Mandarin Chinese

Chinglish Phrases

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This video gives examples of Chinglish (Chinese and English) phrases found in everyday life.

Posted by Danielle Fleming on August 1, 2018

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Code-switching

The British Chinese

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This video is about British born Chinese and how they identify themselves. It also talks about the different kind of speech communities they are apart of.

Posted by Aaron McIntyre on July 2, 2018

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Code-switching;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

Hip Hop Artists in China Add American Rap Language and Culture in Their Rap music

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“Made in China” is a Chinese rap music. The lyrics contain Chinese and English, and the singers add rhymes of both languages in some words and sentences. Meanwhile, the artists mix Chinese and American hiphop culture together. This song also represents a group of Chinese rappers try to break some traditional “rules” in mainstream culture.

Posted by Shanshan He on June 30, 2018

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Hip Hop Nation;
Multilingualism

Basic Chinese Character Parts - Movement Radicals

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This video talks about a development of Chinese character, and how these character become a word. In addition, it shows how same character have different pronunciation.

Posted by Wanling Zhang on June 29, 2018

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Change

Different Chinese Accents - North v. South

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We are going to read Qing Zhang's Rhotacization and the ‘Beijing Smooth Operator’:The social meaning of a linguistic variable in class. I think that this video will showcase the differences in accents between North (closer to Beijing) and South China.

Posted by Tiffany Chang on April 3, 2018

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese

Mandarin Chinese Accent Challenge: "North or South?"

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This video demonstrates differences between northern and southern dialects of Mandarin, including 'er-hua', the feature discussed in Zhang (2008).

Posted by Aidan Malanoski on April 1, 2018

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Accent

Cantonese v Mandarin: When Hong Kong languages get political

This article is about the language battle between Cantonese and Putonghua (Mandarin Chinese). Even though Hong Kong returned to China in 1997, the social rejection of Putonghua still takes place in Hong Kong. In this case, it illustrates the effect of language ideologies. People in Hong Kong reject to speak Putonghua because they question their Chinese identity. Their interpretation of language is that speaking Putonghua makes people lost the identity but speaking Cantonese could protect their culture and history. Importantly, this is the way to clarify the identity. People in Hong Kong believe that Hong Kong is not a part of China, and Cantonese is not one of the dialects of Chinese. Also, they argue Cantonese is the standard "Chinese." [Published on 06-29-2017]

Posted by Jialin Zhang on March 4, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Mandarin Chinese

Code switching between Mandarin, Cantonese, and English

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In this video, multiple examples are collected where the celebrities in a Hong Kong award presenting occasion used code-switching between Cantonese, Mandarin, and English. These cases show the speakers' identification in the special communities where the three languages are constantly used together by the speakers and understood by its members in the community. It is an approach to declare the speakers' membership in the community and to present an international profile of the event.

Posted by Yang Liu on January 13, 2018

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Code-switching

In Singapore, Chinese Dialects Revive after Decades of Restrictions

After decades of attempts to restrict language use in Singapore to Mandarin Chinese and English, there are attempts to bring back linguistic diversity in the country. [Published on 08-26-2017]

Posted by Kara Becker on August 29, 2017

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Language Shift

“Do You Understand the Words That Are Coming Out of My Mouth? - Rush Hour (1/5) Movie CLIP

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This is a clip from the movie Rush Hour where Agent Carter misunderstood that Jackie Chan (Lee) cannot understand English; therefore he got frustrated and started to change his tone and volume while talking to him. This clip touches on the issue of performativity, racial and linguistic ideologies, Standard Language Ideology and Language socialization. Chris Tucker in the movie was expecting Jackie Chan to be able to speak English, and he also used forms like “speaka” and said “Mr. Rice-a-Roni don’t even speak American”. Based on this example and also the rising tone and increasing volume, it shows how Tucker had the linguistic ideologies of if he speaks louder and slower then the other person is going to understand him. He also used terms that shows his own identity such as “speaka”, and he also said, “speak American” to show his ideology of American equals English only.

“Do You Understand the Words That Are Coming Out of My Mouth? - Rush Hour

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This is a clip from the movie Rush Hour where Agent Carter misunderstood that Jackie Chan (Lee) cannot understand English; therefore he got frustrated and started to change his tone and volume while talking to him. This clip touches on the issue of performativity, racial and linguistic ideologies, Standard Language Ideology and Language socialization.

“Do You Understand the Words That Are Coming Out of My Mouth? - Rush Hour

video imagePlay video
This is a clip from the movie Rush Hour where Agent Carter misunderstood that Jackie Chan (Lee) cannot understand English; therefore he got frustrated and started to change his tone and volume while talking to him. This clip touches on the issue of performativity, racial and linguistic ideologies, and Standard Language Ideology and Language socialization.

Why these UK school kids love learning languages

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This group of students talk about why they feel it is important to learn a different language.These students are amazing in the sense that they seem so grown up and ready to take on the world, and language is one very powerful tool to help them do just that!

Mandarin Dialects

This seems relevant to what we're studying right now in class - we're looking at beijing hua (北京话)and the way words are rhotacized. This is interesting to me because it speaks to the idea we talked about at the beginning of the semester that prescriptivists seem to hold an idea that people who don't speak in the standard manner don't have the language at all. [Published on 09-23-2014]

MISS KO 葛仲珊 - CALL ME

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Miss Ko is an American-Taiwanese rapper who code-switches in her lyrics, sometimes mid-sentence. It seems like the purpose of her code-switching is to create a "cool" identity. Most of the words or phrases in English are what I would associate with such an identity: references to American celebrities or slang like "main squeeze", "homie", or "holla at me". The bulk of the song is in Chinese, but she supplements English in order to (from my reading) present herself a certain way.

Posted by Gregor McGee on March 17, 2015

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Code-switching

Speaking up for Cantonese, a tongue in peril

A story in the South China Morning post discussing the potential for shift away from Cantonese in Hong Kong, where Mandarin Chinese is increasingly taught in schools. [Published on 10-03-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 8, 2014

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Language Shift

Language Log: A bilingual, biscriptal product designation in Taiwan

An ad on a food label in Taiwan can be read as either Mandarin or Taiwanese, and speakers' competency in each language influences their reading. [Published on 02-07-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on September 10, 2014

Tags:
Multilingualism;
Mandarin Chinese;
Taiwanese;
Orthography