Jewish

Code-switching with Drake

In this sketch from Saturday Night Live, the cast and special guest star Drake depict a fictionalized version of Drake's bar mitzvah. This event brings together his African-American family from his father's side, and his Jewish and white family from his mother's side. Drake expertly code switches between the two groups, greeting his mother's family with "Shabbat shalom," and his father's with "whasssssup." Drake goes on to deliver a rap in which he talks about knowing what a W2 is, which indexes Drake's membership in the Jewish community and its perceived expertise in dealing with money.

Posted by Madylan Womack on May 9, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching;
Jewish;
Race,Ethnicity

Implementation of Hebrew as a Standard Language in pre-1948 Palestine

This article discusses the revernacularization of Hebrew into a standard language in Palestine, and then gives examples of how political and interest groups carried out this implementation at a local level through an examination of the 1930s and 1940s city documents of a small Jewish settlement, Raanana. [Published on 01-01-2008]

Bernie Sanders' accent, explained

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This video breaks down Bernie Sanders’ accent. It explains how his accent is very unique in the way that it reflects his social class, the area and time where he grew up and his ethnicity. The video explains how Sanders’ accent reflects the dominant New York/Jewish/Middle Class accent of the 1950’s while also explaining how this accent is decreasing in more recent generations

Posted by Julia Nordhem on December 4, 2017

Tags:
New York City English;
Jewish;
Accent;
Communities of Practice

Why Linguists are Fascinated by the American Jewish Accent

This article discusses the American Jewish accent, what it sounds like, and its origins. It discusses how the American Jewish accent is derived from Yiddish, Hebrew, and the languages of prominent Jewish communities, and is common in Jewish people across America.

Posted by Sarah DeBauche on November 28, 2017

Tags:
New York City English;
Jewish;
Accent;
Communities of Practice;
Multilingualism

The New York Jewish Accent

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The idea of the Jewish-American accent highlights the ways in which language associates with a specific group of people and can sometimes be used as a way to stereotype a group of people. Generally, the Jewish accent is tied with the Brooklyn/New York accent, as the boroughs of New York are a big place for Jewish populations. Especially in mainstream media, like “Seinfeld” and “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” have perpetuated the idea of the New Yorker Jew. The idea of code-switching and mixing languages is also prominent in the accent, as Jewish people are more likely to use Yiddish words in their everyday language. In the first media, Larry David amps up his Jewish slang and emphasizes his accent/Yiddish knowledge even more to make the other man know that he is Jewish. In the second video about Bernie Sanders, his accent is in part tied to his Judaism, as well as his hometown. Certain words and phrases, along with the accent, are sometimes tied almost to a learned part of language in Jewish families, especially in more religious households. (For another video of interest, see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waeXBCUkuL8 [from 3:06])

Why Linguists are Fascinated by the American Jewish Accent

In this article, the various features of what is commonly thought of as the American Jewish accent are detailed. This accent is most commonly associated with comedians such as Mel Brooks, Larry David, and Don Rickles. The accent, while not as common as it used to be, is still recognizable to listeners by the word order and intonation it borrows from Yiddish, as well as its "sing-songy" quality. [Published on 09-26-2016]

Bernie Sanders' Accent

A description of Bernie Sanders' accent. Includes brief discussions of vowel-raising and vocalization of r in New York City English, as well as of terminal t enunciation, which is linked to Jewish dialects of English. The decline in New York City English usage over time and its usage as linked to socioeconomic status are also discussed (compare with Labov, William. 1972. Language in the Inner City.; and Mathers, Patrick-André. 2012. The social stratification of /r/ in New York City: Labov's department store study revisited). [Published on 02-18-2016]

Jewish American uses of Yiddish

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This Video contains Jewish Americans using select Yiddish words and Slang words such as JAP(Jewish American Princess).

Posted by Brian Pener on February 22, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Jewish;
Slang

A linguist's take on the knaidel/kneydl controversy

Sociolinguist Sarah Bunin Benor weighs in on the controversy that erupted over the "correct" spelling of the word that won the 2013 Scripps National Spelling Bee -- knaidel. The spelling was disputed by some Yiddish activists and Orthodox community members who argue for "kneydl."

Posted by Kara Becker on June 18, 2013

Tags:
Jewish;
Lexicon