Gender

Learning Language Out of Comfort Level

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This is a clip from an Indian movie 'English Vinglish'. The protagonist, a small snack entrepreneur, secretly enrolls in an English speaking course to stop her husband and daughter mocking her lack of English skills. She goes out of her comfort level and tries to learn new language. This clip shows her newly gained self-confidence and self-respect when she gives a speech in English during a relative's wedding.

Posted by Parthvi Patel on June 29, 2018

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language

For Best Hookup Results, Use Your Words

A young woman voices her frustrations with partners who feel it necessary to say certain words/phrases that get into her head so that they can get into her pants. [Published on 01-12-2018]

Posted by Jenna Giele on May 10, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Gender

Masculinity and Femininity in Disney's Mulan

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The song “I’ll Make A Man Out of You” from the 1998 classic Mulan shows gender stereotypes and battling them. Mulan is a Disney classic that confronts battling feminine stereotypes head on and throughout the movie the protagonist Mulan shows that she can do anything a man can do. In this song specifically, the gender stereotypes of being a man in the war and what a man should be able to do and be is explained to a very catchy rhythm. Along with this throughout the song, Mulan shows how she is strong and she can fight just the same as them, but because of the laws, she must do this all while dressed as a man to blend in.

Jackie Aina's Review of Inclusive Fenty Beauty

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Jackie Aina is a popular black makeup artist and YouTuber who frankly discusses issues of race. She also frequently employs some features of African American English along with Standard English, unlike some other popular black beauty YouTubers who use more Standard English in their videos.

Posted by Michaella Joseph on March 9, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting;
Gender

"I thought you said you was a top"

Taedatea is a black gay youtuber/online personality. This video explores the intersection of styles, both gendered and racialized. Initially, Tae briefly employs a rising, high-pitched style, which is immediately read by the interlocutor over the phone as a 'bottom' (and therefore feminine, as 'bottoming' is a highly gendered and stereotyped action) style. Tae quickly switches into a style that is both deeper and uses more features of AAE, which is designed to present 'masculinity'. This linguistic self-presentation is a good example of style-shifting as a means of constructing a masculine, top identity, and reinforces many of our recent readings which present style-shifting as " continual construction of a persona or personae and variables as resources for this construction" (Eckert, 2004) [Published on 04-01-2017]

Vocal fry

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Vocal fry is a style of language, in each generation, there are different style of language, it is also the same as music, fashion , hairstyle, and so on. Also, because of vocal fry, there are some women will lose their job, this is totally a discrimination of gender. To be honest, men did vocal fry too, no one should use this thing to blame women. What's more, Some people say “I don't want to hear upspeak." this is not true, some of them just use is as an excuse to let women shut up, they do not want to listen to women's speaking.

Posted by Yijun Zhao on January 6, 2018

Tags:
Gender;
Womens Language

Gender and Language

This article examines different scholars on the gender and the language, the current anthropologists hold different views from before. They believe the researcher should “looking locally” and “thinking globally” about gender. The world requires female in the commercial world to work hard to emerge into the group. The gender is evolving as the society changes, the article believes the discussion about sex and gender would increase in the future. We can find the complexity between gender and sex deserves much time and energy to explore. Different countries generates different relationship between gender and language. However, the global phenomenon shows women gradually improve their status. Thus, the language evolves also. [Published on 2011]

Posted by Song Du on January 6, 2018

Tags:
Gender

AI Programs Exhibit Racial & Gender Biases

The article addresses the occurrence of AI algorithms picking up on racial and gender prejudices in their data and "learning" them. This is an artifact of the way language is used by humans, showing that it is in fact socioculturally embedded. AI programs were found to be adapting implicit biases held by humans, associating words such as "female" or "woman" with the home, positive words such as "happy" with European American names, and negative words with African American names. [Published on 08-13-2017]

Posted by Kari Huynh on December 16, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Gender;
Race,Ethnicity

Women Aren't Ruining Food

This article by Jaya Saxena talks about the gender encoded words used to describe foods associated with either men or women, and how that affects perception of the foods in society. [Published on 10-30-2017]

Posted by Reagan Kanter on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Sexism

Zoella's Controversial Tweets from 2010

Gender stereotypes and sexuality appear to cross over in a few aspects, including negative connotations. This quote seems to suggest that spitting is associated with "macho" heterosexual men according to gender stereotypes; whereas gay men are not "macho" enough to be taken seriously when exhibiting the same actions.

Posted by Brittni Groothoff on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Sexual Orientation;
Gender

#I'mNoAngel

Lane Bryant challenges gender stereotypes about what it means to be sexy using #I'mNoAngel, indexing and contrasting with the stereotypical representation of sexy: the Victoria's Secret Angel.

Posted by Kailey Utech on December 14, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Gender

Bounce for Men pure sport

A picture of bounce for men that’s supposed to make you seem masculine. It gives you a scent that makes it seem like you climbed a mountain or just played a game of football.

Posted by Wyatt Ratzlaff on December 13, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender

Things Not to Say to Women at Work

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This video challenges language used in ways that specifically applies to women. This video produced by the BBC discusses common phrases, words and topics that specifically target and apply to women in the workplace that portray sexist ideologies. The women in the video confront these, explain why they are inappropriate, and in some cases offer alternate ways to frame these discussions.

Posted by Chelsea on December 7, 2017

Tags:
Power;
Femininity;
Gender;
Communities of Practice;
Sexism

Everybody uses singular they, whether they realize it or not

Linguist Geoff Nunberg weighs on in singular they after it was voted 2016 word of the year. [Published on 12-30-2016]

Posted by Kara Becker on December 5, 2017

Tags:
Gender;
gender non-conforming;
Pronouns

Welcome to Hell SNL Skit

The SNL skit in this article goes into the topic of how dangerous the world is for women and how men have not been aware of it until now in line with the sexual harassment cases. The title of the song is called "Welcome to Hell." It tries to break language/gender ideologies by describing the how females see the world as "Hell", but in the light cheerful way that women are "supposed" to speak due to current social linguistic ideology now. [Published on 12-03-2017]

Posted by Naomi Phan on December 3, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Femininity;
Gender;
Race,Ethnicity

Incredible! Woman Tacks ‘If That Makes Sense’ Onto Phrases That Definitely Make Sense

This is a satirical article that references women's tendency to use certain features commonly cited in Lakoff's "Women's Language".

Posted by Terra Friedman on October 26, 2017

Tags:
Gender

Lake Bell Calls Girls Out On "Sexy Baby Vocal Virus"

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This video clip shows Lake Bell on Conan O’Brien’s talk show. While discussing her upcoming movie, Bell goes into discussion about her annoyance with what she calls “sexy baby vocal virus” and vocal fry. Lake demonstrates what she means by each of these, as well as explains what they are. Both pitch and vocal fry are the main features of these vocal habits. Bell also makes a gender specific claim, that it is women who fall into this habit of speech. Also, during the clip, while talking about her new movie about voice overs, both Bell and O’Brien style-shift between voices and different ways of speaking, representing performativity.

Posted by Cassiti Wright on October 17, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Creaky Voice;
Pitch

Difference Between Men and Women

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A short clip from the TV show, “Friends” posted in June of 2017. The video explains the generalizations society has for the way men and women speak. The women in the video tend to over exaggerate the situation, in which they grab glasses and a bottle of wine to discuss the kiss. Whereas, the men in the latter part of the video are eating pizza casually talking about the kiss in a matter of five seconds with a few words each. The actions in the video describe the generalizations society gives men and women’s communication styles.

Posted by Sara Strand on October 4, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Gender;
Stigma

"Pink or Blue" Video

A video essay set to a poem on gender. It was commissioned to open the Saatchi showcase in Cannes the film uses 3D technology to allow the viewer to switch between two different versions of the film depending which set of glasses they view it through. Much of the video and poem deals with how language and performance affect one's social interactions. [Published on 07-01-2017]

Posted by Janet Sebastian-Coleman on September 4, 2017

Tags:
Femininity;
Masculinity;
Biological Sex;
Gender;
Gender Binary;
gender non-conforming;
Stigma

Indian Summer Part One with Mom John Roberts

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John Roberts doing an impression of his mom, who is a n Italian from Brooklyn. This voice would later be used as the voice of Linda Belcher on the show Bob's Burgers.

Posted by Dustin Wendt on July 27, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
New England;
Femininity;
Gender;
Accent;
falsetto

Asterisk*

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Asterisk* is a spoken word poem written and performed by Oliver Renee Schminkey. This piece first appeared as the closing act of The Naked I: Insides Out produced by 20% Theater Company in Minneapolis, MN. The artist, who identifies as gender queer, eloquently and powerfully describes what it is like to live in a world that neither affirms nor denies their gender identity. It exemplifies how prescriptive language that is set in ideology can be limiting and discriminatory.

Posted by Kendra Ogdon on July 24, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Gender Binary;
gender non-conforming;
Prescriptivism

Dr. Pepper Ten-It's not for Women

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There are a lot of T.V. advertisements that are quite sexist still today. This Dr. Pepper commercial advertisement from a few years back greatly displays language ideology due to the fact that they quote in the commercial "Dr. Pepper Ten-It's not for women". It displays that certain items, specifically something as simple as a drink should be drank by men only. This is not only sexist, but it displays for men the masculinity that they should have and the toughness factor that women "don't" have. Women have been displayed horribly in advertisements for centuries, and it only seems to be getting worse. Commercial advertisements are seen by millions of people and a lot of people are affected by the language displayed in them. The ideology and meaning behind advertisements like this one is a powerful display. This advertisement makes women feel powerless and as though certain items are only for men, although this isn't truly the case. Overall, there are much more advertisements directed towards men than for women. Advertisements such as this one, use language ideologies to reach out to a certain group of people and tend to deliberately leave others behind.

Posted by Megan George on June 22, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Sexism

Secret Deodorant | Raise | #StressTest

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An example that highlights the struggles that woman face when approaching their bosses is a deodorant advertisement on YouTube. The advertisement highlights a young female acting out to herself by changing the pitch of her voice multiple times in order to discover the best tone pitch she can use to discuss with her boss in eliminating the wage gap between men and women. The women uses a different form of word and sentence structure in order to sound credible and convincing to her boss. In class, we talked about gendered language and how there is gender inequality present in our society. An example is in the workforce where women have to adapt to the male norms of speaking in order to sound credible and convincing by changing the tone of their voice. It also ties in with the concept of gendered ways of speaking where men are usually direct in their speech while women are indirect. In order to succeed, at times it is important to sound direct which the woman in the ad eventually does at the end.

Posted by Misha Khan on May 11, 2017

Tags:
Gender;
Womens Language

Vanderbilt's Football Team does Srat Better than a Real Sorority

This is a video made by the Vanderbilt football team mocking how sororities use videos that follow the same format for recruitment purposes. They run and frolic in matching shirts and talk about how their “sisterhood” brings them together. This is stereotypical sorority behavior, in almost every recruitment on the internet girls do the same actions in a different order during the videos. The football team on the other hand is thought of as hyper masculine, the men who play are buff and tough and would NEVER be caught acting feminine. In the video when the football players talk they have a pronounced “female” way of talking by using filler words, like when the “president” is talking about how the anchor is their symbol he says, “how…how like great friends we are, we’re just anchored together”. This video was posted to a website Total Sorority Move, a satirical site about Greek life. The video demonstrates different ideologies about Greek life such as everyone partying all the time and students involved in Greek life having zero non-greek friends. This video stays true to these stereotypical ideologies only showing the football team (as sorority girls) and zero people outside of the team. They all wear matching outfits and talk in the same mocking accent. Overall this video is used as a satire of sorority recruitment videos through the gendered “sorority girl” stereotype and language. [Published on 04-20-2017]

Posted by Hannah Nitz on May 11, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender

Vocal Fry

In this video the Kardashians use vocal fry by using words such as "like" and a higher pitched tone like the "valley girl" voice. In society media sometimes stereotypes girls as being materialistic, self absorbed, sassy, etc. The Kardashians are very popular with society and when they talk like this on television I think it gives society a sort of realization that women really do talk and act like that. This is not the case however, but I think we all know that. The Kardashians are very influential to young women in America and could potentially have vocal fry being used more frequently in the U.S. It also seems that the Kardashians have more layed back tones when at home but when in public it seems their style of speaking and tone of voice changes slightly. [Published on 03-12-2017]

Posted by Tiffany Bertoncino on May 10, 2017

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Gender;
Creaky Voice

Vocal Fry still an issue

In this video the Kardashians use vocal fry by using words such as "like" and a higher pitched tone like the "valley girl" voice. In society media sometimes stereotypes girls as being materialistic, self absorbed, sassy, etc. The Kardashians are very popular with society and when they talk like this on television I think it gives society a sort of realization that women really do talk and act like that. This is not the case however, but I think we all know that. The Kardashians are very influential to young women in America and could potentially have vocal fry being used more frequently in the U.S. It also seems that the Kardashians have more layed back tones when at home but when in public it seems their style of speaking and tone of voice changes slightly. [Published on 03-12-2017]

Posted by Tiffany Bertoncino on May 10, 2017

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Gender;
r vocalization

Last F**able Day

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This is a link from Amy Schumer's Comedy Central show called "Inside Amy Schumer" including the guest appearances of well known actresses Tina Fey, Patricia Arquette and Julia Louis-Dreyfus. In this Comedy Sketch they are holding a party to celebrate Julia's so called "Last Fuckable Day." When Amy asks what a Last Fuckable Day is the women proceed to tell her since they are all women age 45 and above that they have reached a point where they are no longer portrayed in the media as "fuckable" and this was worth celebrating because they no longer had to worry about acting sexy, looking sexy or preforming their feminine gender stereotypes. You will see examples when you watch the clip of how they are straying from their roles as women in today's society and of coarse with this being a comedy sketch everything is exaggerated and dramatized. This clip relates to what we have talked about in class and read in our "Living Language" book discussing preforming a certain role through language use. From the clip the use of language relating to their gender roles as older women is mentioned when they discuss the titles of the movies they will be cast in from now on as older women and what type of characters in movies they will be limited to because of their age and gender.

Posted by Isabelle E. Huyett on May 9, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Gender;
gender non-conforming

Non-inclusive Language Could Elicit Bad Grades

This article from CNN discusses how students at Hull University are being encouraged to use gender-sensitive language. Cardiff Metropolitan University also extended a "Guide to Inclusive Language." The appearance of gender-neutral language on college campuses reflects a changing ideology of how we view gender. However, the article states that these standards “may not last long” so there is a sense of language phenomenon associated with it. [Published on 04-06-2017]

Posted by Elaine Kelley on May 9, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender

Faith Salie Vocal fry

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Faith Salie in this video reflects on her experiences as a Rhodes scholar and comedian. Salie talks about societal perceptions of a dichotomy between intelligence and comedic ability. The misconception of vocal fry being an indication of lower intelligence falls apart amidst her clear academic success.

Posted by Sean McAlister on May 9, 2017

Tags:
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma

Alice Walker: Fear of Being Feminine

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Alice Walker is an American novelist, poet, and civil and women’s rights activist. She is best known for her critically acclaimed, Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Color Purple. In this video, she talks about the negative repercussions of referring to women as ‘guys’. The type of situation she is referencing are when someone, say a server at a restaurant, walks up to a group of women and addresses them by saying “Hi guys, how are you doing today?” Men and women both do this in America and it only perpetuates the fear of being feminine, or a female in general. With so many women still fighting for equal rights, it is crucial to be proud of being a woman and for women to not label themselves or other women as ‘guys’. This way of speaking stems from the fact that the English language is a “masculine default” language. This means that masculinity, along with masculine terms, are the default in English and other feminine terms have been unnecessarily created in order to differentiate between a male and female performing the same role. A good example of this sociolinguistic model is actor vs. actress and waiter vs. waitress. The original words are changed when talking about a woman when really, the word itself is just supposed to describe the job someone is doing. Although feminine words are added, many people still use the masculine terms by default, creating an alienation and feeling of unimportance or lack of superiority for women. Unfortunately, the aforementioned linguistic features, along with calling a group of women “guys”, are innate in most people’s vocabulary and using them can be a very difficult habit to break. Walker suggests women coming together to change the way that they label themselves and other women in order to first separate women from men and then empower those women. Although it may seem like a small step on the way to equality, it is an extremely vital one.

Outsiders' Views of English Speakers

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This video is one point of view of how non-native English speakers view English. The main point of the video was the focus on how English speakers are perceived based on gender roles, accents, and the cultural views of English speakers. The intonation from both the male and female actor show the gender roles of language. The girl tends to be speaking softly and gently while the boy is a little bit more outgoing in his speech. When they start to argue again the roles come into play with the girl's voice going higher in pitch and sharper in tone. The classic American type of accent is also prevalent in the blurry sentences that are spoken by either actors. The scene also played what one might call a normative view on American dinners between couples; low light, soft talking, homemade meal and then an argument. All of this just screamed stereotypical America.

"10 Reasons Lifting is a Religion".

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Dom Mazzetti is an iconic Youtuber for the lifting community in general. Some categories of lifters who watch these videos for enjoyment are: Powerlifters, Bodybuilders, Weightlifters, Powerbuilders, and more. Dom has created a series of satire Youtube videos for the lifting community that he calls "Broscience". These videos show heavy use of stereotypical "male gym speak" and every video shows a new satirical example of how to be the most "alpha", or the most "manly man", in your gym. These videos show language ideology in the weight room and free weight area in a gym and how to become a normality within this society by the words that you use when with fellow weight lifting members. Dom plays along gender and sex language ideology by performatively using (thus showing) differences in language use between the stereotypical “muscle head” male compared to the normality of speech in society.

Posted by Jessica Coogle on May 7, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender

Mad Men: Challenging Male Hegemony

This image is from the pilot episode of the TV series Mad Men and involves a character named Don Draper and a potential business partner Rachel Menken. In the scene, Don is pitching a business venture to Rachel, whom in a prior scene was wrongly assumed by Don to be a man due to her status in the business world. Rachel forcefully disagrees with Don’s pitch and asserts dominance over him, as she has the power to decline the business deal. Don becomes increasingly agitated and eventually abruptly exits in the meeting stating, “I’m not gonna let a woman talk to me like this”, as shown in the image above. Because Rachel is a woman in a dominant position, she comes across as being a “bitch”, whereas if she were a man, she would come across as confident and assertive. This is due to gendered ways of speaking that have been socially constructed based on ideologies and through socialization. Women’s language is expected to be cooperative and supportive while men’s is expected to be competitive and dominating. Furthermore, girls are socialized to maintain intimacy and criticize without appearing aggressive, while boys are socialized to assert dominance over situations. However, roles were reversed in the business meeting between Don and Rachel, challenging the language ideologies and male hegemonic society. This role reversal and challenge of male hegemony and its associated language ideologies sparked irritation in Don, causing him to react in a distasteful way and insult Rachel, thus furthering the notion that men are seen as superior to women.

Shameless: Mickey and Gender Expectations

These photos are from multiple scenes found in the TV series Shameless. The photos involve a character named Mickey Milkovich, a troubled, poor teenager who radiates the “tough guy” and delinquent persona but also happens to be gay, along with his boyfriend Ian Gallagher. The quotes on the left demonstrate Mickey’s attempt in hiding his sexuality through harsh, derogatory language that is often associated with men. Girls are expected to show polite, clean language while boys can often get away with obscene language due to the ideologies involving expectations of how women and men should speak. These ideologies are socially constructed based on gender stereotypes and are reinforced through socialization. Boys are socialized to assert dominance and stray away from emotion that is typically associated with women, which is what is being displayed in these images. Mickey initially hides behind these language ideologies that are rooted in a largely heteronormative and male hegemonic society due to the fear of intolerance within society and of challenging these ideologies to ultimately lose the masculine, “tough guy” persona he is expected to portray. However, the photos on the right show, although at times still obscene in language use, a changed Mickey that eventually speaks out against these ideologies through publicly coming out as gay with his boyfriend, Ian.

Gender Stereotype

Our society is so caught up with our gender stereotypes that even before we start to speak we have the idea of what it is meant to be a boy or a girl. This meme shows the usage of our society putting the color blue in relation to being a boy. This meme is using informal usage of words because it is putting a joke on our gender stereotype when it comes to wearing blue for a boy and pink for a girl.

Posted by Dylan Golden on May 2, 2017

Tags:
Gender;
gender non-conforming

Sometimes, it's ok to throw rocks at girls...

I was listening to a radio station (can't remember which one now) but they talked about an ad that said "Sometimes, it is okay to throw rocks at girls". This reminded me of a girl and wild shoe ad shown in class. "Rocks" in the ad simply meant that gems are often referred to as rocks. It was widely criticized for its in-sensitiveness. As the article reads, “many argued the advertisement supported a culture of violence against women.” Of course, a child would not see the play on words the company tried to convey but the literal message that it is okay to basically throw things at girls and hurt them. [Published on 03-27-2017]

Posted by Maria D. Santiago on May 2, 2017

Tags:
Power;
Youth;
Gender;
Sexism

Boys' keypads Versus Girls' keypads

This image of “boys’ keypads versus girls’ keypads” shows ideologies about gender and texting. Apparently on a woman’s keypad, there are only three not-so-much-informative words: hm, ok, and oh, while boys seem to text normally, at least in words or sentences. It also shows a phonological feature of women’s texting habits like “hmmmmm, okkkkkk, ohhhhhh” which seems unnecessary when conveying information. In the place of the punctuation button, women apparently use two emojis: smile and wink. This may indicate two things: women’s talk is more cooperative, emotional and encouraging; or women’s talk is mostly not genuine, since whatever others text, women only reply with a happy emoji. Compared to the ideologies that women talk more than men, this keyboard image seems to show women scarcely text anything more than three non-informative words and emojis. However, they both portray a negative image of women’s talk: not too much content. The anecdote also portrays a binary distinction between girls’ talk and boys’ talk, and ignores the varieties of how women/men actually talk in real life.

Posted by Mengting Jiang on May 1, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Gender;
Gender Binary;
Womens Language

Boys' keypads Versus Girls' keypads

This image of “boys’ keypads versus girls’ keypads” shows ideologies about gender and texting. Apparently on a woman’s keypad, there are only three not-so-much-informative words: hm, ok, and oh, while boys seem to text normally, at least in words or sentences. It also shows a phonological feature of women’s texting habits like “hmmmmm, okkkkkk, ohhhhhh” which seems unnecessary when conveying information. In the place of the punctuation button, women apparently use two emojis: smile and wink. This may indicate two things: women’s talk is more cooperative, emotional and encouraging; or women’s talk is mostly not genuine, since whatever others text, women only reply with a happy emoji. Compared to the ideologies that women talk more than men, this keyboard image seems to show women scarcely text anything more than three non-informative words and emojis. However, they both portray a negative image of women’s talk: not too much content. The anecdote also portrays a binary distinction between girls’ talk and boys’ talk, and ignores the varieties of how women/men actually talk in real life.

Posted by Mengting Jiang on May 1, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Gender;
Gender Binary;
Womens Language

Louis CK 2015 - Racism and Sexism are very different

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In this video, Louis C.K. discusses gender issues and being self aware. When doing an impression of a couple of female college students, he uses vocal fry to get the message across to the audience. Not only is the content of what she is supposedly saying in this situation shallow and stereotypical, but he also uses the glottal, creaking sound of lower-register speech oscillation typical of vocal fry. By using this register to do his impression, and in making his impression of a college girl appear dumb and not self aware, he is perpetuating the dominant stereotype that vocal fry is used by young women only, and that it indexes a set of negative attributes. He does this again when describing the USA as a 'terrible girlfriend to the world'. He uses the same register to describe a United States that remembers everything bad that ever happened to it, but does not acknowledge its own faults and mistakes. Tags: Gender, Women's language, Ideology, Femininity, Sexism, Indexicalityhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-Y17YG63B4 Louis CK 2015 - Racism and Sexism are very different In this video, Louis C.K. discusses gender issues and being self aware. When doing an impression of a couple of female college students, he uses vocal fry to get the message across to the audience. Not only is the content of what she is supposedly saying in this situation shallow and stereotypical, but he also uses the glottal, creaking sound of lower-register speech oscillation typical of vocal fry. By using this register to do his impression, and in making his impression of a college girl appear dumb and not self aware, he is perpetuating the dominant stereotype that vocal fry is used by young women only, and that it indexes a set of negative attributes. He does this again when describing the USA as a 'terrible girlfriend to the world'. He uses the same register to describe a United States that remembers everything bad that ever happened to it, but does not acknowledge its own faults and mistakes.

Posted by Sierra Hurd on April 28, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Sexism

Hillary and Her Iconic Pantsuits.

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One thing that really stood out when Hillary Clinton was running for president was iconic attire. Orthodoxically, woman who are in or are running for higher professions, such as the Presidency or any other higher office, would be expected to wear clothing such as a dress, a skirt, or a pair of slacks. The pantsuits worn by Clinton, however, during much of the campaign, is heterodoxical to much of what is normally worn by women in these positions. Conventionally, there has been a very negative sentiment towards this style of clothing as it has been received as inappropriately masculine, and there have even been attempts to ban it in certain places. Therefore, her use of this masculine attire during her campaign can be seen as an appeal of increasing power among women.

Posted by Alex Petersen on April 26, 2017

Tags:
Power;
Gender;
gender non-conforming

Tumblr User cailleachan on Gendered Interruption

This is a post from tumblr reflecting on how women and men speak differently and characterizing the way that women interrupt others as different from the way that men do the same. The post reminded me of our class discussion, in which we explored 1. how people of different genders use different linguistic features and methods to index gender and 2. how we conceptualize the speech of women and men and are influenced by confirmation bias even when faced with actual linguistic data. [Published on 04-19-2017]

Posted by Io Blanchett on April 19, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Gender;
Womens Language

Hurt BAE

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This video shows a younger couple discussing the infidelity on part of the male in the relationship, while a variety of older viewers watch the conversation. The video shows the differences in how younger generations communicate versus older generations, and the changes in how we communicate. Throughout the video, you see and hear the various reactions from the group and hear their thoughts and perception of the situation based on the conversation between the couple and the memes that were posted on the internet about the video.

Posted by Stephanie Maxwell on March 9, 2017

Tags:
Power;
Change;
Gender

Mock Spanish Soap Opera

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Mock Spanish Soap Opera for people who have only had a small amount of Spanish.

Posted by BreAnna Engeman on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Spanglish;
Mock Spanish;
Gender

(Almost) Every time they say "BOY" on Monster Factory (Eps. 1-23)

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This is exactly what it says in the title--a clip show of every time the hosts of Polygon's video series Monster Factory say the word "boy". What is significant about the use of "boy" in this context is that it is non-standard. Most speakers of American English do not refer to grown men as boys in the same way that these same speakers refer to grown women as girls. Moreover, the hosts are both brothers, lending to their similar styles of speaking as well as senses of humor. I also included "internet language" and "slang" as tags due to the growing use of "boy" to describe grown men across the internet as the show gains popularity within gaming circles.

Posted by Katie Allen on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Gender;
Gender Binary;
Internet Language;
Slang

Talk “Like a Man”: The Linguistic Styles of Hillary Clinton, 1992-2013

This article examines the changes in Hillary Clinton's linguistic style from the years of 1992-2013. Many people have claimed that she talks "like a man," and this article examines that theory. In the article Jennifer J. Jones proves how Hillary went to more of a masculine linguistic approach to a more feministic approach in 2007. There are many reasons for these changes that are reflected in this article. [Published on 08-17-2016]

Watch the second presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton

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Certain ideologies have been established without actually speaking, such as handshaking. In the recent debate it was apparent as the candidates met on the debate stage there was no such exchange. Throughout the debate Mr. Trump displayed numerous was to establish power, both through gestures and verbal exchange. Mr. Trump stood throughout and when Senator Clinton was speaking he often stood behind her. This could be interpreted as a stand of power. Mr. Trump interrupted and made comments while Senator Clinton was talking that could have been an attempt to establish power. Mr. Trump’s continued reference to “locker room talk” could appear to be gender based.

Posted by Madison Curnow on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Gender

Japanese Gendered Language: How to Talk Like a Girl or Boy

This article discusses gendered language in Japanese, which includes the origin of "feminine language" (which started off as a form of "vulgar" language that schoolgirls were using) and how gendered language can be used as a form of self-identity or as a way to rebel against the strict standards of Japanese language. In the language ideology of Japanese, there have historically been opinions on who can use what type of language and how, but this article demonstrates that these ideologies are changing today. [Published on 02-05-2014]

Posted by Alex Parnell on October 4, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Communities of Practice

Gender Differences in Communication

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An animated video attempts to explain questions such as: why men and women communicate differently; how the gender difference affects the communication style, and how gender-based forms of speech lead to miscommunication.

Posted by Yanan Fu on October 2, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Gender;
Womens Language

Donald Trump Couldn't Stop Interrupting Hillary

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During the presidential debate this year, Donald Trump interrupted Hillary 51 times versus her 17 times of interrupting him. Studies have shown that this is a gender related difference. Men tend to interrupt women more than vice versa. It is a way of showing their masculinity and power. Instead his interrupting of Hillary was viewed as rude and demeaning by most. This is also an example of the changes occurring in political discourse. Trump uses language and engages in behavior that defies some of our political language ideologies.

Posted by Erica Hageman on October 2, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Sexism

Gender Differences in Communication

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An animated video explained such questions: why men and women communicate differently; how the gender difference affects the communication style, and how gender-based forms of speech lead to miscommunication.

Posted by Yanan Fu on September 29, 2016

Tags:
Biological Sex;
Gender;
Womens Language

Ignorance in the Office

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This is a short clip from the Office where two characters are told by their boss to treat the other person like the race on their forehead (index card). One person is supposed to give hints while the other person must guess who is on their own card.

Posted by Sophia Smith on July 29, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent;
Sexism

Mock Spanish in Scrubs

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Dr. Kelso uses mock spanish to belittle the idea of the nurses wanting a raise.

Posted by BreAnna Engeman on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Race,Ethnicity;
Socioeconomic Status

Key & Peele: Meegan, Come Back

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We all know the comedians Key and Peele, but what most people don't know is that Peele has a popular "Meegan" skit, where he portrays himself as a woman. He has also voiced several female characters, one of them on the cartoon show "Bob's Burgers." This video is an example of not only how a stereotypical woman would act, but also how she might sound.

Posted by Caroline Wright on March 28, 2016

Tags:
Crossing;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Communities of Practice

Always #LikeAGirl Girls Emojis

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This YouTube video sponsored by Always debates that the emojis used on smart phones are not representative of women. It says some of these may even be sexist. Emojis are wildly popular in today’s society and this issue may go unnoticed by many people. See for yourself as this video interviews women and asks their opinions on the subject.

Gender Has/Has Not Been Hijacked by White MiddleClass

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Portion of a very interesting debate at the Oxford Union regarding whether feminism has been hijacked by "white middle class" women. Engages so many topics,including race, poverty, feminism/gender politics.

Posted by Scott Russell on March 10, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Socioeconomic Status;
Politics and Policy;
Sexism

Potty-Mouthed Princesses Drop F-Bombs for Feminism by FCKH8.com

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This video uses young girl cussing to show that there are more problems in society than little girls cussing. The fact that they are talking the way they are is shocking, which is done to make people actually listen to the bigger point.

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Youth;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Sexism;
Slang;
Stigma

Why the f*** shouldn't women swear?

This article talks about sexism in the fact that there is an idea that women should not curse. For example, it mentions that people tell female rapper, Nicki Minaj that she should not cuss, but the same is not said to male rappers, like Eminem or Lil Wayne [Published on 11-04-2014]

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma

Sapir-Worf

This video displays an example of the Sapir-Worf hypothesis by giving the example of a male nurse versus a female nurse. The video is only a sample.

Posted by Zana Pascoe on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Femininity;
Masculinity;
Gender;
Linguistic Relativity;
Sexism

CNN Election Center

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In this video there are many different types of sociolinguistic artifacts, and in any kind of SNL skit they have to make it more dramatic to bring out the commentary. Yet, within this clip you see many types of tags used within the first few minutes. For example, Donald Trump is the first person to be impersonated, but within the short clip that he is in he shows tags of "Race/Ethnicity, Sexism, Gender, Politics and Policy". And for Hillary Clinton she is showing many of the same character traits as well. Within all of these impersonators they are all trying to benefit themselves in some way that looks appealing to the audience.

Ernestine Johnson Performs 'The Average Black Girl' on Arsenio Hall Show

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Ernestine Johnson's performance of "The Average Black Girl" shows the stereotype of talking white vs talking black. Here is a good example of the relationship between race and language.

Posted by Courtney Dickerson on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Gender;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma

Community where husbands and wives speak a different language

In this article, there is a community in Nigeria where men and women speak different languages. Men and women that have the same parents, raised in the same house, have different words that describes the same object. [Published on 03-16-2013]

Posted by Zana Pascoe on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Gender;
Communities of Practice;
Multilingualism

35 American accents

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In this short video, this gentleman displays the ability to use 35 American accents. It is pretty impressive that there are so many dialects of American English.

SNL - Sexual Harassment and You

In this Saturday Night Live skit the are discussing how the work place used to just be guys and was easier that way, now that it is filled with women as well law suits happen more often. They send this geeky guy to ask a girl on a date and he gets rejected and then a 'handsome' guy does the same thing and grabs her boob and gets accepted. This video is full of stigma's, gender issues, masculinity issues and sexism at the beginning.

Posted by Madison Rigdon on March 4, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Variation;
Masculinity;
Gender;
Sexism;
Stigma

Should dictionaries do more to confront sexism?

A New Yorker article about the recent criticism of the Oxford English Dictionary for sexist examples entires for words like "rabid" and "bossy," touching on issues of prescriptivism and descriptivism. [Published on 02-24-2016]

Posted by Kara Becker on February 26, 2016

Tags:
Gender;
Prescriptivism;
Sexism

"The Day Beyonce Turned Black"

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Within this SNL skit, there are many different forms of language used. For this skit, it is explaining how caucasian people tend to look at the world in a over dramatic way. Throughout the skit, there are race, gender, & sexualities between white and blacks. This skit has a comical view on different political problems that we have in this country today, and what the children of our culture are growing up in.

what language barrier

A brief excerpt from Deborah Cameron's book, The Myth of Mars and Venus.

Posted by maggie kneidel on February 24, 2016

Tags:
Gender

"Pick-Up Artist"

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This artifact is showing how different people communicate on a daily basis, and how each person has a different way of showing how the communicate. With this skit, most of it exaggerated for comical effect. But this is showing the diversity of people and there language through a simple conversation in group settings. In this skit there is gender rolls being played of femininity and masculinity, while showing the differences within the women's language. And how this "Art of the Pick-Up" class is teaching women how to properly express themselves.

My Sexuality

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This video entails a character on a TV show, who insists that a women's "sexuality" can get them in or out of any situation. Some may feel that this is demoralizing for women in todays society, because women have worked so hard over the past century to ear the same rights as men. And this is showing that all women have to do is flaunt there sexuality and everything will come to them on a silver platter. Which in fact is not true for all women.

Posted by Tori Miller on February 18, 2016

Tags:
Femininity;
Gender;
Sexism

Freshwoman

This article has an interesting perspective on Language and sexism. How our language is still objectifying woman. It's speaks to the power of the words we use. [Published on 03-20-2012]

Posted by Tricia Roberson on February 17, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Femininity;
Masculinity;
Gender;
Gender Binary;
Sexism

Latinx: The ungendering of the Spanish language

A NPR story on the current practice of using a gender-neutral term for Spanish nouns like Latino/a, amigo/am, etc. Some commons approaches are Latin@ and Latinx. [Published on 01-29-2016]

Posted by Kara Becker on February 15, 2016

Tags:
Spanish;
Gender;
Gender Binary

If you don't have anything nice to say, SAY IT IN ALL CAPS

An episode of This American Life on internet trolls, which includes a segment on the criticisms of female TAL contributors who use creaky voice, with an interview with Penny Eckert. [Published on 01-23-2016]

Posted by Kara Becker on February 8, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Gender;
Stigma;
Creaky Voice

Sorry, grammar nerds: The singular "they" has been declared Word of the Year

Coverage of the American Dialect Society's Word of the Year 2016 vote, in which singular 'they' used to refer to a known reference was voted word of the year.

Posted by Kara Becker on January 28, 2016

Tags:
Gender;
gender non-conforming;
Pronouns

The linguists studied female Disney characters - and what they found was startling

An overview of the recent research by Carmen Fought about gender differentiation in Disney films. [Published on 01-26-2016]

Posted by Kara Becker on January 28, 2016

Tags:
Gender;
Gender Binary

Washington Post accepts singular they

The Washington Post's style guide now accepts singular they. [Published on 12-10-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on December 14, 2015

Tags:
Change;
Gender;
Prescriptivism

Saturday Morning Cartoons

Autostraddle is self-described as "an intelligent, hilarious & provocative voice and a progressively feminist online community for a new generation of kickass lesbian, bisexual & otherwise inclined ladies (and their friends)". There's a weekly column called "Saturday Morning Cartoons" following a few different artists, which reminded me of our discussion about Queen's "I Don't Speak Spritch: Locating Lesbian Language" due to the use of comics. Some of the analyses Queen made are still visible in these cartoons although the distribution method and potentially audience differ from the ones she analyzed in the 90s.

Posted by Jasmine Huang on November 3, 2015

Tags:
Sexual Orientation;
Gender

The Onion RE: girls' voices

This Onion article satirizes some of the criticisms of women's voices in popular media that we've discussed, specifically mentioning HRT, for example.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on October 5, 2015

Tags:
Gender;
Womens Language

I got corrected on my color names

I was having a discussion with my friend Daphne when another friend of mine, August, walked up. The following discussion happened: Daphne: I like the color of your shirt! Me: Yeah, it's a nice minty color August: Actually, it's sea foam... Me: THIS SUDDENLY BECAME VERY RELEVANT TO MY EDUCATION To be clear, August is a heterosexual cis-man. Maybe it's his inner academic that encouraged his exotic color usage.

Posted by Molly Worden on September 11, 2015

Tags:
Gender;
Womens Language

"Dads should cut out the baby talk to improve their child's language skills, study says"

While the writer at this cite wildly overinterprets the results of the study, this is an interesting look at use of child directed speech that found significantly lower pitch and pitch variation when fathers from "traditional two-parent families" spoke to their preschoolers than when mothers did. The academic poster can be found here: http://www.vandammark.com/docs2/VanDamEtal_2015_FathersF0_ASA.pdf [Published on 05-20-2015]

Posted by Jasmine Huang on September 10, 2015

Tags:
Motherese;
Gender

99% Invisible Autoreply

The main reason I'm sharing this article is the auto-reply from the podcast 99% Invisible, near the top: it's set up for when people send in complaints about women's voices. I especially love that it mentions that they never get complaints about men's voices on the show. Also that they'll "consider the complaints within, well, never". So good.

Posted by Miriam Golz on September 9, 2015

Tags:
Gender;
Womens Language

Women's Voices in the Workplace

This is an NPR piece from about a year ago. The woman being interviewed went to a speech pathologist to help her sound "more assertive", because she felt she wasn't being taken seriously at work. The piece discusses saying stuff like "one minute" instead of "got a minute?", which I think relates to the articles we've read so far, especially tag questions.

Posted by Miriam Golz on September 9, 2015

Tags:
Gender;
Womens Language

Blood Orange

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Our discussion of colors and different names for colors on Thursday reminded me of this popular Project Runway quote.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on September 5, 2015

Tags:
Gender

Amy Schumer and Politeness

A sketch from Inside Amy Schumer satirizing what Schumer sees as the tendency of women in her peer group to apologize needlessly. Schumer has other sketches exaggerating linguistic behavior to absurdity. "I'm So Bad" and "Compliments" are available on youtube. Do note, these sketches are pretty vulgar and kind of gruesome. [Published on 05-12-2015]

Posted by Riley Thornton on September 4, 2015

Tags:
Gender;
Womens Language

Hank Green on Genderbready Stuff

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In this video, Hank talks about a lot of stuff covered in the Genderbread Person posts. This is definitely not a perfect model either, but I think it's interesting to get another version (though he is also a cishet white male...). For example, though he does have the continuum going from "man" to "woman", which I do think is problematic, I think it's interesting that he added the "intensity" dimension.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on September 2, 2015

Tags:
Biological Sex;
Intersex;
Sexual Orientation;
Gender;
Gender Binary

Americans aren't the only ones convinced women speak differently

Building on the momentum of the recent surge in discussions over young women's voices in American English, this article points out that, cross-culturally, women's voices are seen as different. [Published on 07-24-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on September 1, 2015

Tags:
Gender;
Womens Language

A response to Naomi Wolf

Deborah Cameron's excellent response to Naomi Wolf. [Published on 07-26-2015]

Naomi Wolf misses the point about vocal fry: It's just an excuse not to listen to women

A response to Naomi Wolf's article suggesting young women should stop using vocal fry because it makes them sound less authoritative. [Published on 07-27-2015]

Young women, give up the vocal fry and reclaim your strong female voice

Author and feminist Naomi Wolf pens an article for the Guardian urging young women to stop using marked features like vocal fry and uptalk. [Published on 07-24-2015]

From upspeak to vocal fry: Are we "policing" young women's voices?

An episode of Fresh Air with sociolinguist Penny Eckert, in part a response to a recent episode of Fresh Air with a speech pathologist who criticized features used by young people in American English. [Published on 07-23-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on July 24, 2015

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language

Sam Adams TV Commercial

A commercial for the beer brand Sam Adams, narrated by a young women who uses creaky voice. [Published on 04-17-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on April 17, 2015

Tags:
Gender;
Creaky Voice

Vocal Fry on This American Life: Freedom Fries

A segment on This American Life that profiles the complaints the show has received about the use of "vocal fry," or creaky voice, by its female commentators. It profiles the dominant stereotype that it is used by young women only, and that it indexes a set of negative attributes. Penny Eckert is interviewed on her recent research on NPR and creak that finds an age-based difference in perceptions of creak. Ira concludes, "people who don't like to listen to young women on the radio have moved on to vocal fry." [Published on 01-23-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on March 4, 2015

Tags:
Eckert, Penelope;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Creaky Voice

How using 'they' as a singular pronoun can change the world

This is an article that discusses the importance of using singular 'they' and addresses issues related to its "correctness". [Published on 02-03-2015]

Posted by Gregor McGee on February 20, 2015

Tags:
English;
Change;
Grammaticalization;
Gender;
gender non-conforming

57% of Languages do not have gendered pronouns

A map from the website "Sociological Images" showing the distribution of gendered and gender-neutral pronouns in the world's languages. 57% of languages profiled here make no gender distinctions. [Published on 10-11-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 14, 2014

Tags:
Gender;
Gender Binary;
Pronouns

Sweden's new gender neutral pronoun is a step towards equality, and catching on quick

A blog post on the recent spread of the gender neutral pronoun "hen" in Sweden. [Published on 10-08-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 14, 2014

Tags:
Gender;
Gender Binary;
Pronouns

Speech markers reveal details about your age, sex, and lifestyle, scientists claim

A daily mail article discussing research that finds gender and age-based differences in the use of fillers [Published on 10-06-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 8, 2014

Tags:
Change;
Gender;
Gender Binary;
Discourse Marker

Vocal Fry may hurt women's job propsects

An Atlantic article summarizing the study of Anderson et al that concluded that use of creaky voice makes women less hireable. [Published on 05-29-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 12, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Creaky Voice

Vocal Fry doesn't harm your career prospects

A critique of the Anderson et al. study that found that females using creaky voice were judged less desirable. The author points out that the matched guise approach involved speakers who were taught to produce more creaky guises, so that the creak is an imitation. Further, the creaky utterances were longer and had lower pitch, raising questions about what listeners were reacting to. [Published on 06-06-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 12, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma;
Creaky Voice

Study: Women with creaky voices deemed less hireable

The Washington Post reports a research study that found that women who used creaky voice were judged by listeners to be less competent, less educated, less trustworthy, less attractive, and less hireable. The research team concludes that speakers should "should undertake conscious effort to avoid vocal fry in labor market settings." [Published on 06-02-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 11, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma;
Creaky Voice

CBS News: Burned out on Vocal Fry

A 2013 video segment on the use of creaky voice by young American women, and how irritating many people find it.

Posted by Kara Becker on September 21, 2013

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Creaky Voice

2010 Color Survey Results

Results from a survey asking participants to label colors in 2010, with an analysis of gender differentiation in the data. Citation: Lakoff, Robin. 1972. Language and Women's Place. Journal of Sociolinguistics.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 9, 2013

Tags:
Lakoff, Robin;
Gender;
Gender Binary

NPR: Kreayshawn breaks in, but whose party is she crashing?

A 2011 profile of white female hip hop artist Kreayshawn, leader of a "white girl mob" of Oakland hip hop artists, which highlights the criticisms of her related to her race and gender.

Women don't talk more than men, so why do people believe that they do?

A Slate article debunking the myth that women talk more than men, and speculating about the myth's staying power.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 25, 2013

Tags:
Gender;
Gender Binary

High School asks female student to pledge to stop cursing

A Catholic High School in New Jersey asks female but not male students to pledge to stop cursing.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 13, 2013

Tags:
Gender;
Gender Binary

NY Times: Generation LGBTQIA

A 2013 New York Times article that addresses changing perspectives on gender, as well as college-students' changing terms of self-reference.

Posted on February 1, 2013

Tags:
Gender;
gender non-conforming

Using Unbiased language

This site offers suggestions for avoiding gender bias and sexism in the English language.

Posted on November 13, 2012

Tags:
Sexism;
Gender

Spivak Pronouns

A description of the gender-neutral Spivak pronouns.

Posted on November 8, 2012

Tags:
Pronouns;
Gender;
Sexism

Gender Map

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A map of all known genders

Posted on November 8, 2012

Tags:
gender non-conforming;
Gender

Gang Girls on Geraldo

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A clip from Geraldo with a panel of self-identified "gangster girls." Citation: Mendoza-Denton, Norma. 2008. Homegirls.

Chola Make-up Tutorial

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A YouTube make-up tutorial from a self-identified Chola, uploaded in 2009. I use this with the reading: Mendoza-Denton, Norma. Gang Girls and Makeup.

NYT: Afghan boys are prized, so girls live the part

A 2010 story about "bacha posh" ("dressed up as a boy") girls in Afghanistan.

Posted on October 4, 2012

Tags:
Gender;
Power

Dude: Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure

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Posted on October 4, 2012

Tags:
Masculinity;
Gender;
Youth

Dude: Bolling Cartoon

(Enlarge image)

Posted on October 4, 2012

Tags:
Gender;
Masculinity;
Youth;
Slang

NY Times: All-Purpose Pronoun

A New York Times On Language column about the continued debate over an all-purpose pronoun to replace the masculine default in constructions like "Each student needs his book."

Posted on September 25, 2012

Tags:
Pronouns;
Gender;
Sexism

Marriage Rights for Intersex Individuals in Texas

A judge in Texas in 2010 refused to rule on whether trans or intersex individuals had the right to marry (and so be considered to be in "opposite-sex" relationships).

Posted on September 25, 2012

Tags:
Gender;
Intersex;
gender non-conforming

Motherese

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An Australian instructional video providing examples of motherese as well as a rational for why this register aids in child development.

Posted on September 25, 2012

Tags:
Gender;
Motherese;
caregiving

Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas Hearings

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A clip from the 1991 confirmation hearing of Supreme Court Justic Clarence Thomas, which shows Senator Arlen Specter questioning Anita Hill. I use this with the reading: Mendoza-Denton, Norma. 1995. "Pregnant Pauses: Silence and Authority in the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas Hearings."

Genderbread Person, V.1

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Verson 1 of the Genderbreak person outling the four continua that make up one's gendered self: gender identity, sexual orientation, biological sex, and gender presentation. From www.itspronouncedmetrosexual.com

Posted on September 20, 2012

Tags:
Gender;
Biological Sex;
Sexual Orientation

BIC For Her Amber Medium Ballpoint Pen

Customer reviews of BIC pen designed for women.