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Calligraphy Leaps off the Page

By llindqst on April 08, 2011 02:44 PM

Lloyd-home.jpg

The greatly anticipated exhibition, Lloyd Reynolds: A Life of Forms in Art, has begun its run in the Cooley Art Gallery. Just hours after it opened, Robin Tovey '97 and I convened at the Hauser Library and headed to the gallery. An arresting exhibition poster hangs just outside, featuring an enlargement of Lloyd's piece "Calligraphy for People." It's a powerful piece--the words connect to one another through serpentine pen strokes--and aptly chosen. Lloyd, who was passionate about teaching, made this "beautiful writing" accessible to people in all walks of life, just as he made calligraphy at Reed prestigious worldwide...

The glass gallery doors carry a stenciled image of Thor's thunderbolt and Poseidon's trident, one of Lloyd's symbols that is featured in the show. Inside, we found outreach coordinator Greg MacNaughton '89, and curator Stephanie Snyder '91, along with gallery registrar Colleen Gotze, were busily putting the finishing touches on signage.

Robin and I slipped into line with other visitors, who looked over the many examples of Lloyd's calligraphy, admiring the writing he chose to bring historical and literary texts to life. There is a display of the puppets that he created with his wife, Virginia, and there are also displays with photographs, chops, inks, tools, engravings, bookplates, sketches, prints, and correspondence. As we strolled about, we listened to Lloyd's voice, emanating from partitioned space where a series he did for educational television in 1976 was being projected. It was a treat to watch his video image work the broad-edged pen.

The exhibition, co-curated by Stephanie and special collections librarian Gay Walker '69, will doubtless delight those who studied with Lloyd, and it represents a strong testament to his influence in many, many lives in the college, the community, and in the expansive world of art. Lloyd's life of forms is worth the honor bestowed by an exhibition, especially during Reed's Centennial Celebration.

Viewing hours are noon--5 p.m., Tuesdays-Sundays, through June 11.