American Indian

How “Rez Accents” Strengthen Native Identity

A cool article about identity and “reservation English” [Published on 03-06-2017]

A Conversation with Native Americans on Race

This video details the issue(s) surrounding Native peoples on former indigenous lands and current U.S. territory. It mentions blood quantum, a measure of genetic pedigree which determines native-ness, actual indigenous regulation which determines native-ness, and linguistic terms for tribes such Anglo-American term “Apache” vs the actual indigenous word referring the tribe among other topics.

Posted by Haroun Said on December 5, 2017

Tags:
Power;
American Indian;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice

Tanto and Lone Ranger

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This is a clip from Lone Ranger, featuring scenes with the famous Tonto. It shows how Tonto talks versus the cowboys/other Americans. It also shows a very skewed view of how Native Americans interact and how they speak English (broken sentences and a sense of "inproper" English).

Posted by Maddie Scheer on February 22, 2017

Tags:
Code-switching;
American Indian;
Accent

Survey of California and Other Indian Languages

A series of California maps over the years depicting the Languages spoken among various Native American tribes and what Linguistic roots these Languages have drawn from posted by as University of California Berkeley.

Posted by Sarah Patton on October 6, 2016

Tags:
Variation;
American Indian

I 'don't code- switch' to hide my identity. I 'code-switch' to celebrate it.

This article is about an Indian American man who uses code switching to celebrate his many identities. His prides himself on being able to use the certain languages in appropriate settings. For example he says at any given time his family speaks in at least three languages- Marathi, Hindi, and English.

Posted by Chrissy McLeod on October 5, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
American Indian;
Multilingualism

Cherokee Look for Ways to Save Their Dying Language

This article depicts the perception of Cherokee as a "dying language", and how the remaining speakers are trying to bring it back to life. [Published on 02-29-2016]

Washington Redskins NBA Commercial

In this advertisement created by the National Congress of American Indians, the narrator takes the viewer through a number of "names" for Native Americans in the United States, including tribal names and other words that could be used to define the communities, before ending with an appeal that Native Americans would never describe themselves as "redskins." [Published on 06-10-2014]

Who speaks Wukchumni?

A short documentary profiling the last fluent speaker of Wukchumni, a Native American language spoken in Central California, and her efforts to document the language through the creation of a dictionary. [Published on 08-18-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on September 29, 2014

Tags:
Wukchumni;
Language Shift;
American Indian

Squamish Language

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A native speaker of Squamish discusses his language.

Posted by Kara Becker on September 5, 2014

Tags:
Squamish;
American Indian

How to Say Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Skwomesh)

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My housemate just got back from vacation in Canada and asked me how to pronounce "7" because she'd seen it on a road sign. I find it telling that a writing system not necessarily suited to the Squamish language is used for road signs (no glottal stop on an English typewriter). Having lived in the PNW for the past few years and being constantly surrounded by such names has made me wonder how true those names are to their originals, and what that means about the relationships between America/the English language and these native languages' speakers.

Posted by Maren Fichter on September 5, 2014

Tags:
Power;
Borrowing;
American Indian;
Contact;
Squamish

When Slang Becomes a Slur

Linguist Geoffrey Nunberg, who testified in the trademark trial over the name of the football team the Washington Redskins, argues that the term remains a slur and that the team name should be changed. [Published on 06-23-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 25, 2014

Tags:
Entextualization;
American Indian;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang;
Lexicon