Perceptual Dialectology

Rethinking Grammar: How We Talk

We as people judge the way that others speak, we assume intelligence based on the way that people speak. African American Vernacular tends to be associated with not being very smart [Published on 10-21-2015]

How English Sounds to Non-English Speakers

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This video is representation of the theory of anthropological practice by showing how body language can be used to show both intentions and motives in a social environment. A couple, speaking what sounds like English have a common dinner date, but something goes wrong. The ability to notice something is wrong, even though the spoken language is not real, shows that the practice of natural, and probably learned body language are obvious to those of the culture and those familiar to it. Body language does not have a written code, it is ever fluid, and it is likely you understood everything minus the exact details of the fight in this skit.

Posted by Hannah Freeman on June 27, 2017

Tags:
English;
Perceptual Dialectology

British Villains -Tom Hiddleston en Jaguar F-Type Coupé

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This Jaguar car commercial adds to an ideology that an English accent sounds villainous. Indexically and through performativity the actor, Tom Hiddleston, describing how to successfully sound "villainous". This commercial is a part of a series featuring other British actors describing how to sound "villainous".

British Villains -Tom Hiddleston en Jaguar F-Type Coupé

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This Jaguar car commercial adds to an ideology that an English accent sounds villainous. Indexically and through performativity the actor, Tom Hiddleston, describing how to successfully sound "villainous". This commercial is a part of a series featuring other British actors describing how to sound "villainous".

Do You Speak American?

Scholar and author, John G. Fought, focuses on how different dialect uses around the country affect the pronunciation of words and formation of speech patterns. Fought explains how the history of the United States has shaped language and has helped develop speech communities into what they are today. The media's role in what is considered "American" in regard to language is also described by Fought, touching on its key part in influencing specific dialect in different regions.

Posted by Samantha Blaesing on October 11, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Southern English;
Perceptual Dialectology;
Communities of Practice

Frito Bandito

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In doing research for my final paper for my linguistics class I ran across this old time video. Hispandering 60's style.

Posted by Tricia Roberson on March 4, 2016

Tags:
Perceptual Dialectology;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Multilingualism

Dating a Latina

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Dating a Latina: Perception vs Reality. This video is funny, some may be able to relate to it. This video exhibits Spanish, American English, and Code Switching.

The sexiest accents in North America

A 2013 article on nj.com reporting that the Jersey accent is one of the top five "sexiest" accents, according to a survey on cupid.com

Posted by Kara Becker on October 24, 2013

Tags:
American English;
Perceptual Dialectology

Dude: Stanford Linguists Probe California Accent

Penelope Eckert and fellow researchers in California examine how English is spoken and perceived in different cities around the state in efforts to refute the stereotype that California English is accentless and homogenous.

Northern Cities Vowel Shift: How Americans in the Great Lakes Are Revolutionizing English

A 2012 Slate article on the Northern Cities Shift and the diversification of American regional dialects.