British English

Linguistic adoration example from Love Actually

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This is a good example of linguistic adoration of British English in America as an attractive language for a man to speak. Colin explains that in America he could easily find a girlfriend because of his "cute British accent". Later in the movie he ends up in a dive bar in Milwaukee and is immediately surrounded by "hot American girls" who adore him because of his accent and later invite him over and basically have an orgy, proving Colin's hypothesis about his accent right.

Posted by Andrea Bryant on May 1, 2019

Tags:
British English

Why Do Cartoon Villains Speak in Foreign Accents?

This article discusses a study similar to Lippi-Green's by Gidney and Dobrow, looking at the trend of villains in children's media being voiced with non-American accents, though it focuses primarily on British, German, and Slavic accents. [Published on 01-04-2018]

Posted by Danny Riso on April 20, 2019

Tags:
British English;
Accent

Two-year old picks up on his dad's accent, and makes fun of it

A British two-year old finds his dad's Northern accent to be incredibly funny. He even goes so far as to mimic the accent.

Posted by Miranda Rintoul on March 7, 2019

Tags:
British English;
Acquisition;
Accent

The RP English Accent – What is it, how does it sound, and who uses it?

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A brief overview of RP - the history and cultural significance of the accent, and a few physiological details

Pheobe Buffay Language Ideology and British Accent

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This clip is part of the movie series “Friends”. In this clip Phoebe is trying to impress her boyfriend’s family by changing her accent. She thinks because her boyfriend’s family is rich, she needs to speak like them and dress like them. This demonstrates a language ideology that British accent is regarded as used by upper class community. When she changes her accent back to her speech community ‘New York' accent she says many things that did not impress her boyfriend’s family and goes back to the British speech community accent to try to impress them again.

Posted by Omaima Alenezi on March 3, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
British English;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting;
Accent

Listen To What Shakespeare Sounded Like In The Original Pronunciation From 1600s

Linguist David Crystal and his son Ben (an actor) present an argument which reconstructs the "Original Pronunciation" of Shakespearean texts through historical linguistics. They claim that these works were meant to be read/performed with rhoticity and vowel changes that don't correspond well to Modern British English. CW: near the end of the video, a joke is reconstructed in OP that uses language some may find troubling [Published on 10-31-2016]

Posted by Elaina Wittmer on February 11, 2018

Tags:
British English;
Language Shift;
Accent

The North Riding of Yorkshire

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This video shows how the Yorkshire Dialect relates to language contact we discussed in class. As it can be observed, the dialect uses words from Old Norse caused by warfare and migrations.

Posted by Andrew Farinella on December 4, 2017

Tags:
British English;
Borrowing

Movie Accent Expert Breaks Down 31 Actors Playing Real People

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Not directly related to gender and language but it's fun and linguistic. This linguist critiques movie accents (this is the second video of his that I've seen) & often talks about how the usage of certain sounds or aspects of a person's speech help create a sense of the character as well as the setting, which I think goes along with some of the themes we've already started to address in the area of language as it constructs identity.

Ed Sheeran tries American Accents

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In this video, British singer Ed Sheeran is asked by a fan during a Q&A session to do his best "American Accent". He goes on to say that he can do three different ones, starting with the "Valley Girl from California" one, then moving to the "Regular" one and ending with the "Southern Draw" one. Since English is obviously one language in and of itself, but different English speaking countries have different accents. For example, Ed has a British English accent. But there are also Australian English accents, Irish English accents, and so on. There are different accents for different parts of the world, but there are also sub-accents in different parts of the same country, as shown here by Mr. Sheeran.

Posted by Lauren Drummond on July 21, 2017

Tags:
Southern English;
American English;
British English;
English;
Accent

Martin Impersonates Daphne (Frasier)

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A scene from the show Frasier which showcases Martin Crane teasing Daphne Moon's English Accent. I see a two linguistic-anthropology elements in the scene. First, by code-switching dialect during the interaction he is drawing attention to the fact that Daphne is not American. What this accomplishes is up for debate given that the two are friends and that the interaction was not hostile in nature. I'm guessing that the impression may mildly suggest that the two are not on equal footing; one is a "native" while the other isn't. This may work in elevating Martin's position in the argument. Second, Martin mentions how Daphne is always complaining about what to do with her hair. Here he is indexing a gender identity that might conflict with his own. In the reading I came across portions that relate language use as a form of identity expression and so while Daphne was being expressive of her female identity Martin, annoyed by her, replied with an antagonistic male critique of her speech.

Family Guy - Stewie Griffin & Eliza Pinchley.

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Some popular TV shows that are based on more offensive humor are great places to find examples of problems with language such as hegemony and accents. This example shows how the american baby is upset with the thick British accent of the girl and demands that she learns the proper accent and pronunciation of English. It is a bit ironic that he too has a bit of a British accent but continues to throw insults about her language ideologies and the accent associated with the way she speaks the same language he is speaking. This example shows how even when groups use hegemony to get others to conform to their ideals that they are a bit ignorant to the flaws of their own ideals and would rather focus on others "wrong doings".

Posted by Zach Beckmann on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
British English;
Cockney English;
Accent

British English vs. American English

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This video depicts a great example of how language ideology plays a role in how you learn to speak and what sounds “natural” to you whether it be “correct” or not. I think this simple example with two different styles of the same language proves the bigger issue of trying to understand how words can or cannot directly translate in two different languages and how some things that are normal in one language can be offensive in other languages, I think it all has to do with ideology and how your society molds the way that you speak and what is viewed as correct in your community.

Posted by Kayla R on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
British English;
English

American Vs. British Slang

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The video I found is what the different slangs that people use in America and British. In the video, the two girls, Kaelyn who’s from America and Lucy who comes from England gave a pop quiz to each other about throw out several slangs and ask what the other person expecting the meanings of the slang words or phrases to show us how different language use in different cultures. For example, "packing heat" means carrying a gun and the word "slayed" means you own it. We can also hear the differences about American and British accent. There is a mass of different types of languages and within those languages, there are a lot of accents in those cultures. Some of them are influenced by genetic and geographical reasons, and some others are learned in particularly social setting. I think all of us are learning new knowledges frequently.

Posted by Rui Wei on June 26, 2017

Tags:
American English;
British English;
English;
Slang

Miraculous Accent

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Language is miraculous. It is diverse because of various regions, there comes accents. Siobhan Thompson imitates 17 different accents in Britain, exploring which region may speak these accents and who are the people that speak these accents. She presents typical stars or movie actors and demonstrates accents like RP, Received Pronunciation, the standard BBC English; Heightened RP, generally spoken in movies or television; London; East Anglia; West County; Northern Welsh and the like. United Kingdom is not among one of those countries with the large territory but it has more than 17 kinds of accents. How can you believe the millions of accents spoken around the world? Besides the amazing of the large numbers of accents, the diverse culture and language behind the accents are also amazing. It is easy to find that people who speak different accents sometimes have their own slang, which represents for their unique culture.

Posted by Junhong Chen on June 26, 2017

Tags:
British English;
Slang

British People Attempting Their Best American Accent

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This is titled "British People Attempting Their Best American Accent," which really encapsulates the main point of the video. Essentially, aside from a handful of outliers, the attempts at accents reflected stereotypes that some British people tend to think Americans hold. The accents revolved around "Southern," "Californian/Surfer," and "Hyper-Metropolitan" accents. The words included by those speaking generally reflected stereotypes involving surfing and smoking weed (for the Californian/Surfer), eating cheeseburgers, shopping, and gossip (Hyper-Metropolitan), and drinking beer and shooting guns (Southern). The participants were not asked to do a specific kind of "American accent," either, they merely did an accent that they deemed to be what is "the American accent." How Americans are perceived by these participants was evident in their style of speech and words chosen to reflect typical American conversation along; one could also possibly argue that this reflects that some British people group all of the American identities into one conglomerate identity which they deem to be wholly "American." Thinking about this more outside of the video, I feel that this could be true in terms of how Americans think of other cultures as well, like how Americans think of the British identities.

What’s the big deal about mocking someone’s accent?

A discussion of prejudice against certain accents from the perspective of someone in the UK. This mirrors many of the things we have seen about the US -- people less willing to rent apartments, more willing to think someone's guilty of a crime, etc. if they speak in a different accent. It also talks about the "politics of transcription" in the way 'non-standard' accents are transcribed, for example, in subtitles, and suggests that mocking people's accents is seen as a more socially acceptable form of prejudice since it's "not a big deal."

My Fair Lady - Why Can't The English?

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This song called "Why can't the English?" from the movie My Fair Lady. In this song Henry Higgins starts the song off by singing: "Look at her, a prisoner of the gutter, Condemned by every syllable she utters By right she should be taken out and hung, For the cold-blooded murder of the English tongue." referring to Hepburn. With this, followed by a lot of remarks that are similar in nature, he is implying very strongly that there is a Standard English language that should be spoken by all English people, and if anyone doesn't, "by right" they could be hung. He says most people are never "taught" and instead learn other stigmatized varieties of English and refers to these as murderers of the English tongue. He is in this way implying that there is a legitimate use of proper English language, and that is the standard variety that he speaks. therefore considering himself as a "better Englishman", and more educated, in this way making a social class distinction between him and the others. He is also implying that there should be unity of the nation as mentioned by Bourdieu in "The Production and Reproduction of Legitimate Language". Higgins refers to the English speaking people of England as Englishmen, but also mentions that non-standard speaking varieties are "painful to your ears" and is afraid they will never be able to get "one common language".

Why Do People In Old Movies Talk Weird?

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The history of the transatlantic accent.

Posted by Nicole Niesen on February 28, 2017

Tags:
American English;
British English;
Socioeconomic Status;
Accent

Plan Now to Avoid Post - Brexit Languages Crisis

There is a focus right now on the education system of the UK, with areas most at risk being language performance. If a crisis was to emerge in language performance from the UK split areas of official practice; such as trade, could be jeopardized. There are plans as of right now to push and ensure the emphasis on particularly language skills to ensure the enhancement post Brexit. This plan includes residency and a national plan to better primary education to even the post graduate level. With the quality of education slipping in the UK as it is, and a nation wide crisis within the linguistics field, the Brexit could only worsen the matter with children potentially receiving a lacking education. The goal of these reforms and education plan is to ensure a quality education to students at all levels, and hopefully encourage the emergence of language skill teachers and even linguistics majors. [Published on 10-16-2016]

Happy Valley creator calls for more northern accents on TV and radio

Sally Wainwright, a British writer, said that there should be more representation of northern England accents in British media, and described some of the qualities of northern English speech that she finds appealing. She also labels southern English as "posh." This might be an example of Ochs' (1993) model of indexicality, where certain linguistic features index social meaning, which then index a social category. It's also part of a larger discussion about media representation. [Published on 04-04-2016]

Posted by Oskar Söderberg on April 5, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
British English;
Accent

Hugh Laurie: the British slang vs the American

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This is a video clip from an episode of Ellen where British actor Hugh Laurie comes on the show. They play a game of "American vs. English slang" where they test each other on whether they understand different types of American and British slang. They go back and forth with each other and test each other's knowledge of what the different types of slang mean.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
American English;
British English;
English;
Accent;
Slang

Shakespeare in the Original English

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A demonstration of the London accent in the Shakespearean accent, the "ancestor" for both modern British English and American English, with marked centralization.

Posted by Gina Ruggeri on February 16, 2016

Tags:
New England;
British English

British Accents: Call Centre English

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Some great discussion about language ideologies, and Diglossia, two variants of the same language.

Posted by Mark Beal on February 7, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
British English;
Cockney English

Brit Language: Peter Sellers' Complete Guide to the British Aisles

Comic Peter Sellers does a wide-ranging parody of accents in Britain and elsewhere.

Posted by Kara Becker on December 19, 2014

Tags:
British English;
Accent

Estuary English

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A young man living in Portland, Oregon who uses a variety of southeastern British English that some scholars refer to as Estuary English.

Posted by Kara Becker on November 10, 2014

Tags:
British English;
Estuary English;
Socioeconomic Status

Accent Tour of the UK

We talked in class about how one person producing two versions of one vowel was helpful when asking people to evaluate or respond to speech, because it eliminates other factors such as age and gender, and controls for the vowel itself. I thought this was a really good example of that: this man is really good at putting on a lot of the accents of the UK, and the fact that it is just one person makes it really easy to hear the differences in his speech.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on October 4, 2014

Tags:
British English;
Received Pronunciation;
Scottish English;
Variation

Queen's English changing!

We talked in class about apparent-time vs. real-time studies, and I thought this was a very interesting example of the latter, focused entirely on one person--the Queen of England. Because of her televised christmas broadcasts, recordings of her have been public consistently since the 1950s. If you compare the Queen's accent in her 1957 christmas broadcast (http://youtu.be/mBRP-o6Q85s) to the one from 2013 (http://youtu.be/6E4v4Dw5Ags), you can here an enormous difference. This short article says that her accent is moving closer to the standard speech of the area, and that "It demonstrates that the monarchy, at least as far as the spoken accent is concerned, isn't isolated from the rest of the community." It would be very interesting to look at recordings from between then and now, and see how quickly these changes happened.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on September 18, 2014

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
British English;
Accent

Ducks quack in regional accents

A researcher known as "Dr. Quack" reports that recordings of "Cockney" ducks from London differ in their quacking from "Cornish" ducks. [Published on 06-01-2004]

Posted by Kara Becker on September 5, 2014

Tags:
British English;
Cockney English;
Accent

Multicultural London English

A 2013 Economist article on Multicultural London English with quotes from Paul Kerswill

Posted by Kara Becker on November 4, 2013

Tags:
British English;
Cockney English;
Youth

Patrick Steward's Yorkshire dialect

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Patrick Steward recites a poem in his native Yorkshire dialect

Posted by Kara Becker on September 16, 2013

Tags:
British English

English to English

A tumblr maintained by the Guardian's New York office, documenting cultural differences between British and American English as well as popular culture.

Posted by Kara Becker on July 8, 2013

Tags:
American English;
British English

Beckhams talk more posh, say researchers

A 2013 report on research from the University of Manchester that David and Victoria Beckham have decreased h-dropping and l-vocalization in their speech.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 18, 2013

Tags:
British English;
Change

Academics "Talk Posh" to Protect Their Careers

A 2013 sociology study in Britain found that academics play down their regional accents for fear of judgment as well as career roadblocks.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 4, 2013

Tags:
British English;
Socioeconomic Status;
Accent

Why do British Singers sound American?

A 2013 Slate article about the continuing trend for British pop singers to adopt American pronunciation when singing, including the use of /r/ vocalization. Peter Trudgill's work on the Beatles is cited.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 25, 2013

Tags:
Trudgill, Peter;
American English;
British English;
r vocalization

The Queen's Christmas Broadcast 1984

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I use this with the following reading: Harrington, Jonathan et al. 2000. Monophthongal vowel changes in Received Pronunciation: An acoustic analysis of the Queen's Christmas Broadcast.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 13, 2013

Tags:
British English;
Received Pronunciation;
Change

The Queen's Christmas Broadcast 1957

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I use this with the following reading: Harrington, Jonathan et al. 2000. Monophthongal vowel changes in Received Pronunciation: An acoustic analysis of the Queen's Christmas Broadcast.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 13, 2013

Tags:
British English;
Received Pronunciation;
Change

Saying no to "gizit" is plain prejudice

A 2013 contribution to The Independent by sociolinguist Julia Snell, arguing against the sentiments in a letter by a teacher in a primary school in Teesside, U.K. that students should remove features of Teesside dialect from their spoken speech in order to succeed in school.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 10, 2013

Tags:
British English;
Stigma

American Talk: The cast of Harry Potter

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The cast of Harry Potter read phrases related to American culture in their best American accents

Posted on November 13, 2012

Tags:
American English;
British English;
Accent

The Queen's Christmas Broadcast 1985

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I use this with the following reading: Harrington, Jonathan et al. 2000. Monophthongal vowel changes in Received Pronunciation: An acoustic analysis of the Queen's Christmas Broadcast.

BBC English

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A BBC Two segment on BBC English, which may be another term for Received Pronunciation, and its impact on other varieties of English

Ellen: British vs. American slang

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Ellen Degeneres and Hugh Laurie quiz each other on American and British slang

Americans Are Barmy Over Britishisms

Discussion of increasing popularity of British vernacular in American English.

Yorkshire "dictionary" for foreign doctors

A 2010 Daily mirror article about a Yorkshire "dictionary" of contemporary slang that is currently distributed to foreign (European) doctors.

Posted on October 2, 2012

Tags:
British English;
Lexicon

Eddie Izzard on Being Bilingual

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Eddie Izzard stand-up about British English vs. American English and the tendency of monolingualism in native English speakers.

BIC For Her Amber Medium Ballpoint Pen

Customer reviews of BIC pen designed for women.