Womens Language

Vocal Fry

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=To0otqt0cQc This video over emphasizes the difference of women with and without vocal fry. Vocal fry is becoming more and more common in young women, this small clip just explains the difference of vocal fry.

Posted by Emily Jacobson on July 1, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Womens Language

Learning Language Out of Comfort Level

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This is a clip from an Indian movie 'English Vinglish'. The protagonist, a small snack entrepreneur, secretly enrolls in an English speaking course to stop her husband and daughter mocking her lack of English skills. She goes out of her comfort level and tries to learn new language. This clip shows her newly gained self-confidence and self-respect when she gives a speech in English during a relative's wedding.

Posted by Parthvi Patel on June 29, 2018

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language

Masculinity and Femininity in Disney's Mulan

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The song “I’ll Make A Man Out of You” from the 1998 classic Mulan shows gender stereotypes and battling them. Mulan is a Disney classic that confronts battling feminine stereotypes head on and throughout the movie the protagonist Mulan shows that she can do anything a man can do. In this song specifically, the gender stereotypes of being a man in the war and what a man should be able to do and be is explained to a very catchy rhythm. Along with this throughout the song, Mulan shows how she is strong and she can fight just the same as them, but because of the laws, she must do this all while dressed as a man to blend in.

Vocal fry

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Vocal fry is a style of language, in each generation, there are different style of language, it is also the same as music, fashion , hairstyle, and so on. Also, because of vocal fry, there are some women will lose their job, this is totally a discrimination of gender. To be honest, men did vocal fry too, no one should use this thing to blame women. What's more, Some people say “I don't want to hear upspeak." this is not true, some of them just use is as an excuse to let women shut up, they do not want to listen to women's speaking.

Posted by Yijun Zhao on January 6, 2018

Tags:
Gender;
Womens Language

Men Complaining About a Female Announcer’s Voice

his in a article about men criticizing the sound of Beth Mowins voice, who is a female sports broadcaster. There were many rude tweets toward her sound of voice and it was even mentioned that just a lower sounding voice should be on sports broadcasting, which I don't understand why. Many women think that they weren't necessarily mad about her voice but just because there was a women broadcasting sports rather than a man. The men on the show even said "I'm not a sexist but..". Sounds to me like they are. [Published on 09-18-2017]

Posted by Mary Copeland on December 19, 2017

Tags:
Womens Language;
Sexism

Chrish - Indie girl introduces us to her kitchen (Vine)

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This vine parodies a female indie pop singer's voice.

Posted by Gregor McGee on November 28, 2017

Tags:
English;
Style-shifting;
Womens Language

Indie Pop Voice

An article detailing the vowels and other features that make up "Indie Pop Voice". [Published on 10-06-2015]

Posted by Gregor McGee on November 28, 2017

Tags:
English;
Style-shifting;
Womens Language

Lake Bell Calls Girls Out On "Sexy Baby Vocal Virus"

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This video clip shows Lake Bell on Conan O’Brien’s talk show. While discussing her upcoming movie, Bell goes into discussion about her annoyance with what she calls “sexy baby vocal virus” and vocal fry. Lake demonstrates what she means by each of these, as well as explains what they are. Both pitch and vocal fry are the main features of these vocal habits. Bell also makes a gender specific claim, that it is women who fall into this habit of speech. Also, during the clip, while talking about her new movie about voice overs, both Bell and O’Brien style-shift between voices and different ways of speaking, representing performativity.

Posted by Cassiti Wright on October 17, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Creaky Voice;
Pitch

The Science behind Vocal Fry

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This video provides a more practical look at the idea of Vocal Fry, which has recently become such an analyzed concept across the globe. In the video, the youtube channel known as "BrainStuff" attempts to explain what Vocal Fry is and what happens when it is performed.

Posted by Libby Ferguson on October 8, 2017

Tags:
Womens Language

The Female Language Translator

A comedic if somewhat patronizing attempt to illustrate how the subtleties of communication between males and females do matter, and that "it's fine" does not always mean that "it's fine."

Posted by Jeremy Pafford on October 7, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Femininity;
Masculinity;
Womens Language

Chronic Uptalk Syndrome

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A parody detailing the cycle of chronic uptalking

Posted by Kara Becker on October 4, 2017

Tags:
Gay Mens Language;
Womens Language;
High Rising Intonation

9 Non-Threatening Leadership Strategies For Women

I found this while scrolling along my Facebook feed. I believe the comics do a good job of describing the absurdity women have to deal with in order to be seen as a valid worker in the workplace, and they way in which their language reflects upon that identity.

Posted by Caroline Wright on September 13, 2017

Tags:
Womens Language;
Sexism

Secret Deodorant | Raise | #StressTest

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An example that highlights the struggles that woman face when approaching their bosses is a deodorant advertisement on YouTube. The advertisement highlights a young female acting out to herself by changing the pitch of her voice multiple times in order to discover the best tone pitch she can use to discuss with her boss in eliminating the wage gap between men and women. The women uses a different form of word and sentence structure in order to sound credible and convincing to her boss. In class, we talked about gendered language and how there is gender inequality present in our society. An example is in the workforce where women have to adapt to the male norms of speaking in order to sound credible and convincing by changing the tone of their voice. It also ties in with the concept of gendered ways of speaking where men are usually direct in their speech while women are indirect. In order to succeed, at times it is important to sound direct which the woman in the ad eventually does at the end.

Posted by Misha Khan on May 11, 2017

Tags:
Gender;
Womens Language

Faith Salie Vocal fry

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Faith Salie in this video reflects on her experiences as a Rhodes scholar and comedian. Salie talks about societal perceptions of a dichotomy between intelligence and comedic ability. The misconception of vocal fry being an indication of lower intelligence falls apart amidst her clear academic success.

Posted by Sean McAlister on May 9, 2017

Tags:
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma

Alice Walker: Fear of Being Feminine

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Alice Walker is an American novelist, poet, and civil and women’s rights activist. She is best known for her critically acclaimed, Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Color Purple. In this video, she talks about the negative repercussions of referring to women as ‘guys’. The type of situation she is referencing are when someone, say a server at a restaurant, walks up to a group of women and addresses them by saying “Hi guys, how are you doing today?” Men and women both do this in America and it only perpetuates the fear of being feminine, or a female in general. With so many women still fighting for equal rights, it is crucial to be proud of being a woman and for women to not label themselves or other women as ‘guys’. This way of speaking stems from the fact that the English language is a “masculine default” language. This means that masculinity, along with masculine terms, are the default in English and other feminine terms have been unnecessarily created in order to differentiate between a male and female performing the same role. A good example of this sociolinguistic model is actor vs. actress and waiter vs. waitress. The original words are changed when talking about a woman when really, the word itself is just supposed to describe the job someone is doing. Although feminine words are added, many people still use the masculine terms by default, creating an alienation and feeling of unimportance or lack of superiority for women. Unfortunately, the aforementioned linguistic features, along with calling a group of women “guys”, are innate in most people’s vocabulary and using them can be a very difficult habit to break. Walker suggests women coming together to change the way that they label themselves and other women in order to first separate women from men and then empower those women. Although it may seem like a small step on the way to equality, it is an extremely vital one.

Outsiders' Views of English Speakers

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This video is one point of view of how non-native English speakers view English. The main point of the video was the focus on how English speakers are perceived based on gender roles, accents, and the cultural views of English speakers. The intonation from both the male and female actor show the gender roles of language. The girl tends to be speaking softly and gently while the boy is a little bit more outgoing in his speech. When they start to argue again the roles come into play with the girl's voice going higher in pitch and sharper in tone. The classic American type of accent is also prevalent in the blurry sentences that are spoken by either actors. The scene also played what one might call a normative view on American dinners between couples; low light, soft talking, homemade meal and then an argument. All of this just screamed stereotypical America.

Mad Men: Challenging Male Hegemony

This image is from the pilot episode of the TV series Mad Men and involves a character named Don Draper and a potential business partner Rachel Menken. In the scene, Don is pitching a business venture to Rachel, whom in a prior scene was wrongly assumed by Don to be a man due to her status in the business world. Rachel forcefully disagrees with Don’s pitch and asserts dominance over him, as she has the power to decline the business deal. Don becomes increasingly agitated and eventually abruptly exits in the meeting stating, “I’m not gonna let a woman talk to me like this”, as shown in the image above. Because Rachel is a woman in a dominant position, she comes across as being a “bitch”, whereas if she were a man, she would come across as confident and assertive. This is due to gendered ways of speaking that have been socially constructed based on ideologies and through socialization. Women’s language is expected to be cooperative and supportive while men’s is expected to be competitive and dominating. Furthermore, girls are socialized to maintain intimacy and criticize without appearing aggressive, while boys are socialized to assert dominance over situations. However, roles were reversed in the business meeting between Don and Rachel, challenging the language ideologies and male hegemonic society. This role reversal and challenge of male hegemony and its associated language ideologies sparked irritation in Don, causing him to react in a distasteful way and insult Rachel, thus furthering the notion that men are seen as superior to women.

Why Do Girls Have Creaky Voices?

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This sociolinguistic artifact covers the topic of "Vocal Fry" or the new way young women talk in which the tone and sound of their voice sounds creaky. People don't exactly enjoy hearing someone talk using vocal fry, and studies have proved that girls who interviewed for a job and spoke using vocal fry were deemed more untrustworthy than those who didn't, and were viewed more negatively than men who used vocal fry, which relates to gender differences in spoken language and language use. What is particularly interesting is why vocal fry is so common among young women. This artifact suggests that linguists think that women tend to be the "vocal trailblazers" because they are more sensitive and receptive of social interactions and more likely able to pick up on settle vocal cues such as a "fry", again accounting for the gender differences in spoken language and language use. Also, there is a theory that vocal fry is simply a form of in-group communication between young girls.  

Posted by Mary Grace Adkins on May 3, 2017

Tags:
Womens Language;
Stigma;
r vocalization;
Creaky Voice;
Pitch

Boys' keypads Versus Girls' keypads

This image of “boys’ keypads versus girls’ keypads” shows ideologies about gender and texting. Apparently on a woman’s keypad, there are only three not-so-much-informative words: hm, ok, and oh, while boys seem to text normally, at least in words or sentences. It also shows a phonological feature of women’s texting habits like “hmmmmm, okkkkkk, ohhhhhh” which seems unnecessary when conveying information. In the place of the punctuation button, women apparently use two emojis: smile and wink. This may indicate two things: women’s talk is more cooperative, emotional and encouraging; or women’s talk is mostly not genuine, since whatever others text, women only reply with a happy emoji. Compared to the ideologies that women talk more than men, this keyboard image seems to show women scarcely text anything more than three non-informative words and emojis. However, they both portray a negative image of women’s talk: not too much content. The anecdote also portrays a binary distinction between girls’ talk and boys’ talk, and ignores the varieties of how women/men actually talk in real life.

Posted by Mengting Jiang on May 1, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Gender;
Gender Binary;
Womens Language

Boys' keypads Versus Girls' keypads

This image of “boys’ keypads versus girls’ keypads” shows ideologies about gender and texting. Apparently on a woman’s keypad, there are only three not-so-much-informative words: hm, ok, and oh, while boys seem to text normally, at least in words or sentences. It also shows a phonological feature of women’s texting habits like “hmmmmm, okkkkkk, ohhhhhh” which seems unnecessary when conveying information. In the place of the punctuation button, women apparently use two emojis: smile and wink. This may indicate two things: women’s talk is more cooperative, emotional and encouraging; or women’s talk is mostly not genuine, since whatever others text, women only reply with a happy emoji. Compared to the ideologies that women talk more than men, this keyboard image seems to show women scarcely text anything more than three non-informative words and emojis. However, they both portray a negative image of women’s talk: not too much content. The anecdote also portrays a binary distinction between girls’ talk and boys’ talk, and ignores the varieties of how women/men actually talk in real life.

Posted by Mengting Jiang on May 1, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Gender;
Gender Binary;
Womens Language

Louis CK 2015 - Racism and Sexism are very different

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In this video, Louis C.K. discusses gender issues and being self aware. When doing an impression of a couple of female college students, he uses vocal fry to get the message across to the audience. Not only is the content of what she is supposedly saying in this situation shallow and stereotypical, but he also uses the glottal, creaking sound of lower-register speech oscillation typical of vocal fry. By using this register to do his impression, and in making his impression of a college girl appear dumb and not self aware, he is perpetuating the dominant stereotype that vocal fry is used by young women only, and that it indexes a set of negative attributes. He does this again when describing the USA as a 'terrible girlfriend to the world'. He uses the same register to describe a United States that remembers everything bad that ever happened to it, but does not acknowledge its own faults and mistakes. Tags: Gender, Women's language, Ideology, Femininity, Sexism, Indexicalityhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-Y17YG63B4 Louis CK 2015 - Racism and Sexism are very different In this video, Louis C.K. discusses gender issues and being self aware. When doing an impression of a couple of female college students, he uses vocal fry to get the message across to the audience. Not only is the content of what she is supposedly saying in this situation shallow and stereotypical, but he also uses the glottal, creaking sound of lower-register speech oscillation typical of vocal fry. By using this register to do his impression, and in making his impression of a college girl appear dumb and not self aware, he is perpetuating the dominant stereotype that vocal fry is used by young women only, and that it indexes a set of negative attributes. He does this again when describing the USA as a 'terrible girlfriend to the world'. He uses the same register to describe a United States that remembers everything bad that ever happened to it, but does not acknowledge its own faults and mistakes.

Posted by Sierra Hurd on April 28, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Sexism

Tumblr User cailleachan on Gendered Interruption

This is a post from tumblr reflecting on how women and men speak differently and characterizing the way that women interrupt others as different from the way that men do the same. The post reminded me of our class discussion, in which we explored 1. how people of different genders use different linguistic features and methods to index gender and 2. how we conceptualize the speech of women and men and are influenced by confirmation bias even when faced with actual linguistic data. [Published on 04-19-2017]

Posted by Io Blanchett on April 19, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Gender;
Womens Language

Sh%t Southern Women Say, Episode 1

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This comical satire highlights common phrases and slang frequently used by southern women. These iconic sayings can also index their southern roots.

Posted by Allison Maxfield on October 4, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Womens Language;
Communities of Practice;
Slang

Japanese Gendered Language: How to Talk Like a Girl or Boy

This article discusses gendered language in Japanese, which includes the origin of "feminine language" (which started off as a form of "vulgar" language that schoolgirls were using) and how gendered language can be used as a form of self-identity or as a way to rebel against the strict standards of Japanese language. In the language ideology of Japanese, there have historically been opinions on who can use what type of language and how, but this article demonstrates that these ideologies are changing today. [Published on 02-05-2014]

Posted by Alex Parnell on October 4, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Communities of Practice

Gender Differences in Communication

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An animated video attempts to explain questions such as: why men and women communicate differently; how the gender difference affects the communication style, and how gender-based forms of speech lead to miscommunication.

Posted by Yanan Fu on October 2, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Gender;
Womens Language

Gender Differences in Communication

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An animated video explained such questions: why men and women communicate differently; how the gender difference affects the communication style, and how gender-based forms of speech lead to miscommunication.

Posted by Yanan Fu on September 29, 2016

Tags:
Biological Sex;
Gender;
Womens Language

Mock Spanish in Scrubs

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Dr. Kelso uses mock spanish to belittle the idea of the nurses wanting a raise.

Posted by BreAnna Engeman on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Race,Ethnicity;
Socioeconomic Status

Bacon Bowl

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The Bacon Bowl commercial shows how knowledge about certain language communities and indexicality are used to make sales. The female host uses rhymes within her cheerfully delivered presentation, common staples of similarly-styled "As Seen on TV" commercials that index friendly and familiar qualities to appeal to a stereotypical mom or grandma audience. In addition, the host emphasizes diet and portions, along with rather specific cooking terms like "crisp up evenly" and "cut of bacon", and serves up an "I heart bacon bowl" pin as a free gift, further intending to index a generally female, family-oriented language community.

Posted by Jill Vesta on July 24, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Womens Language;
Communities of Practice

Rise of the 'vocal fry': Young women are changing how low they talk to sound more like Kim Kardashian and Katy Perry

Women in the UK are changing their voices to match American celebrities. [Published on 04-26-2016]

Posted by Kylie Smith on July 19, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Femininity;
Womens Language

Key & Peele: Meegan, Come Back

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We all know the comedians Key and Peele, but what most people don't know is that Peele has a popular "Meegan" skit, where he portrays himself as a woman. He has also voiced several female characters, one of them on the cartoon show "Bob's Burgers." This video is an example of not only how a stereotypical woman would act, but also how she might sound.

Posted by Caroline Wright on March 28, 2016

Tags:
Crossing;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Communities of Practice

Mahogany performing CultureAppropriation

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Powerful performance and poem from Mahogany. CultureAppropriation. Turns the appropriation of African American culture, using emotional references, provocative stereotypes, music...

Posted by Scott Russell on March 11, 2016

Tags:
Womens Language;
Race,Ethnicity

Always #LikeAGirl Girls Emojis

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This YouTube video sponsored by Always debates that the emojis used on smart phones are not representative of women. It says some of these may even be sexist. Emojis are wildly popular in today’s society and this issue may go unnoticed by many people. See for yourself as this video interviews women and asks their opinions on the subject.

Potty-Mouthed Princesses Drop F-Bombs for Feminism by FCKH8.com

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This video uses young girl cussing to show that there are more problems in society than little girls cussing. The fact that they are talking the way they are is shocking, which is done to make people actually listen to the bigger point.

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Youth;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Sexism;
Slang;
Stigma

Why the f*** shouldn't women swear?

This article talks about sexism in the fact that there is an idea that women should not curse. For example, it mentions that people tell female rapper, Nicki Minaj that she should not cuss, but the same is not said to male rappers, like Eminem or Lil Wayne [Published on 11-04-2014]

Posted by Brittany Weinlood on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma

Gay Men React to Lesbian Slang

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This video shows a bunch of different gay men trying to decipher what different types of lesbian slang mean. They also go in to what their own gay slang is as well while trying to understand lesbian slang.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gay Mens Language;
Sexual Orientation;
Womens Language;
Slang

"Vocal Fry" speaking with Faith Salie

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This video explains "vocal fry" which is prevalent among young women. Vocal fry is described as a 'creaky voice' or a vibratory sound.

Posted by Kristi Sparks on March 7, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Femininity;
Womens Language;
Stigma

"Pick-Up Artist"

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This artifact is showing how different people communicate on a daily basis, and how each person has a different way of showing how the communicate. With this skit, most of it exaggerated for comical effect. But this is showing the diversity of people and there language through a simple conversation in group settings. In this skit there is gender rolls being played of femininity and masculinity, while showing the differences within the women's language. And how this "Art of the Pick-Up" class is teaching women how to properly express themselves.

Teenager Girls: The Real Disruptors of Language

Details historical evidence that young women have always been a driving force behind language change, including some changes previously credited to Shakespeare, for example. [Published on 08-07-2015]

Posted by Gina Ruggeri on February 16, 2016

Tags:
Change;
Youth;
Womens Language

The unstoppable march of the upward inflection?

A short piece speculating on the origins of/reasons for upward inflection/"Valley Girl" speech. [Published on 08-11-2014]

Posted by Maren Bilby on February 8, 2016

Tags:
Youth;
Womens Language

"Like Totally Whatever"

A poem detailing the ideologies related to some features of young women's language, and the effect this sort of policing can have on young women.

Posted by Gregor McGee on November 24, 2015

Tags:
Ideology;
Womens Language;
Prescriptivism

How to be a Grown Ass Woman

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This is an hour long radio piece from WNYC featuring Jessica Williams (among other accomplished women) where interviewees discuss moments and period in their lives that they believe marked their adulthood as women. Although it is public in the popular culture sector, Jessica Williams is essentially participating in a standard sociolinguistic interview as she tells stories from her past that are close to home for minutes at a time. Due to her telling personal stories, I thought this could be a good opportunity for more casual, natural speech that may include /ai/ monophthongization. [Starts at 33:00].

The Onion & Women's Speech

The Onion takes a shot at joking about some features commonly criticized about women's speech in this piece. Some things that jump out are the descriptors, "high-pitched, kind of childish-sounding voice", "slower-than-average delivery and tendency to trail off at the end of long sentences" and "inflection that makes it hard to tell if she’s making a statement or asking a question". Another part that struck me was the similarity between the end and Mendoza-Denton's point about silence and gender in the Anita Hill proceedings, "When reached for comment, Kushnick told reporters she was considering going back to her old habit of stoically saying nothing throughout the school day when she was simply judged by others to be a stuck-up bitch". [Published on 10-05-2015]

Posted by Jasmine Huang on October 6, 2015

Tags:
Womens Language;
Silence

The Onion RE: girls' voices

This Onion article satirizes some of the criticisms of women's voices in popular media that we've discussed, specifically mentioning HRT, for example.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on October 5, 2015

Tags:
Gender;
Womens Language

I got corrected on my color names

I was having a discussion with my friend Daphne when another friend of mine, August, walked up. The following discussion happened: Daphne: I like the color of your shirt! Me: Yeah, it's a nice minty color August: Actually, it's sea foam... Me: THIS SUDDENLY BECAME VERY RELEVANT TO MY EDUCATION To be clear, August is a heterosexual cis-man. Maybe it's his inner academic that encouraged his exotic color usage.

Posted by Molly Worden on September 11, 2015

Tags:
Gender;
Womens Language

99% Invisible Autoreply

The main reason I'm sharing this article is the auto-reply from the podcast 99% Invisible, near the top: it's set up for when people send in complaints about women's voices. I especially love that it mentions that they never get complaints about men's voices on the show. Also that they'll "consider the complaints within, well, never". So good.

Posted by Miriam Golz on September 9, 2015

Tags:
Gender;
Womens Language

Women's Voices in the Workplace

This is an NPR piece from about a year ago. The woman being interviewed went to a speech pathologist to help her sound "more assertive", because she felt she wasn't being taken seriously at work. The piece discusses saying stuff like "one minute" instead of "got a minute?", which I think relates to the articles we've read so far, especially tag questions.

Posted by Miriam Golz on September 9, 2015

Tags:
Gender;
Womens Language

Amy Schumer and Politeness

A sketch from Inside Amy Schumer satirizing what Schumer sees as the tendency of women in her peer group to apologize needlessly. Schumer has other sketches exaggerating linguistic behavior to absurdity. "I'm So Bad" and "Compliments" are available on youtube. Do note, these sketches are pretty vulgar and kind of gruesome. [Published on 05-12-2015]

Posted by Riley Thornton on September 4, 2015

Tags:
Gender;
Womens Language

13 Tips on How to Speak While Female

An extremely sarcastic piece that critiques and "corrects" women's speech. [Published on 07-28-2015]

Posted by Molly Worden on September 3, 2015

Tags:
Womens Language

Americans aren't the only ones convinced women speak differently

Building on the momentum of the recent surge in discussions over young women's voices in American English, this article points out that, cross-culturally, women's voices are seen as different. [Published on 07-24-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on September 1, 2015

Tags:
Gender;
Womens Language

A response to Naomi Wolf

Deborah Cameron's excellent response to Naomi Wolf. [Published on 07-26-2015]

Naomi Wolf misses the point about vocal fry: It's just an excuse not to listen to women

A response to Naomi Wolf's article suggesting young women should stop using vocal fry because it makes them sound less authoritative. [Published on 07-27-2015]

Young women, give up the vocal fry and reclaim your strong female voice

Author and feminist Naomi Wolf pens an article for the Guardian urging young women to stop using marked features like vocal fry and uptalk. [Published on 07-24-2015]

From upspeak to vocal fry: Are we "policing" young women's voices?

An episode of Fresh Air with sociolinguist Penny Eckert, in part a response to a recent episode of Fresh Air with a speech pathologist who criticized features used by young people in American English. [Published on 07-23-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on July 24, 2015

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language

Vocal Fry on This American Life: Freedom Fries

A segment on This American Life that profiles the complaints the show has received about the use of "vocal fry," or creaky voice, by its female commentators. It profiles the dominant stereotype that it is used by young women only, and that it indexes a set of negative attributes. Penny Eckert is interviewed on her recent research on NPR and creak that finds an age-based difference in perceptions of creak. Ira concludes, "people who don't like to listen to young women on the radio have moved on to vocal fry." [Published on 01-23-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on March 4, 2015

Tags:
Eckert, Penelope;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Creaky Voice

NPR: Talking while female

An NPR video piece on the criticisms of women's voices, including their use of higher pitch, HRT, creaky voice, and their evaluation as less authoritative [Published on 10-24-2014]

Can changing how you sound help you find your voice?

A NPR story profiling two women who worked to change their voices due to the stigmatization of their ways of talking. These woman worked with a voice therapist who normally provides therapy to transgender individuals. [Published on 10-14-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 27, 2014

Tags:
Youth;
Gender Binary;
gender non-conforming;
Womens Language;
Pitch

Vocal Fry may hurt women's job propsects

An Atlantic article summarizing the study of Anderson et al that concluded that use of creaky voice makes women less hireable. [Published on 05-29-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 12, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Creaky Voice

Vocal Fry doesn't harm your career prospects

A critique of the Anderson et al. study that found that females using creaky voice were judged less desirable. The author points out that the matched guise approach involved speakers who were taught to produce more creaky guises, so that the creak is an imitation. Further, the creaky utterances were longer and had lower pitch, raising questions about what listeners were reacting to. [Published on 06-06-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 12, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma;
Creaky Voice

Study: Women with creaky voices deemed less hireable

The Washington Post reports a research study that found that women who used creaky voice were judged by listeners to be less competent, less educated, less trustworthy, less attractive, and less hireable. The research team concludes that speakers should "should undertake conscious effort to avoid vocal fry in labor market settings." [Published on 06-02-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 11, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma;
Creaky Voice

NY Times: Japan's Top Voice

A 2013 article about Japan's Phone-Answering competition, which still prizes women using Japanese Women's Language

Posted by Kara Becker on December 20, 2013

Tags:
Japanese;
Gender Binary;
Womens Language

CBS News: Burned out on Vocal Fry

A 2013 video segment on the use of creaky voice by young American women, and how irritating many people find it.

Posted by Kara Becker on September 21, 2013

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Creaky Voice

Girl vs. Woman

A 2013 Harvard Crimson article about the terms "girl" and "woman" as terms of reference.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 11, 2013

Tags:
Gender Binary;
Womens Language

"Ultimate Man Cave" Paint Colors

In 2011, Canadian paint company CIL paints renamed 27 of their paint colors to appeal to male shoppers, with names like "Dirty Socks, "Midlife Crisis, and "Iced Vodka." Citation: Lakoff, Robin. 1972. Language and Women's Place.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 11, 2013

Tags:
Lakoff, Robin;
Gender Binary;
Womens Language

Accommodation and Elongation in Texting

An investigation into what inspires soooo many people to toss extra letters into their text messages

Posted by Christina Lee Gremore on February 24, 2013

Tags:
Indexicality;
Femininity;
Womens Language;
Slang;
Discourse

Creaky Voice: Yet Another Example of Young Women's Linguistic Ingenuity

A 2013 Atlantic article on the "vocal fry" phenomenon.

Posted on January 16, 2013

Tags:
Creaky Voice;
Womens Language;
Youth;
Stigma

NY Timess: Japan's Feminine Falsetto Falls Right Out of Favor

A 1995 article on Japanese Women's Language. Related Article: Inoue, Miyako. 2002. Gender, language, and modernity: Toward an effective history of Japanese women's language. American Ethnologist.

The Root: Why can't black women and white women talk to each other?

A 2009 article about communication issues between white and black women on VH1's charm school.

Posted on November 8, 2012

Tags:
Womens Language;
Race,Ethnicity

Cosmo: Chatty Women Stereotype Dispelled

A 2007 article in Cosmo Magazine about recent dispelling the stereotype that women are more talkative than men.

Posted on November 8, 2012

Tags:
Womens Language

Japanese Women's Language: Commercial

video imagePlay video
A 2006 Japanese commercial that spooks Japanese women's voices.

Posted on November 8, 2012

Tags:
Womens Language;
Japanese

Code-switching: How to talk so men will listen

A website based on a book of the same title, offering guidance for women who want to "code-switch" out of women's language.

Harvard Sailing Team: Boys will be Girls

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A sketch from the Harvard Sailing Team displaying male actors using "women's language."

Posted on September 25, 2012

Tags:
Gender Binary;
Womens Language

The Mindy Kaling Backlash

A 2012 Jezebel article discussing the negative reaction to Indian American writer/producer/director/actress Mindy Kaling, who has been characterized as "brash" and cocky for speaking confidently about her career.

Posted on September 25, 2012

Tags:
Gender Binary;
Womens Language;
Indexicality