Standard Language Ideology

Trump: We speak English here, not Spanish

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In this video, Donald Trump briefly discusses his stance on speaking English, speaking Spanish, and assimilation in the United States. This video is an example of the monoglot ideology.

Posted by Chanelle Swanson on October 8, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
Monolingualism

American Accent Immitations

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This video depicts 70 non-Americans doing their best impression of an American "accent". I find this video interesting because there are so many different dialects of English and numerous other languages spoken in America, but the impressions all tend to be pretty similar, depicting Americans as ditzy, uneducated, improper, etc. This relates to language ideologies and how people outside of America perceive and have certain opinions about how all Americans tend to speak.

Posted by Lauren Hart on June 29, 2018

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
American English;
Accent

The linguistic genius of babies

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The video basically introduces some of the factors that are important to babies when they are first exposed to languages. And also, it shows us how critical period and puberty play a role in babies language acquisitions.

NPR Linguistic Profiling

NPR's Tovia Smith reports on linguistic discrimination in relation to the Fair Housing Act. The interviewee was repeatedly denied housing because of linguistic profiling, and Smith talks about legality and the lawsuit that ensued. The segment addresses many of the concerns in Baugh's "Linguistic profiling" paper. (CW: N-word is used by AAE speaker) [Published on 09-05-2001]

Posted by Luna Albertini on April 17, 2018

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
African American English;
Accent

Why Do Cartoon Villains Speak in Foreign Accents?

This article examines the issue of accent in children's media, particularly the accents of cartoon villains. It addresses many of the themes found in Lippi-Green (2012), and indeed cites her work, along with the work of researchers Calvin Gidney and Julie Dubrow. [Published on 01-04-2018]

Posted by Aidan Malanoski on April 16, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
Accent

Professor suspected of being a terrorist because of a math equation

A woman thinks that an Ivy League professor is a terrorist due to her inability to understand what he's writing (among other things). Her standard language ideology influenced her to believe that because he didn't seem to be writing in English, this could only be an indication that he was foreign and, ultimately in her eyes, a terrorist. [Published on 05-07-2016]

Posted by Camryn Shiroma on March 22, 2018

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology

The Cost of Code Switching

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This is a 10 minute TedX video addressing the complexities of style shifting/code switching in America, specifically AAE speakers being expected to conform to "standard forms" to survive in America. This talk addresses issues of police brutality, racism, and expectations of who is expected to style shift/code switch and why.

Fox News clip sampled on DAMN.

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This clip is a really clearly delineated example of "language as proxy" for racism. It's really clear in the tone of the broadcasters when reading Kendrick's lyrics that their issue is not only with the content but with the stigmatized aspects of AAVE. I also wanted to bring up this clip/the album DAMN. because it's a great example of a lot of the themes talked about in the film Talking Black in America, particularly regarding hip-hop. The way Kendrick puts his music, which deals with issues of race and is basically the way he was able to survive violence in dialogue with white people saying "hip hop is doing more damage than racism" is really masterful and gives me chills.

Implementation of Hebrew as a Standard Language in pre-1948 Palestine

This article discusses the revernacularization of Hebrew into a standard language in Palestine, and then gives examples of how political and interest groups carried out this implementation at a local level through an examination of the 1930s and 1940s city documents of a small Jewish settlement, Raanana. [Published on 01-01-2008]

Spanish phrases Gringos need to stop abusing!

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The women in this video describe all the ways non-Spanish speakers use Mock Spanish. They describe it as sometimes being a way to connect with others. However, the overuse of Mock Spanish can become disrespectful and insulting.

Posted by Kaman Dhanoa on January 15, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

The trouble with Trump's word choices

This is an opinion article on the interruption of President Trump's word choices. During the Presidential race, Trump used trouble words when referring to a community, based on their race or language. This article points out the various examples of Trump using trouble wording then explains how offensive he was being. [Published on 10-20-2016]

Professor's Universal Translator

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In Futurama, the creator of the Universal Translator states that the machine, which translates English to French, only speaks an incomprehensible language. This shows the language ideology of French sounding like nonsense and not able to be understood. He describes French as being gibberish.

Posted by Kaman Dhanoa on January 8, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
French;
Accent

Nigerian Pidgin Speakers Struggle to Translate a Phrase Into "Proper English"

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This video shows speakers of Nigerian Pidgin English struggling to translate the phrase “This Ogbono soup too draw” into “proper English.” The video itself is a good example of how pidgin languages can have a majority of lexical features from one language, but cannot be directly translated due to the uniqueness of the created pidgin. The use of the phrase “proper English” in the title also shows the prescriptive ideology of language that the creator of the video possesses by labeling one way of speaking English as the “proper” way.

Ideologies and stereotypes of southern english

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Musician performs song explaining ideologies and stereotypes associated with the southern accent and the feelings some speakers have about it.

Posted by Andrew Clark on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Southern English;
Socioeconomic Status

Grammer Nazi

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A satirical scene from the show That Mitchell and Webb Look—season 4, episode 1—depicting those who force their language ideology with regard to "correct English grammar" on others in an oppressive way. It comments on hegemony and the difficulty of conforming to the myriad of proposed rules by some, as well as the impossibility to conform perfectly even for those imposing such rules, since English borrows words from languages with different grammatical structures. Furthermore, it is entitled, "Grammer Nazi," indexing a notion of domination and violent imposition of rules by those who hold such views of "correct English."

Posted by James on December 9, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Standard Language Ideology

Will and Grace Mock-Spanish

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This Will and Grace clip shows one of the main characters, Karen, using mock Spanish to speak to her nanny, Rosario.

Posted by Abby Lanohear on December 7, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Mock Spanish

Spanish Words "White" People Can't Say

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A comedic take on "white" people trying to pronounce Spanish words and their struggle in the performance of a basic Spanish lexicon—even in words that share a striking spelling resemblance to its English cognate. Some noteworthy examples appear when the participants are asked to pronounce “refrigerador” and “negar,” with some subjects showing visible apprehension to merely attempt the latter.

Arabic Speakers Are Offering To Help Correct News Anchors Who Mistakenly Say 'Potatoes Are The Greatest'

Ironically, aloo doesn't even mean potatoes in Arabic, that's the Urdu term. So as the article is trying to correct people mispronouncing the word, it doesn't mention a very important fact and it just assumes that it's in Arabic.

Posted by Austen Aiman on December 6, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Communities of Practice

Usain Bolt Final Race Interview

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This is an interview with Usain Bolt, a Jamaican sprinter, after his final race. He is speaking in Jamaican Standard English, as opposed to Jamaican Patois.

Posted by Gregor McGee on October 29, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Globalization

Relationship between linguistic fragmentation and social capital

This article analyzes the experiment that finds the relationship between linguistic fragmentation and social capital. Researchers found that the number of language spoken in a country is significantly negatively correlated with social capital. They have concluded that multilingual countries tend to be poorer than those dominated by a single big language. They also concluded that countries with high levels of social capital tends to be richer and tend to proper. They have examined some countries have many languages and relatively high social capital which include America and Canada as immigration destinations that also host to many indigenous languages. The article created a relationship between the results from the experiment and the immigration in which immigrants and their children must master the language of their new countries whether or not they keep their old languages.

Posted by Julie Kim on October 16, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

The term “Ching Chong” as the representation of mocking Asian community in the U.S.

This audio surrounds the concept of “Ching Chong” which is one of many well-known examples that have been used as an insult to Asians in the United States. The concept of “Ching Chong” was initially formed from an anti- Chinese sentiment and were often brought up as a taunt back in the 19th Century. Mimicry, particularly for mocking Asian accents, is the default pejorative mode. The article mentioned that this form of mockery identifies Asians as decidedly, unequivocally foreign, and that Asians and Asian Americans are the “other” and excluded from the American community.

Posted by Julie Kim on October 16, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity

Linguist Jennifer Scalfani’s analysis on Trump’s “unique” use of language

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This video is about Jennifer Scalfani, a linguist at Georgetown University, who analyzed Donald Trump’s “unique” use of language that he uses as the President of the United States. His language is unique in a way that it is different than the language that other Presidents spoke in the past. He uses much more simple vocabulary and grammar, jumps from one topic to another, involves a variety of hand gestures, and uses an expression at the end of the phrase to emphasize his message. Scalfani analyzed how Trump’s unique use of language is a representation of how language can create a brand, construct an identity that is recognizable, and create an authentic persona.

President Obama's Speech at the 2015 White House Correspondents' Dinner

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This is a video of Comedian Keegan-Michael Key playing his iconic character Luther during President Obama’s speech at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner back in 2015. President Obama uses two distinguishable language varieties; one of which being formal, confident, and intricate English that he speaks as the President of the United States and the other holding characteristics of aggressiveness, slang, and straight-forwardness. President Obama successfully used Anger Translator as a form of code-switching to not only deliver his message with clarity and power but also with sense of humor that motivated the audience to focus throughout the entire duration of the speech.

Difference Between Men and Women

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A short clip from the TV show, “Friends” posted in June of 2017. The video explains the generalizations society has for the way men and women speak. The women in the video tend to over exaggerate the situation, in which they grab glasses and a bottle of wine to discuss the kiss. Whereas, the men in the latter part of the video are eating pizza casually talking about the kiss in a matter of five seconds with a few words each. The actions in the video describe the generalizations society gives men and women’s communication styles.

Posted by Sara Strand on October 4, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Gender;
Stigma

AAVE (African American Vernacular English) Ebonics Is Not “Improper” English

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A video from May of 2016 explaining why AAVE Ebonics is a proper form of English because everyone has their own dialect that is valid. The video goes on to suggest that white supremacy is the cause of all this uproar and if roles were switched then AAVE would be the official language of the United States.

Mandana Seyfeddinipur's TED Talk on Endangered Languages

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This is a TED Talk video of Mandana Seyfeddinipur, a linguist and the director of the Endangered Lanuages Documentation Programme at SOAS University of London, sharing her perspective on endangered languages. Seyfeddinipur shares how globalization, climate change, urbanization and political unrest are causing the extinction of languages at a rate equivalent to the loss of biological diversity during the mass extinction of the dinosaurs. She also emphasizes how such change can negatively impacts cultural diversity and decreases social resilience.

School of Rock First Day

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This is a clip from the movie School of Rock when Jack Black who plays Newy Finn has his first day as a substitute teacher. The language that he uses and the way he communicates is very out of role than what a student would expect from a teacher. Teachers are expected to all be in one speech community and Jack Black shows that he is not part of that speech community that most teachers are in.

Posted by Kayla Schulz on September 26, 2017

Tags:
Power;
Standard Language Ideology;
Style-shifting;
Education

Broad City

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For my sociolinguistic artifact I've chosen a brief clip from the popular show, Broad City. This clip is relevant to the course because it references language ideologies and addresses the issue of "Standardized English," or language. The clip shows how different pronunciation and ways of saying words can index cultural and social values.

Posted by Kara Toney on July 30, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Standard Language Ideology

Yo Quiero Taco Bell

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The chihuahua from Taco Bell has been around a long time but many people have over looked the use of language ideology that it presents. In this commercial it uses a common stereotype that latinos sell bad, cheap fast food by having the chihuahua as hispanic and promoting that tacos are 99 cents. A lot of hispanics were insulted by the commercial, but they continued to use the dog for a number of years.

Posted by Kelli on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity

Bo Burnham's "Country Song"

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Bo Burnham talks about how modern country music isn’t honest anymore, that the country artists say many stereotypical “country” phrases that people can connect to, and continues by singing a song that makes fun of modern country songs. This song shows language ideologies of people who live in the south by singing with a southern accent and saying that the singers use rural nouns and simple adjectives in their music, suggesting that they are unintelligent.

Posted by Katie on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Accent

So You Like Dags?

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In this video, the assumptions the narrator reaches about the use of the gypsies' language comes from his beliefs about gypsies as a group. The narrator assumes that gypsies are untrustworthy, and that this is why they speak in a manner that is difficult for him to understand.

Posted by Sam Zeller on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
Accent

English Motherf*****

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An interrogation scene from the HBO series The Wire. Through their use of mock language two detectives index a language ideology that places the immigrant's language as substandard to English. This language ideology restricts the agency of the immigrant by reinforcing language inequality through the positioning of English as the only tool that can serve the communicative function in this discourse.

President Obama with "Anger Translator"

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This video shows Barack Obama's speech at the 2015 Correspondent's Dinner. In it comedian Keegan-Michael Key plays Luther, Obama's "Anger Translator". Obama is speaking with an SAE dialect while Key uses AAVE. The humor in the sketch plays on the assumption that Presidents (and by extension anyone in a professional setting) should speak SAE, even those who may otherwise use AAVE or another dialect more naturally. Key is speaking, but he is speaking as Obama's inner self. I thought this clip demonstrated the use of different dialects in specific settings, and how when dialects such as AAVE are used in an unexpected setting people almost universally react to it. I believe this video also shows polyphony, due to both Key and Obama speaking, and hegemony due to the play on the unexpectedness of the AAVE dialect in the professional setting.

Posted by Caitlin Smith on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
African American English

mcdonalds ads marathon in different countries

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This is McDonald's advertisements in several different countries. It illustrates how different language idealogies are perceived by each country, and which themes are more attracting to which viewers. For example, the first ad was in the US, and they showed two guys playing basketball since basketball sport is a main sport in the US. The advertisement conveys how language and culture are shaped by human actions. In addition to language ideologies, this video illustrates the power of nonverbal language, the facial expressions and the reactions of the actors all show the multi functionality of language.

Posted by Meshal on June 26, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Language Shift

Movie Accent Expert Breaks Down 32 Actors' Accents

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This artifact depicts american actors attempting, some achieving and some failing, an English accent as if they were from a different country or a different time period. The expert comments on how each actor achieves these accents and how they sometimes diverge from their targeted accent because of their first language, that is, English. These accents include some that relate to socioeconomic classes in the English language, and english accents from different geological location around the world. It's interesting to observe how each actor interprets and practices for each of these accents.

Posted by Thomas Boatright on June 23, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Accent

"Spanish Radio" - Gabriel Iglesias

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Comedian Gabriel Iglesias "Spanish Radio" skit relates to language ideologies regarding the Spanish language. Iglesias, who speaks Spanish and English, creates a humorous effect on how people from the "motherland" of Mexico speak rather fast, even for himself. Iglesias has the ability to speak two different languages (bilingualism) and codeswitches between the two languages in a lot of his skits. The skit can relate to our standard language ideology in that the Spanish speaking language is fast and hard to understand and he presents that concept through mock Spanish.

Posted by Samantha Farrell on June 23, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Spanglish;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Accent

Foreign Accents: Louis C.K's Skit on Saturday Night Live

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In this video clip from a recent Saturday Night Live, the skit seems to have been written to specifically mock both Louis C.K's inability to reproduce a foreign accent, while also mocking the foreign accents of early immigrants. It is difficult to understand their motivations for the skit, but it seems to me that their depictions of 20th century immigrants relate to our Standard Language Ideology that immigrant language is difficult to understand and is something to be mocked. It is also an interesting example of linguistic crossing, as Louis C.K's appearance in this skit depends on his ability to imitate a foreign accent which he is unable to do.

Posted by Alexander P Dang on May 12, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Crossing

The Crows in Dumbo

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Childhood is an extremely critical time for socialization into a given culture. Children learn from parents, teachers, and friends about the norms and beliefs of their community. Language is an important category to be socialized into as language and ideologies surrounding language are intertwined with race, class, and status. Although there is no official language of America, English is pushed as the official language so much so that historically non-English speakers were forced by violence to shed their culture’s identity and language and subscribe to the “English-only” agenda. While the use of corporal punishment is not prevalent in modern society as a means of restricting non-English languages, the general attitude towards anyone who speaks something other than Standardized American English is unfavorable. The crows in Disney’s Dumbo show the ways in which language is used to stereotype a group of people which also acts to socialize young children to stigmatize people either directly or indirectly. In Jane Hill’s study on the use of Mock Spanish, she concluded that mock Spanish is directly linked to ideas of racism by saying, “racism is largely produced in and through everyday talk, not through the obvious racist slurs that most people today condemn but through unintentional, indirect uses of language that reinforce racist stereotypes” (Hill, 2008).  Furthermore, Rankin and Karn’s study on Ebonics led them to the conclusion that “anti-Ebonics ideology is transmitted by a simple set of strategies which suggest one can ‘speak’ Ebonics by simply pejorating standard English” which then “produces a racialized language stereotype of a subordinate group” (Rankin & Karn, 1999). Disney’s portrayal of an animal who is colored black and speaking in a stereotypical manner of African Americans would further push the ideology that this is how all African Americans speak. This portrayal would then be normalized and viewed as acceptable based on the influence and power of media especially on children.

Posted by Alanna Daniels on May 11, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Standard Language Ideology;
Ebonics Controversy

Weird Ways People Talk

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This video entitled, "Weird Ways People Talk," attempts at humor by mocking several different North American dialects of English. In so much that he can faithfully articulate English off the standard variant, he creates a divide between certain mocked groups and raises the so-called standard on a pedestal. In a similar light to mock-Spanish, these variants he mimics can be the origins of stereotypically thought.

Posted by McKale Wiley on May 11, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Standard Language Ideology;
Prescriptivism

"Why Explaining 'The N-Word' To Non-Black People Is So Damn Exhausting"

Article on Cultural Perceptions of the N-Word. Deals with which groups have responsibility or control over a word (and if they can have this control). This also shows lay-person perspective on key socio-linguistic issues. [Published on 05-09-2017]

“Do You Understand the Words That Are Coming Out of My Mouth? - Rush Hour (1/5) Movie CLIP

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This is a clip from the movie Rush Hour where Agent Carter misunderstood that Jackie Chan (Lee) cannot understand English; therefore he got frustrated and started to change his tone and volume while talking to him. This clip touches on the issue of performativity, racial and linguistic ideologies, Standard Language Ideology and Language socialization. Chris Tucker in the movie was expecting Jackie Chan to be able to speak English, and he also used forms like “speaka” and said “Mr. Rice-a-Roni don’t even speak American”. Based on this example and also the rising tone and increasing volume, it shows how Tucker had the linguistic ideologies of if he speaks louder and slower then the other person is going to understand him. He also used terms that shows his own identity such as “speaka”, and he also said, “speak American” to show his ideology of American equals English only.

American vs. British Words

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In this, you can see how different countries use the same language and the same words to refer to different things. One example that is given is that in the U.K., what Americans know how french fries are called chips. In America, a french fry and a chip are two completely separate things. It helps to show how people can use the same language to mean different things in different cultures.

Posted by Chris Schreiber on May 8, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Variation

Outsiders' Views of English Speakers

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This video is one point of view of how non-native English speakers view English. The main point of the video was the focus on how English speakers are perceived based on gender roles, accents, and the cultural views of English speakers. The intonation from both the male and female actor show the gender roles of language. The girl tends to be speaking softly and gently while the boy is a little bit more outgoing in his speech. When they start to argue again the roles come into play with the girl's voice going higher in pitch and sharper in tone. The classic American type of accent is also prevalent in the blurry sentences that are spoken by either actors. The scene also played what one might call a normative view on American dinners between couples; low light, soft talking, homemade meal and then an argument. All of this just screamed stereotypical America.

Press One for English

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This music video features a clearly Anglo couple singing in thick Southern U.S. accents about the need to speak English in the United States. It clearly showcases many examples of languages ideologies and subtle racism. The video indexes a strong relationship between an American identity and English ability by using many flags, referencing the U.S. military, and blatantly saying "English is the language of the land." They also support the dominance of English, associating it with the opportunities of America, even ironically saying that "We share this land of liberties, so please speak English". Language is closely tied to one's identity, and it is a great abuse to force language upon another person. It's also very difficult to learn another language, especially to full proficiency, once one has passed puberty. Despite these facts, the lyric "You chose to come, now choose to speak English", insists that to be accepted as an American, you must alter a fundamental aspect of your being. The song goes on to associate different languages with "others", saying " I don't live in China, Mexico, no foreign place," and frequently implying that to speak another language is to be lesser, especially in the U.S. These attitudes surrounding English are what create the English hegemony in the U.S., but just because it is the norm doesn't mean it is positive. Many nations are multilingual and there are massive benefits, but this song maintains that it is absurd to have "subtitles in 5 languages" and that as an American, "why should I have to press one for English?". English is massively dominant in the U.S., despite the present of many other varieties over time. The dominance of English is closely tied to the systematic oppression of various ethnic groups in the U.S. over time.

Gendered Language in "Beauty and the Beast"

The character LeFou in "Beauty and the Beast" recently caused some discussion about sexuality especially in a children's movie. LeFou is Gaston's sidekick and is portrayed as gay in the movie. Although there are no major changes in the character from the original movie, people are unhappy with Disney for having a gay character in the movie. Children watching the movie won't even notice the comments, language, or actions that are made or think twice about seeing two men dancing together. The image of the Beast and Gaston as manly and tough using so called man speech is seen as appropriate but LeFou dancing with another man or saying which team he prefers is seen as not okay for a man and has roots in socialization. Disney and other companies are trying to erase these and other stereotypes about gender and sexuality. But there will always be those who are upset and protest something that goes against the "standard norm" as they see it. [Published on 03-20-2017]

Posted by Emily Deason on May 6, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Gay Mens Language

Key and Peele Loco Gangsters

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This is a video from the TV show Key and Peele called Loco Gangsters. Key and Peele act out a skit as perceived Latino males. They use a variety of linguistic techniques ranging from the ideologies believed to be associated with Spanish to mock spanish.

Posted by Bryson Risley on May 5, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Mock Spanish

“Do You Understand the Words That Are Coming Out of My Mouth? - Rush Hour

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This is a clip from the movie Rush Hour where Agent Carter misunderstood that Jackie Chan (Lee) cannot understand English; therefore he got frustrated and started to change his tone and volume while talking to him. This clip touches on the issue of performativity, racial and linguistic ideologies, Standard Language Ideology and Language socialization.

“Do You Understand the Words That Are Coming Out of My Mouth? - Rush Hour

video imagePlay video
This is a clip from the movie Rush Hour where Agent Carter misunderstood that Jackie Chan (Lee) cannot understand English; therefore he got frustrated and started to change his tone and volume while talking to him. This clip touches on the issue of performativity, racial and linguistic ideologies, and Standard Language Ideology and Language socialization.

Mad Men: Challenging Male Hegemony

This image is from the pilot episode of the TV series Mad Men and involves a character named Don Draper and a potential business partner Rachel Menken. In the scene, Don is pitching a business venture to Rachel, whom in a prior scene was wrongly assumed by Don to be a man due to her status in the business world. Rachel forcefully disagrees with Don’s pitch and asserts dominance over him, as she has the power to decline the business deal. Don becomes increasingly agitated and eventually abruptly exits in the meeting stating, “I’m not gonna let a woman talk to me like this”, as shown in the image above. Because Rachel is a woman in a dominant position, she comes across as being a “bitch”, whereas if she were a man, she would come across as confident and assertive. This is due to gendered ways of speaking that have been socially constructed based on ideologies and through socialization. Women’s language is expected to be cooperative and supportive while men’s is expected to be competitive and dominating. Furthermore, girls are socialized to maintain intimacy and criticize without appearing aggressive, while boys are socialized to assert dominance over situations. However, roles were reversed in the business meeting between Don and Rachel, challenging the language ideologies and male hegemonic society. This role reversal and challenge of male hegemony and its associated language ideologies sparked irritation in Don, causing him to react in a distasteful way and insult Rachel, thus furthering the notion that men are seen as superior to women.

Shameless: Mickey and Gender Expectations

These photos are from multiple scenes found in the TV series Shameless. The photos involve a character named Mickey Milkovich, a troubled, poor teenager who radiates the “tough guy” and delinquent persona but also happens to be gay, along with his boyfriend Ian Gallagher. The quotes on the left demonstrate Mickey’s attempt in hiding his sexuality through harsh, derogatory language that is often associated with men. Girls are expected to show polite, clean language while boys can often get away with obscene language due to the ideologies involving expectations of how women and men should speak. These ideologies are socially constructed based on gender stereotypes and are reinforced through socialization. Boys are socialized to assert dominance and stray away from emotion that is typically associated with women, which is what is being displayed in these images. Mickey initially hides behind these language ideologies that are rooted in a largely heteronormative and male hegemonic society due to the fear of intolerance within society and of challenging these ideologies to ultimately lose the masculine, “tough guy” persona he is expected to portray. However, the photos on the right show, although at times still obscene in language use, a changed Mickey that eventually speaks out against these ideologies through publicly coming out as gay with his boyfriend, Ian.

Chelsea Handler Criticizes First Lady For Having An Accent

This news article/video is about how comedian Chelsea Handler put down First Lady Melania Trump for having an accent. Chelsea Handler stated that she would never have Melania Trump on her show because "she barley speaks English." However, the article quickly points out that the First Lady actually speaks at least five languages, including French, Slovene, Italian, German, and English. This portrays how language ideologies are used in everyday life and how it influences individuals' attitudes, beliefs, opinions and knowledge about language. In linguistic anthropology language ideologies are a set of shared beliefs, such as the appropriate language use or how language should be used by particular groups. Chelsea Handler has a negative attitude towards Melania Trump's accent because in the U.S., there is the idea or belief that powerful leaders in politics should not possess "foreign accents." Chelsea Handler's comment about not wanting Melania Trump on her show portrays the idea that English is the dominant language. In the United States the popular ideology in regards to the English-only Movement is very prevalent in today's society. [Published on 01-24-2017]

Posted by Marissa Khalil on May 3, 2017

Tags:
Power;
Standard Language Ideology;
Accent;
Politics and Policy

The 100 Language Ideology

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In the episode series, The 100, there are three groups of people, the mountainmen, the ark, and the grounders. The mountainmen and the Ark have both been living in conditions with a school system and a more systematic type of life in general. They both speak Standard English and after 97 years apart come back together and can communicate. The grounders, who live on the ground in a less "civilized" way in the modern worlds eyes, speak a language called “Trigedasleng”, which is supposed to be a descendant of modern English. The grounders have to speak English in order to communicate with the mountainmen and the ark. There is a language ideology within the show that seems similar to the English-only ideology around today. This idea that English is the best language and should be the language to communicate with others as well as the most civilized language (Crawford, 2000). I have attached a video of the language spoken by the grounders and one can also see how they are depicted within the show in accordance to the ideology that they are “less civilized”.

Posted by Molly C Schmidt on May 3, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
English

English = civilized language

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In the episode series, The 100, there are three groups of people, the mountainmen, the ark, and the grounders. The mountainmen and the Ark have both been living in conditions with a school system and a more systematic type of life in general. They both speak Standard English and after 97 years apart come back together and can communicate. The grounders, who live on the ground in a less "civilized" way in the modern worlds eyes, speak a language called “Trigedasleng”, which is supposed to be a descendant of modern English. The grounders have to speak English in order to communicate with the mountainmen and the ark. There is a language ideology within the show that seems similar to the English-only ideology around today. This idea that English is the best language and should be the language to communicate with others as well as the most civilized language (Crawford, 2000). I have attached a video of the language spoken by the grounders and one can also see how they are depicted within the show in accordance to the ideology that they are “less civilized”.

Posted by Molly C Schmidt on May 3, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
English

Always #LikeAGirl

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This term, “like a girl,” can show not only gender differences but also the power of masculinity in the United States. This commercial was able to take adults and ask a series of simple questions, for example, “show me how to run like a girl?” and everyone had their own way of “running like a girl.” However, when they asked younger girls, those who haven’t experienced the hegemony of our society, they showed “running like a girl” no different than “running like a boy.” Moreover, there are clear language ideologies between men and women in our society. This constitutes the fact that there are deep gender inequalities especially with the use and the meaning of certain phrases. However, this phrase and the way the younger girls interpret shows that there is performativity of gender, meaning that people constantly strengthen or reconfigure their gender ideologies.

Posted by Sarah Zimmerman on May 2, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Standard Language Ideology

This Is How I Talk-SNL

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The SNL skit "This is How I Talk" plays off of linguistic and societal norms attributed to different groups of people (in this case black and white people) to create a humorous situation. The situation is funny because Louis C.K. who is an extremely white individual and a speaker of Standard English, pretends to be a native speaker of African-American Vernacular English to avoid letting his new boss know that he was making fun of her. This is unusual because AAVE is strongly associated with race, so to see a white man using this speech type is so out of the ordinary as to be humorous. Later on in the clip, Brenda switches to SE in order to find out for sure if Louis C.K.'s character is only pretending to speak AAVE natively. While she is speaking, she says that "this is my real voice. See, I went to a good college..." indicating the common conception that AAVE is not an "academic" form of speech and reinforcing the social hierarchy that is related to American dialects.

"That's Not How Gay Men Talk!"

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This clip of the television series, "New Girl", indexes language ideologies regarding perceptions of how gay men should speak. At the end of the clip, Jess informs Nick, who is pretending to be gay, that his speech was incongruent with how gay men speak. This indexes the language ideology that there are a believed set of speech qualities that all gay men possess.

Posted by Malkie Hematillake on April 27, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Standard Language Ideology

Troy and Abed Being Normal Scene from Community

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In this scene Troy and Abed, who typically behave far from socially acceptable, try to be "normal" so they do not embarrass their friend Shirley at her wedding. They each change their voice to diminish any distinctive characteristics and accents as well choosing words and using grammar that supports what might be considered a "standard" form of English. They do their best not to be sarcastic and to talk to others in a way that follows social norms.

Trump Relies on Mock Spanish to Talk About Immigration (OPINION)

This blog post is about how non-Spanish speaking white peoples' use of "mock Spanish" is a form of covert racism that is used as a unconsciously strategic effort to silently dominate the folks who are imagined to speak the language, but to do so through attempts at silliness, humor and acting "cool” or "with it". [Published on 10-20-2016]

Do You Speak American?

This is an article and analytical piece by Robert MacNeil, an employee of PBS since the 1980s. He talks about how moving to America and adopting American grammatical policies in order to work for television. [Published on 2005]

What’s the big deal about mocking someone’s accent?

A discussion of prejudice against certain accents from the perspective of someone in the UK. This mirrors many of the things we have seen about the US -- people less willing to rent apartments, more willing to think someone's guilty of a crime, etc. if they speak in a different accent. It also talks about the "politics of transcription" in the way 'non-standard' accents are transcribed, for example, in subtitles, and suggests that mocking people's accents is seen as a more socially acceptable form of prejudice since it's "not a big deal."

At UMass lecture, Stanford professor tackles prejudice against African-American English in courtrooms

A woman’s testimony in court is accused of being “unintelligible” because she speaks a different dialect of English, specifically African American English. The slang terms or speech patterns that she uses do not sound grammatically correct to the courtroom, but back home, it is normal speech. Rickford interestingly notes in the article that since interpreters for foreign languages are used in the courtroom, we should also use those resources of dialects of English that are not as easily interpreted by conventional speakers of the language.

Phineas and Ferb: Ferb Latin

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In this episode of Phineas and Ferb, Ferb comes up with a new language to "accommodate new customs". He takes the first letter of the word, places it at the end, and then adds -erb. The characters even go on to replace normal dialects, such as saying "Bless you", by replacing them with an action. The action for "Bless you" being you play a flugelhorn and give them your left shoe. They describe it as a 'phoenetic caboose'.

Posted by Maria Ortiz Santiago on March 7, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Acquisition;
Grammaticalization

My Fair Lady - Why Can't The English?

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This song called "Why can't the English?" from the movie My Fair Lady. In this song Henry Higgins starts the song off by singing: "Look at her, a prisoner of the gutter, Condemned by every syllable she utters By right she should be taken out and hung, For the cold-blooded murder of the English tongue." referring to Hepburn. With this, followed by a lot of remarks that are similar in nature, he is implying very strongly that there is a Standard English language that should be spoken by all English people, and if anyone doesn't, "by right" they could be hung. He says most people are never "taught" and instead learn other stigmatized varieties of English and refers to these as murderers of the English tongue. He is in this way implying that there is a legitimate use of proper English language, and that is the standard variety that he speaks. therefore considering himself as a "better Englishman", and more educated, in this way making a social class distinction between him and the others. He is also implying that there should be unity of the nation as mentioned by Bourdieu in "The Production and Reproduction of Legitimate Language". Higgins refers to the English speaking people of England as Englishmen, but also mentions that non-standard speaking varieties are "painful to your ears" and is afraid they will never be able to get "one common language".

The Great Language Game Assumptions

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People impose their own attitudes of what a culture is like onto their language. For example, many Americans assume that British people are sophisticated, and as a result, the 'a' as in father is viewed as a more posh pronunciation in other words. In this video, someone plays The Great Language Game; as he guesses what language the sound sample is, he makes some assumptions, such as that he feels that Chinese sounds 'harsher' than Japanese, and that's how he separates them. He uses his concept of standards of how each language sounds to guess which it is. Here's a link to the game itself: https://greatlanguagegame.com/

Posted by Michaella Joseph on February 27, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology

The new Standard Swedish - sound experiment showing how Sweden sounds today

A Swedish linguistics professor has helped design a new kind of Riksvenska, or Standard Swedish, which more closely reflects the way people speak in 2017. [Published on 01-31-2017]

Posted by Nicole Niesen on February 27, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
Change

Jamila Lyiscott: 3 ways to speak English

Jamila Lyiscott is a “tri-tongued orator;” in her powerful spoken-word essay “Broken English,” she celebrates — and challenges — the three distinct flavors of English she speaks with her friends, in the classroom and with her parents. As she explores the complicated history and present-day identity that each language represents, she unpacks what it means to be “articulate.” [Published on 02-01-2014]

African Children Punished for Speaking Vernacular (Luganda in Uganda)

This brief web article exposes punishment of children for speaking their native languages in Africa and debunks the myths for why English is "needed." [Published on 2014]

Posted by Julia Swan on February 5, 2017

Tags:
Power;
Standard Language Ideology;
Multilingualism

President Obama's Anger Translator

President Obama gets an anger translator. This video is comedic twist to a typical presidential speech.

Woman kicked out of Quebec hospital for speaking english

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Two reporters from the Sun News discuss the Quebec French language ideologies that have begun spurring discrimination towards other linguistic communities within the region.

Posted by Sarah Patton on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
French;
Communities of Practice

Karen from Will and Grace speaks in Mock Spanish

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In this clip from the sitcom Will and Grace, Karen speaks to her Hispanic maid/nanny in pseudo- Spanish on the phone. She uses terms like “store-o” in order to seem like she is speaking with Spanish endings. Karen then goes on to ask her friend will how to pronounce something in Spanish, and then continues to just say the English words. She even goes so far as to use Spanish words for “thank you” and “goodbye” but in the wrong context. She uses Spanish not as an actual way to communicate with a native Spanish speaker, but rather to as a way to completely disregard the syntax and morphology of another language.

Posted by Danielle Gibosn on October 15, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Spanish;
Mock Spanish;
Socioeconomic Status

Broken English

Poet Jamila Lyiscott expresses her anger towards racial disparity in specifically the English language in her essay "Broken English." She mocks what it means to be articulate and how language is identified as good versus bad according to societal norms. Touching on the three voices she considers are her languages, Jamila confronts the issue of euro-centrism and what language stands for.

Posted by Samantha Blaesing on October 15, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Standard Language Ideology

The Importance of Code Switching

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Edward Moore explains the importance of Code Switching for success. He emphasizes that people of color need to know how to function in different environments. From "the block" to the board room.

Why I keep speaking up, even when people mock my accent

Animator and Narrator, Safwat Saleem, reflects on his experience with the "pre-existing notion of normal" at a young age and how he is still challenged by that notion today. Throughout his life Saleem has faced criticism due to society's idea of what is "normal" and what is "good" and has let it negatively affect his career and esteem. Saleem explains how he has overcome those challenges and now chooses to use his accent and work to help shape and transform a more accepting society. [Published on 02-01-2016]

Posted by Samantha Blaesing on October 2, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Youth;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent

How WSJ Used an Algorithm to Analyze ‘Hamilton’ the Musical

Joel Eastwood and Erik Hinton wrote an algorithm to analyze the different types of rhymes used in the tony Award Winning Broadway Musical "Hamilton", and reveal their Hip-Hop influences. [Published on 06-06-2016]

British People Attempting Their Best American Accent

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In this video we have people on the streets of Great Britain trying to do their best American accent

Posted by Stephen Alexander on July 29, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Standard Language Ideology

Barack Obama: Your Children Should Learn To Speak Spanish

This is a short clip of a speech by Obama. The speech is a clear example of hispandering as he is placing power into the hands of non-Spanish speaking people and charging them with being wrong and that Spanish speakers are in the right. [Published on 07-08-2008]

Posted by Henry Olivarez on July 29, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Language Shift;
Youth

Could your language affect your ability to save money?

Amazing Ted Talk by Keith Chen illustrating how "language" can help a person's ability to save money! EVERYONE should see this. It also gives a really good illustration on how different languages force you to say different things. [Published on 06-01-2012]

Code-Switching: Obama's 'Nigga' Moment Makes Civil Rights History

The article includes the quote from President Obama "Yo, Barry, you did it my nigga!" which ended the President's final White House Correspondents Dinner. The importance of this is the switch between what could be considered formal English and AAVE. The article also addresses the question of language ideologies by responding to the idea that it was inappropriate for the term "my nigga!" to be included in the speech. Furthermore, that language ideology is rooted in racist ideologies, so the utterance is also a response to power structures. [Published on 05-02-2016]

There's nothing controversial about code-switching

The article, on face, is only about code-switching, but the article goes on to address the standard language ideology which contends that it only happens and/or is negative when African American speakers engage in code-switching. Thus, the article also addresses, although somewhat shallowly, the issues of power and/or racism. [Published on 05-04-2016]

Posted by Mitchell Wagenheim on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Code-switching;
Stigma

Linguist Says You Can Use ‘Like’ More. He’s, Like, Wrong.

This article demonstrates the, potentially discriminatory, language ideology contending that the word "like" is overused in society today. [Published on 11-01-2013]

Posted by Mitchell Wagenheim on July 26, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Stigma

Chelsea's grammar on not to use the word irregardless.

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In the video, Chelsea explains how using the word "irregardless" and double negatives is improper. As speaker's of English, most would understand what someone means when they say this word. She is viewing the use of "irregardless" through the monoglot ideology by applying the hegemony of the "standard" English.

Posted by Autumn McGovern on July 21, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Prescriptivism

Global Business Speaks English

A Harvard Business Review study from 2012 that revealed English is fast becoming the language of the business world through mandated corporate language initiatives meant to foster ease of communication amongst employees worldwide. [Published on 05-01-2012]

Posted by Kylie Smith on July 18, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Globalization

I Speak Jive (Airplane!)

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Scene from the movie Airplane! wherein several characters have a conversation (starting at 0:58), with two African-American men speaking AAE in such a way that the white stewardess cannot understand, and an elderly white woman must "translate" for her.

Posted by Gina Ruggeri on April 26, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
African American English

The Brain Doubts Accent

Follows along with Matsuda, Mari J. 1991. Most of the info related to accent bias has already been covered in class, but the article points out that difficult-to-process language can sometimes lead to more attention in the listener. [Published on 09-21-2010]

Posted by Hunter Gill on April 25, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Stigma

Facebook Wants to Build a Glossary of New Slang

With the rise of social media in our everyday lives where traditional language conventions are not always used, there have been new forms of slang and internet slang coming about daily. This article shows how Facebook wants to detect the uses of slang on their website and create a dictionary to give meaning to all of these new words. This technology will attempt to predict cool slang words before they are “cool”.

Posted by Matt McLaughlin on March 11, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Accommodation;
Linguistic Relativity;
Slang

Does language shape how we think? Linguistic relativity & linguistic determinism

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This video explains and simplifies what linguistic relativity and linguistic determinism is.

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
Linguistic Relativity

The Philippine Language?

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The Philippine language? This video is a very interesting and extremely helpful. Although there is no such thing as the Philippine language, linguistic experts call it a "invented language." The Philippine's is diverse country made up of many ethnicity's and linguistic groups.

Posted by Shane Bessette on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology

17 Reasons Americans Should Be Embarrassed They Only Speak English

This article gives insight onto why only being able to speak English, as is common to a majority of American's, is not a good thing. This article expresses how, as American's we should strive to learn other languages instead of expecting others to know ours. [Published on 03-19-2014]

Altering Chris Rock's Oscars monologue to conform to "standard" english

88th Academy Awards host Chris Rock used his opening monologue to hit on a number of important issues facing people of color in the film industry. Time included a transcript of Rock's speech to go along with a clip, and, interestingly, they have taken his words and "corrected" his grammar. For instance, in the video, Rock jokes, "in the 'in memoriam' section, it's going to be black people that was shot by the cops on their way to the movies." However, his words are transcribed as "...were shot by the cops on their way to the movies." Rock's leveling of verb forms is seen as "non-standard," and "corrected" for publication. [Published on 02-28-2016]

who talks more men or women

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Ellen takes a poke at women talking more than men 20K vs 7K whereas a recent study shows it is about even at 16K a piece but a good piece showing the first points of men not talking as much as women.

Posted by Michael Allan on February 26, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Standard Language Ideology

Carlton

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This particular clip shows the comparisons of what some specific groups might think of how someone should be because of color and class when it is society who defines these boundaries.

"English Only" chants at Nevada Democratic caucuses

At the 2016 Nevada Democratic caucus, civil rights activist Dolores Huerta was heckled and booed off stage by a group of alleged Bernie Sanders supporters, who chanted "english only" when she attempted to translate the ballot for the Spanish-speaking caucus participants. Link to tweet from Ms. Huerta: https://twitter.com/DoloresHuerta/status/701184235315400705 [Published on 02-20-2016]

My Fair Lady "Why Can't the English Learn to Speak?"

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This scene from My Fair Lady shows prescriptivism in action. Higgins clearly states that there is a "right way" and a "wrong way" to speak. Also, he claims that it is Eliza's improper speech that restricts her to a low place in society.

Posted by Willis Jenks on February 19, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Prescriptivism

Cultural Hegemony

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A wonderfully concise description of hegemony, with real world examples of things we see in our everyday life that we may overlook. This idea relates to language in how our society favors standard English and those who utilize it.

Posted by Amanda Salamanca on February 16, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Standard Language Ideology;
Slang

Monoglot Philosophy at Work

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Presidential candidate Donald Trump discusses his views on bilingualism during a recent campaign speech.

Posted by Mark Beal on February 15, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology

3 Ways To Speak English

This is a TED talk about this women who breaks down the english language saying there are three ways to speak. She is saying that the way you speak comes from your background and the culture you experienced growing up. You can speak differently based on where you are. For example in the work community people have been taught to be polite and say "hello" but around your friends the vernacular changes to maybe a "whats good" meaning the same as hello or hi. Jamilia Lyiscott is putting on a performance for people conveying different identities. She also says the word "articulate" multiple times representing language ideologies.

Way Back When

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This artifact brings a funny play on words that has shows how much our culture has grown over the years and how even in our society words have taken on several meanings. They aren't pointed out directly but most people in our society today can relate.

Posted by Ryan Klaus on February 3, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology

Child Parodies Mother's logic to get his own way.

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This video is a great example of a child's language acquisition. This young man uses his mother's terms to "reason" with her to get his way going as far as to adopt her slang for a spanking (burn your butt and pow pow's)

Posted by Tricia Roberson on February 1, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology

LANGUAGE CHALLENGE ITALIAN VS POLISH WITH MY GIRLFRIEND

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A boyfriend and girlfriend challenge each other in translating English works in to either Italian or Polish words.

Posted by Meaghan Kuhlmann on January 30, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
English;
Language Shift

Over and Misused Words We Wish Would Disappear

Lake Superior University's 41st Annual "Banished Words List" reveals the most over and misused words of the year for 2015. The annual list gives context to the linguistic era in which we live.

Posted by Jasmine E. Thompson on January 24, 2016

Tags:
Entextualization;
Standard Language Ideology

"Phrenetic Phonetics"

A little comic on Standard Language Ideology.

Posted by Korina Yoo on April 23, 2015

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology

Mandarin Dialects

This seems relevant to what we're studying right now in class - we're looking at beijing hua (北京话)and the way words are rhotacized. This is interesting to me because it speaks to the idea we talked about at the beginning of the semester that prescriptivists seem to hold an idea that people who don't speak in the standard manner don't have the language at all. [Published on 09-23-2014]

Why are schools punishing children for speaking African languages?

This article reminds me of our discussions about prestige and how in multilingual societies, different languages are associated with different social registers. [Published on 09-17-2014]

Posted by Gregor McGee on February 25, 2015

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
English;
Language Shift

Do Pacific Northwesterners have an Accent?

A local NPR story (audio and text) on the Pacific Northwest Accent, profiling the research of Alicia Wassink and colleagues at the University of Washington. [Published on 12-11-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on December 19, 2014

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Pacific Northwest English

Using the Vernacular to Teach the Standard

Text from a 1998 talk by linguist John Rickford, which presents data on the failure of schools to teach SAE when they ignore the vernacular, and demonstrates how a knowledge of the grammar of AAE is important for teaching speakers of it. Factors in class. [Published on 03-25-1998]

"Ask" versus "Ax"

This article examines the social stigma of using "ax" instead of "axe". NPR labels "Ax" as a distinguishable feature of AAE that many associate with being "poor, black, and uneducated". Garrard McClendon of Chicago State University stated that his parents were "well aware" of the stigma, and taught him that "there's a time and place to use it", encouraging purposeful code switching. Comedians Key and Peele joke that being half black and half white causes them to use both depending on whether they are with friends ("ax") or being pulled over ("ask"). This feature, however, dates back over 1000 years. Jesse Sheidlower, president of the American Dialect Society, says it is in the first English translation of the bible as "axe". Professor John Rickford of Stanford remarks, "so at that point it wasn't a mark of people who weren't highly educated", and that we can't be sure where the popularity of "ax" stopped yet stayed put in the American South and Caribbean. He says it could be "the empire striking back: taking language that has been imposed and making it our own". Rickford also notes, "I don't think any linguist is recommending that you get rid of your vernacular, because you need it - in a sense - for your soul". This article highlights the significance of linguistic versatility; the use of "ax" is only as "right" or "wrong" as a person labels it - and there are multiple opinions! [Published on 12-03-2013]

Throw the 'R' Away

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A Proclaimers song about language ideology, and that people have expressed dislike towards their Scottish accent (sung with lovely Scottish vowels, of course).

Posted by Miriam Gölz on November 6, 2014

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Scottish English

Talking white: Black people's disdain for proper English and academic achievement is a myth

A Slate article challenging the notion that black Americans stigmatize both academic achievement and the use of standard English as 'acting white." The author argues that black speakers who bristle at being accused of 'talking white" are perhaps being accused of failing to code- or style-shift appropriately. [Published on 10-02-2014]

What's Wrong with "America's Ugliest Accent" Tournament

Slate.com's version of Joe Fruehwald's objections to the Gawker tournament where voters select "America's Ugliest Accent." [Published on 10-02-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 2, 2014

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
American English;
Accent;
Stigma

Nefertiti Menoe: Speaking White

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A video by artist Nefertiti Menoe on the criticism of minority speakers as 'speaking white.' She disagrees with this characterization, saying "having proper diction doesn't belong to the Caucasian race." The video sparked the long-time debate over accusations of speaking 'white' in the U.S.

Queen's English changing!

We talked in class about apparent-time vs. real-time studies, and I thought this was a very interesting example of the latter, focused entirely on one person--the Queen of England. Because of her televised christmas broadcasts, recordings of her have been public consistently since the 1950s. If you compare the Queen's accent in her 1957 christmas broadcast (http://youtu.be/mBRP-o6Q85s) to the one from 2013 (http://youtu.be/6E4v4Dw5Ags), you can here an enormous difference. This short article says that her accent is moving closer to the standard speech of the area, and that "It demonstrates that the monarchy, at least as far as the spoken accent is concerned, isn't isolated from the rest of the community." It would be very interesting to look at recordings from between then and now, and see how quickly these changes happened.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on September 18, 2014

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
British English;
Accent

More Language Imitation

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This has much less to do with English specifically, but I thought it was really cool. This woman imitates what a number of languages sound like to foreigners, and she does it really well! Again, there are sometimes actual words involved (like 'bonsoir' in the French one) but it's almost all nonsense.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on September 18, 2014

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology

Skwerl

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Related to what we were talking about in class today (Prisecolinensinenciousol), I thought this video does a really good job of sounding like American English. There are a few times that they use real English words, but most of it is gibberish.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on September 18, 2014

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
American English

Prisecolinensinenciousol

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This is a parody made by Adriano Celentano for the Italian TV programme Mileluci. It is sung entirely in gibberish designed to mimic what American English sounds like to non-English speakers. I'm sure a few of you have seen this before, but it's always entertaining.

Posted by Shiloh on September 16, 2014

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
American English

Henry Cho, Asian American comedian with Southern accent

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Henry Cho is a Korean American comedian from Knoxville, Tennessee. He talks in his act about belonging to certain groups, using his own experiences as a Korean American southern English-speaking person as sources of comedy. The stereotypical cultural correlates of his appearance and his speech may be in conflict for some viewers.

American Tongues: Linguistic Insecurity

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A clip from the documentary American Tongues profiling speakers with linguistic insecurity, including a speaker from Brooklyn who takes accent reduction classes to reduce her New York City accent.

The Language of Maya Angelou

Sociolinguist Anne H. Charity Hudley discusses the linguistic legacy of Dr. Maya Angelou. Although Angelou spoke out against the legitimacy of African American English during the Ebonics Controversy in the late 1990s, Charity Hudley points out her use of many features of AAE, from morphosyntax to discourse. [Published on 05-29-2014]

Hagar the Horrible: I don't get no respect

A blog page that contains a comic strip from Hagar the Horrible where Hagar's negative concord is stigmatized.

Posted by Kara Becker on September 16, 2013

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Stigma;
Negative Concord

XKCD: National Language

An XKCD comic spoofing contemporary notions of a national language in the United States.

Posted by Kara Becker on August 27, 2013

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Northern American English

English Only Rule Scrapped at Utah Prisons

A 2013 article on slate.com documenting the removal of the U.S.'s only written rule from a state prison limiting the language used during prisoner visits to English only.

Language on Trial: Rachel Jeantel

A 2013 interview on NPR's Here and Now with sociolinguist John Rickford about the testimony of Rachel Jeantel, a speaker of Haitian Creole, Spanish, and African American English, during the George Zimmerman trial.

Dark-skinned and plus-sized: the real Rachel Jeantel story

Report on how the defence lawyer in trial of Trayvon Martin's killer tried to make Martin's girlfriend's testimony sound less convincing by discrediting her and her non-standard English.

Historian David Starkey makes some questionable remarks about language and race in the wake of the 2011 London riots

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In the summer of 2011, London (and then other parts of the UK) experienced civil unrest in the wake of a fatal police shooting. In this video, historian and broadcaster David Starkey connects the unrest to non-standard British English vernaculars, and contributes another entry in the long history of links between 'bad language' and disorder, crime, and Bad Things.

Stephen Fry on language

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Humorist Stephen Fry rants against language mavens and prods us all to enjoy linguistic innovation.

Posted by Paul on June 26, 2013

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology

Inuktitut recognized as official language in Canada

A 2013 new item on the Aboriginal language Inuktitut being elevated to the status of an official language in Nunavut, Canada, a first in Canada.

Gingrich links bilingual education and "ghetto"

An NBC news article covering the 2007 remarks made by Newt Gingrich that bilingual speakers in the U.S. need to learn standard English and not the language of the "ghetto."

MTV True Life: I'm a Boxer in Detroit

A reality TV show following two African-American teens in Detroit. Contains examples of numerous AAE features.

Posted by Katelyn L.I. Best on February 26, 2013

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
African American English;
Style-shifting

The battle of African American English in The Boondocks

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The American animated series, The Boondocks, which focuses on an African American family, the Freemans, who move from Chicago to live in a white suburban area. The main characters for this series, are Huey and Riley both played by Regina King, an African American actress. Riley and Huey have been painted as the yin and yang of Black urban maleness, now look how both use AAE differently.

NewsHour: English as an Official Language

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A 2007 segment from NewsHour with Carmen Fought and someone from U.S English debating the proposal to make English the official language of the United States.

The Dialectizer

This website "translates" any web page into a variety of "dialects:" Redneck, Jive, Cockney, Elmer Fudd, Swedish Chef, Moron, Pig Latin, and Hacker.

A Short Class in Manglish: 88, 3Q

Mandarin Chinese written internet-slang is becoming more popular; however, there is also growing opposition to the inclusion of English words and phrases into the Chinese language. By Patti Waldmeir.

How to speak with an American Accent

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A commercial advertising accent reduction services designed to enhance speakers' American accents.

Arizona Education Loses the Accent of America

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Romanian immigrant reflects on Arizona's elimination of educators with accents.