English

English Conundrums

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This is a clip from an "I Love Lucy" episode in which a foreign man is having troubles with some English words. It is interesting, because it points out the several different ways one can say -ough. In my opinion, this is a great example why English is considered one of the more difficult languages to learn as a second language.

Posted by Sarah Brown on July 1, 2018

Tags:
American English;
English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent;
Multilingualism

How to speak Japanese properly

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This is a Canadian YouTuber who enjoy learning Japanese. Although this video only 2 minutes long, it shows proper language usage in Japan and see the cultural difference. This video can help people to understand the asian culture, especially how Asian show their etiquette in a formal way. Specifically, in the use of language, the video shows a very complicated sentence to express gratitude, but the expression in English is very simple, just simply say thank you.

Posted by Zhiyang Chen on June 29, 2018

Tags:
English;
Japanese

Teens Tell All About Slang

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This video emphasizes a new language habit of teenagers in todays' world. What I mean is using slang. Slang is highly informal and often used in colloquial speech. It is a part of a language that is usually outside of standard usage and that may consist of both newly coined words and phrases and of new or extended meanings attached to established terms. This video helps you to understand some slangs with a good explanation of the reason for these changes.

Posted by Wenqi Zang on June 17, 2018

Tags:
English;
Variation;
Youth;
Internet Language;
Slang

Hey Ma

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Pitbull, J Balvin, and Camila Cabello made a bilingual version of the song Hey Ma. This song is an example of code-switching with them switching between Spanish and English throughout the song. They do this to bring in a larger audience and be more inclusive and show off their heritage.

Posted by Elise Burk on January 14, 2018

Tags:
English;
Spanish;
Code-switching

I know you Want Me

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This artifact is of the Song "I know you want me" by Pitbull and is an example of code switching because he uses Spanish and English to sing the song, Pitbull also tries to incorporate his version of the Spanish heritage into the song by switching between Spanish and English to reach out to his audience of both languages.

Posted by Talia Musser on January 7, 2018

Tags:
Spanglish;
English;
Code-switching;
Multilingualism

Code-switching in the song "Exotic"

This artifact is the song “Exotic” by Priyanka Chopra ft. Pitbull, and this is an example of code-switching because they sing in Hindi and English, which is because of Priyanka Chopra and her Indian roots and her attempt to add some of her culture and language to this song. The song also mentions various cities/countries around the world. Thus, the song’s use of Hindi and English expresses code-switching and shows her reaching out to a larger and more diverse audience.

Posted by Millie Shah on December 17, 2017

Tags:
English;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

Chrish - Indie girl introduces us to her kitchen (Vine)

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This vine parodies a female indie pop singer's voice.

Posted by Gregor McGee on November 28, 2017

Tags:
English;
Style-shifting;
Womens Language

Indie Pop Voice

An article detailing the vowels and other features that make up "Indie Pop Voice". [Published on 10-06-2015]

Posted by Gregor McGee on November 28, 2017

Tags:
English;
Style-shifting;
Womens Language

Camila Cabello - Havana (Spanglish Solo Version)

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Camila's Havana song is one of many examples of popular songs that are using Spanglish. Spanglish, an example of how code-switching, is becoming popular in the music industry. It is interesting to see how artists are proud and secure to show that they are bilingual. I feel, in a way, these artists are using code-switching to grab audience's attention and to show their roots (Hispanic/Asian/ etc.).

Posted by Elizabeth Gaitan on November 18, 2017

Tags:
English;
Spanish;
Code-switching

Vladimir Putin Speaks English for the International Expositions Bureau

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This artifact shows Russia´s president Vladimir Putin welcoming the members of the 2013 International Exhibitions Bureau while speaking entirely in English. Putin usually avoids speaking in English even though he is known for knowing enough English to even correct his translators. Speaking English in this welcome video shows his appreciation and respect to the members and guests of the exhibition.

Posted by Giovanni Artavia on July 27, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
English;
Accommodation;
Multilingualism

Philippine English vs. Australian English

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"Philippine English vs. Australian English" is a funny YouTube video by a Filipino husband and his Australian wife illustrating the differences between the two different dialects of English. By comparing different words and terms between the two dialects, the differences are sometimes profound, incomprehensible, and often very funny!

Ed Sheeran tries American Accents

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In this video, British singer Ed Sheeran is asked by a fan during a Q&A session to do his best "American Accent". He goes on to say that he can do three different ones, starting with the "Valley Girl from California" one, then moving to the "Regular" one and ending with the "Southern Draw" one. Since English is obviously one language in and of itself, but different English speaking countries have different accents. For example, Ed has a British English accent. But there are also Australian English accents, Irish English accents, and so on. There are different accents for different parts of the world, but there are also sub-accents in different parts of the same country, as shown here by Mr. Sheeran.

Posted by Lauren Drummond on July 21, 2017

Tags:
Southern English;
American English;
British English;
English;
Accent

How English Sounds to Non-English Speakers

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This video is representation of the theory of anthropological practice by showing how body language can be used to show both intentions and motives in a social environment. A couple, speaking what sounds like English have a common dinner date, but something goes wrong. The ability to notice something is wrong, even though the spoken language is not real, shows that the practice of natural, and probably learned body language are obvious to those of the culture and those familiar to it. Body language does not have a written code, it is ever fluid, and it is likely you understood everything minus the exact details of the fight in this skit.

Posted by Hannah Freeman on June 27, 2017

Tags:
English;
Perceptual Dialectology

British English vs. American English

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This video depicts a great example of how language ideology plays a role in how you learn to speak and what sounds “natural” to you whether it be “correct” or not. I think this simple example with two different styles of the same language proves the bigger issue of trying to understand how words can or cannot directly translate in two different languages and how some things that are normal in one language can be offensive in other languages, I think it all has to do with ideology and how your society molds the way that you speak and what is viewed as correct in your community.

Posted by Kayla R on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
British English;
English

Code Switching-Korean Drama

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This video talks about code switching, which means people sometimes use more than one language in a conversation. I found it very interesting, because I usually do code switching. I speak Chinese to my friend, and speak English to my professors. In this video, it introduces us why people would use more than one language or dialect in a conversation. Sometimes people act different around different people, such as we always use formal English to talk to teachers, but we will use causal or personalized English to talk to our friends. Also, when people are sharing a secret, they are more likely to use a different language, because they don't want the people around them to understand it.

Posted by Zizhen Pei on June 26, 2017

Tags:
English;
Code-switching

Code Switching

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This video talks about code switching, which means people sometimes use more than one language in a conversation. I found it very interesting, because I usually do code switching. I speak Chinese to my friend, and speak English to my professors. In this video, it introduces us why people would use more than one language or dialect in a conversation. Sometimes people act different around different people, such as we always use formal English to talk to teachers, but we will use causal or personalized English to talk to our friends. Also, when people are sharing a secret, they are more likely to use a different language, because they don't want the people around them to understand it.

Posted by Zizhen Pei on June 26, 2017

Tags:
English;
Code-switching

American Vs. British Slang

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The video I found is what the different slangs that people use in America and British. In the video, the two girls, Kaelyn who’s from America and Lucy who comes from England gave a pop quiz to each other about throw out several slangs and ask what the other person expecting the meanings of the slang words or phrases to show us how different language use in different cultures. For example, "packing heat" means carrying a gun and the word "slayed" means you own it. We can also hear the differences about American and British accent. There is a mass of different types of languages and within those languages, there are a lot of accents in those cultures. Some of them are influenced by genetic and geographical reasons, and some others are learned in particularly social setting. I think all of us are learning new knowledges frequently.

Posted by Rui Wei on June 26, 2017

Tags:
American English;
British English;
English;
Slang

Icelanders Seek to Keep Their Language Alive and Out of 'the Latin Bin'

Icelanders are becoming concerned that their language is being overridden by the English language. The current official language in Iceland is Old Norse. It has changed in incredible amount over more than a thousand years and is now a unique dialect. Nowadays English is becoming more prominent due to the tourism industry and devices with automated voices in English. Only about 400,000 people speak it now, and with the vast globalization Icelanders as well as linguistic experts are in fear that Old Norse will have the same fate as Latin. [Published on 04-22-2017]

Posted by Eden Hailemariam on May 11, 2017

Tags:
Power;
English;
Change;
Language Shift

The 100 Language Ideology

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In the episode series, The 100, there are three groups of people, the mountainmen, the ark, and the grounders. The mountainmen and the Ark have both been living in conditions with a school system and a more systematic type of life in general. They both speak Standard English and after 97 years apart come back together and can communicate. The grounders, who live on the ground in a less "civilized" way in the modern worlds eyes, speak a language called “Trigedasleng”, which is supposed to be a descendant of modern English. The grounders have to speak English in order to communicate with the mountainmen and the ark. There is a language ideology within the show that seems similar to the English-only ideology around today. This idea that English is the best language and should be the language to communicate with others as well as the most civilized language (Crawford, 2000). I have attached a video of the language spoken by the grounders and one can also see how they are depicted within the show in accordance to the ideology that they are “less civilized”.

Posted by Molly C Schmidt on May 3, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
English

English = civilized language

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In the episode series, The 100, there are three groups of people, the mountainmen, the ark, and the grounders. The mountainmen and the Ark have both been living in conditions with a school system and a more systematic type of life in general. They both speak Standard English and after 97 years apart come back together and can communicate. The grounders, who live on the ground in a less "civilized" way in the modern worlds eyes, speak a language called “Trigedasleng”, which is supposed to be a descendant of modern English. The grounders have to speak English in order to communicate with the mountainmen and the ark. There is a language ideology within the show that seems similar to the English-only ideology around today. This idea that English is the best language and should be the language to communicate with others as well as the most civilized language (Crawford, 2000). I have attached a video of the language spoken by the grounders and one can also see how they are depicted within the show in accordance to the ideology that they are “less civilized”.

Posted by Molly C Schmidt on May 3, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
English

Bailando-Enrique Iglesias Lyrics

These lyrics contain the lyrics from the song Bailando by Enrique Iglesias where he uses Spanish and English throughout the entire song.

Posted by Kayla Springs on February 20, 2017

Tags:
Spanglish;
English;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Language Shift;
Multilingualism;
Slang

The Specialized Language of Sports

This is a link to a blog post describing the specialized language of sports. This post highlights the various terminology used in a variety of sports. The author describes some of his favorite terms in both American sports as well as terms used in European countries. He likes these terms for the actual sound the words make when uttered. Tags: Community of practice, British, French, Portuguese, Italian, Slang, semantics [Published on 08-11-2010]

Posted by Emily Blessing on September 26, 2016

Tags:
English;
French;
Communities of Practice;
Slang;
Semantics

Brits And Americans Don't Speak The Same Language In The Kitchen

The Author, a U.K. native moves to the United States. She attempts to make cookies with her child and learns, due cultural disconnect in wordage, she is actually making biscuits. [Published on 10-13-2011]

Posted by Kristen Noel on July 29, 2016

Tags:
American English;
English;
Globalization;
Semantics

3 Types of English

This TedTalk features Jamila Lyiscott, who describes the "three Englishes" she speaks on a daily basis, which is determined by her surrounding environment and who she is with. Her detailed breakdown of the different "tongues" she speaks shows the correlation between language, culture, and race, as well as how society and culture effect language acquisition/usage. [Published on 02-01-2014]

Bilingual children switching between English and Spanish

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This video includes children in a one on one setting switching between spanish and english, during various exercise. It features bilingual children in an office setting. The focus is on literacy and acquisition of bilingual children.

Posted by BreAnna Engeman on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Spanglish;
English;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Acquisition;
Youth;
Multilingualism

Speech community or community practice/ code switching and the big bang theory

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This is a great example of a group of people who are speaking English but the are speaking a jargon that they only know and those that are in their field or have the same interests shear known as Community practice. code-switching within their speech community.

Posted by Erin Patterson on July 27, 2016

Tags:
English;
Communities of Practice

Don't Stop the Party - Pitbull lyrics

These lyrics contain the lyrics from the song Don't Stop the Party by artist Pitbull, where he uses Spanish and English throughout the song.

Key & Peele - Obama Meet & Greet

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This Key & Peele comedy sketch humorously depicts Obama and the different ways he talks to black and white people after a speech. There's a lot of code switching going on in this sketch. There's a handful funny references in here as well, from rap to slang.

How to Speak INTERNET

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A group of three British guys basically put together a video "guide" to understanding all of today's internet slang. From "YOLO," to ""FML," they cover a handful of different types of internet slang and explain what they all mean in the non internet world.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
English;
Code-switching;
Youth;
Education;
Internet Language;
Slang

Pardon my Spanglish

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A comedian joins Spanish CNN to talk about his new book about Spanglish. The comedian and the anchor switch between English and Spanish throughout the video, talking in Spanglish. While there's a good deal more Spanish being spoken in the video, there's also English, just not as much as Spanish. The intro of the video is a great example of Spanglish, as is the whole interview for the most part.

Hugh Laurie: the British slang vs the American

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This is a video clip from an episode of Ellen where British actor Hugh Laurie comes on the show. They play a game of "American vs. English slang" where they test each other on whether they understand different types of American and British slang. They go back and forth with each other and test each other's knowledge of what the different types of slang mean.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
American English;
British English;
English;
Accent;
Slang

Emotions that have no names in English

A chart of how emotions that have no names in English relate to emotions that have names in English.

Posted by Brian Pener on March 5, 2016

Tags:
English;
Globalization;
Linguistic Relativity

35 American accents

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In this short video, this gentleman displays the ability to use 35 American accents. It is pretty impressive that there are so many dialects of American English.

Polyglots Might Have Multiple Personalities

Nathan Collins reports that psychologists at Hong Kong Polytechnic University have found that people who speak multiple languages adopt the personality traits associated with the language they are currently speaking. [Published on 05-01-2011]

Posted by Jared Nietfeld on March 1, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
English;
Code-switching

LANGUAGE CHALLENGE ITALIAN VS POLISH WITH MY GIRLFRIEND

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A boyfriend and girlfriend challenge each other in translating English works in to either Italian or Polish words.

Posted by Meaghan Kuhlmann on January 30, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
English;
Language Shift

Study: At 'Rate My Professors,' A Foreign Accent Can Hurt A Teacher's Score

Posted before, but very much related to this last paper that we read (specifically the section starting on page 1353). The issue of accent supposedly impeding communication, as described in the paper, is one that, 20 years later, still exists. As the article says: "This isn't a new issue, it's just one that has never really been solved." [Published on 03-05-2015]

Posted by Jessica Hutchison on April 29, 2015

Tags:
English;
Accent

Why are schools punishing children for speaking African languages?

This article reminds me of our discussions about prestige and how in multilingual societies, different languages are associated with different social registers. [Published on 09-17-2014]

Posted by Gregor McGee on February 25, 2015

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
English;
Language Shift

How using 'they' as a singular pronoun can change the world

This is an article that discusses the importance of using singular 'they' and addresses issues related to its "correctness". [Published on 02-03-2015]

Posted by Gregor McGee on February 20, 2015

Tags:
English;
Change;
Grammaticalization;
Gender;
gender non-conforming

Global English

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A map showing the use of English around the globe, as a native language and as a second language or lingua franca.

Posted on November 4, 2014

Tags:
English;
Globalization

SEEED - Dickes B (Code Switching and Jamaican Creole English)

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A reggae/dancehall song from German band SEEED, with code switching from German to English and a verse in Jamaican Creole. Submitted for Contact Languages music assignment.

Posted by Helen Seay on October 1, 2014

Tags:
English;
Jamaican Creole;
German

France protects itself from dreaded English language

A Daily Mail (a British publication) article on the restrictions on English borrowings into French put forth by the Academie Francaise in France. [Published on 03-12-2008]

Posted by Kara Becker on September 8, 2014

Tags:
English;
French;
Borrowing

How to say "Google" in every language (almost)

A 2012 Atlantic article with an interactive map showing that the verb "to google" has been borrowed into many of the world's languages.

Posted by Kara Becker on March 5, 2013

Tags:
English;
Borrowing

What will globalization do to languages?

A 2008 forum on the effects of globalization on language, including thoughts from linguist Mark Liberman.

Posted on October 2, 2012

Tags:
Globalization;
English

The Third Sex: The Truth About Gender Ambiguity

Discussion of the hardships faced by intersexed individuals, including sex reassignment surgery, gender identity, and societal stigma.

Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas Hearings

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A clip from the 1991 confirmation hearing of Supreme Court Justic Clarence Thomas, which shows Senator Arlen Specter questioning Anita Hill. I use this with the reading: Mendoza-Denton, Norma. 1995. "Pregnant Pauses: Silence and Authority in the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas Hearings."

R Grammar Gaffes Ruining the Language? Maybe Not

Improper grammar usage is becoming more and more prevalent in the world, yet it may not necessarily be a bad thing.

Posted on August 27, 2012

Tags:
English;
Prescriptivism;
Change

Fastidious Spelling Snobs Pushed Over the Edge

A 2009 article on prescriptivism in American English.

Posted on August 26, 2012

Tags:
Prescriptivism;
English