News Center

News from the Reed College public affairs office

Search: or

Features

Campus News

Reed admits a strong pool of applicants for Class of 2013


The number of applications is the third highest in the college’s history and the freshman admit rate of 38.8 percent is the third lowest.


Portland, OR (April 7, 2009)--Reed College has extended admission offers to a diverse cross section of highly achieving students for the Class of 2013. Counting un-weighted grades, the average grade point average of admitted students is 4.034. The average SAT score (critical reading plus math) is 1,407, and the average ACT composite is 31. Ranked by GPA, 74 percent of incoming students are in the top 10 percent of their class, and 90 percent rank in the top 20 percent. Just over 10 percent of the admitted students are first generation college students, 6 percent are international citizens, and 31 percent are students of color (33 percent when international citizens are included).

Reed admitted 1,225 of the 3,159 high school students who applied for admission. The number of applications is the third highest in the college’s history and the freshman admit rate of 38.8 percent is the third lowest. The admitted students hail from 47 states and 44 different countries. The international countries most represented, in descending order, are: Canada, Singapore, India, Japan, China, and the United Kingdom. The top six states are: California, New York, Washington, Massachusetts, Oregon, and Texas.

“It is gratifying to see that the economic downturn has not dampened students’ interest in pursuing a Reed education,” said dean of admission Paul Marthers. More applicants qualified for financial aid this year than in the recent years—an anticipated circumstance that contributed to the college’s decision to allocate more funds to meet the increased need.
 
To help admitted students determine if Reed is right for them, the admission office is holding its annual Reed Activity Days on April 16 and 17. RAD enables admitted students to visit classes; ask questions of students, faculty, and deans during panel discussions; eat in the dining hall; take tours of campus; and stay overnight in a residence hall. Admitted students unable to attend on-campus yield events have the opportunity to attend receptions in Boston, Los Angeles, New York, and Portland.