The Center for Teaching and Learning

Programs

In addition to faculty-initiated workshops (updated regularly on the Events page), the Center hosts a number of on-going programs:

Coffee Talk
CTL in the Department
Faculty Peer Observation and Feedback Program (FPOF)
Faculty Teaching Symposia
FPOF Pool
Griffin Guides
Inclusive Practices Workshops
New Faculty Seminar
One-on-one Consultations
Student Teaching Consultant Program
Videotaping and Consultation

Faculty Peer Observation and Feedback Program (FPOF)

Interested in improving your teaching in the context of an on-going, mutual observation and feedback relationship with a colleague and a larger group of colleagues involved in the same activity?

This program supports faculty to serve as peer-observers, feedback-providers and mentors. It combines this one-on-one peer-mentoring with group reflection in a structured, on-going format.

How it works: Faculty members sign up and identify a faculty partner. Over the course of the semester, partners will engage in four to six observation and feedback sessions. The CTL will provide coffee cards at the Paradox for feedback sessions (or post-feedback sessions, if you like). The entire group meets four times during the semester to discuss what we hope to learn, how we go about it, and what we are learning. The aim of this program is to help faculty improve our teaching. In this spirit, participants are asked not to write letters of evaluation for each other that draw directly from experience in the Faculty Peer Observation and Feedback (FPOF) program. FPOF faculty receive a token stipend for participating.

FPOF Pool

Interested in sitting in on a colleague's class to see how they facilitate discussion, flip the classroom, or try - and don't always succeed - to activate learning? Want to expand your repertoire, gain perspective, be inspired, or just mix things up a bit? Not quite ready to commit to a full semester of FPOF? The FPOF Pool is made up of colleauges who have participated in one of the CTL programs involving classroom observations (the Student Teaching Consultant Program or Faculty Peer Observation and Feedback Program) and are willing to have colleagues observe their teaching on a one-off basis. The idea is not that they are any more expert in teaching than you, but that they are comfortable being observed and reflecting on it afterwards.

To participate, view the list of FPOF Poolers. Contact potential partners directly. You may want to find someone from another discipline, or who is newer to teaching than you. Or, someone with a reputation for experimentation. Go into the selection process and the classroom with a good sense of what you're looking for. Ideally, you meet before observing to learn something about your partner's objectives for the class and again, afterwards, to reflect on what you gained from the experience. Note: the idea is not to supply them with feedback so much as to provide you, the observer, with new perspective and ideas.

Student Teaching Consultant Program

Faculty members participating in the Student Consultant program work with a student who observes one of their courses throughout the semester. Student Consultants provide an opportunity for faculty to reflect on their pedagogy, receive feedback from a student not in their course, and work collaboratively to meet teaching goals. Together, the faculty member and Student Consultant develop areas to focus on throughout the semester. The Student Consultant attends class throughout the semester, takes detailed observation notes, and meets weekly with their faculty partner to communicate their candid and confidential observations.

Faculty who have participated in the Student Consultant program have found the experience to be extremely positive as a way to reflect on their teaching practice and to gain consistent feedback from the perspective of a student. Faculty members can work either with a student they identify or with a student who has applied during the CTL’s open application period.

Videotaping and Consultation

In conjuction with the Office of Instructional Technology, the CTL provides the opportunity for you to videotape one or more of your class sessions. Video is a particularly effective way to put yourself in the shoes of your students and reflect on your teaching. It can be difficult to imagine how students experience your class in the moment. Watching a video of your class allows you to see things that may have been invisible to you at the time. Using the videos to reflect on your teaching with a trusted colleague such as a mentor, a FPOF Pooler, or the director of the CTL can help improve your teaching, bolster confidence, and expand your repertoire.

To participate, contact the Director of the CTL (reedctl@reed.edu). After an initial consultation with the director, you will meet with Trina Marmarelli in the Office of Instructional Technology for a brief tutorial on how to use the video equipment. Once you've recorded a number of class sessions, select a few clips to share with the director of the CTL or other colleagues as grounds for reflection. You may have a particular issue in mind. Or, you may be interested in getting a new angle on your teaching. In either case, you may want to use the FPOF observation guide to help structure your reflection.

Faculty Teaching Symposia

Think Senior Symposium tweaked for faculty! This program aims to support sustained conversations on a topic related to teaching among a small group of faculty, in a more-casual-than-campus setting. Faculty will propose topics and serve as small-group facilitators for the semester. Possible topics? “Teaching Souls of Black Folk,” “teaching introductory courses in the social sciences,” “active learning in lecture courses,” “teaching in urgent times,” “flipping the science classroom,” “integrating research into the classroom,” “sensitive topics in the classroom,” “what is rigor?,” etc. Once topics are selected, the options will be announced and faculty will be invited to sign up according to interest. Groups (no larger than eight) will meet two to five times over the course of the semester for two hours at times and locations of the group’s choosing, e.g. private homes, cafés or bars, or, perhaps the PAB’s roof deck on a nice day. The facilitator will submit a brief, one-page summary of the semester. The CTL will provide funds for wine and cheese (or cake and ice cream). Facilitators will receive a token stipend.

Inclusive Practices Workshops

(in collaboration with the Office of Institutional Diversity)

This is a series of ongoing workshops designed to provide information, tools, and practical tactics for faculty and staff to work most effectively with students from a broad range of backgrounds and identity groups. Workshops topics include: students of color, international students, first generation college students, students from low socioeconomic backgrounds, students with disabilities, LGBQ students, transgender and gender nonconforming students, introverts, students experiencing emotional and mental health issues, students who practice a religious or spiritual tradition, creating inclusive classrooms, and inclusive advising.

New Faculty Seminar

(in collaboration with the Office of the Dean of the Faculty)

This seminar aims to help new faculty members transition into their new role as a member of the Reed College faculty. Over the course of the year, on an approximately bi-weekly basis, new faculty are invited to join the Dean of Faculty, the Director of the CTL and faculty with special insight for a changing topic of discussion. Topics range from integrating teaching and research, when and how to apply for internal resources, to using student evaluations and navigating the evaluation and promotion process. In addition, the last half hour of every session is dedicated to a general discussion of any questions that faculty members have.

Coffee Talk

You and a colleague want to talk about teaching over coffee? The CTL offers free Paradox coffee cards for the occassion. Contact the Director of the CTL to receive coffee cards.

One-on-One Consultations

The Director of the CTL is available for confidential, one-on-one teaching consultations. These may involve anything from classroom observations to syllabus assessment, problem-shooting, to student evaluation debriefs. Contact the Director of the CTL directly to arrange consultations.

CTL in the Department

Bring the Director of the CTL to a department meeting to share latest research on a topic of interest or a few quick teaching tips as a spur for a departmental conversation about teaching. Contact the Director of the CTL to arrange a visit.

Griffin Guides

Returning students work with a faculty member to assist new students with fall course registration and then check in with these new students throughout the year, and, in particular, at registration milestones (i.e. add/drop deadlines). The program is currently facilitated by Sarah Wagner-McCoy. Faculty members can sign up for the program during the spring semester of the year preceding that in which they plan to work with a Griffin Guide.

Useful Centers for Teaching and Learning Websites

University of Michigan

Vanderbilt University

Harvard University