Chinese Department

中文系

Academic Program

Requirements for the Major

  1. A minimum of five units at the 300 and 400 levels, including one unit of third-year Chinese, one unit of classical Chinese, and one unit of either classical Chinese literature or modern and contemporary Chinese literature.
  2. Humanities 231 and 232—Foundations of Chinese Civilization.
  3. A minimum of one unit in Chinese history, Chinese art history, Chinese anthropology, or Chinese religious thought, to be taken in the relevant departments.
  4. Chinese 470—thesis.
Recommended but not required
  1. An additional unit in Chinese history, Chinese art history, Chinese anthropology, or Chinese religious thought.
  2. Religion 157—The Idea Systems of Chinese Religions.
  3. Any other Asia-related course that the college may offer.

Major Planner

Major planner for Chinese (pre-2019 distribution requirements)

Major planner for Chinese (2019- distribution requirements)

Requirements for the Minor

  1. Two units of 300-level Chinese literature courses, at least one must be in the original language (not in translation).
  2. Depending on language proficiency, additional courses or substitutions (see chart below).
Minor requirements

Starting Language Course

Language Courses

300-level Courses

Total Units

Chinese 110:

Chinese 110, 210

Two units of Chinese literature courses, at least one not in translation.

6 units

Chinese 210:

Chinese 210

Four Chinese literature courses, at least three not in translation (two of the four units may be Chinese 311, 312).

6 units

Chinese 311:

Chinese 311, 312 (optional)

Four Chinese courses, at least three not in translation (two of the four units may be Chinese 311, 312).

4 units

 Students planning to complete the minor should make sure to complete the Declaration of Minor form. 

Department Policies

Simplified or Traditional script?

The Chinese Department at Reed teaches both simplified and traditional script from the beginning.  Students are expected to be able to read both scripts but are required to be able to write just one. In class, you can therefore expect that handouts, exams, quizzes, and other exercises typically will not provide you the same information written in both scripts but rather will alternate between them (e.g., one sentence or paragraph written only in simplified followed by another written only in traditional.