Received Pronunciation

The RP English Accent – What is it, how does it sound, and who uses it?

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A brief overview of RP - the history and cultural significance of the accent, and a few physiological details

What’s the big deal about mocking someone’s accent?

A discussion of prejudice against certain accents from the perspective of someone in the UK. This mirrors many of the things we have seen about the US -- people less willing to rent apartments, more willing to think someone's guilty of a crime, etc. if they speak in a different accent. It also talks about the "politics of transcription" in the way 'non-standard' accents are transcribed, for example, in subtitles, and suggests that mocking people's accents is seen as a more socially acceptable form of prejudice since it's "not a big deal."

"Engrish" in the anime Jojo's bizarre adventure

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This video is a compilation of samples of "Engrish" from Jojo's Bizarre Adventure. "Engrish" is the term used for English used in what is perceived as an "incorrect" or "awkward" way. Primarily this term is applied to English translations. The most famous of these would be from the intro of the game Zero Wing. The Japanese version has the villain saying: "With the cooperation of Federation Forces, all your bases now belong to us." However, the english translation became "All your base are belong to us". This term has developed a broader meaning, being used to describe code switching in Anime. Often times these phrases seem almost nonsensical, such as "hail to you", other times the accent is incredibly think and difficult to understand.

Posted by Matthew Mena on October 11, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Received Pronunciation;
Japanese;
Code-switching

Accent Tour of the UK

We talked in class about how one person producing two versions of one vowel was helpful when asking people to evaluate or respond to speech, because it eliminates other factors such as age and gender, and controls for the vowel itself. I thought this was a really good example of that: this man is really good at putting on a lot of the accents of the UK, and the fact that it is just one person makes it really easy to hear the differences in his speech.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on October 4, 2014

Tags:
British English;
Received Pronunciation;
Scottish English;
Variation

The Queen's Christmas Broadcast 1984

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I use this with the following reading: Harrington, Jonathan et al. 2000. Monophthongal vowel changes in Received Pronunciation: An acoustic analysis of the Queen's Christmas Broadcast.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 13, 2013

Tags:
British English;
Received Pronunciation;
Change

The Queen's Christmas Broadcast 1957

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I use this with the following reading: Harrington, Jonathan et al. 2000. Monophthongal vowel changes in Received Pronunciation: An acoustic analysis of the Queen's Christmas Broadcast.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 13, 2013

Tags:
British English;
Received Pronunciation;
Change

The Queen's Christmas Broadcast 1985

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I use this with the following reading: Harrington, Jonathan et al. 2000. Monophthongal vowel changes in Received Pronunciation: An acoustic analysis of the Queen's Christmas Broadcast.

BBC English

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A BBC Two segment on BBC English, which may be another term for Received Pronunciation, and its impact on other varieties of English

Received Pronunciation and Shakespeare's "Original Pronunciation"

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Actor Ben Crystal performs Shakespeare in both Received Pronunciation and what he calls Shakespeare's "Original Pronunciation" (Early Modern English?) and discusses the differences between the two.

Posted on November 1, 2012

Tags:
Received Pronunciation