Ebonics Controversy

Rethinking Grammar: How We Talk

We as people judge the way that others speak, we assume intelligence based on the way that people speak. African American Vernacular tends to be associated with not being very smart [Published on 10-21-2015]

The Crows in Dumbo

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Childhood is an extremely critical time for socialization into a given culture. Children learn from parents, teachers, and friends about the norms and beliefs of their community. Language is an important category to be socialized into as language and ideologies surrounding language are intertwined with race, class, and status. Although there is no official language of America, English is pushed as the official language so much so that historically non-English speakers were forced by violence to shed their culture’s identity and language and subscribe to the “English-only” agenda. While the use of corporal punishment is not prevalent in modern society as a means of restricting non-English languages, the general attitude towards anyone who speaks something other than Standardized American English is unfavorable. The crows in Disney’s Dumbo show the ways in which language is used to stereotype a group of people which also acts to socialize young children to stigmatize people either directly or indirectly. In Jane Hill’s study on the use of Mock Spanish, she concluded that mock Spanish is directly linked to ideas of racism by saying, “racism is largely produced in and through everyday talk, not through the obvious racist slurs that most people today condemn but through unintentional, indirect uses of language that reinforce racist stereotypes” (Hill, 2008).  Furthermore, Rankin and Karn’s study on Ebonics led them to the conclusion that “anti-Ebonics ideology is transmitted by a simple set of strategies which suggest one can ‘speak’ Ebonics by simply pejorating standard English” which then “produces a racialized language stereotype of a subordinate group” (Rankin & Karn, 1999). Disney’s portrayal of an animal who is colored black and speaking in a stereotypical manner of African Americans would further push the ideology that this is how all African Americans speak. This portrayal would then be normalized and viewed as acceptable based on the influence and power of media especially on children.

Posted by Alanna Daniels on May 11, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Standard Language Ideology;
Ebonics Controversy

What is Ebonics?

A look into what Ebonics sounds like and how people feel about this style of speaking.

Posted by Nadia Mahmud on October 13, 2016

Tags:
Ebonics Controversy

Jamila Lyiscott: 3 ways to speak English

Jamila Lyiscott performs her powerful spoken-word essay "Broken English," where she uses distinct flavors of the English that she speaks to explore the complicated history and present-day identity that each language represents, and what it means to be "articulate." [Published on 06-19-2014]

Posted by Jordan Huntley on September 18, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Code-switching;
Ebonics Controversy;
Semantics

Code switching

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In this video Key and Peele explain why they use code switching in their daily lives and in their comedy, i think this applies well with what we're learning but if you watch some of their other videos and look for the code switching it makes it a little more interesting and funny at the same time. you can actually see how code switching is integrated into other people's lives more deeply than others, or even compare it to your own life for example. you can also apply this to what we learned in the other chapter just a couple days ago, the one that detailed the bay city high school teens interaction with someone of the opposite color and how they changed their tone of pitch and the way they talked while explaining the situation to another person.

Gizoogle Search Engine

Website imitating Google that attempts to "translate" pages into AAE for comedic purposes.

Posted by Maren Bilby on April 19, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Ebonics Controversy

Senate Debate over "Ebonics" in Schools

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This is a fairly processed montage of the hype mentioned in Labov's article and analyzed in Lippi-Green, Rosina. (2012).

Posted by Hunter Gill on April 19, 2016

Tags:
Ebonics Controversy

The Ebonics Controversy in my Backyard

This article talks about Ebonics and Code-Switching, It explains what happened when the Ebonics controversy broke out.

Ax VS. Ask

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The video is an example of the "ax" vs. "ask" problem. This short video shows President Obama saying "ax" instead of "ask" while he addresses a crowd on education. I just wanted to portray how this issue in English isn't just due to lack of education and upbringing, as even President Obama uses the term "ax",

Posted by Jeremy Gutovitz on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ebonics Controversy;
Education

Hooked on Ebonics

The article dives into several important concepts as they relate to the understanding of Ebonics. The author explains that there are rules and variety within Ebonics that demonstrate its value as a variety of English. The author also addresses that Ebonics is not just "a black thing" and that many whites, Hispanics and Asian Americans all engage in AAVE.

Family Guy Stereotypes

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This video is a combination of stereotypes that have aired on family guy over the years. Many of these stereotypes have to do with race and language in society today.

African American Vernacular English (AAVE)

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A humorous look at the interpretation of AAVE from the movie Airplane! ca. 1980.

Posted by Mark Beal on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Ebonics Controversy

Tense Present: Democracy, English and the Wars Over Usage

David Foster Wallace reviews 'A Dictionary of Modern American Usage'. In so doing, Wallace explores how language rules are developed and on what authority they are created. Near the end he tells a story about trying to convince students to write in what he calls SWE "Standard Written English" or "Standard White English". [Published on 04-01-2001]

English or Ebonics

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This is a video that show the code-switching involved between proper english vs. slang.

Posted by Kelley Lane on February 28, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching;
Ebonics Controversy;
Slang

Racialism, Ebonics, and Style

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This video addresses common racial discrepancies in America through how "black" and "white" people talk. It also touches on style of speech being construed differently among races. It is a nice viewpoint on why people talk certain ways.

Garrard McClendon on Black English - Ebonics

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Garrad McClendon addresses the dangers of the African American language. Although he believes the African American language is beautiful, he feels strongly that the African Americans in the US need to learn how to code-switch. They need to learn when it is appropriate to talk in slang and when it is necessary to code-switch to "proper" English. Garrad also addresses the issues that teachers need to become more aggressive in correcting children's language at a young age and not be afraid of doing so. The children's future is dependent on being taught proper English and being correct when they don't use it.

Bill Cosby on Ebonics

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Bill Cosby's "Pound Cake Speech" in 2004, where he denies the legitimacy of African American English.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 15, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Ebonics Controversy

Slate: The Ebonic Plague?

A 1997 article in Slate Magazine on the Ebonics Controversy.

Ebonics "Translator" Tool

One of a few websites that will "translate" a standard English phrase into Ebonics.

DEA to hire Ebonics "Translators"

In 2010, The DEA put out a job ad for nine speakers of African American English to serve as "translators."