the recent discovery of the language of a remote tribe in the Amazon that may be drastically different from any other known languages. A researcher from MIT teamed up with one of the few non-native Piraha speakers in the world to try to analyze the differences. This research may change our understanding of how language works and how it developed.

Boise State linguists preserve endangered languages

This article gives perspective from a linguists point of view when discussing endangered languages. There are so many languages that people speak in our world and so many of them are going extinct. As the author discusses in the article, these cultures are not dead and their languages should be preserved as much as they can. [Published on 02-16-2016]

Posted by Courtney Dickerson on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Communities of Practice;
Education;
Globalization

Emotions that have no names in English

A chart of how emotions that have no names in English relate to emotions that have names in English.

Posted by Brian Pener on March 5, 2016

Tags:
English;
Globalization;
Linguistic Relativity

Words that sound dirty in other languages

The article details how a word that is innocuous in one Language is very offensive in another. [Published on 01-02-2015]

Posted by Brian Pener on March 5, 2016

Tags:
Contact;
Globalization;
Linguistic Relativity

Cherokee Look for Ways to Save Their Dying Language

This article depicts the perception of Cherokee as a "dying language", and how the remaining speakers are trying to bring it back to life. [Published on 02-29-2016]

"The Day Beyonce Turned Black"

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Within this SNL skit, there are many different forms of language used. For this skit, it is explaining how caucasian people tend to look at the world in a over dramatic way. Throughout the skit, there are race, gender, & sexualities between white and blacks. This skit has a comical view on different political problems that we have in this country today, and what the children of our culture are growing up in.

Global English

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A map showing the use of English around the globe, as a native language and as a second language or lingua franca.

Posted on November 4, 2014

Tags:
English;
Globalization

Rock Me Amadeus

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This is the song I chose for my music project--it shows a number of English borrowings and code-switches between German and English.

Posted by Maren Fichter on September 30, 2014

Tags:
Code-switching;
Borrowing;
Contact;
Globalization

"We're sinking!"

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A commercial for Berlitz in which a German coast guard trainee misunderstands a call for help from a sinking American ship.

Posted by Meredith Tamminga on June 19, 2013

Tags:
Accent;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

What will globalization do to languages?

A 2008 forum on the effects of globalization on language, including thoughts from linguist Mark Liberman.

Posted on October 2, 2012

Tags:
Globalization;
English