Sexual Orientation

Why are Disney villains gay/queer?

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This video addresses a problem in Disney films not addressed in Lippi-Green's 2012 paper: queer-coding of Disney villains. Disney commonly gives its villains stereotypically gay features, teaching children to associate homosexuality and immorality. While the video does not provide audio, I've provided some further links to queer-coded villains: King Candy (from Wreck-It Ralph): https://youtu.be/MVVeugPVD2Q Scar (from The Lion King: https://youtu.be/-8wgXRNYcPM

Posted by Aidan Malanoski on April 16, 2018

Tags:
Gay Mens Language;
Sexual Orientation;
Stigma

"I thought you said you was a top"

Taedatea is a black gay youtuber/online personality. This video explores the intersection of styles, both gendered and racialized. Initially, Tae briefly employs a rising, high-pitched style, which is immediately read by the interlocutor over the phone as a 'bottom' (and therefore feminine, as 'bottoming' is a highly gendered and stereotyped action) style. Tae quickly switches into a style that is both deeper and uses more features of AAE, which is designed to present 'masculinity'. This linguistic self-presentation is a good example of style-shifting as a means of constructing a masculine, top identity, and reinforces many of our recent readings which present style-shifting as " continual construction of a persona or personae and variables as resources for this construction" (Eckert, 2004) [Published on 04-01-2017]

Zoella's Controversial Tweets from 2010

Gender stereotypes and sexuality appear to cross over in a few aspects, including negative connotations. This quote seems to suggest that spitting is associated with "macho" heterosexual men according to gender stereotypes; whereas gay men are not "macho" enough to be taken seriously when exhibiting the same actions.

Posted by Brittni Groothoff on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Sexual Orientation;
Gender

Ellen DeGeneres' coming out episode

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In a televised talk show this year host Ellen DeGeneres celebrated the twentieth anniversary of her revelation on national prime time television that she was a lesbian. Forty-two million viewers tuned in to watch Ellen’s sitcom character declare “I am gay”, and this challenging and controversial decision made television history. A media frenzy followed with heated debates on gay rights and lifestyles. Ellen’s difficult and personal decision to reveal her lesbianism led to her sitcom show being cancelled in 1997. By 2004 she returned to television as a talk show host, and since then has earned ten Emmys for excellence in television. By making it acceptable for a public figure to declare a sexual preference, social change has occurred, and since then, gay marriage has become legal in the United States.

Posted by Mary Jo Frazier on October 8, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Sexual Orientation;
Politics and Policy;
Sexism

Key & Peele - Office Homophobe (Language of Homosexuality)

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In many ways, Key and Peele focus on the concepts of stereotypes. In this video, the example is the perception of what is considered homosexual. Throughout the clip, it is demonstrated with one that has more focused effeminate inflection in his voice and does often associate heavily explicit material that manifests on the notion of language of homosexuality. Not only that, but the words and actions seem to be taken offense based on the entire argument of being persecuted for the actions of explicit material in the workplace. By the end, it shows that both individuals are homosexual with one following the stereotypes of language and body language of what societies perception of a homosexual and a more rea based homosexual in the same workplace. This demonstrates the notion many people have a perception of what is considered “natural” in language and people when focusing on the stereotype put effort to build around a language that deviates from the “norm.” Linguistically people have built perceptions about the culture behind various cultures and let the bias remain unchanged until something challenges the ideology. Here it is the perceptions of actions, body language, and various tones and words used that look to stereotype homosexuality.

Posted by Scott Bagley on May 4, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Gay Mens Language;
Sexual Orientation

Shameless: Mickey and Gender Expectations

These photos are from multiple scenes found in the TV series Shameless. The photos involve a character named Mickey Milkovich, a troubled, poor teenager who radiates the “tough guy” and delinquent persona but also happens to be gay, along with his boyfriend Ian Gallagher. The quotes on the left demonstrate Mickey’s attempt in hiding his sexuality through harsh, derogatory language that is often associated with men. Girls are expected to show polite, clean language while boys can often get away with obscene language due to the ideologies involving expectations of how women and men should speak. These ideologies are socially constructed based on gender stereotypes and are reinforced through socialization. Boys are socialized to assert dominance and stray away from emotion that is typically associated with women, which is what is being displayed in these images. Mickey initially hides behind these language ideologies that are rooted in a largely heteronormative and male hegemonic society due to the fear of intolerance within society and of challenging these ideologies to ultimately lose the masculine, “tough guy” persona he is expected to portray. However, the photos on the right show, although at times still obscene in language use, a changed Mickey that eventually speaks out against these ideologies through publicly coming out as gay with his boyfriend, Ian.

Response to "What it Means to Sound Gay" (LanguageLog)

Reed professor Sameer ud Dowla Khan's open letter response to NPR interview with filmmaker and speech pathologist from film project "Do I sound gay?" (transcript of interview found at link). Sameer describes how linguistic features do not necessarily link directly to social category (as is seen in indexical models) to problematize the concept of "natural"-ness in speech. (Compare with research done by Gaudio, Rudolph. 1994. Sounding gay: pitch properties in the speech of gay and straight men; especially re:criticisms of other studies made in introduction pp. 34-41). [Published on 07-10-2015]

Gay Men React to Lesbian Slang

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This video shows a bunch of different gay men trying to decipher what different types of lesbian slang mean. They also go in to what their own gay slang is as well while trying to understand lesbian slang.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Gay Mens Language;
Sexual Orientation;
Womens Language;
Slang

"Do I Sound Gay?" A Documentary about Gay Speech

This is a documentary about the speech of gay men and how they view their language not only in terms of their own identity, but also in terms of how they are portrayed in society. [Published on 09-07-2014]

Posted by Caroline Wright on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Gay Mens Language;
Sexual Orientation;
Communities of Practice;
Stigma

Saturday Morning Cartoons

Autostraddle is self-described as "an intelligent, hilarious & provocative voice and a progressively feminist online community for a new generation of kickass lesbian, bisexual & otherwise inclined ladies (and their friends)". There's a weekly column called "Saturday Morning Cartoons" following a few different artists, which reminded me of our discussion about Queen's "I Don't Speak Spritch: Locating Lesbian Language" due to the use of comics. Some of the analyses Queen made are still visible in these cartoons although the distribution method and potentially audience differ from the ones she analyzed in the 90s.

Posted by Jasmine Huang on November 3, 2015

Tags:
Sexual Orientation;
Gender

Hank Green on Genderbready Stuff

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In this video, Hank talks about a lot of stuff covered in the Genderbread Person posts. This is definitely not a perfect model either, but I think it's interesting to get another version (though he is also a cishet white male...). For example, though he does have the continuum going from "man" to "woman", which I do think is problematic, I think it's interesting that he added the "intensity" dimension.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on September 2, 2015

Tags:
Biological Sex;
Intersex;
Sexual Orientation;
Gender;
Gender Binary

LGBTQ girls and the heterosexual marketplace

This article isn't specifically linguistic, but relates to Eckert's notion of the heterosexual marketplace, where adolescents learn how to speak/act/dress/present in the best way possible to attract people of the 'opposite' sex and thus gain popularity. This article deals with how lesbian and queer girls fair in this social structure as people who essentially do not participate in the heterosexual marketplace. Interestingly, the article posits that a good way to combat the isolation of non-conforming young people would be for schools/institutions to reward non-physical and non-sexual achievements. I find this a strange concept because I think of popularity/success in the heterosexual marketplace as being determined almost entirely separately from school-sanctioned recognition of achievement; in fact, I think institutional recognition often detracts from a person's success in the marketplace, and I wonder how/whether institutions are capable of causing a shift in the dynamics of young people's social structure. [Published on 3132013]

Posted by Chase Doremus on April 16, 2015

Tags:
Eckert, Penelope;
Performativity;
Power;
Femininity;
Sexual Orientation

Lexicon Valley: What does it mean to sound gay?

A Lexicon Valley episode on sounding gay, with Benjamin Munson. [Published on 12-01-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on December 8, 2014

Tags:
Gay Mens Language;
Sexual Orientation

Sounding gay, punk, or jock: What language says about your social group

Sociolinguist Doug Bigham discusses the use of linguistic resources in the construction of style, focusing on the construction of a gay style. [Published on 11-24-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on November 25, 2014

Tags:
Style-shifting;
Sexual Orientation

"No Homo" in hip hop

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A 2008 video post on the slang term "No Homo," defined as a "defense mechanism" used within hop hop culture by men wo want to confirm their heteromasculinity.

The Wire: female police officer Kima Greggs

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The character Kima Greggs from the HBO series The Wire, in a scene where she aligns with masculine linguistic practices and other attributes. The character is female and homosexual.

Landover Baptist Children's Hospital Homosexual Reparative Ward

Spoof of homosexual lisping corrective surgery.

Genderbread Person, V.1

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Verson 1 of the Genderbreak person outling the four continua that make up one's gendered self: gender identity, sexual orientation, biological sex, and gender presentation. From www.itspronouncedmetrosexual.com

Posted on September 20, 2012

Tags:
Gender;
Biological Sex;
Sexual Orientation