Race,Ethnicity

The British Chinese

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This video is about British born Chinese and how they identify themselves. It also talks about the different kind of speech communities they are apart of.

Posted by Aaron McIntyre on July 2, 2018

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

English Conundrums

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This is a clip from an "I Love Lucy" episode in which a foreign man is having troubles with some English words. It is interesting, because it points out the several different ways one can say -ough. In my opinion, this is a great example why English is considered one of the more difficult languages to learn as a second language.

Posted by Sarah Brown on July 1, 2018

Tags:
American English;
English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent;
Multilingualism

Rethinking Grammar: How We Talk

We as people judge the way that others speak, we assume intelligence based on the way that people speak. African American Vernacular tends to be associated with not being very smart [Published on 10-21-2015]

Is "talking white" really a thing

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This is a clip in which two people are blindfolded and asked to determine if people are white or black only by their voice. The speaker is given a song to read aloud as the listeners try to determine if “talking white is really a thing”. There is a belief that people will inherently sound different simply because of their ethnicity. This puts the stereotypes to the test and shows how different vocal inflections are perceived

Posted by Olivia Rodriguez on June 30, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent;
Stigma

How Language Shapes the Way We Think

Here is a video link to cognitive scientist Lera Boroditsky explaining how language shapes the way we think on Ted Talks. The video explains how people map out space in their minds and languages to keep them oriented. English speaker would say "right", "left", "behind", "in front", etc., while the Aboriginal community would use cardinal directions to describe the location or directionality whenever they need to. It also talks about the grammatical gender in many different ways. Language can make us have deep effects on what we see, such as color and visualization. [Published on 04-11-2018]

Chardjou dialect of Turkmen

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Indexicality of a tribal affiliation through use of code switching from Chardjou dialect to Russian.

Posted by Ylham Jorayev on May 11, 2018

Tags:
Indexicality;
Accommodation;
Race,Ethnicity

Mock Spanish

This poster is an example of mock Spanish with the phrase Cinco de Drinko.

Posted by Macie Rouse on May 11, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Mock Spanish

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This is an example of Mock Spanish with the phrase Cinco de Drinko.

Posted by Macie Rouse on May 11, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Code-switching with Drake

In this sketch from Saturday Night Live, the cast and special guest star Drake depict a fictionalized version of Drake's bar mitzvah. This event brings together his African-American family from his father's side, and his Jewish and white family from his mother's side. Drake expertly code switches between the two groups, greeting his mother's family with "Shabbat shalom," and his father's with "whasssssup." Drake goes on to deliver a rap in which he talks about knowing what a W2 is, which indexes Drake's membership in the Jewish community and its perceived expertise in dealing with money.

Posted by Madylan Womack on May 9, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching;
Jewish;
Race,Ethnicity

Chancletas

This meme highlights the multifunctionality of a word within and across various languages. It also displays the importance of context when using a word as well as how a word can index both cultural identity and community membership.

Hinglish - Code Switched Hindi + English

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The Portsmouth College, UK has started a course for Hinglish language. Hinglish is the mixed/code switched version of Hindi and English, and is the popular street language in India.

Posted by Kanad Sakhadeo on April 26, 2018

Tags:
Indian English;
Code-switching;
Language Shift;
Race,Ethnicity

Lingthusiasm: What Does it Mean to Sound Black?

an interview with a linguist about sounding black, with a fair amount of commentary on the Trayvon Martin trial

Posted by justice del castillo on April 22, 2018

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity

Brother Ali freestyle on GoRadio - 95.3FM

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Brother Ali is a white socially-conscious rapper who, due to being albino and growing up primarily around African-Americans in the Midwest, existed for many years with a publicly ambiguous racial identity. In more recent years (including at the time of this video), Brother Ali has been more explicit about being white In this video, Brother Ali freestyles on a local Twin Cities radio station. He uses numerous features of AAE, including pervasive coronal stop (-t/-d) deletion.

Posted by Oskar Soderberg on April 18, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Hip Hop Nation

Brother Ali freestyle on B96

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Brother Ali is a white socially-conscious rapper who, due to being albino and growing up primarily around African-Americans in the Midwest, existed for many years with a publicly ambiguous racial identity. In more recent years (after this video), Brother Ali has been more explicit about being white In this video, Brother Ali freestyles on a local Twin Cities radio station. He uses numerous features of AAE, including pervasive coronal stop (-t/-d) deletion.

Posted by Oskar Soderberg on April 18, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Hip Hop Nation

Excerpt from Donald Glover's

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I used these four songs, a clip from "Weirdo," and this interview of Donald Glover's coronal stop deletion.

Varieties of Indian English

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This video samples Southeast Asian speakers of English, showing the diversity of language feature repertoires involved in what non-Southeast Asians often lump together as an Indian English ethnolect.

Posted by Amber Burns on April 13, 2018

Tags:
Indian English;
Race,Ethnicity

Iggy Azalea Freestyle

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Iggy Azalea's attempt at her rap persona and linguistic repertoire without practice. Citation: Eberhardt, M. & Freeman, K. 2015. 'First things first, I'm the realest': linguistic appropriation, white privilege, and the hip-hop persona of Iggy Azalea.

Jesse Williams' Speech (BET Awards 2016)

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Popular speech upon receiving the BET Humanitarian award. Example of black preacher style by biracial speaker.

The Newest 'Grey's Anatomy' Hunk, Jesse Williams

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Jesse William's interview with Ellen on the Ellen Show in 2010, marking usage of African American Language.

Fox News clip sampled on DAMN.

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This clip is a really clearly delineated example of "language as proxy" for racism. It's really clear in the tone of the broadcasters when reading Kendrick's lyrics that their issue is not only with the content but with the stigmatized aspects of AAVE. I also wanted to bring up this clip/the album DAMN. because it's a great example of a lot of the themes talked about in the film Talking Black in America, particularly regarding hip-hop. The way Kendrick puts his music, which deals with issues of race and is basically the way he was able to survive violence in dialogue with white people saying "hip hop is doing more damage than racism" is really masterful and gives me chills.

Spanish phrases Gringos need to stop abusing!

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The women in this video describe all the ways non-Spanish speakers use Mock Spanish. They describe it as sometimes being a way to connect with others. However, the overuse of Mock Spanish can become disrespectful and insulting.

Posted by Kaman Dhanoa on January 15, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Will Ferrell's Spanish Situation

In this video of an episode of Jimmy Kimmel Live!, Will Ferrell promotes his new Spanish language movie "Casa de mi Padre" by engaging in an interview entirely in "Spanish." In many ways, Ferrell is actually satirizing Mock Spanish by purposefully infusing his sentences with horrid grammar, awkward phrasing and some nonsense. This serves as an exaggerated form of how Mock Spanish appropriates the Spanish language for humorous and/or racialized ends. The video also satirizes through exaggeration negative Hispanic/Latino stereotypes with the presence of a giant chihuahua mascot, a very angry and heavily cursing Hispanic man and more. [Published on 03-14-2012]

Posted by Rachel Jenkins on January 8, 2018

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

#MemeOfTheWeek: Hillary Clinton, Not Quite An Abuela

This article touches on Hillary Clinton. Hillary claimed that she was like the Hispanic communities abuela, in order to win the hearts of the Hispanic community. Mrs. Clinton posted a previous article explaining how Hillary was like your abuela. When recapping her actions I don’t understand how her or her team did not find this offensive. However, there was the backlash from the community expressing how Mrs. Clinton is far from their abuela. In this attempt to relate to the people by making fake promises and outrageous gestures, often times there is a line that is crossed. [Published on 12-26-2017]

Posted by Ebony Germany on January 5, 2018

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity

As a Latina, I have a problem with Hispanic Heritage Month

Juliana Schwartz is tired of hearing famous people, the republican party, Obama and more, share their "appreciation" for Hispanic Heritage Month when these same people have caused mass deportation for Hispanics and have created ugly ideologies towards Hispanics. She wants the hispandering to end because she believes that Hispanics are a culture, not some marketing scheme to receive more votes or gain more profit. She wants the government to stop the hispandering and to stop using hispanics, and to instead help Hispanics gain justice and inclusion. [Published on 07-01-2014]

Posted by Jamie Treto on January 5, 2018

Tags:
Spanish;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Code-switching in the song "Exotic"

This artifact is the song “Exotic” by Priyanka Chopra ft. Pitbull, and this is an example of code-switching because they sing in Hindi and English, which is because of Priyanka Chopra and her Indian roots and her attempt to add some of her culture and language to this song. The song also mentions various cities/countries around the world. Thus, the song’s use of Hindi and English expresses code-switching and shows her reaching out to a larger and more diverse audience.

Posted by Millie Shah on December 17, 2017

Tags:
English;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

AI Programs Exhibit Racial & Gender Biases

The article addresses the occurrence of AI algorithms picking up on racial and gender prejudices in their data and "learning" them. This is an artifact of the way language is used by humans, showing that it is in fact socioculturally embedded. AI programs were found to be adapting implicit biases held by humans, associating words such as "female" or "woman" with the home, positive words such as "happy" with European American names, and negative words with African American names. [Published on 08-13-2017]

Posted by Kari Huynh on December 16, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Gender;
Race,Ethnicity

Why Chinese people cannot speak proper English

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In this video, the speaker who is a Chinese American explains why Chinese people cannot speak proper English. Because how Chinese people learn English, and how "sound-like" translations influence on the way Chinese people learning English.

Posted by Jin Han on December 14, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice

10 Things You Should Never Say To A British Person

The website shows the type of languages better to avoid using to British people. It also illustrate the reasons to avoid by explaining their cultural background and thoughts. By a negative approach, it shows some shared beliefs on the community. [Published on 12-13-2017]

Posted by Alan Lin on December 13, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity

The Spanish Teacher

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This is an episode from the show Glee, where the Spanish/Glee teacher gives the assignment to perform songs in both Spanish and English, switching back and forth during the songs. At the end of the episode the teacher dresses up as a matador and one of the students is unhappy with how his perception of the culture is. The whole episode has many examples of mock Spanish.

Posted by Maria Marcotte on December 11, 2017

Tags:
Spanglish;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

#growingupblack Waking up to loud music on a Saturday Morning

This website shows a picture of a meme that is an example of a cultural norm of lots of black people. A norm for many of us was to clean on Saturday morning to music. But your mom or granny was not gonna do all the work! Let me emphasize that not getting up and not helping was not an option! So when you heard that extra loud music in the morning you know that in a few moments you will be awaken from your rest and will be cleaning for the rest of the day! Why is that? Because, "This is your house too!" and "What I look like? Mammy?" It is enough of a norm for many people to retweet it and remember the times where this happened when they were younger.

Posted by Aleesha Atwood on December 9, 2017

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity

Dave/Erina trying Super Spicy Yeobki Tteokbokki

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In this video Dave (the man) and Erina (the woman) are trying a super spicy Korean rice cake dish. In the video both are using Korean, neither being their native languages, but through the experience of eating the food we see an instance of code-switching from both parties due to the spiciness; Erina to Japanese, and Dave to English.

Posted by Chelsea Morris on December 8, 2017

Tags:
American English;
Japanese;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity

Cultural Norms

This is a norm for black girls, who like myself hated getting our hair done. WE grow impatient and tired. This piece is centered around our culture

Posted by Katrina Longmire on December 8, 2017

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity

Coca Cola - Mock Spanish

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This Coca Cola - Hispanic Heritage commercial clip shows the Coca Cola company using Hispandering by using Hispanic sterotype such as a run down town, and tattoos that are on the coke can that they can apply to their skin, especially the one of "Rodriguez" which he applied the tattoo to his neck.

Posted by Phoenix Byrd on December 7, 2017

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent

Ta-Nehisi Coates on words that don't belong to everyone

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This clip specifically looks at uses of language and the contexts and ideologies surrounding them that create speech communities. Ta-Nehisi Coates implies certain terms from particular speech communities and cultures cannot be used by outsiders appropriately.

Posted by Haley Bajorek on December 7, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice

A Conversation with Native Americans on Race

This video details the issue(s) surrounding Native peoples on former indigenous lands and current U.S. territory. It mentions blood quantum, a measure of genetic pedigree which determines native-ness, actual indigenous regulation which determines native-ness, and linguistic terms for tribes such Anglo-American term “Apache” vs the actual indigenous word referring the tribe among other topics.

Posted by Haroun Said on December 5, 2017

Tags:
Power;
American Indian;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice

Welcome to Hell SNL Skit

The SNL skit in this article goes into the topic of how dangerous the world is for women and how men have not been aware of it until now in line with the sexual harassment cases. The title of the song is called "Welcome to Hell." It tries to break language/gender ideologies by describing the how females see the world as "Hell", but in the light cheerful way that women are "supposed" to speak due to current social linguistic ideology now. [Published on 12-03-2017]

Posted by Naomi Phan on December 3, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Femininity;
Gender;
Race,Ethnicity

Mock Spanish T-Shirt

A posting from Facebook with a shirt that uses incorrect lyrics Justin Bieber used for the song “Despacito” by Luis Fonsi when he had issues remembering the Spanish words during a performance.

Posted by Cheyenne Hillman on November 15, 2017

Tags:
Spanish;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Relationship between linguistic fragmentation and social capital

This article analyzes the experiment that finds the relationship between linguistic fragmentation and social capital. Researchers found that the number of language spoken in a country is significantly negatively correlated with social capital. They have concluded that multilingual countries tend to be poorer than those dominated by a single big language. They also concluded that countries with high levels of social capital tends to be richer and tend to proper. They have examined some countries have many languages and relatively high social capital which include America and Canada as immigration destinations that also host to many indigenous languages. The article created a relationship between the results from the experiment and the immigration in which immigrants and their children must master the language of their new countries whether or not they keep their old languages.

Posted by Julie Kim on October 16, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

The term “Ching Chong” as the representation of mocking Asian community in the U.S.

This audio surrounds the concept of “Ching Chong” which is one of many well-known examples that have been used as an insult to Asians in the United States. The concept of “Ching Chong” was initially formed from an anti- Chinese sentiment and were often brought up as a taunt back in the 19th Century. Mimicry, particularly for mocking Asian accents, is the default pejorative mode. The article mentioned that this form of mockery identifies Asians as decidedly, unequivocally foreign, and that Asians and Asian Americans are the “other” and excluded from the American community.

Posted by Julie Kim on October 16, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity

Mock Spanish in The Mexican

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This is a clip from the movie, “The Mexican,” in which Brad Pitt’s character, Jerry, travels to Mexico to claim an antique pistol. While there, Jerry gets stranded and needs a ride. Some Hispanic men drive by and Jerry uses Mock Spanish to ask the men for help. Specifically, Jerry says, “I need a lift in your el trucko to the next towno.”

Posted by Brittany Outler on October 10, 2017

Tags:
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

President Obama's Speech at the 2015 White House Correspondents' Dinner

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This is a video of Comedian Keegan-Michael Key playing his iconic character Luther during President Obama’s speech at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner back in 2015. President Obama uses two distinguishable language varieties; one of which being formal, confident, and intricate English that he speaks as the President of the United States and the other holding characteristics of aggressiveness, slang, and straight-forwardness. President Obama successfully used Anger Translator as a form of code-switching to not only deliver his message with clarity and power but also with sense of humor that motivated the audience to focus throughout the entire duration of the speech.

My name is Jose Jimenez

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“My name is Jose Jimenez” became a popular catch phrase in America after Hungarian-Jewish descent Bill Dana performed this skit dressed as Santa Claus. Bill Dana utilized humor to soften the racializing stereotypes seen in most portrayals of Latin American men. Using Mock Spanish, the naïve character of Jose Jimenez was seen playing a variety of professions, including a United States astronaut. So popular was the character that Mercury astronaut Alan Shepherd adopted “Jose” as his official code name, and astronaut Jose Jimenez made a “guest appearance” at the 1961 Kennedy Inaugural Gala. In the 1960’s Bill Dana was honored by the National Hispanic Media Coalition for his work as an activist. In 1970 with changing sensitivities concerning Mock Spanish and racial stereotypes, Bill Dana had an “official funeral” to declare Jose Jimenez dead.

Posted by Mary Jo Frazier on October 4, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

AAVE (African American Vernacular English) Ebonics Is Not “Improper” English

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A video from May of 2016 explaining why AAVE Ebonics is a proper form of English because everyone has their own dialect that is valid. The video goes on to suggest that white supremacy is the cause of all this uproar and if roles were switched then AAVE would be the official language of the United States.

Mandana Seyfeddinipur's TED Talk on Endangered Languages

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This is a TED Talk video of Mandana Seyfeddinipur, a linguist and the director of the Endangered Lanuages Documentation Programme at SOAS University of London, sharing her perspective on endangered languages. Seyfeddinipur shares how globalization, climate change, urbanization and political unrest are causing the extinction of languages at a rate equivalent to the loss of biological diversity during the mass extinction of the dinosaurs. She also emphasizes how such change can negatively impacts cultural diversity and decreases social resilience.

I GET THE BAG Gucci Mane ft. Migos

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This is a new Hip-Hop video with Gucci Mane and rap group the Migos called I Get The "Bag". When people are talking about getting a "Bag" now of days it's just another way of saying getting money or bossing up that's just your "bag". Bag can be used in many different ways it's a new thing that has been used frequently. It's an African american slang word coming from rap culture.

Posted by Steven Sims Jr. on September 28, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

Key & Peele Loco Gangsters

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Key & Peele are using mock spanish and code switching as well in this video. They are acting as hispanic gang members, going back in for to see who is more Loco.

Posted by Steven Sims Jr. on September 28, 2017

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent

1960 - Jackie Kennedy Spanish Ad

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This is a video of Jackie Kennedy doing a campaign ad in 1960 in Spanish. The goal of this video was to connect with the Hispanic voters. I chose this particular video because it shows how Jackie Kennedy used different speech communities to reach a certain group of people. Indexicality plays a role as well because she is indexing the Spanish speaking community.

Chola Makeover

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A group of cholas give two other woman a makeover using their styles of fashion and makeup.

Posted by Liliana Santos-Vallejo on September 20, 2017

Tags:
Spanglish;
Chicano English;
Race,Ethnicity

Chola's Talk Chola Fashion

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A few groups of cholas comment on chola fashion and the ways people outside of the group use their makeup and clothes styles.

Posted by Liliana Santos-Vallejo on September 20, 2017

Tags:
Spanglish;
Chicano English;
Race,Ethnicity

What kind of Asian are you?

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In this video directed by Ken Tanaka (David Ury), a common topic/"issue" is addressed in a humorous way. This issue is the tendency of caucasian people to ask people who are clearly not caucasian the question "Where are you from?" This is a strange issue because almost all the time, the asker does not mean where the person was born, or where they grew up, but usually is trying to ask where their family origins/heritage lies. It is a funny phenomenon that occurred mainly due to a lack of any other 'politically correct' way of asking someone (usually a stranger) where their family origins are.

Posted by Damian Vu on July 26, 2017

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent

Yo Quiero Taco Bell

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The chihuahua from Taco Bell has been around a long time but many people have over looked the use of language ideology that it presents. In this commercial it uses a common stereotype that latinos sell bad, cheap fast food by having the chihuahua as hispanic and promoting that tacos are 99 cents. A lot of hispanics were insulted by the commercial, but they continued to use the dog for a number of years.

Posted by Kelli on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity

English Motherf*****

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An interrogation scene from the HBO series The Wire. Through their use of mock language two detectives index a language ideology that places the immigrant's language as substandard to English. This language ideology restricts the agency of the immigrant by reinforcing language inequality through the positioning of English as the only tool that can serve the communicative function in this discourse.

Maz Jobrani: Comedy TedTalk in Qatar

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Maz Jobrani is an Iranian-American who does a lot of comedy to bridge Americans with the Middle East, and to bring awareness of Middle Easterners.

Nail Salon

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In this video a comedian is talking about her time at a nail salon, all the while impersonating the women who work at the nail salon. She uses an accent to do so. Although she is using it as a joke, is stereotypes Vietnamese nail salon workers to be both pushy but also unaware. By doing this she further emphasizes a separation between the English customers and non-English workers. In watching the video, it is easy to think that the workers are uneducated because it seems as though they don't understand English, but there is no effort being done on the customers side to really communicate in their language. Here, English is being depicted as a more educated language, creating stigma for the women working.

Posted by Jackie B on July 2, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Race,Ethnicity;
Monolingualism;
Stigma

Racial Slurs- Clerks 2

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Warning- strong language and frequent use of racial slurs. In this scene from the movie "Clerks 2", in which the characters discuss the use of racial slurs, specifically the term "porch monkey", reflects some of the different attitudes towards "racist" language in society. Randal (played by Jeff Anderson) plays the ignorant white man in the scene, and his attitude towards the other, outraged characters in the scene represents opposing ideologies that are present throughout society. Randal isn't intentionally being offensive or racist, but offensive language is more of a perspective issue than one of intent. Just like society as a whole, Randal is stubborn in his defense of the term "porch monkey", claiming that its not racist, and that he can "take it back." At one point Randal describes his grandmothers racist remarks as "cute" and says "that's the way people talked back then", excusing racism as a social norm. Randal's friend and co-worker Dante (played by Brian O'Halloran) at one point says, "And even if it could be saved, you can't save it because you're not black." This statement is interesting because white people are notorious for being entitled when it comes to other races or cultures, whether it be Cinco de Mayo, or white people's use of African American Vernacular English. As funny as this scene is, it also sheds an interesting light on the issue of racism in the US and how different people feel about what is and isn't racist.

Posted by Alexander Winzenburg on June 30, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

Hold Up! Time for an Explanatory Comma

This episode from NPR's Code Switch podcast reminds me of Bell's discussion of audience design. Code Switch is a podcast by journalists of color where they discuss race and identity. Sometimes, the topics they discuss are out of context for those who have different socialization. In the episode below, they talk about having to use what they call an "Explanatory comma" in order to accommodate the different backgrounds of their listeners. [Published on 12-14-2016]

Posted by Becca Sanchelli on June 29, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice

People Around the World Try an American Accent

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In this video, a handful of people from all over the world attempt their best shot at an American accent. Some are good while others, not so good. However, the portrayal of American stereotypes is extremely evident throughout the attempts at an accent. This shows how the language ideologies and styles of multiple American communities can ultimately create many "speech Communities".

Man Insults Puerto Rican for Speaking Spanish

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In this video, a man named Mike starts a racist rant against another man for speaking Spanish. Hector Torres, the guy speaking Spanish, was simply communicating to his mother in her mother tongue. Mike spends most of the video insulting Hector, and he even calls Hector a “spic”, which is a racist derogatory slur against Hispanics. Further, when Hector asked what he did wrong, Mike yells, “Talking that fucking stupid Spanish around here when everybody else is fucking English-speaking American.” His emphasis on separating Hector as a "spic" that speaks Spanish and everyone else as an English-speaking American is an attempt to alienate Hector because of his race and the language he speaks. We can infer from the video that Mike attributes to English some sense of national pride; he subscribes to the ideology of a single, exclusive national language that everyone in America has to speak.

Posted by Brian Quiroz on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Race,Ethnicity

Racism In America (Satire)

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As we have thoroughly discussed Mock Spanish, along with language, race, ethnicity, the following YouTube video is a humorous play on racism in America. The Hispanic housemaid is faced with her racist boss as she's assumed to be a thief, an idiot, and not know English, simply because she is not a white American. It also highlights the tendencies to classify someone as not as intelligent simply because they do not fit the stereotype for where we are from. Again, this is a humorous spin on real life happenings that occur, many of which are oblivious to us.

Posted by Paa Imbeah on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Spanish;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
Socioeconomic Status

Keye & Peele - Proud Thug

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In this Key and Peele skit called “Proud Thug”, comedians Michael Keegan-Key and Jordan Peele portray stereotypical Hispanic gangsters. They use terms like “holmes”, “homie” and “esé” to refer to each other. On top of the heavy Spanish accents, they use some broken English, double negatives, slang, and a lot of cursing to communicate in a way that Hispanic “gangstas” are expected to.

Posted by Samantha Mackey on June 26, 2017

Tags:
Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

A Few Things to Know About American Sign Language

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Similar to the different accents that exist in the English language, different styles of sign language express different cultural upbringings. This video is a short personal account into a few individual’s experiences with sign language and its perception from none deaf people. Explaining issues like the use of the term “hearing impaired”, is considered more offensive than being labeled deaf because it does not recognize deaf people as a “linguistic minority”. The point is that deaf people have a culture. One of the speakers talks about how slang has influenced ASL specifically in the African-American cultural community. Being deaf does not exclude people from existing in a living language that adapts and changes to fit the times. Rich with the impact of various cultures.

Die Antwoord's Evil Boy: A Dynamic Crossroad of Language, Culture, and Rap in South Africa

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Die Antwoord is a controversial rap group from Cape Town, South Africa fronted by Ninja Yolandi Vi$$er. Speaking from a post-apartheid perspective, this group offers an underrepresented view of young, lower-middle class, white Afrikaans - a subculture known as "Zef." Historically, Zef has been considered a derogatory term describing someone who was white, poor, and "trashy." However, Die Antwoord and others have looked to transform this into a self-reflective, somewhat satirical, parody that Ninja described as being "apocalyptic debris that we’ve stuck together." In this music video, they display their unique code-switching between Afrikaans and English, as well as Xhosa - the Bantu language of the Xhosa people. Adding to their mixed-bag controversial nature, is the relationship of the Afrikaans languages’ association with apartheid. Through dynamic language and visual use, this video reflects the complex sociocultural and sociolinguistic interactions that occur in this region. The lyrical narrative told is a statement on the clash between traditional tribal circumcision rituals, and the modern subcultures that seem to offer an alternative path to "manhood." This can be heard in the verse by the guest rapper Wanga, sung in his native tongue: "Mamelapa umnqunduwakho! (listen here, you fucking asshole) Andifuni ukuyaehlatini! (I don't want to go to the bush with you) Sukubammba incanca yam! (don't touch my penis) Andi so stabani! (I’m not a gay) Incanca yam yeyamantobi! (this penis is for the girls) Incanca yam iclean! (my penis is clean) Incanca yam inamandla! (my penis is strong) Ndiyinkwekwe enkulu! (I am a big boy) Angi funi ukuba yeendota! (don't want to be a man) Evil boy 4 life! yebo! (yes) Evil boy 4 life!" Through the use of polyglossic code-switching, performativity, sociocultural and racial integration, and a revamping of contextual meanings, Die Antwoord is doing its part to redefine what it means to be young and Zef in South Africa, and what a socioculturally- and sociolinguistically-complex rebellion sounds like.

British Villains -Tom Hiddleston en Jaguar F-Type Coupé

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This Jaguar car commercial adds to an ideology that an English accent sounds villainous. Indexically and through performativity the actor, Tom Hiddleston, describing how to successfully sound "villainous". This commercial is a part of a series featuring other British actors describing how to sound "villainous".

Covert Racism Found in Grey's Anatomy

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During this scene of Grey’s Anatomy, Amelia approaches Maggie, who is African American, about a situation where she felt like she may have come off racist. There are several points during their conversation in which anthropological elements are highlighted. One major example is presented when Maggie talks about about how people assume things about her based on her race. She mentions that she approached an airline ticket booth with a first class ticket and the attendant said, “We aren’t boarding coach yet.” Although this isn’t an overtly racist statement, the subtle racist ideas are still present. This example is similar to the statement “You can turn the air conditioning on if you want to” that we talked about during lecture. When we make implicit statements like these, we are giving power to racist ideas without coming out and using actual racist language. We let our assumptions do the talking and reinforce the racial stereotypes that already exist in our society.

Posted by Brianna Johnson on May 10, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

British Villains -Tom Hiddleston en Jaguar F-Type Coupé

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This Jaguar car commercial adds to an ideology that an English accent sounds villainous. Indexically and through performativity the actor, Tom Hiddleston, describing how to successfully sound "villainous". This commercial is a part of a series featuring other British actors describing how to sound "villainous".

“Do You Understand the Words That Are Coming Out of My Mouth? - Rush Hour (1/5) Movie CLIP

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This is a clip from the movie Rush Hour where Agent Carter misunderstood that Jackie Chan (Lee) cannot understand English; therefore he got frustrated and started to change his tone and volume while talking to him. This clip touches on the issue of performativity, racial and linguistic ideologies, Standard Language Ideology and Language socialization. Chris Tucker in the movie was expecting Jackie Chan to be able to speak English, and he also used forms like “speaka” and said “Mr. Rice-a-Roni don’t even speak American”. Based on this example and also the rising tone and increasing volume, it shows how Tucker had the linguistic ideologies of if he speaks louder and slower then the other person is going to understand him. He also used terms that shows his own identity such as “speaka”, and he also said, “speak American” to show his ideology of American equals English only.

Mock Asian in Song Sung by Jennifer Murphy

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The woman in this video uses both code-switching and direct indexicality to emulate a sort of acquisition of Asian culture in her becoming of a "ninja." She switches between her native Anglo-American dialect and a stereotypical East Asian accent when she uses more “proper” and “improper” grammar, respectively. The most prevalent of this is the omission of grammatical morphemes (“I want to be ninja” omitting “a” and “I almost a ninja,” omitting the word “am”), a characteristic of Mock Asian as defined by Elaine Chun (Ideologies of Legitimate Mockery, 2004). The usage of her overly stereotypical mimicking of an East Asian accent is a direct indexicality of non-native English-speaking Asians having “improper” grammar as well as enforcing a stereotype that implies that all East Asians are ninjas, another aspect of Mock Asian as defined by Chun, in her use of Chinese imagery ("take Chow down to Chinatown") when referring to a piece of Japanese culture. The instrumentals that change from a rock track to an Asian-sounding track that is reminiscent of "Chopsticks" every time she assumes her Mock Asian identity in the performance, another piece of Mock Asian according to Chun.

Posted by Aiyana Moyer on May 9, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity

"El Messy Look": Mock Spanish and Code-switching in AXE Commercial

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Axe's new commercial for their "Messy Look" hair styling cream is a perfect example of the ways in which Mock Spanish is still prevalent in our society in 2017. Jane Hill, the inventor of the term, states in "Language, Race, and White Public Space" that one practice of Mock Spanish is "taking elements of Spanish morphology" such as the suffix -o and using Spanish modifiers such as "el" to create "jocular and pejorative" terms. In Axe's commercial, the actor refers to the product as "El Messy Look". Then, while giving instructions on using the cream, he says "First-o, take a finger to the cream..." At the end of the commercial, after showing off his confidence and "cultural awareness", the actor mishears the female bartender who actually speaks Spanish when she asks him a question, showing his ignorance. However, the bartender smiles at him, further enforcing Hill's ideas about Mock Spanish directly indexing the speaker as having desirable qualities, while simultaneously indirectly indexing the idea that Spanish is somehow less valuable than English.

Posted by Laurel Nagengast on May 8, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Power;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

Barack Obama - Code Switcher

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Code switching is a large part of a public figures publicity arsenal. Being able to switch mannerisms, linguistic traits, and other factors of a depiction of self is incredibly important in the formulation of a diverse and accepting group of constituents. Being able to maintain all the code switching when prompted is also necessary for maintaining those groups, because being able to appear like you know exactly what they’re experiencing shows commitment and understanding. Barack Obama was known through various examples to show his ability to code switch based on the community he was visiting, whether it be rural North Carolina church, or USA basketball locker rooms. In this clip, we see his interactions with various players, male and female, and the coaching staffs. Take note how he changes the way he speaks based on their perceived race and whether they are a coach or a player. In addition, the status of the individuals he is addressing changes the way he speaks. For example, the way he talks to LeBron James (superstar) and Anthony Davis (rookie at the time) are different, even though they are both power forwards for the USA Men’s basketball team. Furthermore, in his recounting of the story about Joe Biden’s daughter, we see his use of different speech techniques with a coach who is white when compared to interactions with a black player. Finally, the handshake at the beginning of the video with Kevin Durant is a great example of an on the fly code switch.

Posted by Ben Orlowski on May 8, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice;
Slang

Press One for English

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This music video features a clearly Anglo couple singing in thick Southern U.S. accents about the need to speak English in the United States. It clearly showcases many examples of languages ideologies and subtle racism. The video indexes a strong relationship between an American identity and English ability by using many flags, referencing the U.S. military, and blatantly saying "English is the language of the land." They also support the dominance of English, associating it with the opportunities of America, even ironically saying that "We share this land of liberties, so please speak English". Language is closely tied to one's identity, and it is a great abuse to force language upon another person. It's also very difficult to learn another language, especially to full proficiency, once one has passed puberty. Despite these facts, the lyric "You chose to come, now choose to speak English", insists that to be accepted as an American, you must alter a fundamental aspect of your being. The song goes on to associate different languages with "others", saying " I don't live in China, Mexico, no foreign place," and frequently implying that to speak another language is to be lesser, especially in the U.S. These attitudes surrounding English are what create the English hegemony in the U.S., but just because it is the norm doesn't mean it is positive. Many nations are multilingual and there are massive benefits, but this song maintains that it is absurd to have "subtitles in 5 languages" and that as an American, "why should I have to press one for English?". English is massively dominant in the U.S., despite the present of many other varieties over time. The dominance of English is closely tied to the systematic oppression of various ethnic groups in the U.S. over time.

Donald Trump: We need to get out 'bad hombres'

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This is what Donald Trump said in the third presidential debate in regarding to the issue of immigration. In his speech, he used Spanish word “hombre” to refer to the immigrants that he views as bad people, which has some negative meaning. However, “hombre” in Spanish only means “men” without any negative meanings. This is a good example of mock Spanish as defined by Hill (1998). People can’t understand the meaning without understanding the indirect index of the badness and criminal of Spanish people. It also contains underlying racism which shows that Spanish people have a stereotype of being bad, and in contrast white culture is better than others.

Posted by Yujia Wu on May 7, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Airplane-I Speak Jive

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This scene from Airplane depicts an overly dramatized version of AAVE to the point where other white people, besides one elderly lady, cannot understand what the speakers are saying. Beyond this being an example of linguistic ideologies at work it also serves as social commentary on how AAVE was perceived in the time the movie was made.

Posted by Paige Lechtenberg on May 2, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity

Changing a National Language

This photo was taken in Chisinau, Moldova. The one on the left says, “Our Language” and the word Romania is handwritten below. The photo on the left says “I am Moldovan! I speak Moldovan!” Right now, Moldova is in a deep debate about the national language because of its several prevalent ethnic groups. Many people resent Russia and want the language eradicated, however there is still a significant number of Russian speakers. In addition, the recent change of the national language from Russian to Moldovan has sparked an entirely new challenge. Many want to be associated with Romania, become westernized, and speak Romanian. They argue that Moldovan and Romanian are simply dialectal differences. Others want to stay a part of Eastern Europe and retain their own specific national identity as Moldovan or Russian. The government recently changed all street signs, websites, and college classes to Moldovan, despite a large percentage of people unable to speak the language. Many people now associate Russian speakers with “the enemy” or of a lower status. This has alienated the non-Moldovan speakers and has caused immense political unrest.

Trump Relies on Mock Spanish to Talk About Immigration (OPINION)

This blog post is about how non-Spanish speaking white peoples' use of "mock Spanish" is a form of covert racism that is used as a unconsciously strategic effort to silently dominate the folks who are imagined to speak the language, but to do so through attempts at silliness, humor and acting "cool” or "with it". [Published on 10-20-2016]

Reality TV outgroup language use

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This clip shows outgroup language use of a white women on a reality TV show. When she is upset, she begins to use more standard English and less AAE markers. Other people on the show notice. This relates to themes of crossing or outgroup language use and also the question of authenticity in relation to race and speech explored in Cutler's "Keepin It Real" (2003).

Posted by Ally Watson on March 19, 2017

Tags:
African American English;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

At UMass lecture, Stanford professor tackles prejudice against African-American English in courtrooms

A woman’s testimony in court is accused of being “unintelligible” because she speaks a different dialect of English, specifically African American English. The slang terms or speech patterns that she uses do not sound grammatically correct to the courtroom, but back home, it is normal speech. Rickford interestingly notes in the article that since interpreters for foreign languages are used in the courtroom, we should also use those resources of dialects of English that are not as easily interpreted by conventional speakers of the language.

New Girl - Schmidt & Winston Crack Scene

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In this scene, Schmidt tries to help Winston stay true to himself, and Winston suggests they can do this by getting cocaine. Schmidt tries to accommodate Winston by going to a rougher neighborhood. Schmidt tries to fit into the situation at hand, albeit often unsuccessfully, but his linguistic style-shifting is most apparent as he tries to get the "drug dealer's" attention.

Posted by Logan Bannister on March 5, 2017

Tags:
Accommodation;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity;
Socioeconomic Status

Be Free- J. Cole

The artist J. Cole uses his lyrics to express the danger of blacks and the hardships they face. He shares the pain and sorrow they go through his words.

Posted by Kayla Springs on February 28, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Grammaticalization;
Youth;
Race,Ethnicity

Jamila Lyiscott: 3 ways to speak English

Jamila Lyiscott is a “tri-tongued orator;” in her powerful spoken-word essay “Broken English,” she celebrates — and challenges — the three distinct flavors of English she speaks with her friends, in the classroom and with her parents. As she explores the complicated history and present-day identity that each language represents, she unpacks what it means to be “articulate.” [Published on 02-01-2014]

African American Sign Language Different from whites

The article goes over how even today there is a difference in signing between blacks and whites. Some of the African American signs may be different and the way they express signs in stories varies. This difference can create a barrier when signing to a group of African Americans and to a group of white signers. Throughout history and even through the English Only period, many African Americans switched to the way whites sign in order to “fit in.” [Published on 09-17-2012]

Diversity Training with Pam and Dwight

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This is a video from the show "The Office". This is a short clip from an episode where the staff receives diversity training. It shows us how people can be culturally ignorant. The scene involves Pam and Dwight and they both have a card on their head in which the other person must use the other to guess what their card is. Dwight's word was Asian, and Pam helped him by saying that she didn't feel this way but stereotypical they are bad drivers. This resulted in Dwight guessing it the answer was women. This was culturally insulting to those of Asian decent because they have been given this stereotype when it is not true that all Asians are bad drivers. This also attacked women which is unnecessary too considering not all women are poor drivers.

Posted by Danielle Wismer on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Femininity;
Masculinity;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma

Redefining Race and Ethnicity in the US

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This video discusses the problem with classification of race in America. People often attach Race to people wrongly when they should really be referring to ethnicity.

Posted by Tyler Craig on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity

Youth soccer coach booted for speaking Spanish to players

This is an article about a youth soccer coach being ejected for speaking Spanish to his players. The referees ejected him for simply speaking Spanish during a game. This is an obvious attempt to discriminate against this coach and his team. The coach code-switched between Spanish and English and this was deemed unacceptable because they "want everybody to understand". Yet, they say they have no rule against speaking Spanish. [Published on 12-20-2012]

Posted by Tyler Craig on October 15, 2016

Tags:
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity

Black Folks Slang

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This video is a tutorial on several slang words used by people in the black community. The video explains what these words mean in English and gives examples of the slang words used in a sentence in order to understand the context of them. This video is shows the use of African American English and speech communities.

Posted by Chrissy McLeod on October 14, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice;
Slang

The Importance of Code Switching

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Edward Moore explains the importance of Code Switching for success. He emphasizes that people of color need to know how to function in different environments. From "the block" to the board room.

"Token Black Woman" -Issa Rae

This gif comes from an episode of the show "Insecure" that aired recently on HBO. The show is based on Issa Rae, an African American woman, trying to navigate her way through her 20's. Rae works for a non profit called "We Got Ya'll," which helps children of color from low income communities to be successful in school. The non-profit was created by a white woman and Rae is the only black woman working there. Rae refers to herself as the "token black woman." This gif shows a white co-worker asking Rae the meaning of "on fleek." Her co-worker is assuming that because Rae is black, that she is familiar with this language. This is an example of her co-worker's language ideologies. Unfortunately for her co-worker, due to indirect indexicality, making this assumption actually makes her appear racist. Rae spoke about the show, saying that the series will examine "the complexities of 'blackness' and the reality that you can’t escape being black." Rae also said, in regards to the potential mainstream reaction to the series: "We’re just trying to convey that people of color are relatable. This is not a hood story. This is about regular people living life."

Posted by Erica Hageman on October 6, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

"That Mexican Thing"

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During the Vice Presidential Debate, Tim Kaine referred to some of the demeaning comments Donald Trump has made in the past, regarding Latinos. In response, Mike Pence said, "Senator, you whipped out that Mexican thing again." Whether Pence meant to be offensive to the Latino community or not, he most certainly was. Recently, Trump has tried to redeem himself with the Latino community, but with his VP referring to Latino issues as a "Mexican thing," it is apparent that Trump is engaging in hispandering.

Posted by Erica Hageman on October 5, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Race,Ethnicity;
Politics and Policy

Black Girls: The Cycle Continues

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In the video titled “Black Girls: The Cycle Continues.” we see a group of young black females taking turns speaking their mind's over an apparent issue, which has upset them. This is a good example of slang terminology and language ideologies of a speech community.

Strange Wilderness- Spanish accent

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This is a clip from "Strange Wilderness" and in this clip they are mocking Mock Spanish. It's a completely over the top clip. There is obviously overt stereotyping displayed in the clip and attempt to condescend the Latino race. Its a legitimate question as to how many people would realize (because the clip is so over the top and backfires so extraordinarily) that this indeed a mockery of Mock Spanish.

Posted by Tyler Craig on October 4, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

Why I keep speaking up, even when people mock my accent

Animator and Narrator, Safwat Saleem, reflects on his experience with the "pre-existing notion of normal" at a young age and how he is still challenged by that notion today. Throughout his life Saleem has faced criticism due to society's idea of what is "normal" and what is "good" and has let it negatively affect his career and esteem. Saleem explains how he has overcome those challenges and now chooses to use his accent and work to help shape and transform a more accepting society. [Published on 02-01-2016]

Posted by Samantha Blaesing on October 2, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Youth;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent

Ignorance in the Office

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This is a short clip from the Office where two characters are told by their boss to treat the other person like the race on their forehead (index card). One person is supposed to give hints while the other person must guess who is on their own card.

Posted by Sophia Smith on July 29, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent;
Sexism

Could your language affect your ability to save money?

Amazing Ted Talk by Keith Chen illustrating how "language" can help a person's ability to save money! EVERYONE should see this. It also gives a really good illustration on how different languages force you to say different things. [Published on 06-01-2012]

Ted Cruz para Presidente

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This video is of a campaign advertisement for Ted Cruz. who was running for president as a Republican. As someone who has been quoted as saying that Spanish speakers live in a "language ghetto", this can be seen as an example of Hispandering. Since the ad is entirely in Spanish, Cruz was trying to gain acceptance and furthermore the vote from those in the Hispanic, Spanish-speaking communities.

Posted by Gabriella Novello on July 29, 2016

Tags:
Spanish;
Accommodation;
Race,Ethnicity

Jon Stewart - Daily Show - Accents

Clips from Jon Stewart's "The Daily Show" of him performing different accents throughout many different episodes. [Published on 08-29-2011]

Posted by Halie Carr on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent

Mock Spanish in Scrubs

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Dr. Kelso uses mock spanish to belittle the idea of the nurses wanting a raise.

Posted by BreAnna Engeman on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Race,Ethnicity;
Socioeconomic Status

Hillary Clinton: Blaspandering?

Do we need a new term for black pandering, like hispandering has? In this clip, fox news sounds off on Hilary's speech regarding white privilege. Although her intent is good, like examples of hispandering, her language of "we" and "our" vs. "you" helps to reflect and reinforce ideologies of otherness. [Published on 04-13-2016]

Posted by Brandiss Drummer on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

African-American ASL

Variations that have developed and been maintained by White and Black signers of ASL are examined to reveal surprising cultural implications [Published on 09-07-2012]

How to Speak Hip

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This is the intro to a 13 part "album" instructing listeners on how to speak and understand "hip" language. Those who want to appear "cool" to this subculture that includes hipsters, juvenile delinquents, jazz musicians, etc.

Code Switching, Mock Spanish, and Kevin Hart

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Kevin Hart is explaining what it's like to be in prison. He takes on numerous different forms and voices to show the different type of people in prison.

Rich Chigga - I Only Say N**** When I’m Jamming to Rap Music

This Indonesian "rapper"/comedian with the stage name, Rich Chigga, is receiving backlash from the hip-hop community for making a song that utilizes the n-word. When confronted about this word, he was quoted saying, "My intent was to kinda help take the power out of that word so people would be less sensitive about it but I do understand if some people would be offended and I think doing it in that song’s enough." It is usually a common theme for people not to say the n-word due to the negative implications of the word. However, he tries to justify his usage by describing how he is attempting to desensitize a word. He is getting backlash for trying to exploit this culture derived from African-Americans and hip-hop. [Published on 07-20-2016]

Posted by Lauren Watkins on July 20, 2016

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity;
Hip Hop Nation

BET Comic Travina Springer Lesson on Code-Switching

This comic provides several examples of code-switching that she learned upon entering a new school. (A new linguistic community.)

Gizoogle Search Engine

Website imitating Google that attempts to "translate" pages into AAE for comedic purposes.

Posted by Maren Bilby on April 19, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Ebonics Controversy

East L.A. speaks from its heart

This article talks more about Chicano English, but with regards to non-Latino speakers who draw upon its features, and how using these features interacts with their own social identity. [Published on 10-24-2014]

Posted by Caroline Bell Wright on April 13, 2016

Tags:
California English;
Chicano English;
Race,Ethnicity

7 Year Old Polyglot

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This is a girl who is half-Japanese and half-Spanish, and she is currently (as of 2015) living in Spain. In this video she shows us how many languages she has at her disposal, highlighting the fact that speakers can have many different repertoires to index their identities.

Posted by Caroline Wright on April 11, 2016

Tags:
Crossing;
Youth;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

Keith Ape - 잊지마 (It G Ma) (feat. JayAllDay, Loota, Okasian & Kohh)

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Music video depicting East Asian (Korean and Japanese) rappers using CRAAVE. This video was highly controversial because many felt the rappers were appropriating black culture, especially since the song itself was based off of an African American hip-hop song ("U Guessed It" by OG Maco).

Posted by Maren Bilby on March 15, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Japanese;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

Ebonics Dictionary

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In this video stand up comedian Steve Harvey explains the complexity of Ebonics. Although he is African American Steve Harvey's stand up routine plays into certain African American stereotypes while pointing out the differences between American English and AAVE.

Coca Cola por el orgullo de ser latino

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In this video that is supposed to celebrate Hispanic Heritage month Coca Cola has been accused of hispandering. This is evident in that the men and women in the video are discussing their pride in their heritage and family names as they are printed on the side of Coca Cola cans. Not only did Coke decide to put the names on the cans but they made them temporary tattoos. Many latinos have condemned the video as a pathetic attempt to bring in more latino customers. They have also said the tattoos could play into latino stereotypes. Check it out and decide for yourself.

Posted by Ariana Moll on March 14, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
American English;
Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Mahogany performing CultureAppropriation

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Powerful performance and poem from Mahogany. CultureAppropriation. Turns the appropriation of African American culture, using emotional references, provocative stereotypes, music...

Posted by Scott Russell on March 11, 2016

Tags:
Womens Language;
Race,Ethnicity

Gulf Between Words and Actions @ CU-Boulder

Very interesting article illustrate a situation where simply using the "right words" isn't enough. [Published on 03-10-2016]

Posted by Scott Russell on March 11, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Race,Ethnicity;
Politics and Policy

Asian American Slang

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This video depicts slang words used in particular by Asian Americans. This shows the combination of the two cultures of Asia and America. Many of these slang words have Asian roots and are influenced by American culture which gives rise to a whole new word with different meanings. This blend of cultures has given rise to many new languages and words throughout history.

Posted by Matt McLaughlin on March 11, 2016

Tags:
Chinglish;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

A Remote Amazonian tribe could fundamentally change our understanding of language

This article talks about the recent discovery of the language of a remote tribe in the Amazon that may be drastically different from any other known languages. A researcher from MIT teamed up with one of the few non-native Piraha speakers in the world to try to analyze the differences. This research may change our understanding of how language works and how it developed.

Language, Race, and White Public Space

This article talks about the use of language in comparison to race. It talks about the negative stereotypes that are directed to Chicanos and Latinos by talking about "Mock Spanish".

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism;
Slang;
Stigma

Formation - Beyonce

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In this video, singer Beyonce uses her lyrics and video to demonstrate her frustration with society, police brutality, and racism.

Posted by Zana Pascoe on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Race,Ethnicity;
Hip Hop Nation;
Slang

Pardon my Spanglish

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A comedian joins Spanish CNN to talk about his new book about Spanglish. The comedian and the anchor switch between English and Spanish throughout the video, talking in Spanglish. While there's a good deal more Spanish being spoken in the video, there's also English, just not as much as Spanish. The intro of the video is a great example of Spanglish, as is the whole interview for the most part.

Power of Speech

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This is an example of the power within language. The passion, emotion and tone in which Hitler speaks reaches his supporters in an inhumane manner. Eventually, enough of these powerful speeches led to the brainwashing of many Germans and the annihilation of Jews (amongst other populations) in Nazi Germany.

Posted by Jeremy Gutovitz on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Race,Ethnicity

But What Does Bae Actually Mean?

In this article, the author explores the history and rise of the word "bae" in popular culture, noting that the term has actually been around much longer than its 2014 introduction to the mainstream. Many who grew up hearing and speaking AAVE have used "bae" in conversation for years, and the term has been commercialized to a point where it has lost its original vibe and is now being "sold back" to its original users. [Published on 03-07-2016]

Family Guy Stereotypes

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This video is a combination of stereotypes that have aired on family guy over the years. Many of these stereotypes have to do with race and language in society today.

Key & Peele - Obama's Anger Translator - Meet Luther

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In this video clip of Key & Peele, Peele's Obama is a very mild-mannered character who calmly addresses his audience, and Key's Luther interrupts Obama's speech to represent Obama's inner anger.

Posted by Kristi Sparks on March 7, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Does Not Speaking Spanish Make You Less Latino? Pero Like Ep.4

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This article discusses speech communities and how the language you speak does or does not define your culture. In this example, the video is discussing if not speaking Spanish makes you less Latino.

Posted by Courtney Dickerson on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Change;
Language Shift;
Youth;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice;
Education;
Stigma

CNN Election Center

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In this video there are many different types of sociolinguistic artifacts, and in any kind of SNL skit they have to make it more dramatic to bring out the commentary. Yet, within this clip you see many types of tags used within the first few minutes. For example, Donald Trump is the first person to be impersonated, but within the short clip that he is in he shows tags of "Race/Ethnicity, Sexism, Gender, Politics and Policy". And for Hillary Clinton she is showing many of the same character traits as well. Within all of these impersonators they are all trying to benefit themselves in some way that looks appealing to the audience.

If Asians said the Stuff White People Say

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The video is a complete spoof but it does a great job of identifying how the Asian population can be categorized into one giant category. It illustrated linguistic discrimination and shows how the social context you live in cam influence a cultures way of thought.

Posted by Steven Goldstein on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice;
Linguistic Relativity

Fresh Prince: Carlton plays "Gangster"

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A clip from Fresh Prince of Bel-air, where Carlton plays a character called C-note, a "gangster" version of himself, and code-switches his language pattern.

Posted by Lily Siebert on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent;
Slang

Nigerian Pidgin English accepted as unofficial second language

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A news story with examples of spoken NPE as well as cultural context for the shift in perception of the Creole Language.

Ernestine Johnson Performs 'The Average Black Girl' on Arsenio Hall Show

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Ernestine Johnson's performance of "The Average Black Girl" shows the stereotype of talking white vs talking black. Here is a good example of the relationship between race and language.

Posted by Courtney Dickerson on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Gender;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma

Be Free

Rapper J. Cole uses his words to express the danger of African Americans and the struggle that they go through. He uses his words as symbols and powerful words to paint the picture of the pain.

New York Post: "How Iggy Azalea mastered her ‘blaccent’"

A discussion of Iggy Azalea's understanding/appropriation of AAE, and authenticity. [Published on 01-04-2016]

Posted by Shannon Pearson on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity

Stephen Fry - The power of words in Nazi Germany

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Stephen Fry speaks about the power of language during the time of Nazi Germany and how using certain words to describe others can change everyone's perception of those people. This video significantly shows how language influences world-view.

Posted by Samuel Schmidgall on March 5, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Race,Ethnicity

Cut For Time: Def TED Talks - Saturday Night Live

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A skit making fun of Ted talks by creating a 'Def Jam' version. It uses AAE and has Caucasian speakers trying to act like African Americans.

Posted by Samuel Schmidgall on March 5, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

Ted Cruz/ Hispandering

Ted Cruz displays Hispandering during an interview, on Bloomberg. This involves explaining how he has the ability to relate to being Hispanic. There is a bit of code switching also, toward the end of the interview. [Published on 04-30-2015]

Posted by Mylls Cheffey on February 29, 2016

Tags:
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

Altering Chris Rock's Oscars monologue to conform to "standard" english

88th Academy Awards host Chris Rock used his opening monologue to hit on a number of important issues facing people of color in the film industry. Time included a transcript of Rock's speech to go along with a clip, and, interestingly, they have taken his words and "corrected" his grammar. For instance, in the video, Rock jokes, "in the 'in memoriam' section, it's going to be black people that was shot by the cops on their way to the movies." However, his words are transcribed as "...were shot by the cops on their way to the movies." Rock's leveling of verb forms is seen as "non-standard," and "corrected" for publication. [Published on 02-28-2016]

The "White Voice" of Radio

This clip points out the style-shifting of the particular speaker, and attributes it to race, performativity, and accommodation to his audience. [Published on 02-02-2015]

Posted by Jamie Schnee on February 27, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Accommodation;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Hispandering at the Nevada Caucus

Grace Parra demonstrates code-switching as she describes "hispandering" in the 2016 Nevada Presidential Caucus. Parra also highlights changes in different dialects. [Published on 02-22-2016]

Posted by Jamie Schnee on February 27, 2016

Tags:
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

DEA and AAVE

Shows some misconceptions that because of how people speak could lead to better understanding when tapping phones. Interesting not everyone speaks drug dealer dialect really shows how stereotyping is in thinking. [Published on 08-24-2010]

Posted by Michelle Allan on February 25, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

"The Day Beyonce Turned Black"

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Within this SNL skit, there are many different forms of language used. For this skit, it is explaining how caucasian people tend to look at the world in a over dramatic way. Throughout the skit, there are race, gender, & sexualities between white and blacks. This skit has a comical view on different political problems that we have in this country today, and what the children of our culture are growing up in.

28 Reasons to Hug a Black Guy

In this Saturday Night Live skit they are discussing Black history month in class and the teacher lets three of her students come up to give the class a lesson on what it means. The first thing they start to do is rap which is stigmatizing blacks. Next they start talking about slavery and how "white" people need to show them love for this month because this is the only time a year they get love which brings in the issue of race and ideology and much more. [Published on 02-25-2016]

Posted by Madison Rigdon on February 25, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma

Racialism, Ebonics, and Style

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This video addresses common racial discrepancies in America through how "black" and "white" people talk. It also touches on style of speech being construed differently among races. It is a nice viewpoint on why people talk certain ways.

Carlton

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This particular clip shows the comparisons of what some specific groups might think of how someone should be because of color and class when it is society who defines these boundaries.

india vs mexico

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This clip shows how different countries or races think or talk about other countries. The same thing he says here Americans typically say about Mexico.

Posted by Michael Allan on February 23, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Race,Ethnicity

Sh*t People From Hawaii Say

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Content Notes: Obscenities A humorous introduction to Hawaiian Pidgin by local celebrity Ryan Higa. This video demonstrates Pidgin being used in its social context, giving viewers unfamiliar with it an understanding of its importance in forming identity in the Hawaiian speech community.

Posted by Christy Jo Williams on February 22, 2016

Tags:
Hawaiian Pidgin;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

Hawaiian Pidgin: The Voice of Hawaii

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Hawaiian laypeople and scholars give a brief historical and social context to the pidgin used in Hawaii (referred to as just "Pidgin"). They explain that Pidgin, though originating as a very basic form of communication between workers over a hundred years ago, is now the basis of a strong speech community

Posted by Christy Williams on February 22, 2016

Tags:
Hawaiian Pidgin;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Contact

Key & Peele - Negrotown

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In this Key and Peele video, the stigmas attached to African Americans are shown. A white police officer begins to arrest a black man walking in an alley who is doing nothing wrong. When they enter 'Negrotown' he begins singing a song in which he says "here you can walk the streets without being stopped, harassed or beat." This brings in race and ideology about how African Americans are still being treated unfairly.

Posted by Madison Rigdon on February 21, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma

Linguistic- Code Switching

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This video gives the breakdown of code-switching in America. It talks about all the different types of English that exist in US. It also addresses why and individual partitakes in this linguistic practice; a word translation doesn't come to mind so they revert to the word in another language, or they are purposely excluding others from understanding. Code Switching if referred to different terms depending on the language mixture; Spanglish, Chinglish, etc.

Posted by Meaghan Kuhlmann on February 21, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Merger;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice;
Multilingualism

The Linguistics of AAVE

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This video discusses the history of AAVE, "African American Vernacular English. It address the origin, the pronunciations, and how it is used. The video gives great examples of AAVE and the translation of what it means in "proper" English.

Posted by Meaghan Kuhlmann on February 21, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Grammaticalization;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

"English Only" chants at Nevada Democratic caucuses

At the 2016 Nevada Democratic caucus, civil rights activist Dolores Huerta was heckled and booed off stage by a group of alleged Bernie Sanders supporters, who chanted "english only" when she attempted to translate the ballot for the Spanish-speaking caucus participants. Link to tweet from Ms. Huerta: https://twitter.com/DoloresHuerta/status/701184235315400705 [Published on 02-20-2016]

SNL

In this SNL skit, people are over exaggerating the hispanic theme within this skit. Trying to make themselves act like they know what they are talking about by making everything sound hispanic. Even though these colleagues are trying to justify what they are talking about by knowing the facts, it comes off as inappropriate when trying to have this conversation. Even though it is for a comical effect.

Posted by Tori Miller on February 18, 2016

Tags:
Spanglish;
Spanish;
Language Shift;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

"Hispandering" through food.

I am starting my proposal for my research paper and we are tasked with investigating "Hispandering" from a linguistic anthropological perspective. This add personifies "Hispandering" it uses performance to elicit feelings about stereotypes of ethnicity. [Published on 09-30-2014]

Posted by Tricia Roberson on February 12, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

3 Ways To Speak English

This is a TED talk about this women who breaks down the english language saying there are three ways to speak. She is saying that the way you speak comes from your background and the culture you experienced growing up. You can speak differently based on where you are. For example in the work community people have been taught to be polite and say "hello" but around your friends the vernacular changes to maybe a "whats good" meaning the same as hello or hi. Jamilia Lyiscott is putting on a performance for people conveying different identities. She also says the word "articulate" multiple times representing language ideologies.

Obama's Anger Translator

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This clip from “Key & Peele” challenges how a certain language and dialect are often “expected” from African-Americans without taking into account how a person was socialized in their community. Key & Peele touch on this subject again in their video “White Sounding Black Guys”.

Posted by Jamie Schnee on February 7, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity

Beyonce - Formation

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In this song and music video, Beyonce addresses stereotypes of the African-American community and uses language and style-shifting to play on how the public perceives wealthy black individuals such as herself and her family. She also discusses her upbringing in the deep south and mentions how her family's "negro" and "Creole" heritages combine.

Posted by Dante Colombo on February 6, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Emmanual and Philip Hudson- Ratchet Girl Anthem

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Emmanuel and Philp Hudson, two brothers that are YouTube stars have gained several hundred thousand views. They have gained so many views by instigating culturally charged videos. In this video they play the part of two "ratchet" girls that are in the club. This video shows AAE in an extreme method. This is a system that has its own concept of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics.

Posted by Mylls Cheffey on February 2, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity

Interview of Macklemore on 96.5

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Interview of Macklemore and producer Ryan Lewis by a white interviewer for a radio show. To be compared to the interview conducted by black and hispanic interviewers.

Posted by Manon Gilmore on November 24, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Macklemore Interview on 105.1 Radio

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This is an interview of the rapper Macklemore in which he discusses his music, influences, and personal beliefs with a black interviewer and a hispanic interviewer. To be compared to the interview of Macklemore and Ryan Lewis interviewed by a white person.

Posted by Manon Gilmore on November 24, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Middle-Class Black Families, in Low Income Neighborhoods

An article on racial disparities in the U.S. and how the white middle-class tend to live in safer and wealthier neighborhoods than blacks of the same income and social class. Also white middle-class families have higher average net worth than black middle-class families. This data is mentioned in the 2015 paper by Britt, Erica, and Tracy Weldon on AAE in the middle-class. [Published on 06-24-2015]

Posted by Ellery Sloane-Barton on November 16, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Socioeconomic Status

How capicola became gabagool: The Italian New Jersey accent, explained

This article discusses how different varieties of Italian made their way to the U.S., using the example of the word "capicola" pronounced like "gababool" on an episode of the Sopranos. [Published on 11-05-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on November 12, 2015

Tags:
New York City English;
Race,Ethnicity

Key and Peele Rap Album Confession

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This Key and Peele sketch also makes use of a black AAE speaker and a white middle class establishment character. In contrast with Little Homie, this skit illustrates both Key and Peele's abilities to style shift according to the character they are portraying.

Posted by Manon Gilmore on October 17, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Key and Peele Little Homie

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This skit by Key and Peele casts the comedians as a black speaker of AAE and a white establishment character who makes use of a puppet that speaks AAE.

Posted by Manon Gilmore on October 17, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Empire "Without a Country"

Season 2, Episode 2 of Empire. A family drama about a record company, Empire focuses on the Lyon family, who are African-American; much of the dialog is heavy on AAE features. The relatively consistent in-group setting sets up some potentially interesting controlled differences in style by topic and persona.

How to be a Grown Ass Woman

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This is an hour long radio piece from WNYC featuring Jessica Williams (among other accomplished women) where interviewees discuss moments and period in their lives that they believe marked their adulthood as women. Although it is public in the popular culture sector, Jessica Williams is essentially participating in a standard sociolinguistic interview as she tells stories from her past that are close to home for minutes at a time. Due to her telling personal stories, I thought this could be a good opportunity for more casual, natural speech that may include /ai/ monophthongization. [Starts at 33:00].

Obama's Eulogy of Reverend Pinckney

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This is an excerpt of the eulogy for Reverend Clementa Pinckney delivered by President Obama after the Charleston shooting at the Emanuel AME Church. He makes strategic use of preaching style to establish a rapport and sense of belonging with a black audience in a religious setting.

"Cholafied" Celebrities

This is an article about an artist retouching pictures of celebrities with the style of makeup Mendoza-Denton describes in ‘Muy macha.’ This sort of thing got shared a lot by (mostly white) people in my high school, suggesting the practices Mendoza-Denton describes are now available for parody. Mendoza-Denton. 1996. ‘Muy macha’: Gender and ideology in gang-girls’ discourse about makeup. Ethnos 61 (1-2): 47-67. [Published on 12-16-2014]

Posted by Riley Thornton on October 5, 2015

Tags:
Mendoza-Denton, Norma;
Race,Ethnicity

Black vs. African-American

An article written from an individual perspective that complicates the issue of using the terms Black and African-American as blanket terms by reversing the criteria that we discussed in class. [Published on 08-27-2015]

Posted by Manon Gilmore on September 6, 2015

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity

Trevor Noah -- African American

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Trevor Noah's standup--he talks about moving from South Africa to the U.S. and his preparation for being Black in America. He also gives us some performances of AAE.

Posted by Richard Adcock on September 2, 2015

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity

AAVE: Stop Appropriating It

This is a question I've been thinking about throughout 212. We talk about how everyone exhibits variation in their language, but a really important concept in social justice work right now is appropriation. This tumblr author asks people to stop "appropriating" AAVE and lists several lexical/discursive items that people who are not black should avoid/never use. If we pick up linguistic features from our peers, and our peers use these features, how can we avoid appropriating another culture's heritage. [Published on 04-01-2014]

Posted by Chase Doremus on April 21, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Borrowing;
Race,Ethnicity

DYSA African American English (or Ebonics) in the classroom

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This video shows an example of an approach in the classroom that involves teaching young speakers of AAE to translate speech into standard English. It seems like a cool strategy to teach kids in this way because it isn't detracting from the legitimacy of their own code, while also providing them with knowledge that will be useful in school.

Posted by Jasmine Huang on March 30, 2015

Tags:
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity

Debate about who gets to use a word

cw: discussion of racial slur This is a CNN interview between a white commentator and a black rapper named Trinidad. They're debating about use of the n-word. I find the controversy about who gets to use certain words fascinating. I hear a power & privilege conversation most often, as well as an "in-group" vs "out-group" conversation. [Published on 03-17-2015]

Posted by Chase Doremus on March 17, 2015

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma;
Lexicon

Key & Peele - White-Sounding Black Guys

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Comedians Key and Peele talk about how they "adjust their blackness" by shifting their speaking style in response to their audience.

Posted by Abby Mosing on March 5, 2015

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Listen: There's no such thing as a Brooklyn accent, exhibit says

A recent exhibit at NYC organization CityLore played New York voices for listeners, arguing that race/ethnicity and not borough is what distinguishes New York voices from each other. [Published on 01-28-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on February 26, 2015

Tags:
New York City English;
Race,Ethnicity

Thug Kitchen: Literary Blackface

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"Now, the Hollywood couple behind online blog turned vegan cookbook are in the limelight for a clumsily adopted, expletive-charged “thug” persona reminiscent of hypermasculine Black men. Thug is a heavily loaded word and while it is not explicitly synonymous with African Americans, it recently adopted new meaning and performs as a colloquial version of the n word. Did I mention the founders of Thug Kitchen are white? Yes, white. The authors kept their identities anonymous for quite some time." -http://www.forharriet.com/2014/10/dear-creators-of-thug-kitchen-stop.html#axzz3S8EWrMRn

Posted by Katie Farr on February 18, 2015

Tags:
Power;
Race,Ethnicity;
Socioeconomic Status;
Stigma

Black South African English 2

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This variety of Black South African English is notable (especially in comparison to the BSAE speaking security guard) for its more Cultivated style--which makes sense in context because the advertisement is for a South African university and therefore indicative of a higher socioeconomic class and exposure to the standard.

Posted by Manon Gilmore on November 12, 2014

Tags:
South African English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Socioeconomic Status

Black South African English

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This black South African security guard speaks using a variety of Black South African English.

Posted by Manon Gilmore on November 12, 2014

Tags:
South African English;
Race,Ethnicity

Sharlto Copley White South African English

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Sharlto Copley is a white South African actor who speaks with a General/Broad SAE accent.

Posted by Manon Gilmore on November 12, 2014

Tags:
South African English;
Race,Ethnicity

Why language about race changes over time

An NPR piece on changing terms for racial and ethnic categories, but really is about how terms change over time through process of pejoration, or what Pinker calls the "euphemism treadmill." [Published on 11-10-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on November 11, 2014

Tags:
Indexicality;
Race,Ethnicity;
Lexicon

The n-word: An Interactive Feature

An interactive piece on use of the word "nigger" in contemporary American English, with interviews from varying perspectives and on varying aspects of the term's use, including in- vs. out-group usage, reclamation, and its use in hip hop culture. [Published on 11-10-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on November 10, 2014

Tags:
American English;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Lexicon

Talking white: Black people's disdain for proper English and academic achievement is a myth

A Slate article challenging the notion that black Americans stigmatize both academic achievement and the use of standard English as 'acting white." The author argues that black speakers who bristle at being accused of 'talking white" are perhaps being accused of failing to code- or style-shift appropriately. [Published on 10-02-2014]

Hawaiian Creole English and cultural content in "Mr. Sun Cho Lee" (Contact Languages in Music)

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This song, first released in 1975 by Keola and Kapono Beamer, reveals stereotypes of the diverse ethnic backgrounds of Hawai'i residents, and contains several features of Hawaiian Creole English (often called "Pidgin" but is really a creole).

Posted by Emma Rennie on September 30, 2014

Tags:
Hawaiian Pidgin;
Race,Ethnicity;
Contact

Language On Trial: Rachel Jeantel

Our (earlier) discussion of anthropolitical linguistics reminded me of the commentary on Rachel Jeantel's speech during the Trayvon Martin trial. So you have the original artifact then is the AAE as a contact language, and then there's this re-contact with English ideologies and linguists (attempting) to educate the general populace. Other good articles are: http://mic.com/articles/52697/rachel-jeantel-s-language-is-english-it-s-just-not-your-english (article, no audio) http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=5161 (long, v linguisticy) [Published on 06-28-2013]

Posted by Syd Low on September 21, 2014

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity

Henry Cho, Asian American comedian with Southern accent

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Henry Cho is a Korean American comedian from Knoxville, Tennessee. He talks in his act about belonging to certain groups, using his own experiences as a Korean American southern English-speaking person as sources of comedy. The stereotypical cultural correlates of his appearance and his speech may be in conflict for some viewers.

NPR Article on Russia and Nearby Countries/Languages

"Ethnic Russians" in Ukraine and Estonia are defined/described by their language ], especially in relation/contrast to the language spoken by the relevant nation. [Published on 09-04-2014]

Posted by Allesandra Jade Geffen on September 4, 2014

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity;
Contact;
Monolingualism

American Tongues: Tough Guy from Boston's North End

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An excerpt from the documentary American Tongues profiling speakers from the North End of Boston.

When Slang Becomes a Slur

Linguist Geoffrey Nunberg, who testified in the trademark trial over the name of the football team the Washington Redskins, argues that the term remains a slur and that the team name should be changed. [Published on 06-23-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 25, 2014

Tags:
Entextualization;
American Indian;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang;
Lexicon

Dark-skinned and plus-sized: the real Rachel Jeantel story

Report on how the defence lawyer in trial of Trayvon Martin's killer tried to make Martin's girlfriend's testimony sound less convincing by discrediting her and her non-standard English.

Historian David Starkey makes some questionable remarks about language and race in the wake of the 2011 London riots

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In the summer of 2011, London (and then other parts of the UK) experienced civil unrest in the wake of a fatal police shooting. In this video, historian and broadcaster David Starkey connects the unrest to non-standard British English vernaculars, and contributes another entry in the long history of links between 'bad language' and disorder, crime, and Bad Things.

NPR: Kreayshawn breaks in, but whose party is she crashing?

A 2011 profile of white female hip hop artist Kreayshawn, leader of a "white girl mob" of Oakland hip hop artists, which highlights the criticisms of her related to her race and gender.

Macklemore: White Privilege

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A song from white hip hop artist Macklemore that addresses issues of race and ethnicity, specifically whiteness, in the hip hop community and argues that white participation in hip hop is an instance of white privilege.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 1, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

NY Times: A Hip Hop moment, but is it authentic?

A 2013 article questioning the authenticity of recent popularity of hip hop music by white performers, with a focus on Macklemore's hit song "Thrift Shop." Citation: Cutler, Cecilia. 2003. "Keepin' It Real: White Hip Hopper's discourses of language, race, and authenticity." Journal of Linguistics Anthropology.

Mocking Foreign Accents and the Privilege of Sounding White

A 2012 blog post about the asymmetrical reception of speakers with "accents" and connections to race and the hegemony of whiteness.

Posted by Kara Becker on March 5, 2013

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent

Dave Chappelle - HBO Comedy Half Hour [Uncensored]

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Recording of a comedy performance by Dave Chappelle.

Posted by Veronica Jane Stewart on February 26, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity

The battle of African American English in The Boondocks

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The American animated series, The Boondocks, which focuses on an African American family, the Freemans, who move from Chicago to live in a white suburban area. The main characters for this series, are Huey and Riley both played by Regina King, an African American actress. Riley and Huey have been painted as the yin and yang of Black urban maleness, now look how both use AAE differently.

Having Trouble Being Black

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Two African American men employ code-switching while making a video, prompting one to accuse the other acting white.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 21, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

The Root: Why can't black women and white women talk to each other?

A 2009 article about communication issues between white and black women on VH1's charm school.

Posted on November 8, 2012

Tags:
Womens Language;
Race,Ethnicity

"No Homo" in hip hop

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A 2008 video post on the slang term "No Homo," defined as a "defense mechanism" used within hop hop culture by men wo want to confirm their heteromasculinity.

30 Rock: Therapy and African American English

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Actor Alec Baldwin parodies a number of African American English-speaking characters in a scene with African American actor Tracy Morgan.

NPR: Code-swtiching: Are we all guilty?

A 2010 NPR piece about the criticism of President Obama's "negro dialect," with a broader discussing of both style-shifting and code-switching.

Special K, Can't Hardly Wait

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The character Special K from the 1998 movie Can't Hardly Wait is a good example of the linguistic practice of crossing.

African American and white ASL varieties

An article outlining research into Black American Sign Language and the ways it differs from a white ASL variety.

The linguistics of the East L.A. accent

A 2011 interview on Southern California Public radio about the East L.A. accent and Chicano English, with guest Carmen Fought.

Southern Dialects: Talkin' Tar-Heel

Transcript of interview with Walt Wolfram in which many aspects of Southern English are discussed. Audio available on website.

Obama's English

Discussion of Obama's use of AAE in his acceptance speech at the 2012 Democratic National Convention and the significance of style-shifting.

Fair Housing PSA

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PSA highlighting linguistic discrimination.

Linguistic Profiling on 20/20

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20/20 feature on racial linguistic profiling and housing discrimination with linguist John Baugh.

Racism (Linguistic Profiling) Caught on Tape

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White office manager at Tennessee car rental company makes racist remarks over the phone after wrongly guessing the race of the customer based on linguistic profiling.