German

The Anglish Moot

This fandom page is dedicated to the Anglish movement, a form of English linguistic purism. Followers of this movement speak English only using Germanic-based words, purposefully omitting words with Latin or Greek roots. They do this either because they think it's fun and historically interesting, because they think that's how the language was "meant" to be, or because they think it simplifies the language, therefore making it easier to speak. This is a really informative site, but can be kind of difficult to navigate due to the Anglish terms. For a more concise but thorough explanation, I will also link the following YouTube video. Here he explains more of the linguistic aspects rather than the movement itself: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIo-17SIkws Additionally, here is a Reddit page devoted to Anglish and opinions about it (but not written in Anglish, so easier to read): https://www.reddit.com/r/anglish/ I found this fascinating because this is an idea that has allegedly been about since the 1100s. [Published on 03-10-2019]

Posted by Maria Panopoulos on March 10, 2019

Tags:
English;
German;
Prescriptivism

The Anglish Moot

This fandom article contains information about the Anglish movement, its principles, and its community. The Anglish movement is a form of English linguistic purism; followers of this movement either wish to make every word in the English language based on German roots, or just speak it as such. They purposefully omit any words of the English language that have Latin or Greek roots, either because they think this is how English was "meant" to be, because they think it's cool and historically interesting, or because they think it's easier. This site has a lot of information for anyone who wants to learn about how the idea came about or how it's used, but it's pretty difficult to navigate. This video explains the linguistic aspects thoroughly but concisely and has examples of what it would sound like: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIo-17SIkws Here is also a Reddit page dedicated to followers of Anglish: https://www.reddit.com/r/anglish/ [Published on 03-10-2019]

Posted by Maria Panopoulos on March 10, 2019

Tags:
English;
German;
Borrowing;
Prescriptivism

Grief Bacon

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In this video, it depicts a German named Flula who teaches German colloquialisms. This illustrates the differences between cultures. The German culture has many words that cannot necessarily translate equivocally to English. The Germans combine words that are meaningless when translated directly to English. In this video, Flula talks about Kummerspeck, which directly translates to Grief Bacon, or the weight one gains during a period of grief.

Posted by Michael Frets on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
German

Why Germans Can Say Things No One Else Can

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This video talks about language and it's ability to allow for thought, emotion, and the expression of feelings. It talks specifically about the German language and how they have a wide variety of words they can use to better describe a situation or feeling other languages might not be able to do as effectively. It explains many examples of this, along with the appropriate meaning in English. Having a different set of words to think with and use allows for a wide variety of unique knowledge one can obtain. This video just scratches the surface of the importance of language, and how language in our lives can change the way we think and interpret the world around us.

Why I love living in a multilingual town

This article is about a young woman who studied abroad in South Tyrol, a German speaking province in Northern Italy. She speaks about her experiences living in a town that speaks both German and Italian. She says that using both languages every day while she was there gave her confidence.

Posted by Chrissy McLeod on October 14, 2016

Tags:
German;
Accommodation;
Language Shift;
Multilingualism

The Man Of Many Languages

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A polyglot man who can speak at least 15 languages and he wants to learn all languages in the world. He explains why and how speaking another language can give you a different perspective on life.

Posted by Yanan Fu on October 12, 2016

Tags:
German;
Accent;
Multilingualism

Code-Switching Baby

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This video shows a young child speaking in German with his father for most of the video until he looks up and sees his mother, with him immediately switching to Japanese upon seeing her. This shows how code-switching is prevalent even in younger multilingual speakers and is used as a way to communicate with different people. Although the child in this video is very young, he still is aware enough to know that his father understands German best and that his mother responds best to Japanese.

Posted by Alex Parnell on October 11, 2016

Tags:
German;
Japanese;
Code-switching;
Youth;
Multilingualism

Language Learning and Transitions

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Trevor Noah explains how his native language and his father's native language collide and how he tries to learn the tones, pitches and language of German and how each sound in each word can come across differently.

Posted by Melissa Clair on July 28, 2016

Tags:
German;
Linguistic Relativity;
Multilingualism

Germans Versus Other Languages

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A skit comparing the German language to other languages, this video shares many language ideologies, especially the language ideology of the German language being an angry language.

Posted by Samuel Schmidgall on January 29, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
German

Trevor Noah on using AAE to signal black identity

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This is a great clip of Trevor Noah talking about black identity and its relationship with AAE. He also talks about some difficulties in being mixed-race, notably being mistaken for Mexican, and trying to learn German to please the German half of his family.

Posted by Maren on April 17, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
German;
Spanish

SEEED - Dickes B (Code Switching and Jamaican Creole English)

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A reggae/dancehall song from German band SEEED, with code switching from German to English and a verse in Jamaican Creole. Submitted for Contact Languages music assignment.

Posted by Helen Seay on October 1, 2014

Tags:
English;
Jamaican Creole;
German