Youth

The linguistic genius of babies

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The video basically introduces some of the factors that are important to babies when they are first exposed to languages. And also, it shows us how critical period and puberty play a role in babies language acquisitions.

Speech Communities and Ideology from "The Breakfast Club"

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This video shows how each family is their own speech community and that each speech community has their own language ideology. The parents and the children have certain ways to talking to each other that seem normal and necessary in the situation. Also, the teachers are their own speech community with their own language ideology based around how they talk to the students as we can interpret from the line "you see us as you want to see us".

Posted by Harlan Shoemaker on June 17, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Youth;
Communities of Practice;
Education

Teens Tell All About Slang

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This video emphasizes a new language habit of teenagers in todays' world. What I mean is using slang. Slang is highly informal and often used in colloquial speech. It is a part of a language that is usually outside of standard usage and that may consist of both newly coined words and phrases and of new or extended meanings attached to established terms. This video helps you to understand some slangs with a good explanation of the reason for these changes.

Posted by Wenqi Zang on June 17, 2018

Tags:
English;
Variation;
Youth;
Internet Language;
Slang

"Dangerous" Teenage Texting Slang

This article covers a viewpoint of parents on slang used over text by teenagers. The article provides lists of acronyms to provide insight in what teens are saying and ways for parents to "decode". It is interesting to see that communication has adapted so much to the point where an older generation needs a "decoding" list in order to understand conversations of younger generations. It also shows the difference in speech communities between two sets of age groups. [Published on 06-12-2017]

Posted by Deonne Rodriguez on May 3, 2018

Tags:
Youth;
Communities of Practice;
Internet Language;
Slang

Excerpt from Donald Glover's

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I used these four songs, a clip from "Weirdo," and this interview of Donald Glover's coronal stop deletion.

Vocal Fry: The Rules

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A somewhat comedic look at what vocal fry is and a plea from the video's author to stop it. The narrator talks about vocal fry's spread across various mediums and how it may be a reaction to rising vocal intonation that went way too far.

Posted by Jeremy Pafford on October 16, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Style-shifting;
Youth;
Femininity;
Discourse Marker

19 Words Your Kids Use, Explained

An article from 2014 explaining several key slang words and phrases that youth were using at the time, many of which seem relevant today including “bae” and “shade.” The article further displays how language continues to evolve, as the words people use as youths can make their ways into their adult speech and thus possibly garner mass acceptance across a community of speech or practice. [Published on 10-07-2014]

Posted by Jeremy Pafford on October 7, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Youth;
Communities of Practice;
Slang;
Lexicon

The Doge Meme

Fun Fact: it is the 12 year anniversary of the term doge. An internet famous canine known to many, one of the original meme phenomenons: the "doge." Originating with a picture of perplexed Shiba Inu, this picture was one of the first to get the meme movement going. Somehow, this photo of a dog evolved into the same picture with a smorgasbord of random phrases on it in juvenile neon comic sans font. Phrases such as "very wow" "such fun" "so perplex" "much doge" which are obviously not grammatically correct, nor do they make any sense, but for some reason everybody understands and laughs along. There are countless versions of the doge that apply to any situation, and the use of doge language is still relevant and understood 12 years later. [Published on 02-06-2014]

Posted by Hannah Clevenger on July 1, 2017

Tags:
Youth;
Internet Language;
Slang;
Semantics

Anne Curzan: What makes a word "real"?

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In this video Anne Curzan reviews how a word can be introduced to language, how words can begin to move out of the language, and how the usage of words change and alter through time. Curzan also covers how people use dictionaries and resources in order to stay caught up but, editors of dictionaries are struggling to keep up with our vocabulary and have to gabble on which words will actually survive.

Posted by Spencer Q. on June 26, 2017

Tags:
Language Shift;
Youth;
Education;
Slang

Massive Online Community Collaboration: Reddit's "Place" Experiment

Reddit did an experiment on April 1st 2017 involving a blank canvas where users of the popular forum site could collaborate within a structure of only a few rules. The rules were simple, take a pixel of any color out of 16 choices, and place it on the blank canvas, then wait 5 minutes before placing another, single pixel. The experiment was literally titled "Place.” The experiment itself was not a linguistic one, but due to the nature of open forum as well as the Reddit community structure, we see a manifestation of linguistic practice on a grand scale. Place was only open for seventy-two hours, and the limit of one pixel every five minutes per user meant that people had to come together en mass to create the grand masterpiece that ultimately ensued. What we see is a massive community of practice coming together to discuss, and make decisions based upon both shared, and conflicting ideologies as to what should be done to the canvas. A war between the color red, and the color blue began, until green swooped in as well, and collaborators had to decide whether or not to cover the canvas in one color, or allow the art that other collaborative groups were creating to maintain its existence. Not to mention the shear existence of an artistic rendering in Place means massive collaboration within other forums had to exist first, no one person could possibly make a complex rendering come to fruition without the help of many, possibly hundreds of other people. Therefore, communication was rampant, and for seventy-two hours people who would typically avoid each other, or otherwise attempt to rip each other apart, as is the nature of the Internet, came together to put aside ideology for a moment in order to create something beautiful. [Published on 04-16-2017]

Outsiders' Views of English Speakers

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This video is one point of view of how non-native English speakers view English. The main point of the video was the focus on how English speakers are perceived based on gender roles, accents, and the cultural views of English speakers. The intonation from both the male and female actor show the gender roles of language. The girl tends to be speaking softly and gently while the boy is a little bit more outgoing in his speech. When they start to argue again the roles come into play with the girl's voice going higher in pitch and sharper in tone. The classic American type of accent is also prevalent in the blurry sentences that are spoken by either actors. The scene also played what one might call a normative view on American dinners between couples; low light, soft talking, homemade meal and then an argument. All of this just screamed stereotypical America.

Sometimes, it's ok to throw rocks at girls...

I was listening to a radio station (can't remember which one now) but they talked about an ad that said "Sometimes, it is okay to throw rocks at girls". This reminded me of a girl and wild shoe ad shown in class. "Rocks" in the ad simply meant that gems are often referred to as rocks. It was widely criticized for its in-sensitiveness. As the article reads, “many argued the advertisement supported a culture of violence against women.” Of course, a child would not see the play on words the company tried to convey but the literal message that it is okay to basically throw things at girls and hurt them. [Published on 03-27-2017]

Posted by Maria D. Santiago on May 2, 2017

Tags:
Power;
Youth;
Gender;
Sexism

Be Free- J. Cole

The artist J. Cole uses his lyrics to express the danger of blacks and the hardships they face. He shares the pain and sorrow they go through his words.

Posted by Kayla Springs on February 28, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Grammaticalization;
Youth;
Race,Ethnicity

Baby Talk

This is an article that talks about how “baby talk” is the best way for infants to acquire language skills. It discusses the argument that talking to infants like that may be condescending; however, studies have shown that it is an excellent way for them to learn their language. It also discusses how babies are ready to learn language in the last trimester when their ears are fully developed. They are already listening to their mother and the sounds around them. The use of repetition and slower speech is helpful with infants in learning language patterns. [Published on 12-06-2016]

Posted by Stephanie Maxwell on February 27, 2017

Tags:
Motherese;
Acquisition;
Youth;
caregiving;
Education

Code-Switching Baby

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This video shows a young child speaking in German with his father for most of the video until he looks up and sees his mother, with him immediately switching to Japanese upon seeing her. This shows how code-switching is prevalent even in younger multilingual speakers and is used as a way to communicate with different people. Although the child in this video is very young, he still is aware enough to know that his father understands German best and that his mother responds best to Japanese.

Posted by Alex Parnell on October 11, 2016

Tags:
German;
Japanese;
Code-switching;
Youth;
Multilingualism

Why I keep speaking up, even when people mock my accent

Animator and Narrator, Safwat Saleem, reflects on his experience with the "pre-existing notion of normal" at a young age and how he is still challenged by that notion today. Throughout his life Saleem has faced criticism due to society's idea of what is "normal" and what is "good" and has let it negatively affect his career and esteem. Saleem explains how he has overcome those challenges and now chooses to use his accent and work to help shape and transform a more accepting society. [Published on 02-01-2016]

Posted by Samantha Blaesing on October 2, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Youth;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent

Barack Obama: Your Children Should Learn To Speak Spanish

This is a short clip of a speech by Obama. The speech is a clear example of hispandering as he is placing power into the hands of non-Spanish speaking people and charging them with being wrong and that Spanish speakers are in the right. [Published on 07-08-2008]

Posted by Henry Olivarez on July 29, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Language Shift;
Youth

The linguistic genius of babies

Nothing more than a very interesting video showing how babies learn "language". I think it's very interesting to listen to. [Published on 10-01-2010]

Posted by Ahmad Ali on July 29, 2016

Tags:
Youth

Twitch Speak the Language of Twitch Chat

This short article attempts to delve into the appeal of twitch.tv's brand of emoji language and how it has developed into its own language community that spans multiple continents. [Published on 08-08-2014]

Posted by Robb Woodward on July 29, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Communities of Practice;
Internet Language;
Slang

Babies Are Linguistic Geniuses

In this TedTalk, Patricia Kuhl assess the linguistic abilities of babies and how their surrounding environment affects their language acquisition. She examines the various mental processes and reasoning babies use in order to understand their life in this world. [Published on 10-01-2010]

Posted by Bri Smith on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Acquisition;
Youth;
Critical Period

The office: Andy talks baby talk.

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Clip from the show The Office. The greatest character of all time, Michael Scott, confronts Andy about his baby talk around the office. Andy confronts Michael about his Elvis impersonation.

Posted by Haley Mahon on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Code-switching;
Motherese;
Style-shifting;
Youth

Bilingual children switching between English and Spanish

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This video includes children in a one on one setting switching between spanish and english, during various exercise. It features bilingual children in an office setting. The focus is on literacy and acquisition of bilingual children.

Posted by BreAnna Engeman on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Spanglish;
English;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Acquisition;
Youth;
Multilingualism

How to Speak Hip

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This is the intro to a 13 part "album" instructing listeners on how to speak and understand "hip" language. Those who want to appear "cool" to this subculture that includes hipsters, juvenile delinquents, jazz musicians, etc.

The Language of Twins

This article provides a good overview of language acquisition among twins and the possible development of “cryptophasia,” or a secret language. The article points out that, when they are young, twins spend a great deal of time with each other and reinforce each other’s language mistakes, thus creating a unique form of communication. They are, in a sense, their own community of practice. [Published on 08-24-2011]

Posted by James Hall on July 20, 2016

Tags:
Acquisition;
Youth;
Communities of Practice

30 Trendy Internet Slang Words and Acronyms You Need To Know To Fit In

Do you ever read an acronym and have absolutely no idea what it means? Seems to be happening more and more lately! Especially with teens and young adults. Here is your key to internet slang! [Published on 07-15-2015]

Posted by Daniella Donofrio on July 20, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Internet Language;
Slang

What Do Deaf People Think of the Show, "Switched at Birth"?

In this thread, we see a few responses to the question, "What do deaf people think about the show, "Switched at Birth"?" The show is a teenage drama sitcom which portrays many deaf and hard-of-hearing characters alongside hearing characters. The show features characters whose first language is ASL, some who learned later in life and some who are just learning. The first piece on the thread, written by Spencer Horelik is a pretty detailed response to the question. I thought his comments on a hearing actress playing the show's main character, a Deaf teen to be very interesting. [Published on 02-14-2015]

Posted by Erika Huff on July 20, 2016

Tags:
American Sign Language;
Youth;
Communities of Practice

Rise of the 'vocal fry': Young women are changing how low they talk to sound more like Kim Kardashian and Katy Perry

Women in the UK are changing their voices to match American celebrities. [Published on 04-26-2016]

Posted by Kylie Smith on July 19, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Femininity;
Womens Language

The Language of Pokémon

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This short video illustrates how Pokémon trading card game (TCG) players comprise a community of practice with its own unique vocabulary. The community has millions of members and, arguably, has created its own culture and rituals reflected in the words that it uses.

Posted by James Hall on July 18, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Communities of Practice;
Internet Language

Kiezdeutsch

A brief description of Kiezdeutsch, a German dialect first classified as an ethno- or multiethnolect, with primarily Turkish and Arabic foundations. This article emphasizes the sociolect's primary usage among young speakers in larger cities. (Compare with Matsuda's reference to a "youth accent", pp 1361 in Voices of America. The Yale Law Journal.1991.) [Published on 02-11-2012]

Posted by Erika Enge on April 27, 2016

Tags:
Youth

7 Year Old Polyglot

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This is a girl who is half-Japanese and half-Spanish, and she is currently (as of 2015) living in Spain. In this video she shows us how many languages she has at her disposal, highlighting the fact that speakers can have many different repertoires to index their identities.

Posted by Caroline Wright on April 11, 2016

Tags:
Crossing;
Youth;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

Child Language Acquisition

This article talks about development in children's language and what is typical and what is abnormal. Different children develop language differently and at different paces, this explains that most abnormalities are not a concern.

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Critical Period;
Education

Potty-Mouthed Princesses Drop F-Bombs for Feminism by FCKH8.com

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This video uses young girl cussing to show that there are more problems in society than little girls cussing. The fact that they are talking the way they are is shocking, which is done to make people actually listen to the bigger point.

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Youth;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Sexism;
Slang;
Stigma

How to Speak INTERNET

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A group of three British guys basically put together a video "guide" to understanding all of today's internet slang. From "YOLO," to ""FML," they cover a handful of different types of internet slang and explain what they all mean in the non internet world.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
English;
Code-switching;
Youth;
Education;
Internet Language;
Slang

Friends: Joey acting nineteen

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In this clip from the TV show FRIENDS, the character Joey is pretending to be a teenager to prove he can land an acting gig as a younger guy. He uses a bunch of what he thinks is teenager slang while trying to convince Chandler that he can do it. This is a good example of slang, especially in regards to youth and the area in which the show is set (NYC).

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
New York City English;
Youth;
Slang

Key & Peele - Awkward Conversation

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In this video, Key & Peele use a sketch to poke fun at people they feel simply react to others instead of sharing actual views. Jordan Peele's character uses types of performativity, including drawn-out words and phrases, eye rolls, and looking at his friends while excluding Keegan's character to express his displeasure with Keegan's opinions on pop culture.

Posted by Dante Colombo on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Variation;
Youth;
Internet Language

Family Guy Stereotypes

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This video is a combination of stereotypes that have aired on family guy over the years. Many of these stereotypes have to do with race and language in society today.

Why these UK school kids love learning languages

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This group of students talk about why they feel it is important to learn a different language.These students are amazing in the sense that they seem so grown up and ready to take on the world, and language is one very powerful tool to help them do just that!

Gangs: Slang, Words, Symbols

This article contains the language used between the intricate structures of gangs in American communities. One could say gangs are like their own society with a language of their own, only used by members within it. They have grown and evolved throughout the years due to drugs and the growing popularity of fire arms. Because of this the linguistic structure of street gangs have also evolved into, sometimes, very complicated language structure. [Published on 03-01-2011]

Posted by Ainise Havili on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Code-switching;
Youth;
Slang

Parents confused by children's use of internet slang

This article describes the difficulties parents have understanding the language being used by their children on the internet. As the new generation grows up and more generations begin we start to see a change in linguistic tendencies and cultures catch on. And with the ever-growing world of the internet, we can expect these changes in slang to come as frequent as every month. [Published on 05-01-2015]

Posted by Ainise Havili on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Internet Language;
Linguistic Relativity;
Slang

Does Not Speaking Spanish Make You Less Latino? Pero Like Ep.4

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This article discusses speech communities and how the language you speak does or does not define your culture. In this example, the video is discussing if not speaking Spanish makes you less Latino.

Posted by Courtney Dickerson on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Change;
Language Shift;
Youth;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice;
Education;
Stigma

Ernestine Johnson Performs 'The Average Black Girl' on Arsenio Hall Show

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Ernestine Johnson's performance of "The Average Black Girl" shows the stereotype of talking white vs talking black. Here is a good example of the relationship between race and language.

Posted by Courtney Dickerson on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Gender;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma

Be Free

Rapper J. Cole uses his words to express the danger of African Americans and the struggle that they go through. He uses his words as symbols and powerful words to paint the picture of the pain.

Grandmas Attempt To Define Modern Slang Words [LABS] | Elite Daily

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Grandmas try to decipher what modern slang words mean. Here you can see how age and culture can determine your language use. I think we can also see how slang plays into language and how misunderstood slang can be.

Posted by Courtney Dickerson on March 5, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Slang

5th Grade Class Starts American Sign Language Club to Better Communicate with Deaf Classmate

Students at an elementary school in Illinois have started learning ASL signs to communicate with a hearing-impaired student in their class. [Published on 02-25-2016]

Posted by Jamie Schnee on March 4, 2016

Tags:
American Sign Language;
Accommodation;
Crossing;
Acquisition;
Merger;
Youth

Dad Learns Internet Slang

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A son is teaching his father words that are commonly used on the internet and seeing what he thinks they mean. It is very interesting to see how different generations think of these words as two completely different things.Throughout this video of course slang is being used but I think stigmas are brought up throughout this video as well. The refer to Justin Bieber as having swag and then describe it as, hat turned sideways, pants sagged low, etc.

Posted by Madison Rigdon on March 4, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Accent;
Internet Language;
Slang;
Stigma

Mock spanish

This is an interesting article touching on the use of mock spanish in children's books.

Posted by Kelley Lane on February 28, 2016

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Youth;
Multilingualism

"The Day Beyonce Turned Black"

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Within this SNL skit, there are many different forms of language used. For this skit, it is explaining how caucasian people tend to look at the world in a over dramatic way. Throughout the skit, there are race, gender, & sexualities between white and blacks. This skit has a comical view on different political problems that we have in this country today, and what the children of our culture are growing up in.

Garrard McClendon on Black English - Ebonics

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Garrad McClendon addresses the dangers of the African American language. Although he believes the African American language is beautiful, he feels strongly that the African Americans in the US need to learn how to code-switch. They need to learn when it is appropriate to talk in slang and when it is necessary to code-switch to "proper" English. Garrad also addresses the issues that teachers need to become more aggressive in correcting children's language at a young age and not be afraid of doing so. The children's future is dependent on being taught proper English and being correct when they don't use it.

Teenager Girls: The Real Disruptors of Language

Details historical evidence that young women have always been a driving force behind language change, including some changes previously credited to Shakespeare, for example. [Published on 08-07-2015]

Posted by Gina Ruggeri on February 16, 2016

Tags:
Change;
Youth;
Womens Language

Multilingualism on cognitive development

This article talks about how children who are bilingual gain an advantage at problem solving versus a child who is monolingual. [Published on 02-11-2016]

Posted by Kelley Lane on February 11, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Education;
Monolingualism;
Multilingualism

Youth codeswitching

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This is an example of a child having a conversation with both his parents in 3 different languages.

Posted by Kelley Lane on February 11, 2016

Tags:
French;
Code-switching;
Youth;
Multilingualism

The Bae factor

This picture is a perfect example of how our youth have started taking common words of endearment and changing it out of laziness but to mean the same thing as the original word.

Posted by Kelley Lane on February 11, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Slang

The unstoppable march of the upward inflection?

A short piece speculating on the origins of/reasons for upward inflection/"Valley Girl" speech. [Published on 08-11-2014]

Posted by Maren Bilby on February 8, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Womens Language

If you don't have anything nice to say, SAY IT IN ALL CAPS

An episode of This American Life on internet trolls, which includes a segment on the criticisms of female TAL contributors who use creaky voice, with an interview with Penny Eckert. [Published on 01-23-2016]

Posted by Kara Becker on February 8, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Gender;
Stigma;
Creaky Voice

Code-switching example

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This is a perfect example of a child being put in a very unique linguistic environment. This video depicts code-switching for a boy at a very young age. While discussing a hole found in a pair of shorts, the boy uses Indonesian, French and English to talk to his parents.

Posted by Jeremy Gutovitz on February 7, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Youth

From upspeak to vocal fry: Are we "policing" young women's voices?

An episode of Fresh Air with sociolinguist Penny Eckert, in part a response to a recent episode of Fresh Air with a speech pathologist who criticized features used by young people in American English. [Published on 07-23-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on July 24, 2015

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language

Filmmaker and Speech Pathologist weigh in on what it means to "sound gay"

An episode of Fresh Air, profiling a filmmaker who made a documentary about sounding gay, as well as an interview with a speech pathologist who makes a number of troubling comments about features of youth language, including high rising terminals, creaky voice, and discourse markers. [Published on 07-05-2015]

xkcd: Quotative Like

The webcomic xkcd offers a humorous take on language change and the use of "like" as a quotative complementizer.

Posted by Abby Mosing on March 12, 2015

Tags:
Change;
Youth;
Prescriptivism

Vocal Fry on This American Life: Freedom Fries

A segment on This American Life that profiles the complaints the show has received about the use of "vocal fry," or creaky voice, by its female commentators. It profiles the dominant stereotype that it is used by young women only, and that it indexes a set of negative attributes. Penny Eckert is interviewed on her recent research on NPR and creak that finds an age-based difference in perceptions of creak. Ira concludes, "people who don't like to listen to young women on the radio have moved on to vocal fry." [Published on 01-23-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on March 4, 2015

Tags:
Eckert, Penelope;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Creaky Voice

Sensational Spelling

Sensational spelling is the deliberate spelling of a word in an incorrect or non-standard way for special effect Examples from blog text posts: hte -when you want to misspell "the" for comedic effect but don’t want to use "teh" because you’re not in 7th grade im glad everyone on this website settled on "all lowercase and dont end the last sentence of a paragraph with a period" as the official typing style [Published on 02-05-2015]

Posted by Katie Farr on February 18, 2015

Tags:
Youth;
Internet Language

Why do people say "like" so much?

A Grammar Girl post that summarizes Alex D'arcy's research on the discourse functions of like. [Published on 12-05-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on December 8, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Discourse Marker

"This is her, right?" "This is me, right?"

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Catherine Tate as teen Londoner Lauren, performing the quotative "this is + SPEAKER" among other features associated with urban young Londoners of low socio-economic class.

Posted by Amelia Wolf on December 1, 2014

Tags:
Youth;
Socioeconomic Status;
Slang

Time Magazine's "Which Words Should We Ban?"

The banned word poll consists mainly of slang found in youth culture and in AAE, and while the article suggests the words in question are new and over-exposed, the lexical items in AAE have long been in use. The descriptions for the words and slang mock those who use them, heavily targeting African American youth. [Published on 11-12-2014]

Posted by Amelia Wolf on November 17, 2014

Tags:
African American English;
Youth;
Prescriptivism;
Slang;
Lexicon

Australian Youth Representative 2013

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An example of a young speaker of Australian English that might be considered "general," (on a continuum from broad - general - cultivated)

Posted by Kara Becker on November 11, 2014

Tags:
Australian English;
Youth

Can changing how you sound help you find your voice?

A NPR story profiling two women who worked to change their voices due to the stigmatization of their ways of talking. These woman worked with a voice therapist who normally provides therapy to transgender individuals. [Published on 10-14-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 27, 2014

Tags:
Youth;
Gender Binary;
gender non-conforming;
Womens Language;
Pitch

Vocal Fry may hurt women's job propsects

An Atlantic article summarizing the study of Anderson et al that concluded that use of creaky voice makes women less hireable. [Published on 05-29-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 12, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Creaky Voice

Vocal Fry doesn't harm your career prospects

A critique of the Anderson et al. study that found that females using creaky voice were judged less desirable. The author points out that the matched guise approach involved speakers who were taught to produce more creaky guises, so that the creak is an imitation. Further, the creaky utterances were longer and had lower pitch, raising questions about what listeners were reacting to. [Published on 06-06-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 12, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma;
Creaky Voice

Study: Women with creaky voices deemed less hireable

The Washington Post reports a research study that found that women who used creaky voice were judged by listeners to be less competent, less educated, less trustworthy, less attractive, and less hireable. The research team concludes that speakers should "should undertake conscious effort to avoid vocal fry in labor market settings." [Published on 06-02-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 11, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma;
Creaky Voice

Multicultural London English

A 2013 Economist article on Multicultural London English with quotes from Paul Kerswill

Posted by Kara Becker on November 4, 2013

Tags:
British English;
Cockney English;
Youth

A brief history of Dude

A 2013 article in the Atlantic on the evolving meanings of the term of address "dude," with quotes from Scott Kiesling

Posted by Kara Becker on October 24, 2013

Tags:
Youth;
Masculinity;
Slang;
Lexicon

CBS News: Burned out on Vocal Fry

A 2013 video segment on the use of creaky voice by young American women, and how irritating many people find it.

Posted by Kara Becker on September 21, 2013

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Creaky Voice

XKCD: Misusing Slang

A XKCD comic about language change, youth, and slang.

Posted by Kara Becker on August 27, 2013

Tags:
Change;
Youth;
Slang

Historian David Starkey makes some questionable remarks about language and race in the wake of the 2011 London riots

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In the summer of 2011, London (and then other parts of the UK) experienced civil unrest in the wake of a fatal police shooting. In this video, historian and broadcaster David Starkey connects the unrest to non-standard British English vernaculars, and contributes another entry in the long history of links between 'bad language' and disorder, crime, and Bad Things.

Like, You Know

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A performance from poet Taylor Mali entitled "Like, you know" that comments on the use of a number of features of youth language.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 11, 2013

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Discourse Marker;
High Rising Intonation

Creaky Voice: Yet Another Example of Young Women's Linguistic Ingenuity

A 2013 Atlantic article on the "vocal fry" phenomenon.

Posted on January 16, 2013

Tags:
Creaky Voice;
Womens Language;
Youth;
Stigma

Gang Girls on Geraldo

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A clip from Geraldo with a panel of self-identified "gangster girls." Citation: Mendoza-Denton, Norma. 2008. Homegirls.

Chola Make-up Tutorial

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A YouTube make-up tutorial from a self-identified Chola, uploaded in 2009. I use this with the reading: Mendoza-Denton, Norma. Gang Girls and Makeup.

Dude: Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure

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Posted on October 4, 2012

Tags:
Masculinity;
Gender;
Youth

Dude: Bolling Cartoon

(Enlarge image)

Posted on October 4, 2012

Tags:
Gender;
Masculinity;
Youth;
Slang

A Short Class in Manglish: 88, 3Q

Mandarin Chinese written internet-slang is becoming more popular; however, there is also growing opposition to the inclusion of English words and phrases into the Chinese language. By Patti Waldmeir.