Sexism

Masculinity and Femininity in Disney's Mulan

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The song “I’ll Make A Man Out of You” from the 1998 classic Mulan shows gender stereotypes and battling them. Mulan is a Disney classic that confronts battling feminine stereotypes head on and throughout the movie the protagonist Mulan shows that she can do anything a man can do. In this song specifically, the gender stereotypes of being a man in the war and what a man should be able to do and be is explained to a very catchy rhythm. Along with this throughout the song, Mulan shows how she is strong and she can fight just the same as them, but because of the laws, she must do this all while dressed as a man to blend in.

Men Complaining About a Female Announcer’s Voice

his in a article about men criticizing the sound of Beth Mowins voice, who is a female sports broadcaster. There were many rude tweets toward her sound of voice and it was even mentioned that just a lower sounding voice should be on sports broadcasting, which I don't understand why. Many women think that they weren't necessarily mad about her voice but just because there was a women broadcasting sports rather than a man. The men on the show even said "I'm not a sexist but..". Sounds to me like they are. [Published on 09-18-2017]

Posted by Mary Copeland on December 19, 2017

Tags:
Womens Language;
Sexism

Women Aren't Ruining Food

This article by Jaya Saxena talks about the gender encoded words used to describe foods associated with either men or women, and how that affects perception of the foods in society. [Published on 10-30-2017]

Posted by Reagan Kanter on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Sexism

Things Not to Say to Women at Work

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This video challenges language used in ways that specifically applies to women. This video produced by the BBC discusses common phrases, words and topics that specifically target and apply to women in the workplace that portray sexist ideologies. The women in the video confront these, explain why they are inappropriate, and in some cases offer alternate ways to frame these discussions.

Posted by Chelsea on December 7, 2017

Tags:
Power;
Femininity;
Gender;
Communities of Practice;
Sexism

Ellen DeGeneres' coming out episode

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In a televised talk show this year host Ellen DeGeneres celebrated the twentieth anniversary of her revelation on national prime time television that she was a lesbian. Forty-two million viewers tuned in to watch Ellen’s sitcom character declare “I am gay”, and this challenging and controversial decision made television history. A media frenzy followed with heated debates on gay rights and lifestyles. Ellen’s difficult and personal decision to reveal her lesbianism led to her sitcom show being cancelled in 1997. By 2004 she returned to television as a talk show host, and since then has earned ten Emmys for excellence in television. By making it acceptable for a public figure to declare a sexual preference, social change has occurred, and since then, gay marriage has become legal in the United States.

Posted by Mary Jo Frazier on October 8, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Sexual Orientation;
Politics and Policy;
Sexism

9 Non-Threatening Leadership Strategies For Women

I found this while scrolling along my Facebook feed. I believe the comics do a good job of describing the absurdity women have to deal with in order to be seen as a valid worker in the workplace, and they way in which their language reflects upon that identity.

Posted by Caroline Wright on September 13, 2017

Tags:
Womens Language;
Sexism

Bic Pens for Women

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This is Ellen talking about when BIC came out with a pen for women and poking fun at how silly it is to have a pen specifically for women.

Posted by Tory Binger on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Sexism

Dr. Pepper Ten-It's not for Women

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There are a lot of T.V. advertisements that are quite sexist still today. This Dr. Pepper commercial advertisement from a few years back greatly displays language ideology due to the fact that they quote in the commercial "Dr. Pepper Ten-It's not for women". It displays that certain items, specifically something as simple as a drink should be drank by men only. This is not only sexist, but it displays for men the masculinity that they should have and the toughness factor that women "don't" have. Women have been displayed horribly in advertisements for centuries, and it only seems to be getting worse. Commercial advertisements are seen by millions of people and a lot of people are affected by the language displayed in them. The ideology and meaning behind advertisements like this one is a powerful display. This advertisement makes women feel powerless and as though certain items are only for men, although this isn't truly the case. Overall, there are much more advertisements directed towards men than for women. Advertisements such as this one, use language ideologies to reach out to a certain group of people and tend to deliberately leave others behind.

Posted by Megan George on June 22, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Sexism

Alice Walker: Fear of Being Feminine

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Alice Walker is an American novelist, poet, and civil and women’s rights activist. She is best known for her critically acclaimed, Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Color Purple. In this video, she talks about the negative repercussions of referring to women as ‘guys’. The type of situation she is referencing are when someone, say a server at a restaurant, walks up to a group of women and addresses them by saying “Hi guys, how are you doing today?” Men and women both do this in America and it only perpetuates the fear of being feminine, or a female in general. With so many women still fighting for equal rights, it is crucial to be proud of being a woman and for women to not label themselves or other women as ‘guys’. This way of speaking stems from the fact that the English language is a “masculine default” language. This means that masculinity, along with masculine terms, are the default in English and other feminine terms have been unnecessarily created in order to differentiate between a male and female performing the same role. A good example of this sociolinguistic model is actor vs. actress and waiter vs. waitress. The original words are changed when talking about a woman when really, the word itself is just supposed to describe the job someone is doing. Although feminine words are added, many people still use the masculine terms by default, creating an alienation and feeling of unimportance or lack of superiority for women. Unfortunately, the aforementioned linguistic features, along with calling a group of women “guys”, are innate in most people’s vocabulary and using them can be a very difficult habit to break. Walker suggests women coming together to change the way that they label themselves and other women in order to first separate women from men and then empower those women. Although it may seem like a small step on the way to equality, it is an extremely vital one.

Sometimes, it's ok to throw rocks at girls...

I was listening to a radio station (can't remember which one now) but they talked about an ad that said "Sometimes, it is okay to throw rocks at girls". This reminded me of a girl and wild shoe ad shown in class. "Rocks" in the ad simply meant that gems are often referred to as rocks. It was widely criticized for its in-sensitiveness. As the article reads, “many argued the advertisement supported a culture of violence against women.” Of course, a child would not see the play on words the company tried to convey but the literal message that it is okay to basically throw things at girls and hurt them. [Published on 03-27-2017]

Posted by Maria D. Santiago on May 2, 2017

Tags:
Power;
Youth;
Gender;
Sexism

Louis CK 2015 - Racism and Sexism are very different

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In this video, Louis C.K. discusses gender issues and being self aware. When doing an impression of a couple of female college students, he uses vocal fry to get the message across to the audience. Not only is the content of what she is supposedly saying in this situation shallow and stereotypical, but he also uses the glottal, creaking sound of lower-register speech oscillation typical of vocal fry. By using this register to do his impression, and in making his impression of a college girl appear dumb and not self aware, he is perpetuating the dominant stereotype that vocal fry is used by young women only, and that it indexes a set of negative attributes. He does this again when describing the USA as a 'terrible girlfriend to the world'. He uses the same register to describe a United States that remembers everything bad that ever happened to it, but does not acknowledge its own faults and mistakes. Tags: Gender, Women's language, Ideology, Femininity, Sexism, Indexicalityhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-Y17YG63B4 Louis CK 2015 - Racism and Sexism are very different In this video, Louis C.K. discusses gender issues and being self aware. When doing an impression of a couple of female college students, he uses vocal fry to get the message across to the audience. Not only is the content of what she is supposedly saying in this situation shallow and stereotypical, but he also uses the glottal, creaking sound of lower-register speech oscillation typical of vocal fry. By using this register to do his impression, and in making his impression of a college girl appear dumb and not self aware, he is perpetuating the dominant stereotype that vocal fry is used by young women only, and that it indexes a set of negative attributes. He does this again when describing the USA as a 'terrible girlfriend to the world'. He uses the same register to describe a United States that remembers everything bad that ever happened to it, but does not acknowledge its own faults and mistakes.

Posted by Sierra Hurd on April 28, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Sexism

Talk “Like a Man”: The Linguistic Styles of Hillary Clinton, 1992-2013

This article examines the changes in Hillary Clinton's linguistic style from the years of 1992-2013. Many people have claimed that she talks "like a man," and this article examines that theory. In the article Jennifer J. Jones proves how Hillary went to more of a masculine linguistic approach to a more feministic approach in 2007. There are many reasons for these changes that are reflected in this article. [Published on 08-17-2016]

Donald Trump Couldn't Stop Interrupting Hillary

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During the presidential debate this year, Donald Trump interrupted Hillary 51 times versus her 17 times of interrupting him. Studies have shown that this is a gender related difference. Men tend to interrupt women more than vice versa. It is a way of showing their masculinity and power. Instead his interrupting of Hillary was viewed as rude and demeaning by most. This is also an example of the changes occurring in political discourse. Trump uses language and engages in behavior that defies some of our political language ideologies.

Posted by Erica Hageman on October 2, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Sexism

Ignorance in the Office

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This is a short clip from the Office where two characters are told by their boss to treat the other person like the race on their forehead (index card). One person is supposed to give hints while the other person must guess who is on their own card.

Posted by Sophia Smith on July 29, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent;
Sexism

Always #LikeAGirl Girls Emojis

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This YouTube video sponsored by Always debates that the emojis used on smart phones are not representative of women. It says some of these may even be sexist. Emojis are wildly popular in today’s society and this issue may go unnoticed by many people. See for yourself as this video interviews women and asks their opinions on the subject.

Gender Has/Has Not Been Hijacked by White MiddleClass

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Portion of a very interesting debate at the Oxford Union regarding whether feminism has been hijacked by "white middle class" women. Engages so many topics,including race, poverty, feminism/gender politics.

Posted by Scott Russell on March 10, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Socioeconomic Status;
Politics and Policy;
Sexism

Potty-Mouthed Princesses Drop F-Bombs for Feminism by FCKH8.com

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This video uses young girl cussing to show that there are more problems in society than little girls cussing. The fact that they are talking the way they are is shocking, which is done to make people actually listen to the bigger point.

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Youth;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Sexism;
Slang;
Stigma

Sapir-Worf

This video displays an example of the Sapir-Worf hypothesis by giving the example of a male nurse versus a female nurse. The video is only a sample.

Posted by Zana Pascoe on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Femininity;
Masculinity;
Gender;
Linguistic Relativity;
Sexism

Family Guy Stereotypes

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This video is a combination of stereotypes that have aired on family guy over the years. Many of these stereotypes have to do with race and language in society today.

CNN Election Center

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In this video there are many different types of sociolinguistic artifacts, and in any kind of SNL skit they have to make it more dramatic to bring out the commentary. Yet, within this clip you see many types of tags used within the first few minutes. For example, Donald Trump is the first person to be impersonated, but within the short clip that he is in he shows tags of "Race/Ethnicity, Sexism, Gender, Politics and Policy". And for Hillary Clinton she is showing many of the same character traits as well. Within all of these impersonators they are all trying to benefit themselves in some way that looks appealing to the audience.

SNL - Sexual Harassment and You

In this Saturday Night Live skit the are discussing how the work place used to just be guys and was easier that way, now that it is filled with women as well law suits happen more often. They send this geeky guy to ask a girl on a date and he gets rejected and then a 'handsome' guy does the same thing and grabs her boob and gets accepted. This video is full of stigma's, gender issues, masculinity issues and sexism at the beginning.

Posted by Madison Rigdon on March 4, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Variation;
Masculinity;
Gender;
Sexism;
Stigma

Should dictionaries do more to confront sexism?

A New Yorker article about the recent criticism of the Oxford English Dictionary for sexist examples entires for words like "rabid" and "bossy," touching on issues of prescriptivism and descriptivism. [Published on 02-24-2016]

Posted by Kara Becker on February 26, 2016

Tags:
Gender;
Prescriptivism;
Sexism

"The Day Beyonce Turned Black"

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Within this SNL skit, there are many different forms of language used. For this skit, it is explaining how caucasian people tend to look at the world in a over dramatic way. Throughout the skit, there are race, gender, & sexualities between white and blacks. This skit has a comical view on different political problems that we have in this country today, and what the children of our culture are growing up in.

"Pick-Up Artist"

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This artifact is showing how different people communicate on a daily basis, and how each person has a different way of showing how the communicate. With this skit, most of it exaggerated for comical effect. But this is showing the diversity of people and there language through a simple conversation in group settings. In this skit there is gender rolls being played of femininity and masculinity, while showing the differences within the women's language. And how this "Art of the Pick-Up" class is teaching women how to properly express themselves.

My Sexuality

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This video entails a character on a TV show, who insists that a women's "sexuality" can get them in or out of any situation. Some may feel that this is demoralizing for women in todays society, because women have worked so hard over the past century to ear the same rights as men. And this is showing that all women have to do is flaunt there sexuality and everything will come to them on a silver platter. Which in fact is not true for all women.

Posted by Tori Miller on February 18, 2016

Tags:
Femininity;
Gender;
Sexism

Freshwoman

This article has an interesting perspective on Language and sexism. How our language is still objectifying woman. It's speaks to the power of the words we use. [Published on 03-20-2012]

Posted by Tricia Roberson on February 17, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Femininity;
Masculinity;
Gender;
Gender Binary;
Sexism

Using Unbiased language

This site offers suggestions for avoiding gender bias and sexism in the English language.

Posted on November 13, 2012

Tags:
Sexism;
Gender

Spivak Pronouns

A description of the gender-neutral Spivak pronouns.

Posted on November 8, 2012

Tags:
Pronouns;
Gender;
Sexism

NY Times: All-Purpose Pronoun

A New York Times On Language column about the continued debate over an all-purpose pronoun to replace the masculine default in constructions like "Each student needs his book."

Posted on September 25, 2012

Tags:
Pronouns;
Gender;
Sexism