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Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Media Contact

Beth Sorensen
Office of Communications
503/777-7574
beth.sorensen@reed.edu


SEVEN REED STUDENTS AWARDED McGILL LAWRENCE INTERNSHIPS

Reed students Nicole Busto '00, Lea Coon '01, Karl Gillick '01, Amanda Lucier '02, Adrienne Ratner '00, Clayton Szczech '00, and Miriam Yarfitz '00 recently received McGill Lawrence Internship Awards from Reed College. The awards provide each recipient with up to $1,500 for support in a low-paying or volunteer summer internship. Each recipient was required to submit a proposal outlining his or her planned internship and its relation to the student's Reed experience.

Nicole Busto, a psychology major from Rancho Palos Verdes, California, will volunteer at a summer camp in Donegal, Ireland. Busto will work with children who have been affected by Irish national conflict. She hopes to promote security and respect for children who have been traumatized by national violence and bring back to the Reed community an awareness of opportunities to change the lives of those who are often the forgotten victims of war and violence.

Lea Coon, originally from Hastings, Minnesota, will intern at Mercy Corps International in Portland, working on health development and emergency aid. Coon will assist in the Mercy Corps child mortality project in Honduras and the development of an emergency and disaster relief handbook. Coon hopes to gain a practical understanding of health and civil development programs and grant writing, and the "ability to set up organized programs to carry out long-term programs and sustainable solutions to global problems."

Karl Gillick, a biology major from San Diego, California, will combine his theoretical and academic pursuits with his interest in Asian culture in his work as a research assistant in the forestry planning laboratory of the Taiwan Forestry Research Institute in Taipei. Gillick will work with Taiwanese researchers to study interactions within the forest and the ways that these interactions are affected by human activities.

Amanda Lucier, a political science major from Middletown, Connecticut, will intern at Straight Shooting, a Portland nonprofit program that pairs at-risk youth with photographers who become their mentors. Lucier will work with students in the program and learn about nonprofit management, combining her studies in political science with her interest in photography. Lucier writes that "when people can express the reality of their situation as they see it, through photography or other media, policy-makers have a better opportunity to create solutions that fit the needs of the people they will affect."

Adrienne Ratner, a history major from Menlo Park, California, will work with Empty the Shelters, an anti-poverty organization in Atlanta, Georgia, coordinating the organization's political education summer program. Participation in Empty the Shelters will allow Ratner to combine her academic interests in political sociology with direct involvement in oppressed and impoverished communities.

Clayton Szczech, a sociology major from Bakersfield, California, will spend this summer as a full-time volunteer organizer with Portland Copwatch, a grass-roots police accountability organization. He will work with local outreach groups to organize a stronger, more independent civilian review board. Szczech hopes to gain a practical understanding of the ways in which public interest groups organize and agitate for change from the government.

Miriam Yarfitz, an international and comparative policy studies major from Seattle, Washington, has designed an internship with Pi§eros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste (PCUN), an Oregon union of farmworkers and nursery reforestation workers. Through her involvement with PCUN, the largest Latino organization in the state, Yarfitz will work with immigrants from Mexico and Central America, "one of the most invisible, exploited, and demonized groups in the country." Her goal is to "influence consumer awareness of the brutal conditions under which the food we eat every day is produced."

The McGill Lawrence Internship Fund was established in 1997 to fund certain internships for Reed students. Funded by a bequest from Marian McGill Lawrence, a longtime friend of Reed College, and using matching student senate funds, the scholarship provides funding for students in low-paying or volunteer internships, preferably ones that place recipients in contact with diverse populations. The internship experience is intended to "establish a dialogue between a Reed education and the community, the outside world," said Elizabeth Bruch '99, a student who worked to establish the internship fund.