Physics

Seminars in Fall 2017

All seminars are held at 4:10 PM in Physics 123, unless otherwise noted.
Refreshments will be served at 4:00 PM.

Upcoming Seminar

September 27, 2017
Lauren Tompkins, Stanford University
The World’s Most Complicated Game of Bingo: Pattern Recognition and the Physics of Subatomic Particles at the Large Hadron Collider

The Large Hadron Collider produces the world’s highest energy particle collisions in order to study the smallest constituents of matter: subatomic particles and their interactions.   These fleetingly rare particles are produced in proton-proton collisions which occur every 25 nanoseconds, requiring fast decisions on which data might hold the clues to the fundamental structure of matter.  I will describe a novel system for observing these collisions by playing Bingo with the detector data, and describe what questions we are trying to answer with these data.

Aug 30

John Essick
Thesis Start-Up Talk

Sept 6

Aja Procita, Beadle Beadle, Patrick Bedard, Nate MacFadden, Noah Shofer
Summer student presentations

Sept 13

Farhan Hasan, Amanda Swanson, Yunjia Bao, Sarah Racz, Andrew Ryder
Summer student presentations

Sept 20

Chuck Adler, St. Mary’s College
Where is the Science in all that Fiction?

When you hear the words "science fiction", you feel that there should be some science in the fiction.  However, a lot of books, TV shows and movies throw in "bolognium" which looks and sounds "scientific", but is really nonsense.  How can we sort through the baloney to find the good stuff?  I'm going to talk about some basic scientific principles, especially the law of conservation of mass-energy, and review some fictional works that have good science, some that have bad, and one or two which are truly awful.

Sept 27

Lauren Tompkins, Stanford University
The World’s Most Complicated Game of Bingo: Pattern Recognition and the Physics of Subatomic Particles at the Large Hadron Collider

The Large Hadron Collider produces the world’s highest energy particle collisions in order to study the smallest constituents of matter: subatomic particles and their interactions.   These fleetingly rare particles are produced in proton-proton collisions which occur every 25 nanoseconds, requiring fast decisions on which data might hold the clues to the fundamental structure of matter.  I will describe a novel system for observing these collisions by playing Bingo with the detector data, and describe what questions we are trying to answer with these data.

Oct 4

Ira Globus-Harris, Kenji Arai, Ali Cox
Summer student presentations

Oct 11

Caitlin Whalen '08, University of Washington
TBA

Oct 25

Inna Vishik, UC Davis
TBA

Nov 1

Rory Donovan-Maiye '04, Allen Institute
TBA

Nov 8

Peter Collings, Swarthmore College
TBA

Nov 15

Jamie Lomax, University of Washington
TBA

Nov 29

Student Thesis Talks