Dance Department

Courses

Note: All graded dance courses listed below may be used to fulfill the Group X requirement.

Dance 201, 232, 241, 252, 260, 335, 345, 351, 360, 362, and 365 may be used to meet either the Group A or Group X requirement. Students can simultaneously receive both academic and PE credit for Dance 101, 111, 112, 211, 212, 252, 260, 311, 312, 321, and 411.

Dance 101 - Dance Technique

Variable credit: one-half or zero course for one semester. Through this course, students may take technique classes in ballet, Afro-Brazilian dance, Afro-Cuban dance, Argentine tango, hip-hop, lyrical jazz, or other dance forms; students should consult the schedule of classes for specific techniques and levels offered in a given semester. To qualify for one-half credit, students must have taken or be currently enrolled in a graded (rather than a credit/no credit) dance department course; each graded dance department course taken allows a student to earn credit for two semesters (one unit) in Dance 101. Students may repeat Dance 101 and/or enroll in more than one section for credit. A maximum of four units (eight semesters) in Dance 101 may be accrued overall. This course may apply toward the dance studio requirements for majors. Students may also receive PE credit for this course. Credit/no credit only. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Dance 111 - Introduction to Dance: Studio I

One-half or full course for one semester. Designed for students with no previous dance training, this course provides a foundation for the further study of a variety of dance forms. Principles of alignment, body mechanics, and locomotion will be explored through the practice of movement vocabularies drawn from modern and contemporary concert dance. Though primary work will be in the studio, the course includes a discussion of critical perspectives from which to view contemporary dance performance, and viewing of dance performances both live and on video. Students enrolled in the course for one unit will undertake additional reading, viewing, and writing assignments. This course may apply toward the dance studio requirement for majors. Students may also receive PE credit for this course. Studio.

Dance 112 - Introduction to Dance: Studio II

One-half or full course for one semester. This course emphasizes the study of modern and contemporary dance technique and introduces elements of movement composition through the creation of collaborative choreography projects. Active work in the studio along with readings and discussions are designed to locate contemporary dance within cross-cultural contexts. Students enrolled in the course for one unit will carry out additional projects in choreography and additional written work. Dance 111 strongly recommended but not required. This course may apply toward the dance studio requirement for majors. Students may also receive PE credit for this course. Studio.

Dance 201 - Introduction to Dance: History and Culture

Full course for one semester. This course is an introduction to dance studies as an interdisciplinary field within the humanities and social sciences. Broadly defined, dance studies engages in critical analyses of dance practices from historical and cultural perspectives. Throughout the course of the semester, students explore and affirm dance as a vital cultural practice by considering a broad range of concert and social dance practices across time and geographic place. Course material pays particular attention to how dance articulates complex questions around race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, and nation. Written and embodied assignments introduce and explore key methodologies in the field, including movement description and analysis, critical assessment of embodied practice, archival research, and interviews. No previous dance experience is necessary. This course may apply toward the dance studies requirement for majors. Conference.

Dance 211 - Contemporary Dance I (Intermediate Level)

Full course for one semester. Designed for the intermediate dancer, this course combines an exploration of modern and contemporary dance techniques with extensive work in movement composition. Work in both areas emphasizes movement invention, design, and development. Course work includes attendance at professional dance performances, video viewings, discussions, and critiques. Students will perform their work in the end-of-semester concert. This course is appropriate for students with previous training in dance technique. This course may apply toward the dance studio requirement for majors. Students may also receive PE credit for this course. Studio.

Dance 212 - Contemporary Dance II (Intermediate Level)

Full course for one semester. This course is designed to deepen students’ technical and compositional development in contemporary dance with an emphasis on movement analysis. Broadly defined, movement analysis refers to methods for describing, visualizing, interpreting, and documenting human movement. In terms of technique, students develop strength, flexibility, and versatility in movement through immersion in classic and contemporary vocabularies, focusing on the use of weight, musicality, articulation, and alignment in dance. This technical work complements compositional work, viewings, readings, and writing assignments that approach movement analysis from a variety of perspectives, including aesthetic and quotidian movement. This course may apply toward the dance studio requirement for majors. Students may also receive PE credit for this course. Studio.

Dance 232 - Community Dance and Collective Creation

Full course for one semester. This course explores community dance as a mode of choreographic composition and social intervention based on principles of collective creation. Students develop strategies for creating an inclusive dance practice open to all participants regardless of age, training, or physical capacity that is critically attuned to the dynamics of difference that shape embodied encounters, in particular race, class, ability, gender, and sexuality. Course work includes weekly movement sessions that are open to the Portland community. Enrolled students develop and lead these sessions as part of the ongoing Community Dance at Reed project (www.reed.edu/dance/courses/232). The course’s approach to collective dance practices will be based on structured improvisation methods drawn from the Western contemporary dance tradition; however, we will engage group members’ particular embodied knowledges. This course is appropriate for students with previous training in dance technique. For students without prior training, Dance 111 and 112 are recommended as preparation for this course. This course may apply toward the dance studio or studies requirement for majors. Studio-conference.

Dance 241 - Dancing Latin/x America

Full course for one semester. This course is an introduction to Latin/x American dance studies. This course takes a hemispheric perspective and considers a wide range of social, concert, and popular dance practices from the United States, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. From a disciplinary perspective, this course explores the intersection of three fields: dance studies, Latin American studies, and Latin/x studies. At this intersection, it engages the methods used by scholars working from historical, ethnographic, queer, feminist, and ethnic studies standpoints to ask: What is the relationship between dance and Latin/x American identity (national, personal, and/or transnational)? How do dance practices reinforce and/or deconstruct racialized, gendered, and classed stereotypes? How do movement forms and performance styles mobilize, remember, or reimagine Latin/x identities and histories? Dance 201 recommended but not required. This course may apply toward the dance studies requirement for majors. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 261.

Dance 252 - Improvisation

One-half or full course for one semester. Since the early 1960s, improvisation has played an increasingly sophisticated role in contemporary dance. This course will investigate contemporary improvisational practices that are at once creative, performative, and philosophic. The first half of the course will focus on contact improvisation, a partnering form that explores the exchange of physical support, the practice of which has challenged notions of gender roles, ability and disability, and community structure. The second half of the course will focus on choreographic improvisation, a constellation of improvisational practices in which movement scores are developed and refined over time, and which has influenced changing views of the function of performance and the relationships between makers, performers, and viewers of dance. Students enrolled in the course for one unit will undertake additional readings and an extended research project. One year of dance technique or one year of intermediate-level creative work in visual art, music, theatre, or creative writing highly recommended. This course may apply toward the dance studio or studies requirement for majors. Studio-conference.

Dance 260 - Dances of Bali, Indonesia

Full course for one semester. This course offers the opportunity for students to combine contextual study of Southeast Asian culture and performance arts with studio activities in dance. The class provides social, cultural, and aesthetic views of the performing arts in Southeast Asia with a special focus on Bali, Indonesia. The course will examine selected ritual, social, and court dances of Bali such as Kechak and Legong in cultural and historical context. Students will be introduced to technical aspects of Balinese dance and its relation to music. Studio sessions will bring these ideas to life as students learn basic dance movements and musical structures. Lectures, readings, films, and images will cover the diversity of the island, the role of dance and music in Balinese culture, and the challenges of globalization. This course may apply toward the dance studio or studies requirement for majors. Conference-studio.

Dance 270 - Dance, Gender, and Sexuality

Full course for one semester. How do global dance practices perform and/or contest gender and sexual identities? What is the relationship between quotidian and danced identities? This course introduces and explores the intersections between dance studies and gender, queer, feminist, and transgender studies, with special attention to how these fields intersect with questions of race, class, and ability. It considers a wide range of historical and contemporary practices ranging across concert dance, social practices, club dancing, ballroom culture, and popular forms. Work inside and outside the classroom focuses on readings, viewings, class discussion, and written assignments; however, students also engage in movement workshops and dance practice–based classes throughout the course of the semester. Dance 201 is recommended but not required. This course may apply toward the dance studies requirement for majors. Conference.

Not offered 2019–20.

Dance 311 - Contemporary Dance III (Intermediate-Advanced Level)

Full course for one semester. Designed for high-intermediate and advanced level dancers, this course will combine rigorous technical training with work in choreography. Work in contemporary dance technique will focus on moving with energy and precision within complex movement phrases and include detailed work in alignment. Choreographic work will address compositional elements of dance—including action, space, time, gesture, structure, image, and interaction—as inherently meaningful catalysts for thinking choreographically. Studio work will be supported by video viewings, discussions, and critiques, as well as attendance at professional dance performances. Student work will be performed in the end-of-semester concert. Prerequisite: Dance 211 and 212, or Dance 312 or equivalent experience. This course may apply toward the dance studio requirement for majors. Students may also receive PE credit for this course. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Not offered 2019–20.

Dance 312 - Contemporary Dance IV (Intermediate-Advanced Level)

Full course for one semester. Designed for high-intermediate and advanced level dancers, this course combines rigorous technical training with work in choreography. Work in contemporary dance technique will emphasize clarity and specificity and include floor work and partnering. Choreographic work will focus on choreography as research, through projects that consider conceptual, thematic, and processual frameworks for generating performance works. Studio work will be supported by attendance at professional dance performances, video viewings, discussions, and critiques, and students will perform in the end-of-semester concert. Prerequisite: Dance 211 and 212, or Dance 311, or equivalent experience. This course may apply toward the dance studio requirement for majors. Students may also receive PE credit for this course. Studio. 

Not offered 2019–20.

Dance 313 - Contemporary Dance V (Intermediate-Advanced Level)

Full course for one semester. Designed for high-intermediate and advanced level dancers, this course combines rigorous technical training with work in choreography. Contemporary dance vocabularies will provide a platform from which to hone technical facilities and approach nuanced movement material. Work in choreography will investigate biographical and autobiographical sources as source materials for performance. A critical review of significant choreographic works employing biography or autobiography will inform our on-going investigation of ways to approach and develop these source materials. Through the use of movement, text, vocalizations, journal writing, memory games and storytelling, students will create performances based on biographical narratives and real-life experiences. Work in this course will include attendance at professional dance performances, video viewings, discussions, and critiques, and students will perform in the end-of-semester concert. Prerequisite: Dance 211 and 212, or Dance 311, or Dance 312, or equivalent experience. This course may apply toward the dance studio requirement for majors. Students may also receive PE credit for this course. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Not offered 2019–20.

Dance 321 - Contemporary Performance Ensemble

Zero or one-half course for one semester. This course focuses on performance through the development, rehearsal, and production of contemporary dance works. Students will address the technical, stylistic, and interpretive challenges of choreographic material presented as well as develop and manipulate choreographic material of their own. Work in and out of class leading to performance will be supported through written responses, small group sessions, and critiques. Requires rehearsal outside of class times. Prerequisite: instructor’s permission or by audition. This course may apply toward the dance studio requirement for majors. Students may also receive PE credit for this course. Credit/no credit only. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Dance 335 - Special Projects in Choreography: Analagous Forms

One half or full course for one semester. This class will explore concepts, creative processes and formal concerns derived from creative writing, comics, film, music, theater, and the visual art as ways to expand and inform the dance-making process and as bases for interdisciplinary work. Prerequisite: one year of dance technique and one year of creative work in dance, music, theatre, writing, or the visual arts. This course applies toward the dance studio or studies requirement for majors. Studio-conference. May be repeated for credit.

Dance 351 - Dance Traditions of Southeast Asia

Full course for one semester. This course provides an in-depth investigation of the cultural, historical, and artistic significance of choreographic works from Southeast Asia in the context of religious, social, and political development. We will explore classical dance forms including the Peking Opera of China, court dances of Cambodia, ceremonial and ritual dances of Myanmar and Indonesia, and the performing arts of Vietnam, along with contemporary Southeast Asian dance works. Students will learn excerpts of traditional dances as a base from which to explore cultural and anthropological perspectives of performing arts in Southeast Asia, and how these perspectives influence creative processes of contemporary Southeast Asian dance artists. This course may apply toward the dance studio or studies requirement for majors. Lecture-conference-studio.

Not offered 2019–20.

Dance 362 - Dance Ethnography

Full course for one semester. This research seminar examines methods and theories that engage in and emerge from cross-cultural dance analysis and practice. It explores the relationship between dance and ethnography through readings, performance, discussion, and independent research. Students read foundational texts in the field as well as recent ethnographies to address the politics of representing and engaging others, situating positionality, accounting for the transnational circulation of performance practices, and serving as advocate and/or witness. Assigned ethnographies emphasize the relationships between dance and race, nation, class, sexuality, and gender. Prerequisite: Dance 201 or consent of the instructor. This course may apply toward the junior seminar and dance studies requirements for majors. Conference.

Not offered 2019–20.

Dance 363 - African Diaspora Dance Studies

Full course for one semester. This course is an introduction to African diaspora dance studies. From a disciplinary perspective, this course explores the intersection of three fields: dance studies, African diaspora studies, and African American studies. It considers dance as a social process through which categories of race and ethnicity are constructed and debated, and as such, it asks students to investigate the political and social implications of dance and movement. We will survey a range of African diaspora dance forms—from samba to Vodun to tap dance—through readings, video viewings, discussion, and movement exercises with guest artists (no previous dance experience required). How do dance practices reinforce and/or deconstruct radicalized, gendered, and classed stereotypes? How do movement forms and performance styles mobilize, remember, or reimagine black identities and histories? While our focus will remain on dance, we will also read pertinent scholarship on jazz music and theatre. Dance 201 recommended but not required. This course may apply toward the junior seminar and dance studies requirements for majors. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 363. 

Not offered 2019–20.

Dance 365 - Contemporary Global Dance

Full course for one semester. This course asks what it means to dance “locally” in a global world. It considers how contemporary global dance practices challenge neat distinctions between Western and non-Western traditions and destabilize the ethnic and racial identities most readily associated with each. To explore dance as a complex site of cultural negotiation, contestation, and exchange, the course traces transnational dance diasporas across the global north/south axis. Students examine how global dance flows animate the formation of national, racial, ethnic, and gendered (post)colonial identities, chart global migration patterns, mobilize transnational political economies, and complicate facile understandings of cultural authenticity. Prerequisite: Dance 201 or consent of the instructor. This course may apply toward the junior seminar and dance studies requirements for majors. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 365.

Not offered 2019–20.

Dance 411 - Advanced Technique and Performance

One-half or full course for one semester. Designed for the advanced dancer, this course offers a rigorous examination of technique, integrating vocabulary from classical and contemporary dance with choreological conceptions of the body in motion. Emphasis will be placed on understanding and embodying the conceptual framework of movement material and the ways in which that understanding is integrated in performance. Focused assignments will center on how varying approaches to dance performance relate to genre and conceptions of the performative. With permission of the instructor, the course may be repeated as an advanced practicum. Prerequisite: Dance 311 or Dance 312 or equivalent experience. This course may apply toward the dance studio requirement for majors. Students may also receive PE credit for this course. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Not offered 2019–20.

Dance 470 - Thesis (Dance)

Full course for one year.

Dance 481 - Independent Study

One-half or full course for one semester. Prerequisite: approval of instructor and division.

 


The following courses are offered for PE credit only. Register for these courses under the PE department listings.

Beginning/Intermediate Ballet
Intermediate/Advanced Ballet
Ballroom Dance
Folk-dance
Hip-hop
Lindy-hop
Lyrical
Pilates
Tango
Yoga


Reed students my take courses at neighboring Lewis and Clark College for credit and without charge. Please visit Reed's registrar's office for more information. Courses include:

TH 106 Fundamentals Of Movement
TH 107 Ballet I
TH 108 Contemporary Dance Forms I
TH 207 Ballet II
TH 208 Contemporary Dance Forms II
TH 214 Dance In Context: History And Criticism
TH 252 Rehearsal And Performance: Dance
TH 308 Dance Composition And Improvisation
TH 340 The History and Theory of Modern and Contemporary Performance
TH 350 Dance And Performance


Reed students may spend a semester or year studying dance at Sarah Lawrence College in New York. Please visit Paul DeYoung in the international programs office for more information.