Internet Language

Common Teenage Slang Terms

This article helps define several common teenage slang terms to aide parent's understanding of common slang terms that their teenagers may use. Some example of words that are prominent in teenage slang include "goals", "on fleek", and "thot". These slang terms are informal, yet very popular in usage both in person and online by teenagers, and thus this source provides a small description of a few terms to aide in parent's understanding of their teen's vernacular. [Published on 08-22-2018]

Posted by Emma Wormington on May 9, 2019

Tags:
Youth;
Internet Language;
Slang

YEE.T

Picture of the alien ET on top and then of a meme'd version of ET with various emojis to make him seem more "dank" below entitled YEE.T ("ji-ti") [Published on 05-25-2018]

Posted by Lun Levin on May 4, 2019

Tags:
Internet Language;
Slang

How Automated Tools Discriminate Against Black Language

CW for racism, linguistic discrimination, & (to a lesser extent) sexism & ableism. An article about how the comment moderation software Perspective deems AAL and other "non-standard" language more toxic or rude, resulting in the censorship of marginalized voices. It addresses the larger problem of white people not understanding AAL, which results in racist software like this being common as long as people (especially women) of color are prevented access to the computer science field. [Published on 03-05-2019]

Slang in Young Generation

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This video shows how young generation uses slang in their language. It also shows that the difference of using slang based on the different social background and experience. The discussion between daughter and mother shows how speech community has its own ways of speaking and how important the meaning of words transfer and change in today's society.

Posted by Kunpeng Ma on March 10, 2019

Tags:
Youth;
Communities of Practice;
Internet Language;
Slang

How to Speak Internet 101

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This artifact contains terms and phrases that are used on the Internet and provides an explanation and briefing of what context these terms can be used in. The video explains Internet "slang" terms.

Posted by Nirali Desai on July 1, 2018

Tags:
Internet Language;
Slang

Teens Tell All About Slang

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This video emphasizes a new language habit of teenagers in todays' world. What I mean is using slang. Slang is highly informal and often used in colloquial speech. It is a part of a language that is usually outside of standard usage and that may consist of both newly coined words and phrases and of new or extended meanings attached to established terms. This video helps you to understand some slangs with a good explanation of the reason for these changes.

Posted by Wenqi Zang on June 17, 2018

Tags:
English;
Variation;
Youth;
Internet Language;
Slang

"Dangerous" Teenage Texting Slang

This article covers a viewpoint of parents on slang used over text by teenagers. The article provides lists of acronyms to provide insight in what teens are saying and ways for parents to "decode". It is interesting to see that communication has adapted so much to the point where an older generation needs a "decoding" list in order to understand conversations of younger generations. It also shows the difference in speech communities between two sets of age groups. [Published on 06-12-2017]

Posted by Deonne Rodriguez on May 3, 2018

Tags:
Youth;
Communities of Practice;
Internet Language;
Slang

Grammar gripes: why do we love to complain about language?

This article discusses the nature of prescriptivism and how modern technologies are contributing to language change [Published on 03-11-2018]

Posted by Liv Johnson on March 19, 2018

Tags:
Change;
Internet Language;
Prescriptivism

How the triplet flow took over rap

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Although the usage of triplets (i.e. the “Migos” flow) has become very popular as of late, and is currently heard on just about every rap track that hits the Billboard 100, the usage of triplets in rap is not something new. It has its roots in Midwestern and Southern rap communities in the 80s onward. In rap, a triplet is essentially like setting your verse to 3/4 time - three beats per bar rather than 4. In rap, it can be used as a sort of verbal trick - it could slow down a song by throwing off the expected rhythm our brain is expecting to hear or even speed it up. Listening to verses in triplets can also make the rappers’ flow feel cleaner. Lyrically, the songs can be flexible or rigid, allowing a diverse range of rap styles to be done over the beat.

The Doge Meme

Fun Fact: it is the 12 year anniversary of the term doge. An internet famous canine known to many, one of the original meme phenomenons: the "doge." Originating with a picture of perplexed Shiba Inu, this picture was one of the first to get the meme movement going. Somehow, this photo of a dog evolved into the same picture with a smorgasbord of random phrases on it in juvenile neon comic sans font. Phrases such as "very wow" "such fun" "so perplex" "much doge" which are obviously not grammatically correct, nor do they make any sense, but for some reason everybody understands and laughs along. There are countless versions of the doge that apply to any situation, and the use of doge language is still relevant and understood 12 years later. [Published on 02-06-2014]

Posted by Hannah Clevenger on July 1, 2017

Tags:
Youth;
Internet Language;
Slang;
Semantics

Fabricated Cognates as Memes

In October 2016 a trend began of tweets that were probably photos of food, with a caption that ended with a nonsense phrase; a phrase that when read, makes no sense, but when spoken, sounds oddly like "bon appetít." The use of this and related phrases indexed the users/tweeters as cool, hip, and knowledgeable about pop culture, and it allowed them to show off their creativity as the actual photos of food became more and more ridiculous. This meme is particularly interesting from a sociolinguist viewpoint because there's no actual speaking occurring, but anyone in on the joke knows that speech is a vital part of the humor - this entire phenomenon is text-based, and yet intimately tied to the pronunciation of English.

Posted by Logan Hotz on June 26, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Performativity;
Language Shift;
Internet Language

Massive Online Community Collaboration: Reddit's "Place" Experiment

Reddit did an experiment on April 1st 2017 involving a blank canvas where users of the popular forum site could collaborate within a structure of only a few rules. The rules were simple, take a pixel of any color out of 16 choices, and place it on the blank canvas, then wait 5 minutes before placing another, single pixel. The experiment was literally titled "Place.” The experiment itself was not a linguistic one, but due to the nature of open forum as well as the Reddit community structure, we see a manifestation of linguistic practice on a grand scale. Place was only open for seventy-two hours, and the limit of one pixel every five minutes per user meant that people had to come together en mass to create the grand masterpiece that ultimately ensued. What we see is a massive community of practice coming together to discuss, and make decisions based upon both shared, and conflicting ideologies as to what should be done to the canvas. A war between the color red, and the color blue began, until green swooped in as well, and collaborators had to decide whether or not to cover the canvas in one color, or allow the art that other collaborative groups were creating to maintain its existence. Not to mention the shear existence of an artistic rendering in Place means massive collaboration within other forums had to exist first, no one person could possibly make a complex rendering come to fruition without the help of many, possibly hundreds of other people. Therefore, communication was rampant, and for seventy-two hours people who would typically avoid each other, or otherwise attempt to rip each other apart, as is the nature of the Internet, came together to put aside ideology for a moment in order to create something beautiful. [Published on 04-16-2017]

Dogs Are Doggos: An Internet Language Built Around Love For The Puppers

An article describing the evolution of "doggolingo" across the internet over the past few years. It does cite linguists as commenting on the trends. Comments on the lexical and onomatopoetic nature of the "lingo." [Published on 04-23-2017]

Posted by Melanie Stoddard on April 24, 2017

Tags:
Internet Language;
Slang;
Lexicon

(Almost) Every time they say "BOY" on Monster Factory (Eps. 1-23)

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This is exactly what it says in the title--a clip show of every time the hosts of Polygon's video series Monster Factory say the word "boy". What is significant about the use of "boy" in this context is that it is non-standard. Most speakers of American English do not refer to grown men as boys in the same way that these same speakers refer to grown women as girls. Moreover, the hosts are both brothers, lending to their similar styles of speaking as well as senses of humor. I also included "internet language" and "slang" as tags due to the growing use of "boy" to describe grown men across the internet as the show gains popularity within gaming circles.

Posted by Katie Allen on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Gender;
Gender Binary;
Internet Language;
Slang

“Things You Do Online That’d Be Creepy In Real Life”

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This video draws attention to how social media has gone further than just coining new slang terms; it has created a new language with entirely different governing rules. It points out the significant differences in styles of communication between face-to-face contact and social media interactions. The most striking examples are the performative declarations that would seem strange if spoken in front of a live audience. Here we see just how easily we take for granted this major shift in our everyday life.

Posted by Allison Maxfield on September 26, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Communities of Practice;
Internet Language;
Slang

Twitch Speak the Language of Twitch Chat

This short article attempts to delve into the appeal of twitch.tv's brand of emoji language and how it has developed into its own language community that spans multiple continents. [Published on 08-08-2014]

Posted by Robb Woodward on July 29, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Communities of Practice;
Internet Language;
Slang

Marketing For Deadpool

This photo is a billboard promoting the movie, Deadpool. As you can see, the billboard displays emojis. If you were unaware of the movie or did not recognize or utilize emojis, this would not make much sense. This displays how our language and communication has developed into the digital age, where we use emoticons to convey messages.

Posted by Lauren Watkins on July 20, 2016

Tags:
Internet Language

30 Trendy Internet Slang Words and Acronyms You Need To Know To Fit In

Do you ever read an acronym and have absolutely no idea what it means? Seems to be happening more and more lately! Especially with teens and young adults. Here is your key to internet slang! [Published on 07-15-2015]

Posted by Daniella Donofrio on July 20, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Internet Language;
Slang

The Language of Pokémon

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This short video illustrates how Pokémon trading card game (TCG) players comprise a community of practice with its own unique vocabulary. The community has millions of members and, arguably, has created its own culture and rituals reflected in the words that it uses.

Posted by James Hall on July 18, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Communities of Practice;
Internet Language

How to Speak INTERNET

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A group of three British guys basically put together a video "guide" to understanding all of today's internet slang. From "YOLO," to ""FML," they cover a handful of different types of internet slang and explain what they all mean in the non internet world.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
English;
Code-switching;
Youth;
Education;
Internet Language;
Slang

Black Folks Slang

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A black comedian basically goes through a handful of different types of "black folks slang" and explains what they really mean. He does this through a couple different ways, from using the slang in a sentence, to describing exactly what it means, to even showing tweets that use a particular type of "black folks slang." He also does it in a humorous way which makes it easier to understand and more engaging.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
African American English;
whiteness;
Internet Language;
Slang

But What Does Bae Actually Mean?

In this article, the author explores the history and rise of the word "bae" in popular culture, noting that the term has actually been around much longer than its 2014 introduction to the mainstream. Many who grew up hearing and speaking AAVE have used "bae" in conversation for years, and the term has been commercialized to a point where it has lost its original vibe and is now being "sold back" to its original users. [Published on 03-07-2016]

Key & Peele - Awkward Conversation

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In this video, Key & Peele use a sketch to poke fun at people they feel simply react to others instead of sharing actual views. Jordan Peele's character uses types of performativity, including drawn-out words and phrases, eye rolls, and looking at his friends while excluding Keegan's character to express his displeasure with Keegan's opinions on pop culture.

Posted by Dante Colombo on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Variation;
Youth;
Internet Language

Luis Von Ahn- Massive Online Scale

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This video explains how one company plans to make learning a second language free. By setting a goal of translating the web into every major language for free, these researchers created the website Duolingo. Students are presented with sentences that vary in difficulty depending on their level of understanding. This program has found that students translating material are as proficient as paid translators. This could be a glance into the future of affordable bilingual education.

Parents confused by children's use of internet slang

This article describes the difficulties parents have understanding the language being used by their children on the internet. As the new generation grows up and more generations begin we start to see a change in linguistic tendencies and cultures catch on. And with the ever-growing world of the internet, we can expect these changes in slang to come as frequent as every month. [Published on 05-01-2015]

Posted by Ainise Havili on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Internet Language;
Linguistic Relativity;
Slang

Internet Language

This article goes over the beginning unique language on the Internet. It also goes over grammar that is unique the Internet. [Published on 01-22-2015]

Posted by Brian Pener on March 5, 2016

Tags:
Grammaticalization;
Language Shift;
Internet Language;
Slang

Hillary Clinton "Hispandering" Pummeled On Twitter

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A news reporter talks about Hillary Clinton and her "Washington games." He mentions that now because of the internet, she is no longer able to continue the same political approach as she has in the past. He also calls her out on her calm that she is just like the Latinos abuela, and how far off she really is with this claim.

Dad Learns Internet Slang

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A son is teaching his father words that are commonly used on the internet and seeing what he thinks they mean. It is very interesting to see how different generations think of these words as two completely different things.Throughout this video of course slang is being used but I think stigmas are brought up throughout this video as well. The refer to Justin Bieber as having swag and then describe it as, hat turned sideways, pants sagged low, etc.

Posted by Madison Rigdon on March 4, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Accent;
Internet Language;
Slang;
Stigma

How Social Networks Have Changed the World

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This video describes how we as a society have changed how we interact with peers and friends. This video also describes the change of how we acknowledge birthdays with those around us.

Posted by Katherine Helms on February 10, 2016

Tags:
Internet Language

"We Talk In Pictures Now, But What Does It Mean?"

This article talks about the ever-growing form of image-based communication (emojis, memes, GIFs, etc.) in Internet language. As Montreal linguist and writer Gretchen McCulloch says: "as social life migrates online, visual forms of communication become increasingly attractive because they replicate some of the physical experience we've lost." This article presents a really interesting sort of dichotomy between image and speech, and even image and word (as seen on a page). McCulloch and Tumblr-based artist Kari Altmann imply that images are in a sense more natural to us, more so than words (which, in my personal view, I don't really see as that different from images? For example, how do we check to make sure a word is spelled right? We write it out and make a judgment based on what it 'looks like.') and maybe even (spoken) language. @_@ wow... such semiotics... (See what I did there?) One other thing McCulloch mentioned was how ironic it was that it was technology that transformed "images" (religious icons, etc.) into "words" in the first place (printing press) but it is now bringing it back. Anyway, really interesting read! [Published on 05-03-2015]

Posted by Korina Yoo on May 14, 2015

Tags:
Indexicality;
Internet Language

In defense of "textspeak:" A socio-linguist says emojis and LoLs are modernizing English

A description of some forms of internet language and how the contribute to change in American English. [Published on 05-04-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on May 14, 2015

Tags:
American English;
Change;
Internet Language

'Twitch Speak'

A brief article that only scratches the surface but nonetheless reveals some of the peculiarities of the language on Twitch, a popular game streaming platform. What's interesting is how some of the emoticons have come to exist out of their original forms/contexts to be understood in the larger gaming community. [Published on 08-08-2014]

Posted by Clark Chang on May 13, 2015

Tags:
Internet Language

Hahaha vs. Hehehe

A piece that muses on the different ways we portray "e-laughter" and how everything from the base chosen (ha vs. he) to the number of ha's, etc. or the number of letters used indicates certain meanings. [Published on 04-30-2015]

Posted by Jessica Hutchison on April 30, 2015

Tags:
Internet Language

France Gives In to the Hashtag

France has been resisting English hashtags as an attempts to "keep French French." The minister of culture has finally declared that trying to prevent this natural evolution of the language is probably more harmful than beneficial. [Published on 03-31-2015]

Posted by Ellery Sloane-Barton on April 22, 2015

Tags:
Internet Language

That Way We’re All Writing Now

This article talks about change in syntax on the Internet. More specifically it addresses the rise of subordinate clauses, leading to utterances such as "that x when..." or "when x..." as well as suggestions for their increasing prevalence. [Published on 03-06-2015]

Posted by Clark Chang on March 14, 2015

Tags:
Internet Language

Sensational Spelling

Sensational spelling is the deliberate spelling of a word in an incorrect or non-standard way for special effect Examples from blog text posts: hte -when you want to misspell "the" for comedic effect but don’t want to use "teh" because you’re not in 7th grade im glad everyone on this website settled on "all lowercase and dont end the last sentence of a paragraph with a period" as the official typing style [Published on 02-05-2015]

Posted by Katie Farr on February 18, 2015

Tags:
Youth;
Internet Language

Computational Linguistics of Twitter Reveals the Existence of Global Superdialects

Bruno Gonçalves (University of Toulons, France) and David Sanchez (the Institute for Cross-Disciplinary Physics and Complex Systems, Spain) found a new way to study dialects on a global scale. In sampling 50 million tweets written in Spanish over 2 years (all with geolocation information), they produced a snapshot of how dialects are distributed throughout the world. Goncalves and Sanchez looked specifically at tweets using words like "car" and "computer" - as there are multiple words in various Spanish dialects used for these nouns - and plotted where these words were being used on a map to visualize patterns. They found that Spanish dialects fall into two groups, which they call superdialects. The first is used almost exclusively in major Spanish and American cities, and the second in rural areas (divided into Spain, the Caribbean/Latin America, and South America). Goncalves and Sanchez say these regions reflect the settlement patterns of Spanish immigrants from many centuries ago, and that strong cultural heritages can still be observed. Studying other dialects using this method, however, depend on user accessibility to the internet and global communication systems. [Published on 08-07-2014]

Posted by Isobel Reed on September 3, 2014

Tags:
Spanish;
Internet Language

25 Questions for Teaching with "Word Crimes"

Lauren Squires provides a linguist's perspective on Weird Al's spoof "Word Crimes," with practical suggestions for how teachers might use the video to teach important lessons about prescriptivism. [Published on 07-17-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on July 18, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Internet Language;
Prescriptivism

Word Crimes - Weird Al Yankovic

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Weird Al Yankovic promotes prescriptivism online in his cover of the pop song Blurred Lines.

Posted by Kara Becker on July 16, 2014

Tags:
Internet Language;
Prescriptivism

Hashtags are the new scarce quotes

the various stances that a hashtag can convey, including distance, solidarity, and sarcasm

Posted by Kara Becker on May 12, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Internet Language;
Discourse

English has a new preposition, because internet

A 2013 article on the "because + noun" construction

Posted by Kara Becker on November 19, 2013

Tags:
Internet Language

Texting in the Underwear Language

A 2013 blog post from the Economist on the preferences of texters to text in their local or vernacular variety, with examples from Switzerland and India.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 10, 2013

Tags:
Internet Language