COOLEY

DOUGLAS F. COOLEY MEMORIAL ART GALLERY, REED COLLEGE


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COOLEY GALLERY NEWS /

THE COOLEY WILL BE CLOSED TO THE PUBLIC FROM TUESDAY FEBRUARY 7, THROUGH WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 8, AND WILL REOPEN ON THURSDAY FEBRUARY 9.

ON VIEW THROUGH APRIL 28, 2017: ICONOCLASTIC—an exhibition exploring historical and contemporary forms of image destruction, alteration, substitution, and circulation.


Iconoclastic


ICONOCLASTIC

JANUARY 31 – APRIL 28, 2017

PROGRAMS & EVENTS


The Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery, Reed College, is proud to present ICONOCLASTIC, featuring works by Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke, Demian DinéYazhi' and Noelle V. Sosaya, Maya Lin, Goshka Macuga, Michael Rakowitz, and Ryan Woodring.

Friday, February 24, 6:00pm, Psychology 105
Artist talk and conversation with Ryan Woodring followed by a reception at the Cooley where we will celebrate the grand opening of artist Demian DinéYazhi's Radical Indigenous Queer Feminism Pop-up shop!

Friday, March 3, 6:30pm, at the Cooley
Poetry reading with writers manuel arturo abreu, Demian DinéYazhi’, and Elissa Washuta, part of Reed Arts Week 2017.

Tuesday, March 21, 4:45pm, Psychology 105
Art historian Ömür Harmansah lectures on Materiality of ISIS: Media Performance as Things-Politics. Harmansah is an Associate Professor of Art History at the Univeristy of Illinois, Chicago, specializing in the art, architecture, and archaeology of the ancient Near East, with emphasis on Anatolia, Syria, and Mesopotamia.

Iconoclasm, the purposeful destruction and censorship of images and representational objects, and aniconism, the refusal to produce images, are recurring phenomena throughout the history of art. Long neglected by art historians, their study is now considered central to the understanding of the historical function of images.

Prominent examples of iconoclasm and aniconism across time include: the ancient practice of destroying the monuments of previous rulers; the prohibition on images in the Hebrew Bible; Christian iconoclasm in medieval Byzantium and in the wake of the Protestant Reformation; state-sponsored destruction of images during the French and Russian revolutions and the Nazi era; vandalism; contemporary attempts to censor the visual arts; and the draining of iconographic power within neoliberal, capitalist systems.



Recent examples of iconoclasm include the destruction of religious shrines and monuments in the Middle East, such as the Monumental Arch of Palmyra in Syria in March 2016. Various western groups have worked to virtually preserve and reconstruct such monuments by means of anastylosis and 3D modeling—confronting iconoclasm through data collection and remediation.

How has the experience and understanding of historical and contemporary forms of iconoclasm and aniconism been transformed in the context of a world rife with humanitarian, political, and environmental crises? Intentionally subverting, manipulating, and destroying images has played a critical role in artists’ ability to confront corruption and oppression. The destruction and absence described in past histories of iconoclasm must be expanded to consider the phenomenon in relationship to the global circulation and suppression of images and information that establish and transmit ideologies of the image, particularly in the more hidden dimensions of archives, corporate culture, and digital networks.

The artists in ICONOCLASTIC examine the ideological construction, imagistic confusion, erasure, and physical destruction of societies, nature, works of art, and the art historical canon. Media include: sculpture, large-scale installation, video, film, sound, performance, print media, open-source software, and photography.



Exhibition curators: Stephanie Snyder, John and Anne Hauberg Curator and Director, Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery, and William J. Diebold, Jane Neuberger Goodsell Professor of Art History and Humanities, Reed College.

The exhibition and all related events are free and open to the public.

Image: Michael Rakowitz The Breakup, 2010. Radio series, film, vinyl record, and mixed media. The image depicts members of the Palestinian band Sabreen performing the Beatles on the roof of the Swedish Christian Study Centre in Jerusalem. Courtesy of the artist and Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago.



THE DOUGLAS F. COOLEY MEMORIAL
ART GALLERY, REED COLLEGE
3203 SE WOODSTOCK BLVD.
PORTLAND, OREGON 97202-8199


HOURS: NOON TO 5 P.M., TUESDAY – SUNDAY, FREE
LOCATED ON THE MAIN FLOOR OF THE REED LIBRARY


The mission of the Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery is to enhance the academic offerings of Reed College with a diverse range of scholarly exhibitions, lectures, and colloquia in its role as a teaching gallery.

The gallery was established by a generous 1988 gift from Sue and Edward Cooley and John and Betty Gray "in support of the teaching of art history at Reed College, as part of an interdisciplinary educational experience that strengthens the art history component of Reed's distinctive humanities program." Exhibitions are coordinated in collaboration with Reed faculty members and courses, with attention to the needs and interests of the larger Portland and Northwest arts communities. A schedule of three to four exhibitions during the academic year brings to Reed and the Portland community work that would not otherwise be seen in the region.



 
Stephanie Snyder
John and Anne Hauberg Curator and Director
Office: 503.777.7251
Fax: 503.788.6691
Cell: 503.367.7004
snyders[at]reed.edu

Colleen Gotze
Registrar and Program Coordinator
Office: 503.517.7851
Fax: 503.788.6691
gotzec[at]reed.edu

Greg MacNaughton
Education Outreach Coordinator
Calligraphy Initiative Coordinator
Office: 503-517-7677
Cell: 503.929-3663
Fax: 503.788.6691
macnaugg[at]reed.edu

Please email Registrar Colleen Gotze to be added to the Cooley Gallery announcement list and for general gallery questions.