whiteness

Rethinking Grammar: How We Talk

We as people judge the way that others speak, we assume intelligence based on the way that people speak. African American Vernacular tends to be associated with not being very smart [Published on 10-21-2015]

Is "talking white" really a thing

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This is a clip in which two people are blindfolded and asked to determine if people are white or black only by their voice. The speaker is given a song to read aloud as the listeners try to determine if “talking white is really a thing”. There is a belief that people will inherently sound different simply because of their ethnicity. This puts the stereotypes to the test and shows how different vocal inflections are perceived

Posted by Olivia Rodriguez on June 30, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent;
Stigma

Brother Ali freestyle on GoRadio - 95.3FM

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Brother Ali is a white socially-conscious rapper who, due to being albino and growing up primarily around African-Americans in the Midwest, existed for many years with a publicly ambiguous racial identity. In more recent years (including at the time of this video), Brother Ali has been more explicit about being white In this video, Brother Ali freestyles on a local Twin Cities radio station. He uses numerous features of AAE, including pervasive coronal stop (-t/-d) deletion.

Posted by Oskar Soderberg on April 18, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Hip Hop Nation

Brother Ali freestyle on B96

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Brother Ali is a white socially-conscious rapper who, due to being albino and growing up primarily around African-Americans in the Midwest, existed for many years with a publicly ambiguous racial identity. In more recent years (after this video), Brother Ali has been more explicit about being white In this video, Brother Ali freestyles on a local Twin Cities radio station. He uses numerous features of AAE, including pervasive coronal stop (-t/-d) deletion.

Posted by Oskar Soderberg on April 18, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Hip Hop Nation

Iggy Azalea Freestyle

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Iggy Azalea's attempt at her rap persona and linguistic repertoire without practice. Citation: Eberhardt, M. & Freeman, K. 2015. 'First things first, I'm the realest': linguistic appropriation, white privilege, and the hip-hop persona of Iggy Azalea.

Spanish Words "White" People Can't Say

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A comedic take on "white" people trying to pronounce Spanish words and their struggle in the performance of a basic Spanish lexicon—even in words that share a striking spelling resemblance to its English cognate. Some noteworthy examples appear when the participants are asked to pronounce “refrigerador” and “negar,” with some subjects showing visible apprehension to merely attempt the latter.

Racial Slurs- Clerks 2

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Warning- strong language and frequent use of racial slurs. In this scene from the movie "Clerks 2", in which the characters discuss the use of racial slurs, specifically the term "porch monkey", reflects some of the different attitudes towards "racist" language in society. Randal (played by Jeff Anderson) plays the ignorant white man in the scene, and his attitude towards the other, outraged characters in the scene represents opposing ideologies that are present throughout society. Randal isn't intentionally being offensive or racist, but offensive language is more of a perspective issue than one of intent. Just like society as a whole, Randal is stubborn in his defense of the term "porch monkey", claiming that its not racist, and that he can "take it back." At one point Randal describes his grandmothers racist remarks as "cute" and says "that's the way people talked back then", excusing racism as a social norm. Randal's friend and co-worker Dante (played by Brian O'Halloran) at one point says, "And even if it could be saved, you can't save it because you're not black." This statement is interesting because white people are notorious for being entitled when it comes to other races or cultures, whether it be Cinco de Mayo, or white people's use of African American Vernacular English. As funny as this scene is, it also sheds an interesting light on the issue of racism in the US and how different people feel about what is and isn't racist.

Posted by Alexander Winzenburg on June 30, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

"El Messy Look": Mock Spanish and Code-switching in AXE Commercial

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Axe's new commercial for their "Messy Look" hair styling cream is a perfect example of the ways in which Mock Spanish is still prevalent in our society in 2017. Jane Hill, the inventor of the term, states in "Language, Race, and White Public Space" that one practice of Mock Spanish is "taking elements of Spanish morphology" such as the suffix -o and using Spanish modifiers such as "el" to create "jocular and pejorative" terms. In Axe's commercial, the actor refers to the product as "El Messy Look". Then, while giving instructions on using the cream, he says "First-o, take a finger to the cream..." At the end of the commercial, after showing off his confidence and "cultural awareness", the actor mishears the female bartender who actually speaks Spanish when she asks him a question, showing his ignorance. However, the bartender smiles at him, further enforcing Hill's ideas about Mock Spanish directly indexing the speaker as having desirable qualities, while simultaneously indirectly indexing the idea that Spanish is somehow less valuable than English.

Posted by Laurel Nagengast on May 8, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Power;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

Reality TV outgroup language use

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This clip shows outgroup language use of a white women on a reality TV show. When she is upset, she begins to use more standard English and less AAE markers. Other people on the show notice. This relates to themes of crossing or outgroup language use and also the question of authenticity in relation to race and speech explored in Cutler's "Keepin It Real" (2003).

Posted by Ally Watson on March 19, 2017

Tags:
African American English;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

Strange Wilderness- Spanish accent

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This is a clip from "Strange Wilderness" and in this clip they are mocking Mock Spanish. It's a completely over the top clip. There is obviously overt stereotyping displayed in the clip and attempt to condescend the Latino race. Its a legitimate question as to how many people would realize (because the clip is so over the top and backfires so extraordinarily) that this indeed a mockery of Mock Spanish.

Posted by Tyler Craig on October 4, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

Why I keep speaking up, even when people mock my accent

Animator and Narrator, Safwat Saleem, reflects on his experience with the "pre-existing notion of normal" at a young age and how he is still challenged by that notion today. Throughout his life Saleem has faced criticism due to society's idea of what is "normal" and what is "good" and has let it negatively affect his career and esteem. Saleem explains how he has overcome those challenges and now chooses to use his accent and work to help shape and transform a more accepting society. [Published on 02-01-2016]

Posted by Samantha Blaesing on October 2, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Youth;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent

Jon Stewart - Daily Show - Accents

Clips from Jon Stewart's "The Daily Show" of him performing different accents throughout many different episodes. [Published on 08-29-2011]

Posted by Halie Carr on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent

Hillary Clinton: Blaspandering?

Do we need a new term for black pandering, like hispandering has? In this clip, fox news sounds off on Hilary's speech regarding white privilege. Although her intent is good, like examples of hispandering, her language of "we" and "our" vs. "you" helps to reflect and reinforce ideologies of otherness. [Published on 04-13-2016]

Posted by Brandiss Drummer on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

Spoof on Utah speech community

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this is a spoof on the Utah speech community on how they speck and what they name their kids. If you listen to how are speaking its meat to mimic or mock the way the stereotyped Utah girl speaks.

Posted by Erin Patterson on July 27, 2016

Tags:
whiteness;
Religion

Code Switching, Mock Spanish, and Kevin Hart

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Kevin Hart is explaining what it's like to be in prison. He takes on numerous different forms and voices to show the different type of people in prison.

Professional Educator: Grades, Showing Up On Time Are A Form Of White Supremacy

This education consultant takes issue with values that are taught in schools as beneficial for success but which she says are selected to favor white people, including language-related expectations of students. She suggests some unusual methods to "move away from all these aspects of white privilege in education." [Published on 04-16-2016]

Posted by Shannon Pearson on April 17, 2016

Tags:
whiteness;
Education;
Multilingualism;
Prescriptivism;
Stigma

Ebonics Dictionary

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In this video stand up comedian Steve Harvey explains the complexity of Ebonics. Although he is African American Steve Harvey's stand up routine plays into certain African American stereotypes while pointing out the differences between American English and AAVE.

Asian American Slang

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This video depicts slang words used in particular by Asian Americans. This shows the combination of the two cultures of Asia and America. Many of these slang words have Asian roots and are influenced by American culture which gives rise to a whole new word with different meanings. This blend of cultures has given rise to many new languages and words throughout history.

Posted by Matt McLaughlin on March 11, 2016

Tags:
Chinglish;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

Key & Peele - Obama Meet & Greet

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This Key & Peele comedy sketch humorously depicts Obama and the different ways he talks to black and white people after a speech. There's a lot of code switching going on in this sketch. There's a handful funny references in here as well, from rap to slang.

Black Folks Slang

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A black comedian basically goes through a handful of different types of "black folks slang" and explains what they really mean. He does this through a couple different ways, from using the slang in a sentence, to describing exactly what it means, to even showing tweets that use a particular type of "black folks slang." He also does it in a humorous way which makes it easier to understand and more engaging.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
African American English;
whiteness;
Internet Language;
Slang

Family Guy Stereotypes

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This video is a combination of stereotypes that have aired on family guy over the years. Many of these stereotypes have to do with race and language in society today.

CNN Election Center

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In this video there are many different types of sociolinguistic artifacts, and in any kind of SNL skit they have to make it more dramatic to bring out the commentary. Yet, within this clip you see many types of tags used within the first few minutes. For example, Donald Trump is the first person to be impersonated, but within the short clip that he is in he shows tags of "Race/Ethnicity, Sexism, Gender, Politics and Policy". And for Hillary Clinton she is showing many of the same character traits as well. Within all of these impersonators they are all trying to benefit themselves in some way that looks appealing to the audience.

Cut For Time: Def TED Talks - Saturday Night Live

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A skit making fun of Ted talks by creating a 'Def Jam' version. It uses AAE and has Caucasian speakers trying to act like African Americans.

Posted by Samuel Schmidgall on March 5, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

"The Day Beyonce Turned Black"

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Within this SNL skit, there are many different forms of language used. For this skit, it is explaining how caucasian people tend to look at the world in a over dramatic way. Throughout the skit, there are race, gender, & sexualities between white and blacks. This skit has a comical view on different political problems that we have in this country today, and what the children of our culture are growing up in.

Carlton

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This particular clip shows the comparisons of what some specific groups might think of how someone should be because of color and class when it is society who defines these boundaries.

SNL

In this SNL skit, people are over exaggerating the hispanic theme within this skit. Trying to make themselves act like they know what they are talking about by making everything sound hispanic. Even though these colleagues are trying to justify what they are talking about by knowing the facts, it comes off as inappropriate when trying to have this conversation. Even though it is for a comical effect.

Posted by Tori Miller on February 18, 2016

Tags:
Spanglish;
Spanish;
Language Shift;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

V-Nasty Talks N-Word Controversy

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On the topic of AAE, WHH and authenticity. V-Nasty, of the somewhat infamous White Girl Mob, talks about (and defends) her usage of the N-word, even losing the favor of contentious Kreayshawn.

Posted by Tyler Helton on November 24, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
whiteness

Talking white: Black people's disdain for proper English and academic achievement is a myth

A Slate article challenging the notion that black Americans stigmatize both academic achievement and the use of standard English as 'acting white." The author argues that black speakers who bristle at being accused of 'talking white" are perhaps being accused of failing to code- or style-shift appropriately. [Published on 10-02-2014]

Nefertiti Menoe: Speaking White

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A video by artist Nefertiti Menoe on the criticism of minority speakers as 'speaking white.' She disagrees with this characterization, saying "having proper diction doesn't belong to the Caucasian race." The video sparked the long-time debate over accusations of speaking 'white' in the U.S.

The making of "jive" talk in the movie Airplane

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The 1980 film Airplane contains a classic comedic scene of AAVE representation. This clip shows interviews with the film's writers and the actors who actually created the dialogue in the film.

Posted by Rob Troyer on August 1, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
whiteness;
Contact

NPR: Kreayshawn breaks in, but whose party is she crashing?

A 2011 profile of white female hip hop artist Kreayshawn, leader of a "white girl mob" of Oakland hip hop artists, which highlights the criticisms of her related to her race and gender.

Macklemore: White Privilege

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A song from white hip hop artist Macklemore that addresses issues of race and ethnicity, specifically whiteness, in the hip hop community and argues that white participation in hip hop is an instance of white privilege.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 1, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

NY Times: A Hip Hop moment, but is it authentic?

A 2013 article questioning the authenticity of recent popularity of hip hop music by white performers, with a focus on Macklemore's hit song "Thrift Shop." Citation: Cutler, Cecilia. 2003. "Keepin' It Real: White Hip Hopper's discourses of language, race, and authenticity." Journal of Linguistics Anthropology.