Hip Hop Nation

Made In-Medine

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This song is "Made In" by the French-Algerian Kabyle rapper Medine. The lyrics are mostly in French, with code switching to English and briefly to Arabic. The song is about being proud of one's ethnic/cultural heritage and/or immigrant identity. The song celebrates diverse origins and experiences, and the code switching helps to support that message and lend the lyrics a global feeling.

Posted by Cecilia Bahls on September 26, 2018

Tags:
Code-switching;
Borrowing;
Race,Ethnicity;
Hip Hop Nation

Workplace Norms Conveyed Through Rap

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The Office is a popular show on NBC from which we can apply linguistic concepts to. In this short clip Dwight and Michael compose a rap for new members of the office that have relocated from another geographical area. This rap is used to introduce the new hires to the social workplace norms that typically take place at Dunder Mifflin. Dwight and Michael utilize rap and rhyming to make the song seem more comical and appealing to the individuals they have never met before. They also try hard to make their office seem "cool" and "inviting."

Posted by Sydney Chappell on June 30, 2018

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Communities of Practice;
Hip Hop Nation;
Slang

Hip Hop Artists in China Add American Rap Language and Culture in Their Rap music

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“Made in China” is a Chinese rap music. The lyrics contain Chinese and English, and the singers add rhymes of both languages in some words and sentences. Meanwhile, the artists mix Chinese and American hiphop culture together. This song also represents a group of Chinese rappers try to break some traditional “rules” in mainstream culture.

Posted by Shanshan He on June 30, 2018

Tags:
Mandarin Chinese;
Hip Hop Nation;
Multilingualism

Brother Ali freestyle on GoRadio - 95.3FM

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Brother Ali is a white socially-conscious rapper who, due to being albino and growing up primarily around African-Americans in the Midwest, existed for many years with a publicly ambiguous racial identity. In more recent years (including at the time of this video), Brother Ali has been more explicit about being white In this video, Brother Ali freestyles on a local Twin Cities radio station. He uses numerous features of AAE, including pervasive coronal stop (-t/-d) deletion.

Posted by Oskar Soderberg on April 18, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Hip Hop Nation

Brother Ali freestyle on B96

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Brother Ali is a white socially-conscious rapper who, due to being albino and growing up primarily around African-Americans in the Midwest, existed for many years with a publicly ambiguous racial identity. In more recent years (after this video), Brother Ali has been more explicit about being white In this video, Brother Ali freestyles on a local Twin Cities radio station. He uses numerous features of AAE, including pervasive coronal stop (-t/-d) deletion.

Posted by Oskar Soderberg on April 18, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Hip Hop Nation

Excerpt from Donald Glover's

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I used these four songs, a clip from "Weirdo," and this interview of Donald Glover's coronal stop deletion.

Iggy Azalea Freestyle

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Iggy Azalea's attempt at her rap persona and linguistic repertoire without practice. Citation: Eberhardt, M. & Freeman, K. 2015. 'First things first, I'm the realest': linguistic appropriation, white privilege, and the hip-hop persona of Iggy Azalea.

How the triplet flow took over rap

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Although the usage of triplets (i.e. the “Migos” flow) has become very popular as of late, and is currently heard on just about every rap track that hits the Billboard 100, the usage of triplets in rap is not something new. It has its roots in Midwestern and Southern rap communities in the 80s onward. In rap, a triplet is essentially like setting your verse to 3/4 time - three beats per bar rather than 4. In rap, it can be used as a sort of verbal trick - it could slow down a song by throwing off the expected rhythm our brain is expecting to hear or even speed it up. Listening to verses in triplets can also make the rappers’ flow feel cleaner. Lyrically, the songs can be flexible or rigid, allowing a diverse range of rap styles to be done over the beat.

HIP HOP SLANGS

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This is about a Guy who is trying to explain rap slang. Based on the video he is a white male trying to explain the hip hop cultures slang. The thing that I found really interesting about the video is his persona that presents the word. How he tries to explain the word with “appropriate English”. I noticed that this related to our class because we talked about how we appropriate certain styles of language over the other. Even though rap slang is only used by a small group of people it seem to be represented a an inferior way of speak based on the presentation of this video. When they gave examples it was looked at as silly. Just a really interesting video especially when you relate it to this topic.

Posted by Simeon Perkins on May 12, 2017

Tags:
Language Shift;
Hip Hop Nation;
Slang

Black Girls: The Cycle Continues

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In the video titled “Black Girls: The Cycle Continues.” we see a group of young black females taking turns speaking their mind's over an apparent issue, which has upset them. This is a good example of slang terminology and language ideologies of a speech community.

Kodak Black Social Artifact Golden Boy

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He uses a dialect that is familiar with the rap community, and has an accent that is usually associated with the Haitian community. His delivery of the language he uses gives him his swagger, and gives him a style that stands out from other artists. Examples of his lyrics include saying things like "dat" instead of "that", or "witchu" instead of with "with you".

How WSJ Used an Algorithm to Analyze ‘Hamilton’ the Musical

Joel Eastwood and Erik Hinton wrote an algorithm to analyze the different types of rhymes used in the tony Award Winning Broadway Musical "Hamilton", and reveal their Hip-Hop influences. [Published on 06-06-2016]

How to Speak Hip

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This is the intro to a 13 part "album" instructing listeners on how to speak and understand "hip" language. Those who want to appear "cool" to this subculture that includes hipsters, juvenile delinquents, jazz musicians, etc.

Rich Chigga - I Only Say N**** When I’m Jamming to Rap Music

This Indonesian "rapper"/comedian with the stage name, Rich Chigga, is receiving backlash from the hip-hop community for making a song that utilizes the n-word. When confronted about this word, he was quoted saying, "My intent was to kinda help take the power out of that word so people would be less sensitive about it but I do understand if some people would be offended and I think doing it in that song’s enough." It is usually a common theme for people not to say the n-word due to the negative implications of the word. However, he tries to justify his usage by describing how he is attempting to desensitize a word. He is getting backlash for trying to exploit this culture derived from African-Americans and hip-hop. [Published on 07-20-2016]

Posted by Lauren Watkins on July 20, 2016

Tags:
Race,Ethnicity;
Hip Hop Nation

Kyle vs. Kanye

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Highlights the absurdity of participating in rap culture without adapting some amount of AAE - the protagonist's middle-class white background clashes in the way accounted for in Cutler, Cece, 2003. Note the only potential AAE marker, "dope" which is marked in the above article as a strictly "fake" AAE marker.

Posted by Hunter Gill on March 14, 2016

Tags:
Hip Hop Nation

'Thug Life' and the Effect of Hip-Hop on Language

This audio talks about how hip hop influence today's language. The word "Thug" is discussed and explained how the words meaning has changed over time.

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Grammaticalization;
Hip Hop Nation;
Slang

Formation - Beyonce

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In this video, singer Beyonce uses her lyrics and video to demonstrate her frustration with society, police brutality, and racism.

Posted by Zana Pascoe on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Race,Ethnicity;
Hip Hop Nation;
Slang

Key & Peele - Obama Meet & Greet

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This Key & Peele comedy sketch humorously depicts Obama and the different ways he talks to black and white people after a speech. There's a lot of code switching going on in this sketch. There's a handful funny references in here as well, from rap to slang.

But What Does Bae Actually Mean?

In this article, the author explores the history and rise of the word "bae" in popular culture, noting that the term has actually been around much longer than its 2014 introduction to the mainstream. Many who grew up hearing and speaking AAVE have used "bae" in conversation for years, and the term has been commercialized to a point where it has lost its original vibe and is now being "sold back" to its original users. [Published on 03-07-2016]

Be Free

Rapper J. Cole uses his words to express the danger of African Americans and the struggle that they go through. He uses his words as symbols and powerful words to paint the picture of the pain.

How Others Interpret Slang

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This is video shows different members of society, whether it be by age, gender or race, trying to identify what different slang terms mean.

Posted by Katherine Helms on March 3, 2016

Tags:
Hip Hop Nation;
Slang

Rudy Giuliani: Beyoncé’s halftime show was an ‘outrageous’ affront to police

Rudy Giuliani describes Beyonce's halftime show as being inappropriate for the middle american audience of the Super Bowl. He states “This is football, not Hollywood, and I thought it was really outrageous that she used it as a platform to attack police officers who are the people who protect her and protect us, and keep us alive." [Published on 02-08-2016]

Posted by Jared Nietfeld on March 1, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Hip Hop Nation;
Politics and Policy

"The Day Beyonce Turned Black"

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Within this SNL skit, there are many different forms of language used. For this skit, it is explaining how caucasian people tend to look at the world in a over dramatic way. Throughout the skit, there are race, gender, & sexualities between white and blacks. This skit has a comical view on different political problems that we have in this country today, and what the children of our culture are growing up in.

Lil' Kim - Single Black Female

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One song off Lil' Kim's album The Notorious K.I.M. which I analyzed with respect to CSD.

Posted by Sami Peterson on November 24, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Hip Hop Nation

"A white rapper is more marketable in America."

Rapper Mac Miller on NPR's podcast Microphone Check. Around the 41:00 mark, Mac reflects on what it means to be white in hip hop.

Posted by Richard Adcock on November 24, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Hip Hop Nation

Bryan Silva

Bryan Silva is a celebrity on Vine, a video sharing website that caps videos at 6 seconds. Silva uses Vine to promote his career as a white rapper. As part of establishing his legitimacy as a rapper, he employs use of AAVE and uses his lyrics (and his body) to demonstrate his masculinity. The video is too short to hear the initial consonant, but in the word "with" he uses a /d/ instead of an /ð/. In the only post-vocalic /ɹ/ environment ("your"), he drops the /ɹ/. His use of the word "ain't" is also a demonstration of his AAVE. The content of this particular line also reinforces his masculinity. He discounts "fufu lame shit" (i.e. experiences he's not proud of or chooses not to associate with) and threatens to "send some shots at your fitted" (a type of hat). Silva perceives rap as a masculine genre. By employing what he perceives to be masculine linguistic and stylistic features, he stakes his claim as a rapper. In other videos, Silva says the n-word and says that he has a right to use it (and other AAVE features) because he grew up in a black neighborhood. [Published on 04-11-2014]

Posted by Gregor McGee on March 17, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Hip Hop Nation

MISS KO 葛仲珊 - CALL ME (Mandarin-English Codeswitching)

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Music for Project 1 on contact varieties, this is a Taiwanese-American hip-hop artist who uses Mandarin and English in her songs. (to varying degrees, if you want a youtube adventure check out her other videos)

Posted by Syd Low on September 30, 2014

Tags:
Chinglish;
Code-switching;
Hip Hop Nation

Why do rappers have fake accents?

An interview with David Crystal on the speaking and rapping of Iggy Azalea, a white Australian woman who adopts AAE features in her hip hop style.

Posted by Kara Becker on September 29, 2014

Tags:
Australian English;
African American English;
Hip Hop Nation

Interview: Nardwuar vs. E-40

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Music personality Nardwuar interviews rapper E-40 about his hometown, the Bay Area music scene, and E-40's music history.

Posted by Sydney Alysse Negus on April 23, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Hip Hop Nation

E-40 "Barbarian"

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E-40's song "Barbarian", which addresses performing a street identity authentically.

Posted by Sydney Alysse Negus on April 23, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Hip Hop Nation

NPR: Kreayshawn breaks in, but whose party is she crashing?

A 2011 profile of white female hip hop artist Kreayshawn, leader of a "white girl mob" of Oakland hip hop artists, which highlights the criticisms of her related to her race and gender.