Guidebook

Alcohol and other drug policy

Alcohol and other drug policy

Passed by the Student Senate March 4, 1993 and accepted by the Faculty March 8, 1993. Amended October 23, 1995. Amended by the Student Senate May 1998 and approved by the Faculty August 26, 1998. Amended by the CAC October 2011, approved by the Student Senate October 9, 2011, and approved by the Faculty November 7, 2011. Amendments proposed and approved by the Student Senate April 26, 2012, approved by the CAC May 2012, and approved by the faculty May 18, 2012. Amendments proposed and approved by the Student Senate and approved by the CAC November 2012, and approved by the faculty December 3, 2012.

Preamble

Alcohol and other drug (AOD) use is a complex and controversial topic.  Many would argue that public policy on AOD use has been counterproductive, discouraging rational analysis of substance use, abuse, and addiction.  Whatever the views of its individual members, however, the Reed College Community must respond to empirical and legal realities.

The use, sale, or transfer of illicit drugs disturbs and offends many members of the Reed Community.  Such actions are not only illegal (and often felonious) in themselves, they can also have consequences that create an atmosphere of fear and distrust at odds with the educational mission of the College.  Drug use, especially drug abuse, frequently leads to a deterioration in academic performance, which can compromise the education of others as well as that of the user.  The illegal use and the abuse of alcohol can also have deleterious effects upon individuals and the community.  Moreover, the College has certain legal obligations to make reasonable efforts to prevent the use (which includes being under the influence) and transfer of illegal drugs and the illegal use or abuse of alcohol on campus or during Reed activities.

The College encourages all members of the Reed Community to become familiar with the health and legal aspects of AOD use and to make informed decisions regarding their own behavior. The college emphasizes that all members of the community are responsible for their own actions. Members of the community are expected to comply with this policy and to be aware of the consequences of violations thereof. The Community therefore expects and admonishes individuals to evaluate their own behavior, as well as that of their peers, in order to create and maintain a healthy and safe environment.

This AOD Policy (AODP) is intended to define the expectations of the College with respect to alcohol and other drugs, to clarify the consequences of failing to abide by these expectations, and to identify the resources available within the College Community to assist in dealing with AOD related problems.

I. Statement of Policy

A.  Reed College believes that it has a serious extralegal responsibility to support the health and safety of the members of this community.  Therefore, it has a responsibility to help prevent substance abuse through the provision of appropriate assistance, including educational materials and counseling.  When substance abuse occurs, we believe that the most effective response relies on early identification of the problem and the availability of effective, confidential assistance.  The Community encourages individuals voluntarily to seek assistance for substance abuse problems.  Moreover, the College will respond directly to alcohol or other drug use that results in behavior that is dangerous to the health or safety of the user, other members of the community, or adversely affects the institution as a whole.

B.  In keeping with local, state and federal laws, the illegal use, sale, transfer, dispensing, possession and manufacture of illicit drugs, or being under the influence of illegal drugs, or the illegal use, possession, or abusive use of alcohol on the Reed College campus or during official Reed activities is a violation of college policy and is prohibited.  In particular,

1.  Illegal drugs and drug paraphernalia are not permitted anywhere on the Reed College campus.

2. Reed College will treat beer or wine made for personal consumption like any other alcoholic beverage. Students who make beer or wine for personal consumption anywhere on campus, including in student housing, must comply with all applicable local, state and federal laws.

3.  The manufacture of illegal drugs, the growing of marijuana and other illegal psychoactive plants, and the distillation of alcohol are felonies under applicable federal law and are not allowed on College property, except that alcohol may be distilled for academic research purposes under the supervision of a faculty member.

4.  It is illegal and a violation of this policy for those under the age of twenty-one ("minors") to possess or consume alcoholic beverages, or for anyone to provide alcoholic beverages to minors. 

II.  Implementing Procedures

The following procedures have been developed with two goals in mind: 1) to promote increased understanding of the expectations embodied in this policy, and 2) to provide for its principled enforcement. 

A.  Certain terms used in this policy and the associated guidelines for events with alcohol are defined as follows.  “Public” area means any space on the Reed College campus (which as a whole is private property) other than student rooms in residence halls. As used in this policy, “college social event” is defined as any social gathering that 1) requires the reservation of any college property or facilities (including the Student Union, faculty lounges, and public areas in residence halls), or 2) that if otherwise occurring on campus receives publicity (including postings on electronic bulletin boards or mass e-mailings), or 3) that involves the expenditure of college funds.  Lectures, discussion groups, and other gatherings associated with normal academic activities are not considered 'college social events.'  But if alcohol is served at a reception following such lectures and other events, the organizers of the event are responsible for complying with the pertinent provisions of this policy. Alcohol may not be served or consumed at any academic event or in any place where academic activities are occurring.  “College funds” is defined as any money (including student body funds and funds generated through student organizations) collected or disbursed by Reed College.  “Financial consideration” is defined in accordance with OLCC regulations and includes the use of college funds to purchase alcohol, as well as the purchase of alcohol through membership fees, the collection of donations, the sale of tickets, or direct purchase by persons being served.

B.  The College shall distribute to all Community members, at the beginning of each academic year, the federally mandated information concerning federal, state, and local AOD laws, a copy of this policy, and a copy of the Guidelines for Events with Alcohol. These materials shall reference relevant Oregon State laws regarding AOD and the OLCC licensing requirements for events at which alcohol is sold or distributed and federal penalties and sanctions for illegal possession and trafficking of controlled substances.

C.  Reed College believes that students have certain rights to privacy in their residence hall rooms, as are specified in the housing contract. Students should nonetheless be aware that the right to privacy does not imply immunity from provisions of the law or of this policy, especially in the event of any violation coming to the explicit attention of a College official or legal authority.

D.  All members of the Reed community and their guests possessing alcoholic beverages must show legal proof of age on request from any member of the College Community.

E.  When alcohol is being consumed by, or is in the possession of people on the Reed campus who do not provide proof of legal age, when it is being distributed to those under legal age, or in violation of this policy and the associated guidelines for events with alcohol, or when, regardless of age, a person in possession of alcohol is acting unacceptably as defined by community standards or with hazardous disregard for themselves or those around them, said alcohol is subject to confiscation and is a violation of the policy.  Illegal drugs and drug paraphernalia, if discovered or if known to be in the possession of any person on the Reed campus, are always subject to confiscation and are a policy violation.

F.  Gatherings in any public facility or public area on campus may not be closed to any College officer or to any staff member charged with determining that the provisions of this policy are being complied with.

G.  For all events where alcohol is distributed or reasonably expected to be present, event organizers must follow the Guidelines for Events with Alcohol which outlines provisions to ensure that this policy must be followed.  These Guidelines are found in the Campus Events Guidelines.  The Guidelines for Events with Alcohol must be approved by both the Senate and the CAC.  In the event that the Senate and the CAC cannot agree on a set of guidelines or an alteration to the existing guidelines, the proposed changes shall be procedurally treated as community legislation.

III. Violations of the Alcohol and Other Drug Policy

Alleged student violations of the AOD Policy should be 1) taken to the Honor Council, or 2) to the Student Judicial Board, or 3) to the Dean of Student Services (or designate), the latter particularly when a substance abuse problem may also be present.  Actions may include medical leave, AOD assessment, treatment, informal or formal mediation, referral to the Student Judicial Board, referral for prosecution, or other sanctions as outlined in Section VI.

Alleged faculty violations of the AOD Policy should be referred to the Dean of the Faculty.

Alleged staff violations of the AOD Policy should be handled as outlined in the Staff Policies and Procedures Manual. 

Adjudicating bodies or offices and Community Safety shall forward summary information regarding the incidence and disposition of alcohol and other drug related problems to the Dean of Student Services, who will compile a biennial summary report. 

IV. Treatment of Substance Abuse Problems

A.  Individuals with substance abuse problems are encouraged voluntarily to seek assistance and appropriate treatment options.  The College provides certain counseling and treatment-related resources as well as referrals to sources of help off campus.  The College employs counselors, who are available to talk with any student on a confidential basis and to advise faculty and staff on student-related AOD problems.  Students may also seek help through the Office of Student Services, and/or the Health and Counseling Center.  Faculty are encouraged to seek advice from the Office of the Dean of the Faculty.  Staff are encouraged to talk with their supervisor or with the Director of Human Resources.  Confidential counseling is available to Faculty and Staff through the Employee Assistance Program and information about this program is available at the Human Resources Office.

B.  The College may provide a medical or rehabilitation leave for an individual requiring in-patient treatment.  The medical leave policy for students is described in the Faculty Code, Section III-E.  The rehabilitation leave program for faculty is described in the "Drug Use Statement" passed by the faculty at its November 13, 1989, meeting.  The voluntary alcohol/substance abuse rehabilitation leave for staff is described in the Staff Policies and Procedures Manual.

C.  The College should strive to preserve confidentiality for individuals voluntarily seeking assistance for a substance abuse problem.

D.  The College encourages students, faculty, and staff to share concern for and to help those involved in substance abuse.  Individuals who know of a substance abuse problem or who are trying to help someone with such a problem may themselves require considerable support.  The College will endeavor to provide confidential assistance to such individuals, through the resources described in the first paragraph of this section.

E.  Appropriate procedures for dealing with substance abuse problems in the case of faculty members are governed by the Rules of Procedure of the Faculty Constitution (Sections C-14 and F, G, and H), the Faculty Resolution on Drug Use of November 13, 1989, and in the case of staff members by the Staff Policies and Procedures Manual.   Appropriate procedures for dealing with substance abuse problems in the case of students are governed by this policy.

V. Behavioral Problems Related to Alcohol or Other Drugs

A.  Although the College hopes that individuals with substance abuse problems will voluntarily seek assistance, there are occasions when AOD use and/or abuse leads to harm or the danger of harm to the abuser or others or to an unacceptable detriment in academic or job-related performance.  When suspected possession or use of alcohol or other drugs results in behavioral or performance problems that come to the attention of the College, the response may include an informal inquiry into the possibility of a substance abuse problem.  Members of the community should direct suggestions for such an inquiry to the Dean of Student Services, the Dean of the Faculty, or the Director of Human Resources, as appropriate.

B.  If it is determined by the informal inquiry that an abuse problem may be present but is being denied by the abuser, sanctions or intervention aimed at addressing the abuse problem may be imposed:

1.  for students, by the Dean of Student Services, under procedures described in section VI. below for disciplinary sanctions and in the Faculty Code Chapter III, Section E, 2 for therapeutic interventions.

2.  for faculty, by the procedures set forth in the Rules of Procedure of the Faculty Constitution (Sections C-14 and F, G, and H).

3.  for staff, the voluntary alcohol/substance abuse rehabilitation leave falls under the same guidelines as the “unpaid medical leave” policy found in the benefits section of the Staff Policies and Procedures Manual.

VI. Response to Violations: Sanctions and Interventions

Violations of the AOD Policy and associated guidelines will normally be handled through the procedures explained below.  Moreover, the presence of a substance abuse problem does not prevent disciplinary action for related breaches of the standards of conduct expected of members of the Reed College Community.  These various infractions may result in sanctions or interventions including but not limited to warnings, fines, community service, required educational programs, required substance abuse assessment, enrollment in a treatment program, involuntary medical leave of absence, probation, suspension, expulsion, termination of employment, and referral for prosecution.

In all cases, the College will maintain the privacy and confidentiality of student records consistent with the law. That said, some sanctions may require the student to follow aftercare recommendations sand to allow the College to monitor aftercare progress via a release of information with the treatment program.

A. Serious and Minor Violations and Uncooperative Behavior – Definition of Terms

For purposes of responding to violations, the following definitions should be used:

Violation: behavior which, according to direct or compelling circumstantial evidence, infringes upon the college’s stated policies and/or relevant legal statutes.

Serious AOD Policy Violations: possession of small quantities and/or use of “hard” drugs, possession of small quantities and/or use of illegal prescription drugs, distribution of alcohol to minors, possession of distribution quantities and/or actual distribution of any illegal drugs.  Tampering with smoke detectors in any way represents a real and immediate threat to safety, and will generally be considered a serious violation.

Hard Drugs—include heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine. These drugs pose health risks to users that are inherently unpredictable and potentially catastrophic. The probability of adverse consequences and the severity of those consequences—addiction, physical and mental illness, death—are unacceptably high. Possession of distribution quantities and/or actual distribution of hard drugs are among the most egregious violations, as these endanger the entire community.  The Health and Wellness Plan Relating to Alcohol and Other Drug Use at Reed (Implementation Plan) will provide a more detailed accounting of substances considered “hard” drugs.

Minor AOD Policy Violations: underage use of alcohol, personal use of illegal drugs not defined as “hard,” possession of personal use quantities of illegal drugs not defined as prescription or “hard” drugs. Use of marijuana in the residence halls and other campus facilities protected by smoke detectors is usually considered minor unless such use coincides with any attempt to disable a smoke detector.

Uncooperative Behavior: Student behavior in the context of AOD violations may be deemed uncooperative under the following circumstances:

a. The student refuses to provide I.D. and/or his or her name

b. The student refuses to surrender illegal drugs, paraphernalia, alcohol illegally possessed, or other evidence upon request

c. The student refuses to answer reasonable questions related to an AOD-related incident and/or provides intentionally inaccurate or incomplete answers

d. The student is otherwise overtly uncooperative with the reasonable questions or requests of a community safety officer (CSO) or college official related to an AOD-related incident.

Uncooperative behavior by a student may result in an initially higher response level than would otherwise be applied in a similar situation in which the student did not behave uncooperatively, and/or may result in engagement of disciplinary proceedings for both the AOD violation as well as the uncooperative behavior. The degree to which the student’s lack of cooperation will impact any subsequent response will depend on the specific circumstances of the incident in question.

B. Response Levels

The response levels listed are intended to guide the process of determining the most reasonable response to potential violations of the AOD Policy. Each reported incident will be reviewed individually and a response level will be initiated appropriate to the specific circumstances (see Section C below).

Level I - A Level I response will result in a warning letter from the Dean of Student Services or his/her designee that includes an invitation for the student to take advantage of confidential therapeutic resources, an invitation (voluntary) to discuss the incident with the Dean or a designee, and an invitation (voluntary) to discuss the incident with a Resident Director (RD), if appropriate. Level I responses are documented in the student’s educational record, but would not in and of themselves trigger a disciplinary entry in the student’s educational record.

Level II - Community Level Intervention: A Level II response will result in a meeting between the student and a representative of his or her community. In most cases this will be the student’s RD or a designee of the Dean. If a student declines to meet, a Level III or higher response will be initiated. The outcome of the meeting will depend on the specific circumstances of the violation and those involved in the meeting. If the meeting is successful (all parties agree to an outcome), the student will receive a letter from the Dean’s office documenting the satisfactory resolution and any mutually agreed upon outcomes. If the meeting is unsuccessful (the student and RD or designee do not agree on an outcome), a Level III response may be initiated. Level II responses are documented in the student’s educational record, but would not in and of themselves trigger a disciplinary entry in the student’s educational record.

Level III - Meeting with the Dean of Student Services or Designee: A Level III response will result in a mandatory meeting between the student and the Dean or designee. Failure to participate in this meeting will result in a Level IV response. This meeting will include a comprehensive overview of therapeutic resources, and likely future steps in the event of continuing violations. The outcome of this meeting will depend on the specific circumstances of the violation(s). A follow up letter will be sent to the student detailing the content of the meeting and documenting any mutually agreed upon outcomes. If both parties to the meeting agree to a specific outcome, the student will receive a letter from the Dean’s office documenting that the meeting was successful and restating the mutually agreed upon outcomes. Likely outcomes may include a referral to counseling or treatment resources, a behavioral expectations contract with the student stipulating specific responses to continued behavior, and/or community service work designed to help restore the relationship with the community. If the meeting is unsuccessful, a Level IV response or higher will be initiated. Level III responses are documented in the student’s educational record, but would not in and of themselves trigger a disciplinary entry in the student’s educational record.

Level IV - AOD Review Panel: A Level IV response will result in the referral of the incident to the AOD Review Panel. The Dean of Student Services shall designate a student services staff member to serve as complainant and the student involved will be the respondent. The panel will be composed of a student member of the Judicial Board selected by the chair of the Judicial Board, a faculty member of the AOD Committee selected by the committee chair, and a staff member from Student Services, other than the Dean, appointed by the Dean. The complainant may not be a member of the Panel. The AOD Review Panel will receive copies of the relevant Community Safety incident reports and other supporting documentation. The complainant and respondent will be given the opportunity to respond to the community safety incident reports and other documentation in writing. Responses should be sent within five (5) business days of notification of the proceeding.

In a given case, Panel members may recuse themselves if they feel they might be biased. Both complainant and respondent may request, in writing, the removal of a member of the Panel on the grounds of personal bias.  Such requests will be considered by the remaining members of the panel. The two remaining panel members must agree to reject a request for removal; if either member of the panel concludes that removal is appropriate, the request should be granted. The panel’s decision on the matter shall be final.  In the event that a Panel member is unable to serve, due to recusal, removal, or unavailability, a replacement member shall be selected, from the appropriate pool, as described above, by the appropriate chair or Dean.  If none can be found, the chair or Dean shall use their discretion to select an appropriate replacement.

If the panel determines by majority vote that there is substantive factual disagreement with the incident reports, the panel should proceed no further, and recommend that the office of the Dean of Student Services initiates a Level V response. If the panel determines by majority vote that more likely than not the action represents a serious violation (as defined above), the panel should proceed no further, and recommend that the office of the Dean of Student Services initiates a Level V response. If the panel determines by majority vote that more likely than not the misconduct represents a minor violation or a pattern thereof (that is appropriate for the AOD Panel to review), the panel will deliberate and recommend sanctions in accordance with the guidelines below. If the sanctions are not unanimous, the dissenting individual may offer a written statement of disagreement with the majority recommendation. The findings and recommended sanctions, together with all supporting documentation, shall be forwarded to the President or his or her designee for a final decision.

When recommending sanctions, the panel shall place particular emphasis on treatment and educational outcomes. Likely outcomes may include a referral to counseling or treatment resources, a behavioral expectations contract stipulating specific responses to continued behavior, community service designed to help restore the relationship with the community, placing the student on disciplinary probation, placing the student in the bottom cohort of the housing lottery, cancellation of a housing contract, disqualifying the student from serving in leadership positions or participating in other activities where the student serves as a representative of Reed, and/or limiting the student’s attendance at on- campus events where alcohol will be served. The AOD Review Panel may not recommend sanctions rising to the level of suspension or expulsion.  The AOD Review Panel’s recommendations and sanctions are documented in the student’s educational record, but would not in and of themselves trigger a disciplinary entry in the student’s educational record.

The complainant or respondent may appeal the decision of the President or of his or her designee within ten (10) business days. If classes are in session, the appeal shall be heard by the Judicial Board. If classes are not in session, the appeal shall be heard by a Temporary Hearing Board constituted according to Section 1L of the Judicial Board Code. No one serving on the AOD Review Panel for a given case may also serve on the appellate body for that same case. The appeal should be made in writing to the chair of the board hearing the appeal. Apart from the composition of the appellate body, the appeals process shall generally follow Section 7 of the Judicial Board Code. The appellate body’s decision consists of recommendations to the President or his/her designee, who will make a final decision.

In all cases, the panel and/or hearing board will make relevant documentation of its deliberations and decisions available to the office of the Dean of Student Services, and will make every effort to keep said information confidential outside the purview of the office of the Dean of Student Services. The President or his or her designee is responsible for notifying the student, the Dean, and any other relevant parties of the ultimate outcome.

Level V - Honor Case: A Level V response will result in a referral of the incident to the Judicial Board. The outcome of a Judicial Board referral will be determined by the Judicial Board per the Judicial Board Code and all applicable policies and community guidelines. Any cases that result in a sanction by the Judicial Board would be documented as a formal disciplinary entry in the student’s educational record.

Egregious Violations: Additionally, in cases of egregious violations of the law and/or Reed policy, the Dean of Student Services may opt to act immediately to provide for the safety of the Reed community. Please refer to section 3B of the Judicial Board Code, cited below:

“The Dean of Student Services, or in case of his or her absence, the President of the College may, in case of emergency, take immediate action against a student for an alleged violation as specified in paragraph A, but must forward a complaint to the Judicial Board within six working days, counting only days while the college is in session, or be required to withdraw such action. In such cases, the action of the Dean or President shall remain in force until the conclusion of the judicial process.”

In such a case, the student shall be notified of the right to make an immediate appeal to the President of the College. Involuntary medical leave of absence (or other therapeutic intervention) may be appealed to the President of the College.

C. Guidelines for Responding to AOD Violations

Generally, the response level for AOD violations will begin at the lowest level appropriate to the violation, while taking into consideration the seriousness of the specific violation, relevant history, and extenuating or aggravating circumstances.

The guidelines listed below are intended to serve as the typical starting point for determining an appropriate response, but are not prescriptive. The Dean may ultimately initiate any response level based on the specific circumstances. Additionally, engagement of the honor process does not preclude other actions, such as review of housing contracts and possible eviction, allowable fines, referral for criminal investigation, or other available sanctions.

1. Minor Violations (as defined above)

First-time minor violations will in most cases receive a Level I response.

Repeated minor violations will in most cases receive a response one level higher than the previous response (i.e., if a previous violation received a Level I response, a subsequent violation will receive a Level II response, etc.).

Fifth and subsequent violations will in most cases receive a Level V response and generally be referred directly to the Judicial Board.

Violations that also involve uncooperative behavior may receive a higher level response than would otherwise be indicated in the absence of such behavior.

2. Serious Violations (as defined above)

First-time serious violations will be reviewed by the Dean and an initial response level will be chosen appropriate to the circumstances of the incident. If warranted by particularly egregious violations that threaten the safety of the Reed community, external law enforcement resources may be engaged in accordance with Reed’s Memorandum of Understanding with the Portland Police Bureau.

Repeated serious violations will be reviewed by the Dean and will typically receive progressively higher-level responses.

3. Prior Academic Year Violations

Second and subsequent minor violations from a prior academic year that did not result in referral to the Judicial Board will generally be viewed as if they were one response level below the prior year, e.g., if a student had two minor violations in the prior academic year, a first minor violation in the new academic year would generally receive a Level II response.

Second and subsequent serious violations will be reviewed by the Dean and receive a response appropriate to the specific circumstances.

D. Documentation of AOD Violations

AOD violations observed by or reported to community safety, the Dean of Student Services’ office, or other college officials, may be documented in one or more areas, based on the specific circumstances.

1.   Community Safety Incident Reports: Community safety officers will document all AOD violations in the form of an incident report. The names of all persons associated with an incident (reporting party, subject, witness, CSO, etc.) will be included in the report, along with all relevant facts, statements, and evidence. All alcohol or other drug related incident reports are reviewed by the Director of Community Safety and, when appropriate, forwarded to the Dean (or designee) for further review and follow up. All information shared between the Community Safety office and any other office on campus shall become part of the student’s educational record. Community safety incident reports that relate to AOD violations are permanent and are generally not considered part of the student educational record.

2.   Clery Act Reporting: The college is required to report annually to the U.S. Department of Education (DOE) all violations of AOD policies that are law violations and referred for disciplinary action.

3.   Student Educational Record Reporting: Reports of violations of the AOD Policy are recorded in a database of student incidents and interactions, which is one component of the student’s educational record. Entries into this database are intended to document all steps in the process of reviewing and responding to AOD violations, and do not constitute a separate disciplinary record. Any cases that result in a sanction by the Judicial Board would be documented as a formal disciplinary entry in the student’s educational record.

4.   Dean of Student Services’ Documentation: The Dean or his/her designee, will document the consequent action that the Dean determines is appropriate and necessary in a letter (email or hard copy) to the student.

5.   Health & Counseling Center: Information a student provides directly to clinical staff members of the Health & Counseling Center (HCC) is considered private and confidential and is protected by applicable state regulation, federal law, and expectations for ethical professional conduct. The HCC staff will not release to anyone outside of the HCC any information about students, including information related to alcohol or other drug use. The only exceptions to this are in circumstances where the student provides explicit written permission, the staff member assesses a situation of grave and immanent danger to the student or others, certain cases of child abuse, elder abuse, the abuse of a disabled person, or if subpoenaed to testify in court. Please discuss any concerns about this with HCC staff.

E. In the case of alleged violations by faculty, a decision to impose sanctions or therapeutic intervention is subject to appeal by procedures outlined in the Rules of Procedure of the Faculty Constitution (Sections C-14 and F, G, and H), the Faculty Resolution on Drug Use of November 13, 1989.

F.  In the case of alleged violations by staff, the procedures in the Staff Policies and Procedures Manual, section XIV, “Supervisor Procedures: Employee Assistance Program” pertain. Supervisors may refer an employee for counseling as part of a discipline process or a “last chance agreement.”

VII.  Alcohol and Other Drug Committee

Alcohol and Other Drug Committee Charge

Each academic year, the President of the College shall appoint an Alcohol and Other Drug Committee, consisting of at least two faculty members (one a member of CAC), at least two students (one a member of Senate), the Dean of Student Services, and the Directors of Health & Counseling and Community Safety.  Other community members, including but not limited to the Director of Institutional Research, may be asked to participate in Committee Activities on an ad hoc basis. 

The committee shall be charged with these duties:

1.  To consult with the Director of Institutional Research in order to survey incoming and enrolled students on a regular basis to better understand the AOD use patterns of Reed students.

2.  To consult with the Honor Council and others in order to promote education regarding the cognitive and social effects of AOD use and abuse.

3.  To work with Student Services, Residence Life, Health Services, CAC and the Student Senate to find better ways for the community to take positive actions to reduce AOD abuse.

4.  To review the College’s biennial AOD reports and when appropriate to make recommendations based on their findings.

5. To meet with the CAC at the beginning of each academic year in order to formulate an agenda for that year.  It will report back to the CAC at least once each semester.

6. As needed, a faculty representative of the AOD Committee or if necessary a designee thereof will serve on the AOD Review Panel as detailed in Section VI of this policy.

VIII. Medical Amnesty

A. Preamble

Reed College affirms the need for Reed’s policies and procedures to support the practice of students calling for help during a medical emergency. A growing body of evidence suggests that among the factors that may contribute to a reduction of students’ willingness to call for help in a medical emergency is the belief that doing so would result in disciplinary action for either the caller, the individual in need of help, and/or any groups associated with the incident. The inclusion of the medical amnesty clause is an effort to ensure that students’ safety takes priority in the implementation of Reed’s AOD Policy.

According to this policy, when a student experiences a physical and/or psychological crisis while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs (AOD), neither the student in crisis nor any student calling for help will be subject to disciplinary action for personal possession or use of illicit substances, including consumption of alcohol by minors.

B. Community Safety and Dean’s Office Response to Medical Emergencies

The community safety officer(s) (CSO) on-scene in the event of an AOD emergency will document the incident and the identities of all students directly involved, and students are expected to cooperate fully with responding CSOs. Documentation by CSOs will be reviewed by the Director of Community Safety for accuracy and completeness and will be forwarded to the Dean of Student Services in order to thoroughly document the incident. A search of the premises will be conducted by the CSO only for medically relevant purposes (i.e., determining the substance(s) ingested by the student in need of medical attention). Illicit substances and paraphernalia observed by CSOs will be confiscated pursuant to Reed policy.

In an effort to prevent the recurrence of such a medical emergency and to identify patterns of problematic AOD behavior, the Dean will document the incident in the student’s educational record, separate from the student’s disciplinary file. The Dean will share this documentation with the Health & Counseling Center (HCC), and will write a letter to the student to inform him/her that his/her behavior represents a violation of Reed’s AOD Policy, is covered under Reed’s Medical Amnesty Policy, and will therefore not be included in his/her disciplinary record. At the discretion of the Dean, the student who experienced the AOD-related incident may be required to attend up to two appointments at the HCC for evaluation and treatment purposes. This evaluation is provided free of charge. Any recommendations for further treatment or action will be left to the discretion of HCC staff. The person who calls for help on behalf of an intoxicated student will not be requested to undergo any evaluation, unless deemed necessary by the Dean.

In lieu of working with HCC staff, students may choose a community-based provider licensed to provide AOD evaluation services. A letter from the community-based provider documenting attendance and the result of the evaluation must be sent to the Dean. The cost of evaluation provided outside of the HCC is borne by the student. Failure to attend mandatory health appointments will invalidate the Medical Amnesty Policy, and standard disciplinary action will be taken.

In cases of sexual abuse or physical assault involving AOD, student services staff will not pursue disciplinary action against someone who complains of a physical or sexual assault as a result of AOD use.

C.  Misuse of the Medical Amnesty Policy

The Medical Amnesty Policy should not be abused. This policy does not protect students who are found to be in violation of other Reed policies from disciplinary action. Cases in which the individual in need of help is found to be guilty of sexual abuse/assault; physical assault; vandalism; theft; destruction of property; distribution, possession of distributable quantities; or intention to distribute scheduled substances will in most cases result in formal disciplinary action as described in applicable Reed policies. In cases involving hard drugs (with no evidence of distribution, possession of distributable quantities or intention to distribute), the Dean will in most cases require the student to be evaluated by HCC staff and/or a community provider specializing in AOD, to follow subsequent treatment recommendations, and to provide documentation thereof to the Dean. Failure to comply with these recommendations may result in disciplinary action.

Should a student who invokes the Medical Amnesty Policy experience a subsequent AOD-related medical emergency, s/he may be excluded from the Medical Amnesty Policy and therefore subject to disciplinary action.

-END OF ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG POLICY-

 

 

GUIDE TO RESOURCES AND LAWS REGARDING DRUGS AND ALCOHOL


Where To Go For Help

Reed College believes that the most effective responses to instances of substance abuse rely on appropriate identification of the problem and the availability of effective, confidential assistance. Individuals with substance abuse problems are encouraged to seek such assistance and appropriate treatment options. The College also encourages members of the community to care about each other and to express concern for and to offer help to those engaged in substance abuse.

On-Campus Counseling

The College provides counseling and treatment-related resources as well as referrals to sources of help off campus. Kathryn Smith extension 7462, Director of Health & Counseling is trained in the assessment and treatment of drug and alcohol problems, and are available to talk with any student on a confidential basis or to advise faculty and staff on student-related drug and alcohol problems. They can help to assess whether a problem exists, and refer to other clinicians and/or services as needed. Paris Schaefer extension 7636, Sheryl Moren extension 7437, Pepita Payne extension 7923, Aaron Krenkel extension 7349, and Marina Valdez extension 7895, all members of the counseling staff, are available for confidential counseling of students. Members of the Student Services and Residence Life staffs, the Director of Human Resources, and the Dean of Faculty can provide individuals with advice about College policies and procedures, on-campus resources, and the appropriate off-campus services. Faculty and staff are advised to consult the resources available through their health care plan, including the EAP program (503-503-639-3009 or 1-800-433-2320). Alcoholics Anonymous-Gryphon Group meets Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7 p.m. and Sundays at 4:30 p.m. in Eliot 103. A beginners meeting on Saturdays at 8 p.m in Eliot 103 has been added.

Medical and Rehabilitation Leaves

Generally the College provides a medical leave to students or a rehabilitation leave to faculty and staff seeking treatment for drug or alcohol abuse. The College will make reasonable efforts to keep the bases of medical and rehabilitation leaves confidential.

Students seeking a medical leave should speak the director of the health and counseling center, and the VP Dean of Student Services. A physician or mental health professional must provide a written recommendation for the medical leave. Readmission for students on medical leave is contingent on a physician's or mental health professional's written recommendation and the recommendation of the health and counseling center director or their designee.  The VP Dean of Student Services must approve the petition to return from a medical leave. A medical leave can be taken at any point in the semester.

Faculty members seeking a rehabilitation leave should speak with the Dean of Faculty. Any faculty member who acknowledges a problem with drugs, and who decides voluntarily to enroll in a rehabilitation program, will be given up to 30 working days of paid leave to participate in such a program. The costs of participation will be paid by the faculty member or the faculty member's health insurance provider.

Off-Campus Resources

The following resources may be helpful to individuals with substance abuse problems:

Alcoholics Anonymous (503) 223-8569

Alanon (503) 292-1333

Cocaine Anonymous (503) 256-1666

Narcotics Anonymous (503) 345-9839

The following resources may be helpful to people who are in a relationship with an individual with a substance abuse problem or who grew up in a drug or alcohol affected, or other types of dysfunctional homes.

Adult Children of Alcoholics 1-800-331-0503

Co-Dependents Anonymous (503) 285-8891

Alanon (503) 292-1333

LEGAL SANCTIONS


A. Federal Laws

The following summary of Federal penalties and sanctions for illegal possession of a controlled substance is taken from The Federal Register, 55 (159), page 33589.

21 U.S.C. 844(a)

First conviction: Up to one year imprisonment and a fine of at least $1,000 but not more than $100,000, or both.

After one prior drug conviction: At least 15 days in prison, not to exceed two years, and a fine of at least $2,500, but not more than $250,000, or both.

After two or more prior drug convictions: At least 90 days in prison, not to exceed three years, and a fine of at least $5,000 but not more than $250,000, or both.

Special sentencing provisions for possession of crack cocaine: Mandatory sentence of at least five years in prison, not to exceed 20 years, and a fine of up to $250,000, or both, if:

a.  the first conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds five grams.

b. the second crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds three grams.

c.  the third or subsequent crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds one gram.

21 U.S.C. 853(a)(2) and 881(a)(7)

Forfeiture of personal and real property used to possess or to facilitate possession of a controlled substance if that offense is punishable by more than one year imprisonment. (See special sentencing provisions re: crack.)

21 U.S.C. 881(a)(4)

Forfeiture of vehicles, boats, aircraft or any other conveyance used to transport or conceal a controlled substance.

21 U.S.C. 944a

Civil fine of up to $10,000 (pending adoption of final regulations).

21 U.S.C. 853a

Denial of Federal benefits, i.e., student loans, grants, contracts, and professional and commercial licenses, up to one year for first offense, up to five years for second and subsequent offenses.

18 U.S.C. 922(g)

Ineligibility to receive or purchase a firearm.

Information regarding legal sanctions under Federal law for unlawful distribution of controlled substances can be found at http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/agency/penalties.htm

B. State Laws

The following information regarding legal sanctions under Oregon state laws for the unlawful possession, use or distribution of controlled substances and alcohol is taken from the Criminal Code of Oregon and from the Peace Officer's Guide to the Oregon Criminal Code.

1. Possession of liquor by a person under the age of 21, except in a private residence accompanied by a parent or guardian and with the parent or guardian's consent, is a misdemeanor.

2. Purchase or attempt to purchase liquor by a person under the age of 21 constitutes a misdemeanor.

3. Providing (giving, selling, or otherwise making available) liquor to a person known to be under 21 years of age is a class A misdemeanor.

4. Providing liquor to any person who is visibly intoxicated is a class A misdemeanor.

5. Driving under the influence of intoxicants (liquor and /or a controlled substance) is a class A misdemeanor.  Blood alcohol levels of .08% or more as shown by chemical analysis of the breath or blood meet the standard of driving under the influence.

6. Possession of marijuana: possession of less than one ounce is punishable by a fine.

7. Marijuana sales: Delivering marijuana for consideration carries a typical sentence of 10 years.  Delivering less than one ounce carries a typical sentence of one year and/or $2,500.  Delivering less than five grams invokes a fine of $500.

8. Selling any substance, article, apparatus, or device, with knowledge that the substance, article, apparatus, or device will be used to manufacture, compound, convert, process, or prepare a controlled substance for unlawful sale or distribution is considered a class A misdemeanor.

9. Any person who keeps, maintains, frequents, or remains at a place while knowingly permitting persons to use controlled substances in such a place or to keep or sell them in violation of Oregon law is subject to a sentence of one year/$2,500.

The following table summarizes penalties in the state of Oregon for possession of a sampling of drugs classified as controlled substances.  The drugs are categorized by their placement in the Federal Drug Schedules.

Schedule Max. prison time Max. Fine

Schedule I:  Class B Felony 10 years $100,000

Heroin, LSD, other hallucinogens, marijuana, others

Schedule II:  Class C Felony 5 years $100,000

Methadone, morphine, amphetamine, cocaine, PCP

Schedule III:  Class A Misdemeanor 1 year $2,500

Non-amphetamine stimulants, some depressants

Schedule IV: Class C Misdemeanor 30 days $500

Valium-type tranquilizers, some less potent depressants

Schedule V: Violation none $1,000

Dilute mixtures, compounds with small amounts of controlled drugs

Criminal convictions may have serious effects on an individual's future career, in addition to carrying the penalties cited above.  When drug arrests occur, an attorney should be consulted.   Resources for obtaining an attorney include the Oregon Attorney Referral Service, (503) 241-0736, or Oregon Legal Aid Service, (503) 224-4086.

Drug Effects

Alcohol consumption causes a number of marked changes in behavior.  Even low doses significantly impair the judgment and coordination required to drive a car safely, increasing the likelihood that the driver will be involved in an accident.  Low to moderate doses of alcohol also increase the incidence of a variety of aggressive acts, including spouse and child abuse.  Moderate to high doses of alcohol cause marked impairments in higher mental functions, severely altering a person's ability to learn and remember information.  Very high doses cause respiratory depression and death.  If combined with other depressants of the central nervous system, much lower doses of alcohol will produce the effects just described.

Repeated use of alcohol can lead to dependence.  After dependence develops, sudden cessation of alcohol intake without medical supervision is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms, including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations, and convulsions.  Alcohol withdrawal can be life-threatening.  Long-term consumption of large quantities of alcohol, particularly when combined with poor nutrition, can also lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as the brain and the liver.

Mothers who drink alcohol during pregnancy may give birth to infants with fetal alcohol syndrome. These infants have irreversible physical abnormalities and mental retardation.  In addition, research indicates that children of alcoholic parents are at greater risk than other youngsters of being hyperactive, developing anti-social behavior, and of becoming alcoholics themselves.

Miscellaneous

Revocation of certain Federal licenses and benefits, e.g. pilot licenses, public housing tenancy, etc., are vested within the authorities of individual Federal agencies.

Drug and Alcohol implementation plan

HEALTH AND WELLNESS PLAN RELATING TO ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG USE AT REED COLLEGE

As Adopted by the President of Reed College
May 6, 2009

I.        Preamble
II.       Planning, Research, & Reporting
III.      Education, Prevention, & Wellness
IV.      Treatment
V.        Violations of the Drug and Alcohol Policy
VI.      Community Safety Department Procedures

This document describes Reed College’s approach to addressing the use and abuse of illegal drugs and alcohol.  The goal is stated, the nature of the problem is identified, the process for addressing the problem is described, College initiatives are introduced, implementation plans are detailed, policy clarification and enforcement/response protocols are profiled and next steps recommended.


I.  Preamble

This Plan describes a strategy for implementing the College’s official Policy on Drugs and Alcohol.  It is informed, above all, by considerations of health and wellness.  Such considerations are understood to be essential in supporting and sustaining the academic mission of the College and the well-being of the Reed community.

The abuse and/or illegal use, possession and distribution of alcohol and other drugs (AOD) have serious negative impacts on the user, on other members of the community and on the institution itself.  Negative impacts may be social, academic, legal or ethical in nature.  But such impacts are, in all cases, closely connected to the direct or indirect threat that substance abuse poses to the health and wellness of all members of the Reed community.

This plan is intended to clarify the approaches taken by Reed College to execute its Drug and Alcohol Policy and in no way should be interpreted to supersede that legislated policy. The Plan presents a comprehensive strategy that focuses on the promotion of overall health, education and wellness programs and a clear explanation of enforcement protocols. The plan was adopted by the President following consultation with the Drug and Alcohol Committee. Subsequent revisions will be adopted only following further consultation with the Committee.

The Plan is divided into five sections detailing campus strategies for (a) monitoring the use of alcohol and other drugs, (b) promoting health and wellness through prevention and education, (c) providing treatment to community members in need, (d) describing mechanisms of response to violations of the Drug and Alcohol Policy and (e) describing protocols for Community Safety in handling violations of the Policy.

II. Planning, Research, & Reporting

A critical aspect of planning, executing and monitoring the progress of a drug and alcohol policy is the assessment of the types of AOD issues present within the community and the determination of risk factors and problematic behaviors. The results of such research and assessment should then be used to raise awareness within the community of the nature and seriousness of the problem and to help guide selection of prevention, health and wellness interventions and enforcement programs.

In an effort to better understand the patterns and implications of AOD use on campus, the Vice-President/Dean of Students (VP/DOS) will:

  • Provide incident reports to the President and Vice Presidents on a regular basis.
  • Report at least annually to the Student Life Committee of the Board of Trustees on the state of AOD issues at Reed.
  • Communicate on a regular basis with the Student Body President and Vice-President and with the Drug and Alcohol Committee regarding current AOD issues.  This should include summaries and analyses of relevant surveys and of incident reports, in a manner that preserves the confidentiality of the individuals involved.

In partnership with the Director of Institutional Research, the VP/DOS and the Associate Dean for Health and Wellness will:

  • Monitor current research and information relating to best practices in addressing AOD issues in higher education.
  • Continue at regular intervals to administer standardized surveys of current students and incoming freshmen about their experiences with AOD; benchmark with similar institutions and share aggregate results of anonymous surveys.
  • Survey students periodically, using an instrument of our own design that would elucidate more specific and relevant information not captured on standardized measures.
  • Promulgate a standard protocol to capture and report statistical information from Community Safety, Residence Life, Health and Counseling and the Registrar. Report these data annually to trustees, faculty, students and staff.
  • Identify patterns that may be associated with deleterious health and academic outcomes. We will further identify, in the national literature and in our own practice, those interventions that are most likely to be effective in reducing the potential and/or actual impacts of such behaviors and risk factors.    

III. Education, Prevention, & Wellness

Compelling data in the AOD literature suggest that support of healthy lifestyle choices significantly reduces the risk of deleterious AOD use.  In addition, a variety of constituencies in the Reed community continue to express an interest in unfettered access to accurate information about the physiological effects of AOD use and abuse.  In an effort to adhere to best practices and meet the needs of the community, the VP/DOS will:

  • Expand staff and faculty training and provide a wider variety of opportunities for students to explore issues related to substance use and abuse in discussions with peers, faculty, health and counseling staff and national experts in the field.
  • Collaborate with College Relations staff to assess the most effective ways to engage concerned alumni and community members.
  • Evaluate various programmatic options:
    • Publicize professionally reliable and up-to-date sources of information (on the web or elsewhere) about the effects and risks of AOD use.
    • Continue to present an AOD session at Orientation.  This session should minimally include information on what the policy is, how it will be enforced and what repercussions students might face if they make the decision to disregard the policy.  The session should also provide state of the art information on effects of AOD use on brain chemistry and functioning, short and long term, as well as risks of adverse health effects.  If information relating to the latter does not fit in the Orientation schedule, the Orientation staff will work with other student services units on campus to ensure that it is presented early in the academic year.
    • Invite a legal professional to participate in discussions of legal risks associated with AOD use, including criminal enforcement protocols and procedures.
    • Invite rehabilitated addicts, especially current or former students, to present their personal histories to students.
    • Include in educational programs a complete, accurate, transparent account of the procedures followed by the College (including CSOs, Residence Life, Health & Counseling and the VP/DOS’s office) in cases of suspected or known AOD possession, use, distribution, or sale.
    • Collaborate with the Drug and Alcohol Committee to provide educational programs for the entire community throughout the academic year. For example, have small group meetings in residence halls during mid-fall to discuss AOD issues and concerns in a candid fashion and provide information sessions annually for the entire community on AOD concerns at Reed.
    • Enhance the quantity and quality of information about AOD risks and policies on the Reed College website.
    • Post and distribute information about whom to contact in the event that a student thinks s/he may have a problem or thinks a friend may have a problem.
    • Take steps to assure that all persons, who use college resources, auspices, or funding (including student body funds) to publish advice about the risks of using AOD, are fully informed about the personal and institutional legal risks if such advice proves to be erroneous or misleading.
  • Create a permanent information resource regarding AOD to which all students would have access throughout the year. This forum for self-education could be in the form of an online database or a physical library. It would contain extensive information organized by drug types, including but not limited to known physiological and psychological effects (during use and long-term according to the best available scientific research), potential health complications beyond normal effects and information regarding origins of individual drugs.  Although this resource would provide unbiased facts, it is likely that comprehensive education will discourage AOD use or at the very least aid in harm reduction.
  • Provide peer educators and health advocates. While AOD experts may contribute to the educational process, research supports the effectiveness of peer educators as agents of change regarding AOD issues. However, these students must be well respected by students, have good information and be models of good AOD decision-making to be effective. Working with student leaders while developing peer-based strategies with Student Services and Residence Life is crucial. Dorm life is one setting in which such peer educators would be highly utilized and effective. Therefore, one strategy for developing these peer health advocate roles may be to provide more extensive education for House Advisors on AOD and wellness issues.  To this end, House Advisors will receive more formalized training around recognizing warnings of AOD abuse and talking with students about AOD use as it affects wellness.
  • Support faculty and staff education. Students are not the only members of the community that stand to benefit from the educational effort.  Faculty and staff will have ready access to information regarding the direct costs to scholarship and the general campus community that hazardous AOD use propagates on campus (i.e., assaults, rape, HIV-risk behaviors). Faculty and staff will be educated as to the legal ramification of serving minors in their homes or at campus events.  Student services will be available to faculty and staff for consultation regarding AOD use (e.g., what should be done if a student is inebriated in class or in the workplace? if it appears that a student needs treatment? if someone is drunk and disorderly on campus? if someone is clearly violating the Drug and Alcohol Policy?). Faculty will be presented this information during their initial faculty orientation as well as during annual AOD presentations to the faculty.  Presentations will similarly be made to staff members on an annual basis. 
  • Collaborate with the Sports Center and other campus groups. AOD initiatives will be embedded within a comprehensive program to promote healthy living choices.  Some members of the Reed Community engage in a number of poor health-related behaviors that impact negatively on their academic performance. These include but are not limited to poor sleep hygiene, poor nutrition, lack of exercise, smoking, unsafe sex, etc. Living a healthy lifestyle is incompatible with pathological AOD use. Promoting healthy living in the campus culture can impact AOD use indirectly by supporting mutually exclusive behaviors. The existing Wellness Committee might be a partner in supporting this work, or may be subsumed under the HCC directorship in order to more effectively integrate its services in to the mainstream of student services and the Reed community as a whole.
  • Develop substance-free community activities with student input. A direct approach in changing campus culture is to structure the environment so that the choice NOT to use AOD is easy for students, primarily as a function of providing high value campus activities that are explicitly AOD-free. In addition, students will have access to dedicated funds to promote activities as substance-free social, recreational and public service options.
  • Through the Office of Residence Life, offer students the option to reside in substance free (“sub-free”) housing. Experience has shown these are connected, active communities where residents demonstrate a high level of respect for themselves and one another. This healthy living option is for first-year and returning students that are willing to make a commitment to maintain a living environment free from tobacco, alcohol and other drugs.

IV. Treatment

Early Intervention - A critical question is how to identify students who are at risk for problematic AOD use. First year students are often targets of early intervention/ prevention programs, particularly around hazardous drinking, because they bear the disproportionate burden for overdose and other drinking-related consequences such as injury and assault.  To that end, the Health and Counseling Center will:

•    Investigate the feasibility of using anonymous self-report mechanisms, as they represent potentially effective mechanisms for identifying at-risk students, directing early treatment interventions and establishing adaptive social norms.
•    Provide direct intervention to students who have already demonstrated problems related to AOD.  Students who have been cited for significant AOD violations will be required to participate in an AOD program. The level of problematic behavior determines the assignment from less intensive to more intensive programming.
•    Outreach to the community regarding common risk factors for and indications of AOD abuse and problems. It is clear that individuals come to AOD problems through a variety of mechanisms. Some of these factors students, staff and faculty bring with them to Reed (e.g., family history of AOD problems, ways of coping with stress), while others are environmental (e.g., free access to AOD, academic/job stress). Active outreach to the community is needed to facilitate self-care.

Tertiary Intervention -
The mission of the Reed Health and Counseling Center (HCC) is to manage a broad range of general medical and mental health issues and to educate and promote wellness and healthy lifestyle choices for students.  When AOD use/abuse adversely affects the health and functioning of a student, HCC staff will first determine if an immediate significant risk to the student exists and will recommend or institute appropriate interventions to protect the safety of the student.  This may include an involuntary medical leave of absence. The HCC staff will also decide if the clinical issues are most likely to be effectively managed within the Reed HCC and/or with the intervention of a more specialized off-campus resource.  As is usual, the HCC staff will assist the student in accessing referrals and provide reasonable assistance during the process. When functioning is so impaired as to represent an immediate and significant health risk and/or necessitates treatment, which would be incompatible with the academic rigors of Reed, we may instigate an involuntary medical leave of absence. Finally, while AOD use and abuse are reasonably considered and treated as medical issues, some AOD actions may be considered and managed as behavioral issues under the auspices of the
 office of the VP/DOS.

Peer support - This represents one of the most under-utilized resources on campus.  We will identify ways to include students directly in effective educational and preventive initiatives and to provide sufficient training and support to include them in the process of responding to AOD issues.  The Health and Counseling Center will develop facilitated and/or co-facilitated (HCC staff and student) discussion groups ranging from general AOD issues to specific substance, recovery model etc.


V. Violations of the Drug and Alcohol Policy


The response to the injurious effects of AOD must not only focus on education and prevention, but must also make clear to students what the Drug and Alcohol Policy entails, including how staff and security personnel will respond to perceived violations. 

Operating Principles - The following considerations will guide the College’s response to alleged violations of the Drug and Alcohol Policy.

  • The use of so-called “hard drugs” (including heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine) poses health risks to users that are inherently unpredictable and potentially catastrophic.  The probability of adverse consequences and the severity of those consequences – addiction, physical and mental illness, death – are very high.  The College, via the VP/DOS (or his or her delegate), has a responsibility to assess and provide appropriate help for any individual who uses hard drugs, as would be the case with any member of the Reed community who has a medical emergency or other serious and untreated medical condition.  Such help may include a determination that the College is unable to provide adequate services or that a student is unable to handle the academic demands of the College and that a medical leave is therefore required.
  • The use of hard drugs also poses unacceptable and unnecessary threats to the well-being of the Reed College community and to the academic program.  Such threats include, though are not necessarily limited to, substantial and unnecessary discomfort, offense, inconvenience, fear and danger for individual community members; the attraction of drug dealers to campus; unreasonable and unnecessary burdens on members of the staff; and serious and unnecessary exposure of the entire community or individual community members to adverse public sentiment, punitive sanction by public authorities and adverse legal action.  Thus, the College will view possession of hard drugs in any amount as a very serious violation of the Drug and Alcohol Policy.  The Student Services office will seek resolution through the honor process with any and all individuals who are thought to have possessed hard drugs in any amount (provided that doing so is consistent with principles of confidentiality that govern the activities of the counseling staff).   Such cases will be handled through the College’s established honor process (including, where appropriate, informal and formal mediation, or honor cases).
  • The College also regards as a very serious violation of the Drug and Alcohol Policy providing to any individual (whether by sale or gift) of any hard drug, in any amount. Individuals providing hard drugs to others knowingly subject another person to a potentially serious or even fatal risk of injury, typically without being able to verify the contents or strength of the substance or the tolerance of the recipient to that substance. The Student Services office will seek resolution through the honor process with any individual who is thought to have distributed hard drugs. Furthermore, the VP/DOS, in consultation with the President of the College, may refer any case involving the distribution of hard drugs to the Portland police.
  • Under Oregon law, the possession of “distribution quantities” of hard drugs – quantities suitable for sale or distribution to other individuals – is a serious crime, and College officials have a moral, legal and institutional responsibility to report serious crimes to civil authorities.  Thus, in addition to pursuing internal judicial remedies, the VP/DOS, in consultation with the President of the College, will ordinarily refer cases involving the possession of distribution quantities of hard drugs to the Portland police. Distribution quantities of selected hard drugs are defined as quantities in excess of: 5 g of heroin, 10 g of cocaine and 10 g of methamphetamine.
  • The Drug and Alcohol Policy prohibits the possession, sale and distribution of other illegal drugs. Possessing distribution quantities of such drugs is especially egregious. The Student Services office will seek resolution through the honor process.
  • The possession, sale or distribution of alcoholic beverages, where minors are involved, are violations of the Drug and Alcohol Policy. The Student Services office will seek resolution through the honor process.
  • The expenditure of college funds (including student body funds and all other monies collected or disbursed by Reed College) by faculty, staff or students for the purchase of any illegal drug or for the purchase of alcohol for the purpose of distribution to minors is prohibited by the Drug and Alcohol Policy (section II.A). Enforcement of this provision may include the initiation of an honor proceedings or grievance against the person authorizing or making such expenditure, including in the case of an expenditure by any student organization, the signator(s) of that organization. Authorization or expenditure of funds for the purchase of illegal drugs will be regarded as comparable in severity to direct distribution of those drugs. Enforcement of this provision will also include a demand by the College that the person authorizing or making such expenditure reimburse the College in the amount of funds improperly expended.

Notification and Reporting - The following guidelines apply to instances of misuse or abuse of AOD conceived as behavioral, as opposed to, or in addition to, medical. In order to provide a consistent response to violations of the Drug and Alcohol Policy, the VP/DOS will:

  • Formalize and publicize current practice of instituting a graduated set of responses comparable to our strategy for dealing with academic misconduct.
  • Maintain a record of violations including all cases of possession, regardless of the amount.  The VP/DOS may issue a letter to any student who violates the Drug and Alcohol Policy describing the consequences of the violation.  This will include notification of escalating consequences for subsequent violations.
  • Notify emergency contacts when necessary. The purpose of notification is to ensure that the College can be as effective as possible in providing treatment and counseling service.  Ordinarily, notification will occur with the consent of the individual involved.  Notification of the student’s emergency contact without such consent will occur in situations of acute medical and/or psychiatric crisis, as determined by the VP/DOS or his/her designee.

Responses to Possible Violations - When informed of alleged violations of the Drug and Alcohol Policy, the College will seek to provide treatment and counseling, insofar as this is appropriate and possible as determined by the Student Services office.  In addition, however, the College may also respond in ways that do not primarily involve treatment and counseling. Specifically, the responses will include:

  • Emergency support.  Upon encountering a potential violation, CSOs (or other College personnel) will, in all cases, first determine if any individual is facing an emergency medical or mental health situation.  In such circumstances, CSOs (or other College personnel) will immediately seek suitable medical support. Further in such circumstances, the primary mission of CSOs will be to provide emergency help rather than to investigate the behavior of individuals who have called for assistance.
  • Reporting.  Upon encountering a potential violation, CSOs normally will, in all cases, make a report of the incident in question. Such reports will include the identity of all possible violator(s) and will be forwarded to the VP/DOS or his or her designee. The Student Services office will normally maintain a record of violations including all cases of possession, regardless of the amount.  The VP/DOS may issue a letter to any student who violates the Drug and Alcohol Policy describing the consequences of the violation.  This will include notification of escalating consequences for subsequent violations.
  • Confiscation.  Upon encountering a potential violation, CSOs normally will confiscate all materials thought to be illegal drugs, normally will confiscate distribution quantities of alcohol (cases of beer, beer kegs, etc.) and normally will confiscate all alcohol in the possession of minors.  Confiscated material will be handled according to procedures established and published by the Community Safety office.
  • Detention.  Upon encountering a potential violation, CSOs may detain possible violators if it is reasonably believed that the violator(s) pose an imminent physical danger either to themselves or to anyone else. The sole purpose of detention is to prevent physical harm. Detention will end when it is reasonably believed that the imminent threat of physical harm – either to violator(s) or to others – no longer exists.
  • Honor Process. All violations of the Drug and Alcohol Policy may, in principle, lead to the initiation of honor proceedings.  Honor proceedings include informal mediation, formal mediation and/or resolution through an honor case.   Normally, the VP/DOS or his or her designee will initiate honor proceedings against possible violators who are alleged to have possessed either distribution or non-distribution quantities of hard drugs or to have distributed hard drugs in any amount (as described in V.A.1. above) or distribution quantities of other illegal drugs. In addition, the VP/DOS or his or her designee normally will initiate honor proceedings against individuals who are alleged to have repeatedly been in violation of the Drug and Alcohol Policy, regardless of the particular nature of the violations.
  • Civil authorities. The VP/DOS or his or her designee normally will report to the Portland Police Bureau or other appropriate civil authorities the identity of individuals alleged to have been in possession of distribution quantities of hard drugs.

VI.    Community Safety Department Procedures

The Community Safety Department is committed to collaborative partnerships in implementing educational, intervention and enforcement measures that are designed to support the community in making informed decisions regarding AOD. The role of the CSO in responding to any situation involving AOD is to assure the safety of individuals, to investigate and to report and refer the information to other appropriate bodies.  Such referrals are conducted without being influenced by the process that might ultimately be pursued. This provides for appropriate checks and balances between those entities who carry out enforcement responsibility and those who pursue sanctions.

Patrol and Enforcement Interactions -  Providing and ensuring safety on campus requires a mediated approach.  Those under question with regard to any potential violation of campus policies or local laws are expected to be honest, cooperative and respectful during these interactions. Likewise, CSOs conducting investigations into alleged violations will treat all community members with honesty, respect and civility.

Patrol Practices - The Community Safety Department conducts ongoing general patrols of the campus and specialized patrols at major events and incidents to enhance safety and security. Officer activities are focused on assisting the community through various services and providing guidance regarding appropriate behavior. Regular patrols may occur in all public areas of the campus. Regular patrols do not occur in offices, apartments or dormitory rooms.

Reed College’s Drug and Alcohol Policy states that, “In keeping with local, state and federal laws, the illegal use, sale, transfer, dispensing, possession and manufacture of illicit drugs, or being under the influence of illegal drugs, or the illegal use, possession, or abusive use of alcohol on the Reed College campus or during official Reed activities is a violation of College policy and is prohibited”.

In all responses to incidents where AOD is considered a primary or secondary factor, officer shall consider the following questions in selecting a proper course of action:

  • Is there a corresponding medical issue involved?
  • Is there a known psychological issue involved?
  • Is the person a danger to self or to others?
  • Does this person have a history of related behavior?
  • Is the situation a violation of Reed College policy?

Normally, the CSO will:

  • Investigate the circumstance and document by identifying and interviewing principles and witnesses involved, taking statements, collecting photographic evidence, collecting and processing physical evidence and writing a report.
  • Notify persons responsible for the area affected.
  • Notify internal management staff utilizing notification procedures.

Emergency Support
Medical Issues. In any circumstance where AOD are the cause or have contributed to the medical concern, whether or not possession is in violation of policy or law, CSOs are expected to respond by:

  • Controlling the scene. In any emergent situation, the safety of the responder is paramount. The CSO should remove any item or individual with the potential to cause harm to themselves, others and/or to the person needing assistance. This can include weapons, people, drug paraphernalia, etc. The CSO should not move an injured person, unless a danger at the scene requires it.
  • Supporting the physical welfare of the person by rendering medical first aid and/or summoning professional medical assistance, determining whether the person’s behavior presents a danger to self or others and if the person having a medical concern is a student, contacting the on-call RD and/or the on-call counselor for assistance.
  • If the person is in need of emergency medical attention, or if the situation requires police assistance, requesting that the dispatcher call 9-1-1. Examples include: Situations where basic aid will not suffice, suicide attempts, any situation where CPR is used and any situation where the patient is a danger to self or others.
  • Mental Health Issues. In any circumstance where AOD are the cause or have contributed to a psychological concern, whether or not possession is in violation of policy or law, CSOs are expected to respond by:
  • Controlling the scene. In any emergent situation, the safety of the responder is paramount CSO should remove any item or action that could cause harm to themselves, others and/or to the person needing assistance. This can include weapons, people, drug paraphernalia, etc.
  • Supporting the psychological welfare of the person by rendering aid and/or summoning professional assistance, determining whether the person’s behavior presents a danger to self or others and if the person experiencing psychological difficulties is a student, contacting the on-call RD and/or the on-call counselor for assistance.
  • If the person is in need of psychological counseling team response, or if the situation requires police assistance, the CSO will request that the dispatcher call 9-1-1. Examples include: Situations where basic aid will not suffice, suicide attempts or any situation where the patient is a danger to self or others.

Response to Possible Violations of the Drug and Alcohol Policy - Situations where a CSO encounters a person in possible violation of the Reed College Drug and Alcohol Policy, the CSO normally will respond in the following manner:

  • Assure the safety of the community by isolating the person.
  • If necessary, secure the scene.
  • If necessary, survey the scene starting with items that are immediately open and visible to determine if there is evidence to support a substantial violation of the Policy, or if the action is of such a nature that the safety or security of Reed College is compromised.
  • Investigate the circumstance and document by interviewing principles and witnesses involved, taking statements, collecting photographic evidence, collecting and processing physical evidence, writing a report. 
  • Notify persons responsible for the area affected.
  • Notify internal management staff utilizing notification procedures to determine further courses of action, including: referral to the VP/DOS or his/her designee and/or direction to the officer to contact the appropriate law enforcement agency for support.

Confiscation - When CSOs encounter illicit drug possession or use on campus involving materials that are not deemed as a felony to possess, the CSO must confiscate the material and any accompanying paraphernalia. CSOs will only hold and question the person for the purpose of obtaining information regarding the incident and to determine the following personal identifying information:

  • Name
  • Identifying information (student identification or drivers license)
  • Date of Birth

When illicit drug substances and/or paraphernalia are confiscated, CSOs will follow Community Safety Department internal policies and procedures pertaining to the collection, processing, custody and disposing of evidence and property.

A Community Safety Incident Report and Evidence/Property Report will normally result in and should include date and time of incident and names and personal information of all offending persons. The reports will normally be forwarded to the Director of Community Safety.

Paraphernalia includes items such as pipes, bongs, vaporizers, cocaine spoons and cocaine vials. It should be noted that hypodermic needles do not immediately constitute illicit paraphernalia. 

Detention - If a decision to arrest is made by the CSOs on scene, the Director of Community Safety and the VP/DOS will be immediately contacted.

Upon encountering a potential violation by a community member, CSOs may detain possible violators if it is reasonably believed that the violator(s) pose an imminent physical danger either to themselves or to anyone else. The sole purpose of detention is to prevent physical harm. Detention will end when it is reasonably believed that the imminent threat of physical harm – either to violator(s) or to others – no longer exists.

In the case of non-community members, a CSO may encounter suspected illicit drug possession and/or use within the above limits. The CSO may invoke a citizen’s arrest if the suspected possession occurs in the presence of the officer enacting the arrest. CSOs will only hold and question the person for the purpose of obtaining information regarding the incident and to determine personal information, incident to the citizen’s arrest.

Use of force is allowed to safely detain the subject as justifiable under ORS 161.255. Scope of authority is limited to the property of Reed College, including all buildings, homes and real property.

In any case where an individual is detained and arrested in accordance with ORS 133.225, the individual must be turned over to a magistrate or peace officer without delay.

If a decision to arrest is made by the CSOs on scene, the Director of Community Safety and the VP/DOS will be immediately contacted.

Confidentiality - All cases investigated by the Community Safety Department are considered confidential.

CSOs shall not discuss nor release outside of the investigative process any information concerning the confiscation of material or the arrest of any subject except by direction of the Director of Community Safety upon the request and coordination of the senior officers of the College or their designee(s). 

Violation of confidentiality will be addressed on an individual basis and will be deemed a direct violation of an order given by the Director of Community Safety.

Implementation Plan FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding the Implementation of Reed’s Drug and Alcohol Policy

The guiding principle that informs the range of possible responses to violations of Reed’s drug and alcohol policy is the safety and wellbeing of each individual member of the Reed community and of the community as a whole. The specific circumstances and gravity of a given violation of the policy will normally determine the College’s response to that violation. In order to take into account the variety of circumstances that accompany any individual incident, the College intentionally maintains flexibility within an established range of responses.

However in order for students, staff, and the community at large to have a clear understanding of Reed’s procedures, and in an effort to provide as much consistency as is reasonable and appropriate in the College’s response to violations of the drug and alcohol policy, we believe that it is essential to provide a concise description of the range of consequences that applies to each type of violation.

What happens when underage students are found in possession of alcohol?
Any Reed student under the legal drinking age (21 years) who is in possession of alcohol is in violation of the Reed’s drug and alcohol policy as well as state law. (Please see the “Rules of Engagement” from Community Safety.) The student will normally receive a letter from the dean’s office explaining the policy, potential consequences associated with subsequent violations (see below), and in the case of significant intoxication and/or disruption to the community may be requested to visit the dean’s office and/or may be referred to one or more educational, therapeutic and/or Reed judicial resources.

What happens when alcohol is given or sold to underage students?
The sale or distribution of alcoholic beverages to minors represents a violation of the drug and alcohol policy and state law that will normally result in a violation letter from the dean’s office and/or the initiation of Reed’s honor process.

If I'm over 21, how much alcohol can I have before it's considered a "distributable" quantity?

Both the drug and alcohol policy and the Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Health and Wellness Plan are intended to reduce negative consequences of individuals’ use of alcohol and other drugs, and to reduce the negative consequences to the community as a whole. Therefore Reed students, regardless of whether they are of legal drinking age (21 years of age and older), are considered in violation of the drug and alcohol policy if the quantity of alcohol and/or the manner in which it is possessed make it more likely than not that the individual is, or plans to, distribute the alcohol on campus. A “distributable” quantity is considered to be a quantity that a reasonable person would conclude is more than an individual could safely consume in a single sitting. Behavior that could indicate the intent to distribute includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Pouring drinks for others;
  • Handing out containers of alcohol;
  • Possessing alcohol in conjunction with cups, pitchers, kegs, or other items typically used to share beverages.

Are the responses to all alcohol violations the same?
Generally speaking, the seriousness of the violation, and thus the severity of consequences, is directly related and proportional to the behaviors associated with alcohol use and abuse. Students whose alcohol use is associated with significant health risks, disruptive and/or dishonorable behavior will normally face more serious consequences.

What happens when students are found in possession of illegal drugs?
Reed’s drug and alcohol policy prohibits the possession, use, sale and distribution of illegal drugs. Illicit drugs of any kind (regardless of quantity), as well as drug paraphernalia and alcohol in excess of the limits described above will be confiscated by community safety officers. Depending on the nature and severity of the related drug and alcohol policy violation, the confiscated materials will be destroyed according to community safety protocols and/or preserved as evidence for related legal proceedings.

Students in possession of illegal drugs will normally receive a letter from the dean of students explaining the drug and alcohol policy, the consequences of subsequent violations (see below), and in the case of particularly significant violations may be referred to one or more educational, therapeutic and/or Reed judicial resources. In cases involving disruptive/dangerous behavior the dean’s office will normally initiate an honor process and may seek further resolution through legal proceedings.

Possessing distribution quantities of illegal drugs (please refer to the AOD Health and Wellness Plan for these quantities) is considered especially egregious, and in these cases the dean of students’ office will normally seek resolution through the Reed judicial process and appropriate legal proceedings.

Are all drugs considered equally dangerous?
The AOD Health and Wellness Plan defines heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine as “hard drugs”, which pose health risks to users that are inherently unpredictable and potentially catastrophic. In response to drug and alcohol policy violations that include the possession, use and/or distribution of hard drugs, the College will normally respond with intensive therapeutic, judicial and legal interventions. Other illicit substances will be handled as described above.

Will policy violations be on students’ records?
Letters from the dean’s office pertaining to drug and alcohol policy violations are not normally included in the student’s disciplinary file. In some cases, repeat and/or particularly egregious violations will result in the initiation of an honor process and/or, for those living on campus, termination of the student’s residential life contract (please refer to the residence life contract and RCRRRG). Should the honor process result in a sanction, a summary thereof may be included in the student’s disciplinary file.

Do the consequences of drug and alcohol policy violations change with subsequent violations?
The educational, therapeutic and enforcement elements of the implementation plan described above are designed not only to prevent the harmful effects of AOD use and abuse but also to reduce the frequency of and ideally eliminate repeat violations. Students who recurrently engage in behavior that constitutes violation of the drug and alcohol policy will normally be considered to represent a significant threat to the wellbeing of the individual student(s) involved and to the wellbeing of the Reed community as a whole. As such, students with multiple violations of the drug and alcohol policy will in most cases face more significant consequences than those associated with initial violations, including clinical, judicial, and/or legal interventions as described above. Those living on campus may be subject to termination of their residential life contract (please refer to the residence life contract and RCRRRG).

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Mike Brody, Vice President and Dean of Students (503.777.7521).

Community Safety Rules of Engagement for Alcohol

RULES OF ENGAGEMENT FOR CONTACTING INDIVIDUALS WITH ALCOHOL

Source: Guidebook to Reed Drug and Alcohol policy, Guidebook to Reed Implementation Plan, Departmental Directive issued by the CS Director, January, 2011

Principle

CSOs will assume that individuals with alcohol are acting according to the Honor Principle and complying with the Drug and Alcohol Policy, provided the CSO does not have a reasonable concern that the individuals are violating school policy, the law, or that alcohol use has created, or is likely to create, an unsafe or disruptive situation.

Intent

This directive is intended to accomplish the following:
  • Protect the safety and security of individual members of the community
  • Protect the college community from injury or disruption
  • Protect the standing of the college in the larger community
  • Ensure that underage drinking, and other concerns relating to the use of alcohol are addressed consistently, reasonably, and honorably
  • Preserve respectful and open relationships between CSOs, students, other members of the Reed community, and visitors
  • Prevent disruption of campus activities and events
  • Provide clear and objective standards for when CSOs may take reasonable steps to monitor the consumption of alcohol at Reed, including monitoring for underage drinking, and the distribution of alcohol at Reed 

Definitions

  • Community Safety Officer (CSO): All Community Safety (CS) field staff, including officers, supervisors, managers, and the Director
  • Alcohol: For purposes of this directive, alcohol refers to any beverage containing alcohol

Departmental Policy

In order to implement Reed College’s policy regarding the possession and consumption of alcohol, CSOs shall take reasonable steps to monitor the use of alcohol on Reed property, and to determine whether or not individuals observed, reported, or reasonably believed to be consuming alcohol at Reed are at least 21 years of age or otherwise in violation of relevant policies and/or laws.

General Guidelines

  • CSOs shall not question individuals randomly or indiscriminately about their age
  • CSOs shall not target individuals for age checks because of a group affiliation, residential situation, gender, race, national origin, perceived gender identification, or any other characteristics not directly linked to the individual’s reported or observable behavior
  • CSOs shall abide by the Honor Principle in all contacts with individuals related to alcohol by striving to be respectful and to minimize potential embarrassment and inconvenience to an individual being contacted
  • CSOs will generally limit contact to individuals observed or reported to have a container with a beverage containing alcohol or acting in a disruptive manner because of apparent consumption of alcohol

Engagement Rules

CSOs shall contact individuals with alcohol and verify whether or not the individual is at least 21 years of age for one or more of the following reasons:

 

  • Reported or observed disruptive behavior
  • Reported or observed intoxication
  • Observed and overt attempts to conceal alcohol that would lead a reasonable officer to conclude that the individual is attempting to avoid an interaction with the CSO
  • The CSO has personal knowledge that the individual is under 21
  • The CSO receives a first-hand report from a named member of the Reed community that a named individual is under 21
  • Observed distribution/sharing of alcohol from a container that a reasonable officer would conclude contains more alcohol than an individual could safely consume in a single sitting
  • The individual is in possession of a quantity of alcohol that a reasonable officer would conclude is more than an individual could safely consume in a single sitting
  • Other than as listed above, anytime the CSO establishes a reasonable concern that an individual’s behavior involving alcohol presents a safety risk or is disruptive

Contacting Groups

Groups where alcohol is present may be contacted under the same rules of engagement listed for individuals.  If a group is contacted under one or more of the criteria above, all individuals immediately associated with the group and in the immediate proximity to alcohol shall have their age verified.

 

Community Member Status Checks

CSOs may contact any individual at Reed if the CSO has a reasonable concern that the individual presents a risk to the safety of the Reed community or a risk of disruption to the educational mission of the college, or the individual may be engaged in activity that is a violation of the law, Reed policy, or the Honor Principle.

 

If an individual is not recognizable as a Reed community member, and is in possession of alcohol, CSOs may contact the individual in order to determine whether or not the individual is a Reed community member or invited guest.  While such contacts should not be used as a pretext for conducting age checks, if the CSO learns during the course of the contact that the individual is underage, the CSO will take appropriate actions. If an individual is contacted solely for the purpose of determining whether or not s/he is, in fact, permitted on campus, the CSO may verify the individual’s age according to the Engagement Rules listed above.

Individuals with alcohol on campus who are not Reed community members or invited guests (including approved event attendees) may be required to leave campus.

Documentation

All age verifications, regardless of the outcome, shall be documented in the ARMS CAD and shall include at least the following information:
  • Individual’s name and student I.D. number (if applicable)
  • Date, time, and location of the contact
  • Description of the reason(s) for initiating the contact
  • Outcome of the contact

CSOs shall clearly document the reason(s) for conducting age verification.  If an AOD violation is identified, the CSO shall produce an incident report, and the reason(s) for initiating the contact shall be documented in the report narrative.  If the CSO determines that the individual is NOT underage, the CSO shall document the reason(s) for the contact in the officer’s shift summary and ensure that the reason(s) are also documented in the ARMS CAD notes.

Rules of Engagement for Contacting Individuals with Alcohol

Quick Reference Guide

CSOs shall contact individuals with alcohol and verify whether or not the individual is at least 21 years of age for one or more of the following reasons:

  • Disruptive behavior
  • Intoxication
  • Observed and overt attempts to conceal alcohol
  • Personal knowledge
  • First-hand report
  • Distribution/sharing of alcohol
  • Possession of a distribution quantity of alcohol
  • Safety or community disruption risks

CSOs shall contact groups where alcohol is present under the same rules of engagement listed for individuals.

CSOs may contact any individuals on campus with alcohol for the purpose of identifying the individual’s community member status and purpose for being at Reed.

CSOs may NOT conduct random age checks or use other contacts as pretexts for age verifications.

All age verifications shall be documented according to departmental directives.

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(last modified: September 12, 2013)