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Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Media Contact

Beth Sorensen
Office of Communications
503/777-7574
beth.sorensen@reed.edu


GALLERY SHOW TO FOCUS ON JEWISH IDENTITY; ARTIST LECTURES CANCELLED

Performing Judaism will open at Reed College's Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery on January 31 and remain on view through March 10. In this exhibition artists Ken Aptekar, Paul Brach, Gila Gevirtz, Miriam Schapiro, Susan Silas ’75, Stephanie Snyder ’91, Susan Sobeloff ’92, and Nikos Stavroulakis wrestle with Jewishness from spiritual, moral, and personal perspectives. The Cooley Gallery is open every day except Monday from noon to 5 p.m. The gallery is in Reed's library. Parking is available nearby, and the #19 bus stops on Woodstock at the campus entrance near the library. For more information, please call 503/777-7790.

An opening reception will be held Monday, February 11, at 7 p.m. in the Cooley Gallery. An opening night concert will be held in conjunction:

Opening night concert: Monday February 11, 6–7 p.m., Eliot Hall chapel
Vashti , a mini-opera by David Schiff, R.P. Wollenberg professor of music at Reed College, that retells the Book of Esther in a contemporary spirit in a score for piano, clarinet, and mezzo-soprano

THE LECTURES BY PAUL BRACH AND MIRIAM SCHAPIRO THAT WERE SCHEDULED FOR TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, HAVE BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO ILLNESS.

Building upon the groundbreaking 1996 Too Jewish? exhibition at the Jewish Museum in New York City, the work in Performing Judaism furthers explore Jewish artistic response and reflection, examining Jewish identity from a multigenerational group of artists with widely varying life experiences. Each explores the subject through a different milieu: WWII and the birth of post-war American painting (Brach); post-WWII Jewish diaspora and the development of post-Holocaust museology (Stavroulakis); American feminism and the emergence of the "woman artist" (Schapiro); 1970s assimilation and the rise of women in American Jewish institutions (Gevirtz); postmodernism and the emergence of textuality in contemporary artistic practice and interpretation (Ken); Jewish renewal and the re-evaluation of Zionist ideology and Holocaust memorialization (Silas, Snyder); and post-feminism and the preoccupation with the body in artistic practice (Sobeloff).

Performing Judaism is curated by Stephanie Snyder, with guest curator Karen Levitov, assistant curator of fine arts at the Jewish Museum, New York. A color catalogue will be available at the Cooley Gallery and the Reed College bookstore.

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