Chinglish

Video Proves Logan Paul Did Many More Utterly Offensive Things In Japan

Logan Paul is an online personality from America that basically just makes video blogs. Recently he went to Japan and vlogged about his time there. He came under fire almost immediately for positing a video of him in the Suicide Forest where someone had just committed suicide. In the week following, people also watched other videos of his time in Japan where he basically disrespects anything and anyone. At one point he breaks a game boy on purpose and brings it back to the salesman saying it was “much-o, broken-o”. Him and his friends also get together and yell “arigato” before running around — which shows he probably had no idea what it meant but yelled it because it translates to “thank you” in English. Though the things he did were disrespectful to Japanese culture for a number of reasons these things discussed linguistically showed the shallow amount of knowledge he had on the place he was visiting and the lack of care he had for the people there. I see this as a form of speech communities - because Logan Paul is from a very laid-back, privileged, English speaking community online and went to Japan but changed nothing, therefore observably offending members of the speech communities in Japan. [Published on 01-05-2018]

Posted by Darby VanHoutan on January 14, 2018

Tags:
Chinglish;
Japanese;
Code-switching;
Stigma

Code Switching

This is a video showing a young boy and his sister speaking to each other in Korean. Their father asks the boy some questions in English, and the boy responds to him in English. This is a perfect example of code-switching between the English and Korean languages.

Posted by Janay Jacobs on October 10, 2017

Tags:
Chinglish;
Code-switching;
Language Shift;
Multilingualism

Anjelah Johnson-Nail Salon

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This video is a stand-up comedy act about an experience in a nail salon. Johnson’s voice changes as she impersonates a nail technician. This video shows code switching between Vietnamese and English. She does an excellent job imitating her visit at the salon by the facial expressions, accent, and specific word choice.

Posted by Lauren Snyder on March 7, 2017

Tags:
Chinglish;
Code-switching

Asian American Slang

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This video depicts slang words used in particular by Asian Americans. This shows the combination of the two cultures of Asia and America. Many of these slang words have Asian roots and are influenced by American culture which gives rise to a whole new word with different meanings. This blend of cultures has given rise to many new languages and words throughout history.

Posted by Matt McLaughlin on March 11, 2016

Tags:
Chinglish;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent;
Globalization;
Multilingualism

Code-switching

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This video explains some of the main reasons why people engage in code switching. Code switching can be used in many different ways, but the primary function of this practice is to switch between two languages in a single conversation.

MISS KO 葛仲珊 - CALL ME (Mandarin-English Codeswitching)

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Music for Project 1 on contact varieties, this is a Taiwanese-American hip-hop artist who uses Mandarin and English in her songs. (to varying degrees, if you want a youtube adventure check out her other videos)

Posted by Syd Low on September 30, 2014

Tags:
Chinglish;
Code-switching;
Hip Hop Nation

A Short Class in Manglish: 88, 3Q

Mandarin Chinese written internet-slang is becoming more popular; however, there is also growing opposition to the inclusion of English words and phrases into the Chinese language. By Patti Waldmeir.