r vocalization

erhua as a morpheme

A question about the usage of erhua in a morphological context instead of in the phonological context, asking if there are examples of times when it can be used to differentiate one word from another. A reply to the message gives some examples of it, and a second reply gives a description of an encounter the author had about perceptions of what erhua is according to native Chinese speakers not from the Beijing area. [Published on 05-19-2015]

Posted by Lun Levin on April 14, 2019

Tags:
r vocalization

Beijing speech meme

"When you speak Chinese after a week in Beijing" - to complement the Zhang paper.

Posted by Miranda Rintoul on April 10, 2019

Tags:
Variation;
r vocalization

Jesse Williams' Speech (BET Awards 2016)

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Popular speech upon receiving the BET Humanitarian award. Example of black preacher style by biracial speaker.

The Newest 'Grey's Anatomy' Hunk, Jesse Williams

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Jesse William's interview with Ellen on the Ellen Show in 2010, marking usage of African American Language.

Southern Dialect Pt. 1

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Study of Southern accents - rhotic or “r” pronouncing Mountain Southern, and non-rhotic or “r” dropping Plantation or Tidewater Southern.

Posted by Tiffany Chang on February 5, 2018

Tags:
Southern English;
r vocalization

Vocal Fry still an issue

In this video the Kardashians use vocal fry by using words such as "like" and a higher pitched tone like the "valley girl" voice. In society media sometimes stereotypes girls as being materialistic, self absorbed, sassy, etc. The Kardashians are very popular with society and when they talk like this on television I think it gives society a sort of realization that women really do talk and act like that. This is not the case however, but I think we all know that. The Kardashians are very influential to young women in America and could potentially have vocal fry being used more frequently in the U.S. It also seems that the Kardashians have more layed back tones when at home but when in public it seems their style of speaking and tone of voice changes slightly. [Published on 03-12-2017]

Posted by Tiffany Bertoncino on May 10, 2017

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Gender;
r vocalization

Why Do Girls Have Creaky Voices?

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This sociolinguistic artifact covers the topic of "Vocal Fry" or the new way young women talk in which the tone and sound of their voice sounds creaky. People don't exactly enjoy hearing someone talk using vocal fry, and studies have proved that girls who interviewed for a job and spoke using vocal fry were deemed more untrustworthy than those who didn't, and were viewed more negatively than men who used vocal fry, which relates to gender differences in spoken language and language use. What is particularly interesting is why vocal fry is so common among young women. This artifact suggests that linguists think that women tend to be the "vocal trailblazers" because they are more sensitive and receptive of social interactions and more likely able to pick up on settle vocal cues such as a "fry", again accounting for the gender differences in spoken language and language use. Also, there is a theory that vocal fry is simply a form of in-group communication between young girls.  

Posted by Mary Grace Adkins on May 3, 2017

Tags:
Womens Language;
Stigma;
r vocalization;
Creaky Voice;
Pitch

Clinton's drawl, Trump's 'yuuge' N.Y. accent and campaign 'code-switching'

The article discusses several politicians' adressee-based style shifting while speaking to different groups of people. Gives an example of monophthongization from Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama using elements of AAE. The article also talks about differences between the styles of Jeb Bush and George W. Bush. [Published on 03-05-2016]

Bernie Sanders' Accent

A description of Bernie Sanders' accent. Includes brief discussions of vowel-raising and vocalization of r in New York City English, as well as of terminal t enunciation, which is linked to Jewish dialects of English. The decline in New York City English usage over time and its usage as linked to socioeconomic status are also discussed (compare with Labov, William. 1972. Language in the Inner City.; and Mathers, Patrick-André. 2012. The social stratification of /r/ in New York City: Labov's department store study revisited). [Published on 02-18-2016]

Mandarin Dialects

This seems relevant to what we're studying right now in class - we're looking at beijing hua (北京话)and the way words are rhotacized. This is interesting to me because it speaks to the idea we talked about at the beginning of the semester that prescriptivists seem to hold an idea that people who don't speak in the standard manner don't have the language at all. [Published on 09-23-2014]

Problems with Labov's Department Store Study

This comic plays with a potential problem in Labov's department store RA study.

NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio accused of faking accent

The media criticized Boston-born Bill de Blasio, the mayor of New York City, for faking a New York accent to gain "street cred" with his constituents. Interestingly, the feature focused on, nonrhoticity, is also a feature of Boston English. [Published on 02-04-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on February 26, 2015

Tags:
New York City English;
Boston English;
r vocalization

Boston Teens: Cumberland Farms

An SNL parody incorporating features of Boston English.

Posted by Amelia Wolf on September 24, 2014

Tags:
Boston English;
r vocalization

Common: The People

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The music video for Common's song "The People," in the rapper uses many features of African American English.

Posted by Kara Becker on September 11, 2014

Tags:
African American English;
r vocalization;
Negative Concord

American Tongues: Tough Guy from Boston's North End

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An excerpt from the documentary American Tongues profiling speakers from the North End of Boston.

In Walsh, students of Bostonese have found their avatah

A 2013 article on Boston mayor-elect Marty Walsh, who has a pronounced Boston accent. The comments about Boston being "lazy" are unfortunate, as are the interviews with speech coaches.

Posted by Kara Becker on November 21, 2013

Tags:
Boston English;
Politics and Policy;
low back merger;
r vocalization

Joke about /r/-vocalization in New England accents -- Family Guy

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A short clip from the program Family Guy where Lois and the family discuss the organization PETA, much to Peter's dismay.

Posted by Sara Elizabeth Mulliner on April 11, 2013

Tags:
r vocalization;
New England

Why do British Singers sound American?

A 2013 Slate article about the continuing trend for British pop singers to adopt American pronunciation when singing, including the use of /r/ vocalization. Peter Trudgill's work on the Beatles is cited.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 25, 2013

Tags:
Trudgill, Peter;
American English;
British English;
r vocalization

The Disappearing New Yawk Accent

A 2013 podcast from the show "Lexicon Valley" on Slate, profiling the change in progress for /r/ vocalization in New York City English.

Ellen: British vs. American slang

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Ellen Degeneres and Hugh Laurie quiz each other on American and British slang

Good Will Hunting

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A clip of the bar scene from the movie Good Will Hunting. Actors Matt Damon and Ben Affleck are both native Bostonians and utilize many features of Boston English.

Posted on September 18, 2012

Tags:
Boston English;
r vocalization

FDR's Inaguaural Speech and /r/ - Fear Itself

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An example of FDR's /r/less, upper class New York City variety. An interesting spot to look at r vocalization, as the iconic phrase "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself" includes two coda /r/ environments that we don't expect to vocalize, given that they are intervocalic.

(r) in New York City English

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The classic graph from Labov (1966) showing stratification by socioeconomic class and speaker style for coda r vocalization in New York City English

r-vocalization in Boston English

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Posted on August 27, 2012

Tags:
Boston English;
r vocalization