Mock Spanish

Mock Spanish

This poster is an example of mock Spanish with the phrase Cinco de Drinko.

Posted by Macie Rouse on May 11, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Mock Spanish

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This is an example of Mock Spanish with the phrase Cinco de Drinko.

Posted by Macie Rouse on May 11, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Indexicality;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Justin Bieber forgets the words to Despacito

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This is the video I referred to in my final project proposal in which Justin Bieber forgets the chorus to Despacito, a song by Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee. Bieber sings in both English and Spanish in the popular remix of the song. To me, this indicates that Bieber, while not a competent Spanish speaker, was able to use the language performatively to obtain some sort of social capital, essentially creating content for both English and Spanish speaking audiences for his own benefit. I’ve tagged this video as code-switching, but I think it’s more the failure to do so that makes this example interesting.

Posted by Elaina Wittmer on April 12, 2018

Tags:
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

Spanish phrases Gringos need to stop abusing!

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The women in this video describe all the ways non-Spanish speakers use Mock Spanish. They describe it as sometimes being a way to connect with others. However, the overuse of Mock Spanish can become disrespectful and insulting.

Posted by Kaman Dhanoa on January 15, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Will Ferrell's Spanish Situation

In this video of an episode of Jimmy Kimmel Live!, Will Ferrell promotes his new Spanish language movie "Casa de mi Padre" by engaging in an interview entirely in "Spanish." In many ways, Ferrell is actually satirizing Mock Spanish by purposefully infusing his sentences with horrid grammar, awkward phrasing and some nonsense. This serves as an exaggerated form of how Mock Spanish appropriates the Spanish language for humorous and/or racialized ends. The video also satirizes through exaggeration negative Hispanic/Latino stereotypes with the presence of a giant chihuahua mascot, a very angry and heavily cursing Hispanic man and more. [Published on 03-14-2012]

Posted by Rachel Jenkins on January 8, 2018

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

As a Latina, I have a problem with Hispanic Heritage Month

Juliana Schwartz is tired of hearing famous people, the republican party, Obama and more, share their "appreciation" for Hispanic Heritage Month when these same people have caused mass deportation for Hispanics and have created ugly ideologies towards Hispanics. She wants the hispandering to end because she believes that Hispanics are a culture, not some marketing scheme to receive more votes or gain more profit. She wants the government to stop the hispandering and to stop using hispanics, and to instead help Hispanics gain justice and inclusion. [Published on 07-01-2014]

Posted by Jamie Treto on January 5, 2018

Tags:
Spanish;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Hillary Clinton Is ‘Not My Abuela,’ Critics Say

Hillary Clinton claims that she is like ‘our abuelas,’ which was noted as one of the most visible cases of political use of Mock Spanish. Hilary hoped to establish some connection with this block of voters and help boost her campaign by using that phrase. But she does not know “Abuela’ is a term that means ‘grandmother’ in Mexican, and She expected it to portray her not just as a caring and matriarchal figure, but also as one who understands the problems of American Mexicans so well that she knows the terms they use to describe them.

Posted by Yijun Zhao on January 4, 2018

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Language Revitalization

Sign Fail

This is an example of a too common problem with translations of signage into Spanish. It is also a prime example of Mock Spanish. Although the intent is to convey a simple message "exit only" to a Spanish speaker, the act of adding an "o" to the end of exit does not do this and indirectly indexes the reader for not being able to speak English and needing a translated sign. The correct translation for this sign would be solo salida...even if they were trying to say "exit here", they were not even close. [Published on 02-05-2015]

Posted by Karen Lewis on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Mock Spanish

Mock Spanish in the movie Friday

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In this video, Chris Tucker is talking to his Hispanic friends and uses Spanish. This is an example of mock Spanish.

Posted by Jordan Wagnon on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Mock Spanish

Speaking “Mexican” and the use of “Mock Spanish” in Children’s Books (or Do Not Read Skippyjon Jones)

The prevalence of mock Spanish is discussed - specifically its appearance in children's books. The book Skippyjon Jones is discussed briefly: its premise (a Siamese cat who pretends to be a Chihuahua) and examples of mock Spanish within it (hyperanglized Spanish used by the character.)

Posted by Andrea Ortiz on December 14, 2017

Tags:
Mock Spanish

Delivery Job Advertisement, Mock Spanish

This is a example of the use of "Spanglish" or mock Spanish where people combine what they see as simple Spanish words with English words to try to communicate with Spanish speaking people. This sign is a advertisement targeting both English and Spanish speakers for a delivery driver job, under the English portion the sign simply says "Se Necesita Delivery guy". The use of the Spanish mock Spanish is indexing Spanish speakers. [Published on 12-14-2017]

Posted by Landon Sweeney on December 14, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Spanglish;
Mock Spanish

The Spanish Teacher

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This is an episode from the show Glee, where the Spanish/Glee teacher gives the assignment to perform songs in both Spanish and English, switching back and forth during the songs. At the end of the episode the teacher dresses up as a matador and one of the students is unhappy with how his perception of the culture is. The whole episode has many examples of mock Spanish.

Posted by Maria Marcotte on December 11, 2017

Tags:
Spanglish;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Coca Cola - Mock Spanish

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This Coca Cola - Hispanic Heritage commercial clip shows the Coca Cola company using Hispandering by using Hispanic sterotype such as a run down town, and tattoos that are on the coke can that they can apply to their skin, especially the one of "Rodriguez" which he applied the tattoo to his neck.

Posted by Phoenix Byrd on December 7, 2017

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent

Will and Grace Mock-Spanish

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This Will and Grace clip shows one of the main characters, Karen, using mock Spanish to speak to her nanny, Rosario.

Posted by Abby Lanohear on December 7, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Mock Spanish

Spanish Words "White" People Can't Say

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A comedic take on "white" people trying to pronounce Spanish words and their struggle in the performance of a basic Spanish lexicon—even in words that share a striking spelling resemblance to its English cognate. Some noteworthy examples appear when the participants are asked to pronounce “refrigerador” and “negar,” with some subjects showing visible apprehension to merely attempt the latter.

Mock Spanish T-Shirt

A posting from Facebook with a shirt that uses incorrect lyrics Justin Bieber used for the song “Despacito” by Luis Fonsi when he had issues remembering the Spanish words during a performance.

Posted by Cheyenne Hillman on November 15, 2017

Tags:
Spanish;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Mock Spanish in The Mexican

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This is a clip from the movie, “The Mexican,” in which Brad Pitt’s character, Jerry, travels to Mexico to claim an antique pistol. While there, Jerry gets stranded and needs a ride. Some Hispanic men drive by and Jerry uses Mock Spanish to ask the men for help. Specifically, Jerry says, “I need a lift in your el trucko to the next towno.”

Posted by Brittany Outler on October 10, 2017

Tags:
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Jacqueline Kennedy's political speech Nov. 21, 1963

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This film clip showed First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy speaking to a Texas Latino audience on November 21, 1963. Three years earlier in the 1960 Presidential campaign, a young Jack Kennedy and his political team recognized the potential of the Latino voters in the Republican held state of Texas. They decided to utilize Jacqueline Kennedy’s fluency in Spanish and a few months before the vote, she spoke to a Texas Latino crowd, persuading them to support her husband. It worked and Kennedy won the race by carrying Texas. Returning to Texas in 1963, President Kennedy allowed his wife to once again take the stage and speak Spanish, the first time a sitting United States President had honored a Hispanic group. The next day, JFK was assassinated in Dallas Texas.

Posted by Mary Jo Frazier on October 8, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Mock Spanish;
Multilingualism;
Politics and Policy

My name is Jose Jimenez

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“My name is Jose Jimenez” became a popular catch phrase in America after Hungarian-Jewish descent Bill Dana performed this skit dressed as Santa Claus. Bill Dana utilized humor to soften the racializing stereotypes seen in most portrayals of Latin American men. Using Mock Spanish, the naïve character of Jose Jimenez was seen playing a variety of professions, including a United States astronaut. So popular was the character that Mercury astronaut Alan Shepherd adopted “Jose” as his official code name, and astronaut Jose Jimenez made a “guest appearance” at the 1961 Kennedy Inaugural Gala. In the 1960’s Bill Dana was honored by the National Hispanic Media Coalition for his work as an activist. In 1970 with changing sensitivities concerning Mock Spanish and racial stereotypes, Bill Dana had an “official funeral” to declare Jose Jimenez dead.

Posted by Mary Jo Frazier on October 4, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

Key & Peele Loco Gangsters

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Key & Peele are using mock spanish and code switching as well in this video. They are acting as hispanic gang members, going back in for to see who is more Loco.

Posted by Steven Sims Jr. on September 28, 2017

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
Accent

1960 - Jackie Kennedy Spanish Ad

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This is a video of Jackie Kennedy doing a campaign ad in 1960 in Spanish. The goal of this video was to connect with the Hispanic voters. I chose this particular video because it shows how Jackie Kennedy used different speech communities to reach a certain group of people. Indexicality plays a role as well because she is indexing the Spanish speaking community.

The Game-Spanglish

This is a song the is by the rapper, The Game, and the song is titled "Spanglish". Growing up in Compton, California, The Game was subjected to many interactions with gang members and other individuals; this includes many hispanics. I found it interesting that this song includes a good amount of mock spanish, which i relevant to our final paper. In the song, Game switch back and forth between spanish to english and describes his life growing up in Compton along with the love for his city. [Published on 07-25-2017]

Posted by Parker Johnson on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Spanish;
Mock Spanish;
Socioeconomic Status;
Slang

SchoolBoy Q - Collard Greens(Explicit) ft. Kendrick Lamar

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"Collard Greens" by Schoolboy Q featuring Kendrick Lamar contains a verse which is an example of Mock Spanish in pop culture. This verse is from Kendrick Lamar and features him utilizing Spanish words as obscene euphemisms for humorous effect.

Posted by Saadan Mir on July 24, 2017

Tags:
Mock Spanish

Racism In America (Satire)

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As we have thoroughly discussed Mock Spanish, along with language, race, ethnicity, the following YouTube video is a humorous play on racism in America. The Hispanic housemaid is faced with her racist boss as she's assumed to be a thief, an idiot, and not know English, simply because she is not a white American. It also highlights the tendencies to classify someone as not as intelligent simply because they do not fit the stereotype for where we are from. Again, this is a humorous spin on real life happenings that occur, many of which are oblivious to us.

Posted by Paa Imbeah on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Spanish;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
Socioeconomic Status

People Around The World Try An American Accent

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After completing a assignment over #hispandering, I was curious about the flip side, mock English. In this video, individuals from around the world give their impression of an American accent, typically using common phrases and terms associated with the particular accent. I personally have a midwestern accent and use y'all more than I probably should, however, I did not take offense to the individuals in the video who attempted a midwestern accent.

Posted by Cooper Seely on June 23, 2017

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Accent;
Linguistic Relativity

Jane H. Hill’s 1999 work “Language, Race, and White Public Space"

In Jane H. Hill’s 1999 work “Language, Race, and White Public Space” she piggy-backs off of a piece of 1996 literature written by Bonnie Urciuoli about bilingual Puerto Ricans living in New York City. While referring to these bilingual Puerto Ricans, Hill acknowledges that they symbolize all of the greater Spanish speaking community, not just themselves. Hill’s main points throughout the article argue that there are two spheres of spoken language throughout a community and that there is a blatant double standard between whites and the Spanish speaking people. Let’s start with the two spheres of bilingual spoken language. Throughout a Spanish speaking community in the united states, there sits two spheres of spoken language, an “inner-sphere” and an “outer-sphere”. The inner sphere of bilingual spoken language includes all the informal speech regarding subjective personal matter. Within this sphere speakers are relaxed, often code switching to help relate with whom they are speaking to. Code switching also allows them to use words that don’t “exist” in the English language, allowing them to broaden their conversational vocabulary and to help get their point across. The boundaries between English and Spanish are blurred, and the speaker jumps back and forth as they please. Code switching is popular within the inner-sphere. The outer-sphere however, is a much different space for a foreign bilingual speaker. The outer-sphere consists of the societal normalcies that cater to the English only speakers and gives them an unfair advantage when speaking with native Spanish speaking bilinguals. According to Hill, “In an "outer-sphere" of talk with strangers and, especially, with gatekeepers like court officers, social workers, and schoolteachers, the difference between Spanish and English is ‘sharply objectified’. Boundaries and order are everything. The pressure from interlocutors to keep the two languages "in order" is so severe that people who function as fluent bilinguals in the inner sphere become so anxious about their competence that sometimes they cannot speak at all.” These two spheres do not coexist in the eyes of a native Spanish speaker. They make sure to differentiate the two at all times, as well as verify the status of the space they are in to make sure they do not bring inner-sphere speech into an outer-sphere setting. Residing within these two spheres of speech (formal and informal), we have just two languages being spoken (English and Spanish), and two “kinds” of speakers (white English-only and native Spanish speaking bilinguals), but there are four dialects (two per language). These dialects are as follows: English spoken in an American accent and a Spanish accent, and Spanish spoken in a heavy English accent and a Spanish accent. Native Spanish speakers such as the bilingual Puerto Ricans studied by Bonnie Urciuoli speak immaculate Spanish, sometimes even speaking perfect English as well. The only thing that separates them from engaging as effectively in white culture is their accent, which causes them to be very self-conscious while speaking. On the contrary, whites of course speak perfect English but when they attempt to speak Spanish, their heavy English accent does not concern them, though it disrespects and upsets native Spanish speakers. Hill says for them it’s like hearing “nails on a chalkboard”. These four spoken dialects within these two spheres ties into Jane Hills biggest main point, the double standard that manifests between these two social and spoken classes. The blatant double standard between these two groups in today’s society is pointed out by Hill in her text by stating: “Puerto Ricans experience the "outer sphere" as an important site of their racialization, since they are always found wanting by this sphere's standards of linguistic orderliness. My research suggests that precisely the opposite is true for Whites. Whites permit themselves a considerable amount of disorder precisely at the language boundary that is a site of discipline for Puerto Ricans that is, the boundary between Spanish and English in public discourse. I believe that this contrast, in which White uses of Spanish create a desirable "colloquial" presence for Whites, but uses of Spanish by Puerto Ricans are "disorderly and dangerous," is one of the ways in which this arena of usage is constituted as a… "White public space": a morally significant set of contexts that are the most important sites of the practices of a racializing hegemony, in which Whites are invisibly normal, and in which racialized populations are visibly marginal.” This creates a frustrating double standard between whites and native Spanish speakers because like Hill says in the texts, English speaking whites can speak Spanish in whatever accent or regard they care to, but when a native Spanish speaker chooses to speak Spanish, it becomes intimidating and labeled “dangerous”. Another double standard arises while regarding the intelligence of both classes of speakers, involving the two spheres of spoken language. While speaking in a non-formal inner-sphere setting, a native Spanish speaker can fluently transcribe his thoughts to words in brilliant discourse. Habitually speaking his home language, he doesn’t have to think twice about his accent, only the words he chooses to speak. Though when we shift him from the inner to the outer-sphere and put him in a formally objective conversation with a white English speaker, he becomes cornered because he has had his identity taken away from him. Among worrying about his accent while speaking within the outer-sphere he must worry about his speech as well such as his choice of diction and avoidance of simple grammatical mistakes an English speaker wouldn’t have to think twice about. Unfortunately, the opposite applies to white English speakers. On top of their English dominated speech, whenever they decide to speak what they know of the Spanish language, it is often times “grossly nonstandard and ungrammatical”. Though because English is the dominant language among the two, whites can get away with speaking a slaughtered Spanish speech because it is socially acceptable, and almost deserving of praise for learning a new language. Despite the intelligence it takes to become bilingual, that intelligence is often times not recognized by whites regarding native Spanish speakers. Native Spanish speakers are often times seen as inferior and stupid just because they may take longer with responses in Spanish/English discourse. Spanish accents in English are also seen labeled as inferior without even observing the intelligence of a speaker. A brilliant Spanish speaker may be disregarded as insufficient only because of the way he sounds to a white English speaker. These double standards between white English speakers and native Spanish speakers are frustrating to observe but important to understand. [Published on 05-11-2017]

Posted by Chase Kaplan on May 11, 2017

Tags:
Spanglish;
Mock Spanish

"El Messy Look": Mock Spanish and Code-switching in AXE Commercial

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Axe's new commercial for their "Messy Look" hair styling cream is a perfect example of the ways in which Mock Spanish is still prevalent in our society in 2017. Jane Hill, the inventor of the term, states in "Language, Race, and White Public Space" that one practice of Mock Spanish is "taking elements of Spanish morphology" such as the suffix -o and using Spanish modifiers such as "el" to create "jocular and pejorative" terms. In Axe's commercial, the actor refers to the product as "El Messy Look". Then, while giving instructions on using the cream, he says "First-o, take a finger to the cream..." At the end of the commercial, after showing off his confidence and "cultural awareness", the actor mishears the female bartender who actually speaks Spanish when she asks him a question, showing his ignorance. However, the bartender smiles at him, further enforcing Hill's ideas about Mock Spanish directly indexing the speaker as having desirable qualities, while simultaneously indirectly indexing the idea that Spanish is somehow less valuable than English.

Posted by Laurel Nagengast on May 8, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Power;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

Donald Trump: We need to get out 'bad hombres'

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This is what Donald Trump said in the third presidential debate in regarding to the issue of immigration. In his speech, he used Spanish word “hombre” to refer to the immigrants that he views as bad people, which has some negative meaning. However, “hombre” in Spanish only means “men” without any negative meanings. This is a good example of mock Spanish as defined by Hill (1998). People can’t understand the meaning without understanding the indirect index of the badness and criminal of Spanish people. It also contains underlying racism which shows that Spanish people have a stereotype of being bad, and in contrast white culture is better than others.

Posted by Yujia Wu on May 7, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Key and Peele Loco Gangsters

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This is a video from the TV show Key and Peele called Loco Gangsters. Key and Peele act out a skit as perceived Latino males. They use a variety of linguistic techniques ranging from the ideologies believed to be associated with Spanish to mock spanish.

Posted by Bryson Risley on May 5, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Mock Spanish

Mock Spanish in Scrubs

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In this video from the show "Scrubs", one of the characters uses mock Spanish to demean some of the other characters from the show. It was interesting to see mock Spanish used in such a popular and well known show

Posted by Harley Holub on May 1, 2017

Tags:
Mock Spanish

Trump Relies on Mock Spanish to Talk About Immigration (OPINION)

This blog post is about how non-Spanish speaking white peoples' use of "mock Spanish" is a form of covert racism that is used as a unconsciously strategic effort to silently dominate the folks who are imagined to speak the language, but to do so through attempts at silliness, humor and acting "cool” or "with it". [Published on 10-20-2016]

SNL Skit

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In a business meeting with four Americans and a Latino man, the Americans over pronounce the Spanish words and act like they cannot understand the Latino man when he speaks normally. They attempt to incorporate many Spanish words when speaking English.

Posted by Jennifer Boyce on March 9, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Mock Spanish

Mock Spanish in 'The Mexican' Trailer

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This trailer for the 2001 movie “The Mexican” starring Brad Pitt and Julia Roberts, demonstrates Brad Pitt’s character utilizing mock Spanish saying words like “el trucko” and “towno” in an interaction with Hispanic men. He also attempts Spanglish in another interaction saying a phone call is “muy muy important.”

Posted by Callie Hawkins on March 9, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Spanglish;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

Mock Spanish Soap Opera

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Mock Spanish Soap Opera for people who have only had a small amount of Spanish.

Posted by BreAnna Engeman on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Spanglish;
Mock Spanish;
Gender

Karen from Will and Grace speaks in Mock Spanish

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In this clip from the sitcom Will and Grace, Karen speaks to her Hispanic maid/nanny in pseudo- Spanish on the phone. She uses terms like “store-o” in order to seem like she is speaking with Spanish endings. Karen then goes on to ask her friend will how to pronounce something in Spanish, and then continues to just say the English words. She even goes so far as to use Spanish words for “thank you” and “goodbye” but in the wrong context. She uses Spanish not as an actual way to communicate with a native Spanish speaker, but rather to as a way to completely disregard the syntax and morphology of another language.

Posted by Danielle Gibosn on October 15, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
Spanish;
Mock Spanish;
Socioeconomic Status

Strange Wilderness- Spanish accent

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This is a clip from "Strange Wilderness" and in this clip they are mocking Mock Spanish. It's a completely over the top clip. There is obviously overt stereotyping displayed in the clip and attempt to condescend the Latino race. Its a legitimate question as to how many people would realize (because the clip is so over the top and backfires so extraordinarily) that this indeed a mockery of Mock Spanish.

Posted by Tyler Craig on October 4, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

Spanglish with George Lopez

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I have included a link to a video of Comedian George Lopez doing stand up comedy and talking about how Spanglish will always be used in America. This is interesting to me not only because of doing research paper on mock Spanish but also because I am Hispanic and have heard my relatives talk just how he does in the video.

Posted by Jonathan Salazar on October 3, 2016

Tags:
Spanglish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

"Hispandering"

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This clip is a president election debate and it’s regarding Latino issue. Both of the candidates are in favor of Latino and against deportation. The debate end with “that what we are trying to do is to united families and not to divide families”. This clip is a really good example of expanding “hispandering”.

Posted by Cyndi Lin on September 29, 2016

Tags:
Power;
Mock Spanish

"7 things Hillary Clinton has in common with your abuela" Hispandering and Codeswitching

This article, titled "7 things Hillary Clinton has in common with your abuela" is an article on Hillary Clinton's official website and lists 7 ways in which Hillary and "your abuela" (AKA your grandmother) are similar and share the same values/priorities. It is quite clear that the article is an example of Hispandering, and it includes a great deal of codeswitching. [Published on 12-22-2015]

Posted by Morgan Wiley on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

7 things Hillary Clinton has in common with your abuela

Hillary Clinton compares herself to Hispanic grandma's in order to win Hispanic votes in the elections.This is an illustration of hispandering which is commonly used by politicians. Also Hillary Clinton uses "Abuela" instead of grandma in order to make it hold more significant meaning to it. Also the switch from English to Spanish is a great example of "code-switching". [Published on 12-22-2015]

Posted by Ahmad Ali on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Politics and Policy

Mock Spanish in Scrubs

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Dr. Kelso uses mock spanish to belittle the idea of the nurses wanting a raise.

Posted by BreAnna Engeman on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Race,Ethnicity;
Socioeconomic Status

Issues of Hispandering

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Comedienne Cristela Alonzo discusses Hispandering in her own experience growing up in South Texas, often referring to political campaigns and gender issues.

Posted by Caitlin Ogren on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Mock Spanish

Variety of Spanish Accents

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Joanna Rants uses analogies to compare different Spanish accents.

Posted by Caitlin Ogren on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Spanglish;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

Jon Stewart - Thank Donald Trump

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Jon Stewart mocks the 'inspiration' of new Latino voters for Donald Trump's run for presidency.

Code Switching, Mock Spanish, and Kevin Hart

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Kevin Hart is explaining what it's like to be in prison. He takes on numerous different forms and voices to show the different type of people in prison.

Mock Spanish in Scrubs

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A popular T.V. comedy depicting a doctor using Spanish as a way to demean the Hispanic nurse he is speaking to.

Posted by Amanda Salamanca on March 10, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

Swing County USA: Hispandering

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This video talks about Hispandering in the United States. It details moments on the campaign trail where Presidential candidates, Democratic and Republican, engage in Hispandering. Many of the candidates refer back to their parents and their experiences as immigrants.

Speaking "Mexican" and the use of "Mock Spanish" in Children's Books

This article explains how underrepresented African American and Latino's are in the world of children's literature. The author focuses on the book Skippyjon Jones, which exemplifies the problem the author is describing. The main character speaks English and his alter-ego speaks Mock-Spanish. There is code switching back and forth in this book as the characters move from English to Mock Spanish in the context on a single conversation. Also, the main character in this book (speaking English) is a white Siamese cat and the alter-ego is a brown Chihuahua. The color of each animal can be seen as symbolizing the color of the skin. [Published on 05-05-2014]

35 American accents

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In this short video, this gentleman displays the ability to use 35 American accents. It is pretty impressive that there are so many dialects of American English.

Frito Bandito

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In doing research for my final paper for my linguistics class I ran across this old time video. Hispandering 60's style.

Posted by Tricia Roberson on March 4, 2016

Tags:
Perceptual Dialectology;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Multilingualism

El Maco

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This is a perfect example of mock spanish. This ad is mixed with overt racism. I am surprised that McDonald's publicity team let this one go.

Posted by Tricia Roberson on March 3, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

President Obama - Hispandering

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In Obama's Cinco de Mayo speech it is clear that hispandering is taking place. He invited a crowd of what appeared to be people of hispanic background. What Obama is speaking about is clear, he wants immigration laws and reform to continuously be adjusted and bettered. Each time Obama said the term 'tequila' he changed the way he said it to sound more hispanic and the crowd went nuts so he continued to say it to please the people there. He used code-switching to his advantage in this speech.

Posted by Madison Rigdon on March 2, 2016

Tags:
Spanglish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish;
Style-shifting;
Stigma

Mock spanish

This is an interesting article touching on the use of mock spanish in children's books.

Posted by Kelley Lane on February 28, 2016

Tags:
Mock Spanish;
Youth;
Multilingualism

Hasta La Vista, Baby

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Arnold Schwarzenegger use's Mock Spanish in The Terminator. I use this with the reading: Hill, Jane. 1999. Language, Race, and White Public Space.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 4, 2013

Tags:
Hill, Jane;
Mock Spanish

SNL: Mock Spanish

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A Saturday Night Live skit from the early nineties that spooks the use of Mock Spanish. Citation: Hill, Jane. 1999. Language, race and white public space.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 3, 2013

Tags:
Hill, Jane;
Mock Spanish