African American English

Rethinking Grammar: How We Talk

We as people judge the way that others speak, we assume intelligence based on the way that people speak. African American Vernacular tends to be associated with not being very smart [Published on 10-21-2015]

Is "talking white" really a thing

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This is a clip in which two people are blindfolded and asked to determine if people are white or black only by their voice. The speaker is given a song to read aloud as the listeners try to determine if “talking white is really a thing”. There is a belief that people will inherently sound different simply because of their ethnicity. This puts the stereotypes to the test and shows how different vocal inflections are perceived

Posted by Olivia Rodriguez on June 30, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent;
Stigma

Code-switching with Drake

In this sketch from Saturday Night Live, the cast and special guest star Drake depict a fictionalized version of Drake's bar mitzvah. This event brings together his African-American family from his father's side, and his Jewish and white family from his mother's side. Drake expertly code switches between the two groups, greeting his mother's family with "Shabbat shalom," and his father's with "whasssssup." Drake goes on to deliver a rap in which he talks about knowing what a W2 is, which indexes Drake's membership in the Jewish community and its perceived expertise in dealing with money.

Posted by Madylan Womack on May 9, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching;
Jewish;
Race,Ethnicity

SNL - Amazon Echo

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Kenan Thompson plays an older African-American man in a parody Amazon Echo ad. He displays several features of AAVE, the most prominent being the phonological (eg. using word-initial stop consonants /t/ or /d/ rather than /θ/ or /ð/).

Posted by Camryn Shiroma on April 26, 2018

Tags:
African American English

SNL- Black Jeopardy with Drake

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Drake plays as a African-American from Canada in a Jeopardy show centered around African-American stereotypes. The awareness of the public about certain features they use allow them to construct these stereotypes and place Drake as a part of the out group.

Posted by Camryn Shiroma on April 26, 2018

Tags:
African American English

Brother Ali freestyle on GoRadio - 95.3FM

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Brother Ali is a white socially-conscious rapper who, due to being albino and growing up primarily around African-Americans in the Midwest, existed for many years with a publicly ambiguous racial identity. In more recent years (including at the time of this video), Brother Ali has been more explicit about being white In this video, Brother Ali freestyles on a local Twin Cities radio station. He uses numerous features of AAE, including pervasive coronal stop (-t/-d) deletion.

Posted by Oskar Soderberg on April 18, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Hip Hop Nation

Brother Ali freestyle on B96

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Brother Ali is a white socially-conscious rapper who, due to being albino and growing up primarily around African-Americans in the Midwest, existed for many years with a publicly ambiguous racial identity. In more recent years (after this video), Brother Ali has been more explicit about being white In this video, Brother Ali freestyles on a local Twin Cities radio station. He uses numerous features of AAE, including pervasive coronal stop (-t/-d) deletion.

Posted by Oskar Soderberg on April 18, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Hip Hop Nation

Cardi B's Casual Speech and Realness

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In regular speech, Cardi B uses Chicano English and AAE features; she says when she speaks, she doesn't care about her accent, unlike when she sings.

Cardi B's authentic accent

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Audiences applaud Cardi B for embracing Chicano English in her rap music. She also uses AAE features in a way that is typical for rap music.

G-Eazy - Fire In The Booth.

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The freestyle that I analyzed for my assignment in AAE. This rapper is interesting because he potentially disrupts traditional notions of authenticity in hip-hop, given the recent "frat rap" movement.

Posted by Arthur Garrison on April 18, 2018

Tags:
African American English

G-Eazy On Stepping Away From H&M, Being A Crazy Gemini, Halsey & More.

The interview that I analyzed for AAE variables. This rapper potentially steps away from traditional notions of AAE/HHL being symbols of authenticity because of the recent spate of "frat rappers."

Posted by Arthur Garrison on April 18, 2018

Tags:
African American English

Sev'ral Timez Songs

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This video parodies 90s-style boy bands, especially their appropriation of AAE. Of note is their declaration, "We're non-threatening!" (found in the first and second clips) which I think captures many white Americans' attitudes towards black culture: a little is cool, but too much is scary. See 0:31 for an example of their use AAE features in speech.

Posted by Aidan Malanoski on April 17, 2018

Tags:
Indexicality;
African American English

NPR Linguistic Profiling

NPR's Tovia Smith reports on linguistic discrimination in relation to the Fair Housing Act. The interviewee was repeatedly denied housing because of linguistic profiling, and Smith talks about legality and the lawsuit that ensued. The segment addresses many of the concerns in Baugh's "Linguistic profiling" paper. (CW: N-word is used by AAE speaker) [Published on 09-05-2001]

Posted by Luna Albertini on April 17, 2018

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
African American English;
Accent

Excerpt from Donald Glover's

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I used these four songs, a clip from "Weirdo," and this interview of Donald Glover's coronal stop deletion.

Scholars defend ‘African American English,’ from Ebonics to slang to improper grammar

A review of Walt Wolfram's film "Talking Black in America," In which the author clearly articulates a position against the push of the film. [Published on 02-23-2018]

Posted by Arthur Garrison on April 16, 2018

Tags:
African American English

Black Panther-Kendrick Lamar

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This is the song I looked at for coronal stop deletion for the famous hip-hopper Kendrick Lamar.

Posted by Caroline Wright on April 16, 2018

Tags:
African American English

Iggy Azalea Freestyle

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Iggy Azalea's attempt at her rap persona and linguistic repertoire without practice. Citation: Eberhardt, M. & Freeman, K. 2015. 'First things first, I'm the realest': linguistic appropriation, white privilege, and the hip-hop persona of Iggy Azalea.

Kevin Hart in "Night School"

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In the trailer for the new movie "Night School" starring Kevin Hart, the white principal of the high school "talks Black" and is confronted by Kevin Hart about it, as can be seen at the 48 second mark and the 2 minute and 14 second mark.

Posted by Caroline Wright on April 4, 2018

Tags:
African American English

Denzel Washington - Dillard commencement speech

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Video of a commencement address delivered by Denzel Washington at Dillard University in May 2015. Compare to Washington's commencement address given at the University of Pennsylvania in 2011. Washington is an African American actor and director from New York who is a native speaker of AAE. Dillard University is a small, private, historically black university in New Orleans. Over 90% of the Dillard student body is black. Used for /ai/ monophthongization project for Reed AAE class Spring 2018.

Posted by Oskar Soderberg on March 14, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Variation;
ai monophthongization1

Denzel Washington - Penn commencement speech

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Video of commencement speech delivered by Denzel Washington at the University of Pennsylvania in May 2011. Compare to commencement speech given at Dillard University in May 2015. Washington is an African American actor and director from New York who is a native speaker of AAE. The University of Pennsylvania is a large Ivy League university located in Philadelphia. White students make up a relative majority of the Penn student body. Used for /ai/ monophthongization project in Reed College AAE class Spring 2018.

Posted by Oskar Soderberg on March 14, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Variation;
ai monophthongization1

Jackie Aina's Review of Inclusive Fenty Beauty

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Jackie Aina is a popular black makeup artist and YouTuber who frankly discusses issues of race. She also frequently employs some features of African American English along with Standard English, unlike some other popular black beauty YouTubers who use more Standard English in their videos.

Posted by Michaella Joseph on March 9, 2018

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching;
Style-shifting;
Gender

Jesse Williams' Speech (BET Awards 2016)

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Popular speech upon receiving the BET Humanitarian award. Example of black preacher style by biracial speaker.

The Newest 'Grey's Anatomy' Hunk, Jesse Williams

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Jesse William's interview with Ellen on the Ellen Show in 2010, marking usage of African American Language.

The Cost of Code Switching

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This is a 10 minute TedX video addressing the complexities of style shifting/code switching in America, specifically AAE speakers being expected to conform to "standard forms" to survive in America. This talk addresses issues of police brutality, racism, and expectations of who is expected to style shift/code switch and why.

Ghostbuster 2016-Subway Scene

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This is a clip from the movie Ghostbusters, with actresses Leslie Jones, Melissa McCarthy, Kristin Wiig, and Kate McKinnon. Leslie Jones, an AAE speaker, uses the monophthong version of /ai/ in this clip.

Posted by Caroline Wright on March 7, 2018

Tags:
African American English

"I thought you said you was a top"

Taedatea is a black gay youtuber/online personality. This video explores the intersection of styles, both gendered and racialized. Initially, Tae briefly employs a rising, high-pitched style, which is immediately read by the interlocutor over the phone as a 'bottom' (and therefore feminine, as 'bottoming' is a highly gendered and stereotyped action) style. Tae quickly switches into a style that is both deeper and uses more features of AAE, which is designed to present 'masculinity'. This linguistic self-presentation is a good example of style-shifting as a means of constructing a masculine, top identity, and reinforces many of our recent readings which present style-shifting as " continual construction of a persona or personae and variables as resources for this construction" (Eckert, 2004) [Published on 04-01-2017]

Fox News clip sampled on DAMN.

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This clip is a really clearly delineated example of "language as proxy" for racism. It's really clear in the tone of the broadcasters when reading Kendrick's lyrics that their issue is not only with the content but with the stigmatized aspects of AAVE. I also wanted to bring up this clip/the album DAMN. because it's a great example of a lot of the themes talked about in the film Talking Black in America, particularly regarding hip-hop. The way Kendrick puts his music, which deals with issues of race and is basically the way he was able to survive violence in dialogue with white people saying "hip hop is doing more damage than racism" is really masterful and gives me chills.

This Is How I talk SNL Skit

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This is a skit from SNL in which Donald is a new employee at Sprint. The video starts off with him talking in his normal voice to his other coworkers and then his boss comes in and starts talking in African American slang. After she walks away, Donald starts impersonating the way she speaks and she walks back by and hears his impersonation. In order to not get fired, Donald talks that same way every time she’s around so she thinks that’s just the way he talks. Every time his boss would walk by, he would accommodate his speech style by shifting from his normal voice to African American slang.

Posted by Brittany Outler on October 9, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
African American English;
Accommodation;
Style-shifting

How the triplet flow took over rap

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Although the usage of triplets (i.e. the “Migos” flow) has become very popular as of late, and is currently heard on just about every rap track that hits the Billboard 100, the usage of triplets in rap is not something new. It has its roots in Midwestern and Southern rap communities in the 80s onward. In rap, a triplet is essentially like setting your verse to 3/4 time - three beats per bar rather than 4. In rap, it can be used as a sort of verbal trick - it could slow down a song by throwing off the expected rhythm our brain is expecting to hear or even speed it up. Listening to verses in triplets can also make the rappers’ flow feel cleaner. Lyrically, the songs can be flexible or rigid, allowing a diverse range of rap styles to be done over the beat.

AAVE (African American Vernacular English) Ebonics Is Not “Improper” English

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A video from May of 2016 explaining why AAVE Ebonics is a proper form of English because everyone has their own dialect that is valid. The video goes on to suggest that white supremacy is the cause of all this uproar and if roles were switched then AAVE would be the official language of the United States.

I GET THE BAG Gucci Mane ft. Migos

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This is a new Hip-Hop video with Gucci Mane and rap group the Migos called I Get The "Bag". When people are talking about getting a "Bag" now of days it's just another way of saying getting money or bossing up that's just your "bag". Bag can be used in many different ways it's a new thing that has been used frequently. It's an African american slang word coming from rap culture.

Posted by Steven Sims Jr. on September 28, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

Meet The British Woman Who Sings In Yoruba (Nigerian Language)

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A British woman sings in Yoruba, a language that might shock or surprise other people.

Posted by Mmachi Nwoke on September 26, 2017

Tags:
African American English

Movie Accent Expert Breaks Down 31 Actors Playing Real People

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Not directly related to gender and language but it's fun and linguistic. This linguist critiques movie accents (this is the second video of his that I've seen) & often talks about how the usage of certain sounds or aspects of a person's speech help create a sense of the character as well as the setting, which I think goes along with some of the themes we've already started to address in the area of language as it constructs identity.

President Obama with "Anger Translator"

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This video shows Barack Obama's speech at the 2015 Correspondent's Dinner. In it comedian Keegan-Michael Key plays Luther, Obama's "Anger Translator". Obama is speaking with an SAE dialect while Key uses AAVE. The humor in the sketch plays on the assumption that Presidents (and by extension anyone in a professional setting) should speak SAE, even those who may otherwise use AAVE or another dialect more naturally. Key is speaking, but he is speaking as Obama's inner self. I thought this clip demonstrated the use of different dialects in specific settings, and how when dialects such as AAVE are used in an unexpected setting people almost universally react to it. I believe this video also shows polyphony, due to both Key and Obama speaking, and hegemony due to the play on the unexpectedness of the AAVE dialect in the professional setting.

Posted by Caitlin Smith on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
African American English

A Few Things to Know About American Sign Language

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Similar to the different accents that exist in the English language, different styles of sign language express different cultural upbringings. This video is a short personal account into a few individual’s experiences with sign language and its perception from none deaf people. Explaining issues like the use of the term “hearing impaired”, is considered more offensive than being labeled deaf because it does not recognize deaf people as a “linguistic minority”. The point is that deaf people have a culture. One of the speakers talks about how slang has influenced ASL specifically in the African-American cultural community. Being deaf does not exclude people from existing in a living language that adapts and changes to fit the times. Rich with the impact of various cultures.

"Why Explaining 'The N-Word' To Non-Black People Is So Damn Exhausting"

Article on Cultural Perceptions of the N-Word. Deals with which groups have responsibility or control over a word (and if they can have this control). This also shows lay-person perspective on key socio-linguistic issues. [Published on 05-09-2017]

Airplane-I Speak Jive

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This scene from Airplane depicts an overly dramatized version of AAVE to the point where other white people, besides one elderly lady, cannot understand what the speakers are saying. Beyond this being an example of linguistic ideologies at work it also serves as social commentary on how AAVE was perceived in the time the movie was made.

Posted by Paige Lechtenberg on May 2, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity

Transformers 2 mudflap and skidz spitting on leo

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this video shows off to heavily criticized characters from transformers 2 : revenge of the fallen. director Micheal Bay has a habit throughout this movie series of introducing transformers that are stereotypes of races and cultures such as the Mexican and samurai warrior transformers in the 4th movie. mudflap and skidz are no exceptions to this habit, both portraying a stereotypical African american way of talking and using certain words like bust a cap in his ass and nah what I mean?

Posted by David Norvell on May 1, 2017

Tags:
African American English

Substitute Teacher

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This a skit from Key and Peele about language barriers between ethnicities. The teacher pronounces the students name differently and each student is confused. When the teacher is confronted with this knowledge he gets upset that they mock his pronunciation of their names. This relates to linguistic anthropology because it showcases language barriers between different ethnicities.

Posted by Garion Morgan on April 29, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Language Shift;
Stigma

This Is How I Talk-SNL

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The SNL skit "This is How I Talk" plays off of linguistic and societal norms attributed to different groups of people (in this case black and white people) to create a humorous situation. The situation is funny because Louis C.K. who is an extremely white individual and a speaker of Standard English, pretends to be a native speaker of African-American Vernacular English to avoid letting his new boss know that he was making fun of her. This is unusual because AAVE is strongly associated with race, so to see a white man using this speech type is so out of the ordinary as to be humorous. Later on in the clip, Brenda switches to SE in order to find out for sure if Louis C.K.'s character is only pretending to speak AAVE natively. While she is speaking, she says that "this is my real voice. See, I went to a good college..." indicating the common conception that AAVE is not an "academic" form of speech and reinforcing the social hierarchy that is related to American dialects.

Do You Speak American?

This is an article and analytical piece by Robert MacNeil, an employee of PBS since the 1980s. He talks about how moving to America and adopting American grammatical policies in order to work for television. [Published on 2005]

Reality TV outgroup language use

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This clip shows outgroup language use of a white women on a reality TV show. When she is upset, she begins to use more standard English and less AAE markers. Other people on the show notice. This relates to themes of crossing or outgroup language use and also the question of authenticity in relation to race and speech explored in Cutler's "Keepin It Real" (2003).

Posted by Ally Watson on March 19, 2017

Tags:
African American English;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

Why the DEA's embrace of Ebonics is lost in translation

There are many people who are upset that the DEA are hiring on individuals who are fluent in AAVE or Ebonics because they see this form of language as “broken” or a “bastardization of English.” What people don’t understand is that the DEA is doing this because it is important to have people who understand these vernaculars because of the discriminatory treatment of blacks in the criminal justice system. They want to better understand and present these types of people in their native language because of the constant misunderstandings of their words when law enforcement is involved. It is important for the DEA to have people on their teams who understand this time of vernacular so there is not discrimination or misunderstandings. [Published on 08-25-2010]

Posted by Mycal Scott on March 15, 2017

Tags:
African American English;
Socioeconomic Status

Different Types to Speak English

Jamila Lyiscott describes her perception of the various types of slang and vocabulary that she uses based off of the people she is surrounded by [Published on 02-15-2014]

Posted by Bri Smith on March 14, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
African American English;
Multilingualism

At UMass lecture, Stanford professor tackles prejudice against African-American English in courtrooms

A woman’s testimony in court is accused of being “unintelligible” because she speaks a different dialect of English, specifically African American English. The slang terms or speech patterns that she uses do not sound grammatically correct to the courtroom, but back home, it is normal speech. Rickford interestingly notes in the article that since interpreters for foreign languages are used in the courtroom, we should also use those resources of dialects of English that are not as easily interpreted by conventional speakers of the language.

Jamila Lyiscott: 3 ways to speak English

Jamila Lyiscott is a “tri-tongued orator;” in her powerful spoken-word essay “Broken English,” she celebrates — and challenges — the three distinct flavors of English she speaks with her friends, in the classroom and with her parents. As she explores the complicated history and present-day identity that each language represents, she unpacks what it means to be “articulate.” [Published on 02-01-2014]

Fresh Prince Code-switching

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Carlton code-switching on the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. Carlton switches between his usual proper English to AAVE.

Posted by BreAnna Engeman on October 16, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching

President Obama's Anger Translator

President Obama gets an anger translator. This video is comedic twist to a typical presidential speech.

Black Folks Slang

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This video is a tutorial on several slang words used by people in the black community. The video explains what these words mean in English and gives examples of the slang words used in a sentence in order to understand the context of them. This video is shows the use of African American English and speech communities.

Posted by Chrissy McLeod on October 14, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Communities of Practice;
Slang

The Importance of Code Switching

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Edward Moore explains the importance of Code Switching for success. He emphasizes that people of color need to know how to function in different environments. From "the block" to the board room.

Black Girls: The Cycle Continues

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In the video titled “Black Girls: The Cycle Continues.” we see a group of young black females taking turns speaking their mind's over an apparent issue, which has upset them. This is a good example of slang terminology and language ideologies of a speech community.

Inner White Girl

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This video shows how comedy has taken advantage of code switching. This is comedy but it exemplifies the power of speech. When the character speaks AAVE they are stereotyped as untrustworthy and dishonest. The style of speech is indexical in social positioning. Even though the skit was meant to be funny it has been criticized as degrading and insulting.

Posted by Madison Curnow on October 4, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Power;
African American English;
Code-switching

Kodak Black Social Artifact Golden Boy

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He uses a dialect that is familiar with the rap community, and has an accent that is usually associated with the Haitian community. His delivery of the language he uses gives him his swagger, and gives him a style that stands out from other artists. Examples of his lyrics include saying things like "dat" instead of "that", or "witchu" instead of with "with you".

How WSJ Used an Algorithm to Analyze ‘Hamilton’ the Musical

Joel Eastwood and Erik Hinton wrote an algorithm to analyze the different types of rhymes used in the tony Award Winning Broadway Musical "Hamilton", and reveal their Hip-Hop influences. [Published on 06-06-2016]

3 Types of English

This TedTalk features Jamila Lyiscott, who describes the "three Englishes" she speaks on a daily basis, which is determined by her surrounding environment and who she is with. Her detailed breakdown of the different "tongues" she speaks shows the correlation between language, culture, and race, as well as how society and culture effect language acquisition/usage. [Published on 02-01-2014]

Pidgin English from Nigeria

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A video of two Nigerian Men who explain and give example of language divergence and Pidgin English.

African-American ASL

Variations that have developed and been maintained by White and Black signers of ASL are examined to reveal surprising cultural implications [Published on 09-07-2012]

How to Speak Hip

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This is the intro to a 13 part "album" instructing listeners on how to speak and understand "hip" language. Those who want to appear "cool" to this subculture that includes hipsters, juvenile delinquents, jazz musicians, etc.

Code-Switching: Obama's 'Nigga' Moment Makes Civil Rights History

The article includes the quote from President Obama "Yo, Barry, you did it my nigga!" which ended the President's final White House Correspondents Dinner. The importance of this is the switch between what could be considered formal English and AAVE. The article also addresses the question of language ideologies by responding to the idea that it was inappropriate for the term "my nigga!" to be included in the speech. Furthermore, that language ideology is rooted in racist ideologies, so the utterance is also a response to power structures. [Published on 05-02-2016]

BET Comic Travina Springer Lesson on Code-Switching

This comic provides several examples of code-switching that she learned upon entering a new school. (A new linguistic community.)

I Speak Jive (Airplane!)

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Scene from the movie Airplane! wherein several characters have a conversation (starting at 0:58), with two African-American men speaking AAE in such a way that the white stewardess cannot understand, and an elderly white woman must "translate" for her.

Posted by Gina Ruggeri on April 26, 2016

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
African American English

Gizoogle Search Engine

Website imitating Google that attempts to "translate" pages into AAE for comedic purposes.

Posted by Maren Bilby on April 19, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Ebonics Controversy

Keith Ape - 잊지마 (It G Ma) (feat. JayAllDay, Loota, Okasian & Kohh)

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Music video depicting East Asian (Korean and Japanese) rappers using CRAAVE. This video was highly controversial because many felt the rappers were appropriating black culture, especially since the song itself was based off of an African American hip-hop song ("U Guessed It" by OG Maco).

Posted by Maren Bilby on March 15, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Japanese;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

Honey Oats Commercial

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Woman talking about working at a Honey Oats factory, who uses very "light" AAE.

Posted by Gina Ruggeri on March 15, 2016

Tags:
African American English

Ebonics Dictionary

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In this video stand up comedian Steve Harvey explains the complexity of Ebonics. Although he is African American Steve Harvey's stand up routine plays into certain African American stereotypes while pointing out the differences between American English and AAVE.

The Ebonics Controversy in my Backyard

This article talks about Ebonics and Code-Switching, It explains what happened when the Ebonics controversy broke out.

Key & Peele - Obama Meet & Greet

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This Key & Peele comedy sketch humorously depicts Obama and the different ways he talks to black and white people after a speech. There's a lot of code switching going on in this sketch. There's a handful funny references in here as well, from rap to slang.

Black Folks Slang

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A black comedian basically goes through a handful of different types of "black folks slang" and explains what they really mean. He does this through a couple different ways, from using the slang in a sentence, to describing exactly what it means, to even showing tweets that use a particular type of "black folks slang." He also does it in a humorous way which makes it easier to understand and more engaging.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
African American English;
whiteness;
Internet Language;
Slang

But What Does Bae Actually Mean?

In this article, the author explores the history and rise of the word "bae" in popular culture, noting that the term has actually been around much longer than its 2014 introduction to the mainstream. Many who grew up hearing and speaking AAVE have used "bae" in conversation for years, and the term has been commercialized to a point where it has lost its original vibe and is now being "sold back" to its original users. [Published on 03-07-2016]

Hooked on Ebonics

The article dives into several important concepts as they relate to the understanding of Ebonics. The author explains that there are rules and variety within Ebonics that demonstrate its value as a variety of English. The author also addresses that Ebonics is not just "a black thing" and that many whites, Hispanics and Asian Americans all engage in AAVE.

Family Guy Stereotypes

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This video is a combination of stereotypes that have aired on family guy over the years. Many of these stereotypes have to do with race and language in society today.

Key & Peele - Obama's Anger Translator - Meet Luther

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In this video clip of Key & Peele, Peele's Obama is a very mild-mannered character who calmly addresses his audience, and Key's Luther interrupts Obama's speech to represent Obama's inner anger.

Posted by Kristi Sparks on March 7, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Clinton's drawl, Trump's 'yuuge' N.Y. accent and campaign 'code-switching'

The article discusses several politicians' adressee-based style shifting while speaking to different groups of people. Gives an example of monophthongization from Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama using elements of AAE. The article also talks about differences between the styles of Jeb Bush and George W. Bush. [Published on 03-05-2016]

Cut For Time: Def TED Talks - Saturday Night Live

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A skit making fun of Ted talks by creating a 'Def Jam' version. It uses AAE and has Caucasian speakers trying to act like African Americans.

Posted by Samuel Schmidgall on March 5, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

35 American accents

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In this short video, this gentleman displays the ability to use 35 American accents. It is pretty impressive that there are so many dialects of American English.

Altering Chris Rock's Oscars monologue to conform to "standard" english

88th Academy Awards host Chris Rock used his opening monologue to hit on a number of important issues facing people of color in the film industry. Time included a transcript of Rock's speech to go along with a clip, and, interestingly, they have taken his words and "corrected" his grammar. For instance, in the video, Rock jokes, "in the 'in memoriam' section, it's going to be black people that was shot by the cops on their way to the movies." However, his words are transcribed as "...were shot by the cops on their way to the movies." Rock's leveling of verb forms is seen as "non-standard," and "corrected" for publication. [Published on 02-28-2016]

English or Ebonics

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This is a video that show the code-switching involved between proper english vs. slang.

Posted by Kelley Lane on February 28, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching;
Ebonics Controversy;
Slang

DEA and AAVE

Shows some misconceptions that because of how people speak could lead to better understanding when tapping phones. Interesting not everyone speaks drug dealer dialect really shows how stereotyping is in thinking. [Published on 08-24-2010]

Posted by Michelle Allan on February 25, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Garrard McClendon on Black English - Ebonics

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Garrad McClendon addresses the dangers of the African American language. Although he believes the African American language is beautiful, he feels strongly that the African Americans in the US need to learn how to code-switch. They need to learn when it is appropriate to talk in slang and when it is necessary to code-switch to "proper" English. Garrad also addresses the issues that teachers need to become more aggressive in correcting children's language at a young age and not be afraid of doing so. The children's future is dependent on being taught proper English and being correct when they don't use it.

The Linguistics of AAVE

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This video discusses the history of AAVE, "African American Vernacular English. It address the origin, the pronunciations, and how it is used. The video gives great examples of AAVE and the translation of what it means in "proper" English.

Posted by Meaghan Kuhlmann on February 21, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Grammaticalization;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

What Matters- Code Switching: Communication That Matters

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A great video on a more educational aspect of code switching and how important it is to understand the implications of this valuable language tool.

Posted by Amanda Salamanca on February 16, 2016

Tags:
Power;
African American English;
Code-switching

Obama's Anger Translator

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This clip from “Key & Peele” challenges how a certain language and dialect are often “expected” from African-Americans without taking into account how a person was socialized in their community. Key & Peele touch on this subject again in their video “White Sounding Black Guys”.

Posted by Jamie Schnee on February 7, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity

Beyonce - Formation

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In this song and music video, Beyonce addresses stereotypes of the African-American community and uses language and style-shifting to play on how the public perceives wealthy black individuals such as herself and her family. She also discusses her upbringing in the deep south and mentions how her family's "negro" and "Creole" heritages combine.

Posted by Dante Colombo on February 6, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Emmanual and Philip Hudson- Asking all of them questions

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Do men and women engage in conversation differently? This video by Emmanual and Phillp Hudson discredit the thought that men are straight forward with information rather that emotion or gossip. He is displaying the ability to understand gender language in the community that he is mocking, exploring ultra feminism and masculinity.

Posted by Mylls Cheffey on February 3, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting

Emmanual and Philip Hudson- Ratchet Girl Anthem

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Emmanuel and Philp Hudson, two brothers that are YouTube stars have gained several hundred thousand views. They have gained so many views by instigating culturally charged videos. In this video they play the part of two "ratchet" girls that are in the club. This video shows AAE in an extreme method. This is a system that has its own concept of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics.

Posted by Mylls Cheffey on February 2, 2016

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity

This Is How I Talk

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In another sketch pitting Louis C.K. as the awkward, middle-class white man, this SNL bit presents a new Sprint employee caught imitating his boss's style. He convinces her that this is how "[his] momma done taught [him] to talk." This forces him into affecting an AAVE style for the five years of his employment.

Posted by Matt Bernobich on December 4, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching

Black Jeopardy--SNL

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CW for a brief reference to domestic abuse. One in a series, this sketch imagines a black version of Jeopardy! with categories such as "It's Been a Minute" and "White People." The episode features a black Alex Trebek (Kenan Thompson), two black contestants (Jay Pharaoh and Sasheer Zamata), and a white professor of African American Studies (Louis C.K.). Linguistically the video is interesting because, though exploiting common stereotypes of the African American community, it does so using phonologically and morphosyntactically authentic AAE (switching at times into a more vernacular style).

Posted by Matt Bernobich on December 4, 2015

Tags:
African American English

Lil' Kim - Single Black Female

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One song off Lil' Kim's album The Notorious K.I.M. which I analyzed with respect to CSD.

Posted by Sami Peterson on November 24, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Hip Hop Nation

"A white rapper is more marketable in America."

Rapper Mac Miller on NPR's podcast Microphone Check. Around the 41:00 mark, Mac reflects on what it means to be white in hip hop.

Posted by Richard Adcock on November 24, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Hip Hop Nation

Interview of Macklemore on 96.5

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Interview of Macklemore and producer Ryan Lewis by a white interviewer for a radio show. To be compared to the interview conducted by black and hispanic interviewers.

Posted by Manon Gilmore on November 24, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Macklemore Interview on 105.1 Radio

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This is an interview of the rapper Macklemore in which he discusses his music, influences, and personal beliefs with a black interviewer and a hispanic interviewer. To be compared to the interview of Macklemore and Ryan Lewis interviewed by a white person.

Posted by Manon Gilmore on November 24, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

V-Nasty Talks N-Word Controversy

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On the topic of AAE, WHH and authenticity. V-Nasty, of the somewhat infamous White Girl Mob, talks about (and defends) her usage of the N-word, even losing the favor of contentious Kreayshawn.

Posted by Tyler Helton on November 24, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
whiteness

English to Ghetto translator

An example of an Ebonics translator, a popular site of linguistic racism that results from the Ebonics controversy of 1996.

Posted by Kara Becker on November 18, 2015

Tags:
African American English

If Folks Wanna Pop Off

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This week, Obama said "pop off" in a public address. Responses were...enthusiastic.

Posted by Richard Adcock on November 17, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Politics and Policy

Middle-Class Black Families, in Low Income Neighborhoods

An article on racial disparities in the U.S. and how the white middle-class tend to live in safer and wealthier neighborhoods than blacks of the same income and social class. Also white middle-class families have higher average net worth than black middle-class families. This data is mentioned in the 2015 paper by Britt, Erica, and Tracy Weldon on AAE in the middle-class. [Published on 06-24-2015]

Posted by Ellery Sloane-Barton on November 16, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Socioeconomic Status

Nelly - Hot in Herre

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The urr variable.

Posted by Kara Becker on November 12, 2015

Tags:
African American English

Assault Swim

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Jessica Williams reports on a Texas pool party that ended with police assaulting a group of young black teenagers.

Posted by Sami Peterson on October 17, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
ai monophthongization1

Key and Peele Rap Album Confession

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This Key and Peele sketch also makes use of a black AAE speaker and a white middle class establishment character. In contrast with Little Homie, this skit illustrates both Key and Peele's abilities to style shift according to the character they are portraying.

Posted by Manon Gilmore on October 17, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Key and Peele Little Homie

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This skit by Key and Peele casts the comedians as a black speaker of AAE and a white establishment character who makes use of a puppet that speaks AAE.

Posted by Manon Gilmore on October 17, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Empire "Without a Country"

Season 2, Episode 2 of Empire. A family drama about a record company, Empire focuses on the Lyon family, who are African-American; much of the dialog is heavy on AAE features. The relatively consistent in-group setting sets up some potentially interesting controlled differences in style by topic and persona.

Death Scene of "the black guy" in Alien (1979)

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I couldn't find an example of Parker's use of the /ai/ monophthong, but here's an example of what I coded as "emotional", ie. there's a Xenomorph in my face who wants to eat me. Happy Halloween.

Posted by Marissa Olmos on October 15, 2015

Tags:
African American English

Diphthongal Terry

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Here, Terry is talking to his boss, and therefore produces more diphthongal /ai/s than his more casual speech.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on October 15, 2015

Tags:
African American English

Terry Needs Nutrients!

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All of Terry's food spoils, resulting in a long list of "my ___", and some nice monophthongal /ai/s.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on October 15, 2015

Tags:
African American English

How to be a Grown Ass Woman

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This is an hour long radio piece from WNYC featuring Jessica Williams (among other accomplished women) where interviewees discuss moments and period in their lives that they believe marked their adulthood as women. Although it is public in the popular culture sector, Jessica Williams is essentially participating in a standard sociolinguistic interview as she tells stories from her past that are close to home for minutes at a time. Due to her telling personal stories, I thought this could be a good opportunity for more casual, natural speech that may include /ai/ monophthongization. [Starts at 33:00].

White Sounding Black Guys

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Key and Peele talk about their very intentional use of AAE features in both real life and comedy.

Posted by Ellery Sloane-Barton on October 8, 2015

Tags:
African American English

Obama's Eulogy of Reverend Pinckney

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This is an excerpt of the eulogy for Reverend Clementa Pinckney delivered by President Obama after the Charleston shooting at the Emanuel AME Church. He makes strategic use of preaching style to establish a rapport and sense of belonging with a black audience in a religious setting.

AAE and Narration

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Since we looked at /ai/ variety and its use by comedians last week, I remembered this hilarious video of a great comedic story. I thought it'd be entertaining and worth taking another look at after last week's readings.

Posted by Marissa Olmos on October 5, 2015

Tags:
African American English

Steve Harvey: Ebonics Dictionary

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Steve Harvey presents a humorous example of why an "ebonics dictionary" as some had called for would be very useful. He tells the story of a group of young African-Americans who rob a convenience store early in the morning. The white customers in the store are not able to understand what the leader is saying, which causes confusion and escalates the violence. This confusion is caused primarily by phonological differences (floor-->bo').

Posted by Matthew Bernobich on September 30, 2015

Tags:
African American English

Children learn the darndest things

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Through an eventful search through YouTube links, I found this video of a young girl being very angry at her dad. Not only is it adorable and entertaining, it's also a good example of how children acquire language through imitation of their parents. Even this sassy lil girl.

Posted by Marissa Olmos on September 30, 2015

Tags:
African American English

Drunk History Harriet Tubman

The story of Harriet Tubman, as drunkenly told by a speaker of AAE.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on September 27, 2015

Tags:
African American English

Trevor Noah -- African American

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Trevor Noah's standup--he talks about moving from South Africa to the U.S. and his preparation for being Black in America. He also gives us some performances of AAE.

Posted by Richard Adcock on September 2, 2015

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity

AAVE: Stop Appropriating It

This is a question I've been thinking about throughout 212. We talk about how everyone exhibits variation in their language, but a really important concept in social justice work right now is appropriation. This tumblr author asks people to stop "appropriating" AAVE and lists several lexical/discursive items that people who are not black should avoid/never use. If we pick up linguistic features from our peers, and our peers use these features, how can we avoid appropriating another culture's heritage. [Published on 04-01-2014]

Posted by Chase Doremus on April 21, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Borrowing;
Race,Ethnicity

Trevor Noah on using AAE to signal black identity

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This is a great clip of Trevor Noah talking about black identity and its relationship with AAE. He also talks about some difficulties in being mixed-race, notably being mistaken for Mexican, and trying to learn German to please the German half of his family.

Posted by Maren on April 17, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
German;
Spanish

Bryan Silva

Bryan Silva is a celebrity on Vine, a video sharing website that caps videos at 6 seconds. Silva uses Vine to promote his career as a white rapper. As part of establishing his legitimacy as a rapper, he employs use of AAVE and uses his lyrics (and his body) to demonstrate his masculinity. The video is too short to hear the initial consonant, but in the word "with" he uses a /d/ instead of an /ð/. In the only post-vocalic /ɹ/ environment ("your"), he drops the /ɹ/. His use of the word "ain't" is also a demonstration of his AAVE. The content of this particular line also reinforces his masculinity. He discounts "fufu lame shit" (i.e. experiences he's not proud of or chooses not to associate with) and threatens to "send some shots at your fitted" (a type of hat). Silva perceives rap as a masculine genre. By employing what he perceives to be masculine linguistic and stylistic features, he stakes his claim as a rapper. In other videos, Silva says the n-word and says that he has a right to use it (and other AAVE features) because he grew up in a black neighborhood. [Published on 04-11-2014]

Posted by Gregor McGee on March 17, 2015

Tags:
African American English;
Hip Hop Nation

Debate about who gets to use a word

cw: discussion of racial slur This is a CNN interview between a white commentator and a black rapper named Trinidad. They're debating about use of the n-word. I find the controversy about who gets to use certain words fascinating. I hear a power & privilege conversation most often, as well as an "in-group" vs "out-group" conversation. [Published on 03-17-2015]

Posted by Chase Doremus on March 17, 2015

Tags:
Ideology;
Power;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma;
Lexicon

Using the Vernacular to Teach the Standard

Text from a 1998 talk by linguist John Rickford, which presents data on the failure of schools to teach SAE when they ignore the vernacular, and demonstrates how a knowledge of the grammar of AAE is important for teaching speakers of it. Factors in class. [Published on 03-25-1998]

DYSA African American English (or Ebonics) in the classroom

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A clip from the documentary "Do You Speak American?" profiling the use of contrastive analysis exercises to teach children who speak both SAE and AAE in the LA Unified School District.

Posted by syd on December 8, 2014

Tags:
African American English;
Education

Game done changed: A look at selected AAVE features in the TV series The Wire

Article that looks at the features of AAE (and specifically Baltimore AAE) through the lens of The Wire.

Posted by Ashley Brandt on November 17, 2014

Tags:
Baltimore English;
African American English

Dew as You Dew: Baltimore Accent and the Wire

A discussion of the use of both Baltimore English and AAE (author refers to "Baltimore African American English" initially then appears to separate the two concepts) in the television series the Wire, with specific examples of both u-fronting and o-fronting. [Published on 08-15-2012]

Posted by Ashley Brandt on November 17, 2014

Tags:
Baltimore English;
African American English

Time Magazine's "Which Words Should We Ban?"

The banned word poll consists mainly of slang found in youth culture and in AAE, and while the article suggests the words in question are new and over-exposed, the lexical items in AAE have long been in use. The descriptions for the words and slang mock those who use them, heavily targeting African American youth. [Published on 11-12-2014]

Posted by Amelia Wolf on November 17, 2014

Tags:
African American English;
Youth;
Prescriptivism;
Slang;
Lexicon

The n-word: An Interactive Feature

An interactive piece on use of the word "nigger" in contemporary American English, with interviews from varying perspectives and on varying aspects of the term's use, including in- vs. out-group usage, reclamation, and its use in hip hop culture. [Published on 11-10-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on November 10, 2014

Tags:
American English;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Lexicon

"Ask" versus "Ax"

This article examines the social stigma of using "ax" instead of "axe". NPR labels "Ax" as a distinguishable feature of AAE that many associate with being "poor, black, and uneducated". Garrard McClendon of Chicago State University stated that his parents were "well aware" of the stigma, and taught him that "there's a time and place to use it", encouraging purposeful code switching. Comedians Key and Peele joke that being half black and half white causes them to use both depending on whether they are with friends ("ax") or being pulled over ("ask"). This feature, however, dates back over 1000 years. Jesse Sheidlower, president of the American Dialect Society, says it is in the first English translation of the bible as "axe". Professor John Rickford of Stanford remarks, "so at that point it wasn't a mark of people who weren't highly educated", and that we can't be sure where the popularity of "ax" stopped yet stayed put in the American South and Caribbean. He says it could be "the empire striking back: taking language that has been imposed and making it our own". Rickford also notes, "I don't think any linguist is recommending that you get rid of your vernacular, because you need it - in a sense - for your soul". This article highlights the significance of linguistic versatility; the use of "ax" is only as "right" or "wrong" as a person labels it - and there are multiple opinions! [Published on 12-03-2013]

Which English you speak has nothing to do with how smart you are

A Slate guest post by linguist Anne H. Charity Hudley addressing issues of language discrimination in U.S. schools based on the use of nonstandard varieties and features. She argues in favor of embracing language diversity in the classroom. [Published on 10-14-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 15, 2014

Tags:
American English;
African American English;
Variation;
Education;
Stigma

Talking white: Black people's disdain for proper English and academic achievement is a myth

A Slate article challenging the notion that black Americans stigmatize both academic achievement and the use of standard English as 'acting white." The author argues that black speakers who bristle at being accused of 'talking white" are perhaps being accused of failing to code- or style-shift appropriately. [Published on 10-02-2014]

Nefertiti Menoe: Speaking White

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A video by artist Nefertiti Menoe on the criticism of minority speakers as 'speaking white.' She disagrees with this characterization, saying "having proper diction doesn't belong to the Caucasian race." The video sparked the long-time debate over accusations of speaking 'white' in the U.S.

Spoken Word on Code-Switching

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Jamila Lyiscott's spoken word poem describing her observations of her own code switching between Patois, AAE, and Standard English. She discusses the sociohistorical background to her codes and what it is to live through their use and legitimates them by describing linguistic rules governing the varieties.

Posted by Allesandra Geffen on September 30, 2014

Tags:
Jamaican Creole;
African American English;
Code-switching

Why do rappers have fake accents?

An interview with David Crystal on the speaking and rapping of Iggy Azalea, a white Australian woman who adopts AAE features in her hip hop style.

Posted by Kara Becker on September 29, 2014

Tags:
Australian English;
African American English;
Hip Hop Nation

Language On Trial: Rachel Jeantel

Our (earlier) discussion of anthropolitical linguistics reminded me of the commentary on Rachel Jeantel's speech during the Trayvon Martin trial. So you have the original artifact then is the AAE as a contact language, and then there's this re-contact with English ideologies and linguists (attempting) to educate the general populace. Other good articles are: http://mic.com/articles/52697/rachel-jeantel-s-language-is-english-it-s-just-not-your-english (article, no audio) http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=5161 (long, v linguisticy) [Published on 06-28-2013]

Posted by Syd Low on September 21, 2014

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity

Gator fan fails miserably with Jameis Winston "scrong" sign

A response to a sign making fun of football player Jameis Winston's pronunciation of the word "strong," with palatalization in the initial cluster. Many football fans have stigmatize the player as illiterate and uneducated. [Published on 09-13-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on September 17, 2014

Tags:
African American English;
Stigma

Common: The People

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The music video for Common's song "The People," in the rapper uses many features of African American English.

Posted by Kara Becker on September 11, 2014

Tags:
African American English;
r vocalization;
Negative Concord

The Language of Maya Angelou

Sociolinguist Anne H. Charity Hudley discusses the linguistic legacy of Dr. Maya Angelou. Although Angelou spoke out against the legitimacy of African American English during the Ebonics Controversy in the late 1990s, Charity Hudley points out her use of many features of AAE, from morphosyntax to discourse. [Published on 05-29-2014]

The "ax" versus "ask" question

A 2014 op-ed in the LA TImes from John McWhorter on the pronunciation of "ask" as "ax" by African Americans.

Posted by Kara Becker on January 25, 2014

Tags:
African American English

The Grammar Rules Behind 3 Commonly Disparaged Dialects

A 2013 piece highlighting three features of three stigmatized U.S. dialects - a-prefixing in Appalachian English, "liketa" in Southern English, and remote past BIN in African American English

The making of "jive" talk in the movie Airplane

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The 1980 film Airplane contains a classic comedic scene of AAVE representation. This clip shows interviews with the film's writers and the actors who actually created the dialogue in the film.

Posted by Rob Troyer on August 1, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
whiteness;
Contact

Rachel Jeantel's Language in the George Zimmerman Trial

A guest post on Language Log by John Rickford on the media's reaction to the use of AAE in the testimony of Rachel Jeantel in the 2013 George Zimmerman trial.

Posted by Kara Becker on July 11, 2013

Tags:
Rickford, John;
African American English;
Stigma

Language on Trial: Rachel Jeantel

A 2013 interview on NPR's Here and Now with sociolinguist John Rickford about the testimony of Rachel Jeantel, a speaker of Haitian Creole, Spanish, and African American English, during the George Zimmerman trial.

Insect Triggers Dramatic Code Switch

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An African-American news reporter shifts from a very standard style into a considerably more vernacular one when a bug flies into his mouth.

Posted by Daniel Ezra Johnson on June 26, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching

Interview: Nardwuar vs. E-40

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Music personality Nardwuar interviews rapper E-40 about his hometown, the Bay Area music scene, and E-40's music history.

Posted by Sydney Alysse Negus on April 23, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Hip Hop Nation

E-40 "Barbarian"

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E-40's song "Barbarian", which addresses performing a street identity authentically.

Posted by Sydney Alysse Negus on April 23, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Hip Hop Nation

Bill Cosby on Ebonics

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Bill Cosby's "Pound Cake Speech" in 2004, where he denies the legitimacy of African American English.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 15, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Ebonics Controversy

Do You Speak American: AAE in Ann Arbor, MI

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A clip from the 2004 documentary Do you Speak American that covers the "Black English case," or "King case," in which the parents of African American English-speaking children won a case brought against Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary in Ann Arbor, MI in the late 1970s.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 15, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Education;
Politics and Policy

NPR: Kreayshawn breaks in, but whose party is she crashing?

A 2011 profile of white female hip hop artist Kreayshawn, leader of a "white girl mob" of Oakland hip hop artists, which highlights the criticisms of her related to her race and gender.

Macklemore: White Privilege

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A song from white hip hop artist Macklemore that addresses issues of race and ethnicity, specifically whiteness, in the hip hop community and argues that white participation in hip hop is an instance of white privilege.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 1, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Crossing;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness

Teaching Tolerance: Sound Effects

A 2013 article in the Southern Poverty Law Center's "Teaching Tolerance" publication about addressing linguistic diversity in the classroom.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 1, 2013

Tags:
American English;
African American English;
Education;
Stigma

J-Roc, Microphone Assassin

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Serial crosser J-Roc, a character on the TV comedy series Trailer Park Boys, gives a lesson on critical race theory.

Posted by Katelyn L.I. Best on March 28, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Crossing

NY Times: A Hip Hop moment, but is it authentic?

A 2013 article questioning the authenticity of recent popularity of hip hop music by white performers, with a focus on Macklemore's hit song "Thrift Shop." Citation: Cutler, Cecilia. 2003. "Keepin' It Real: White Hip Hopper's discourses of language, race, and authenticity." Journal of Linguistics Anthropology.

Key & Peele: Phone Call

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Two comedians code-switch between Standard English and African American English

Posted by Kara Becker on March 12, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Code-switching

Study finds blacks' English increasingly different

The 1985 New York Times article reporting on Labov's research demonstrating divergence for Black English Vernacular in Philadelphia. The article plays a major role in the divergence debates of the 1980s. Citation: Fasold, Labov, Vaughn-Cooke, Bailey, Wolfram, Spears, and Rickford. 1987. Are black and white vernaculars diverging? Papers from NWAV XIV Panel Discussion. American Speech.

Posted by Kara Becker on March 9, 2013

Tags:
African American English

BAMBOOZLED (2000) - Convo between Sloan & Big Blak Afrika

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A Spike Lee joint about a TV writer who creates a modern-day minstrel show. Link is to entire movie but has been set to begin at this scene. A highly recommended film! (Warning: movie contains offensive language)

Posted by Sara Elizabeth Mulliner on February 27, 2013

Tags:
African American English

MTV True Life: I'm a Boxer in Detroit

A reality TV show following two African-American teens in Detroit. Contains examples of numerous AAE features.

Posted by Katelyn L.I. Best on February 26, 2013

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
African American English;
Style-shifting

Dave Chappelle - HBO Comedy Half Hour [Uncensored]

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Recording of a comedy performance by Dave Chappelle.

Posted by Veronica Jane Stewart on February 26, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity

Chris Rock on Race in the 2008 Election

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Chris Rock uses contrastive AAE and SE to highlight a political point about the role of race in the 2008 election.

Posted by Sydney Alysse Negus on February 26, 2013

Tags:
Performativity;
African American English;
Code-switching

The battle of African American English in The Boondocks

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The American animated series, The Boondocks, which focuses on an African American family, the Freemans, who move from Chicago to live in a white suburban area. The main characters for this series, are Huey and Riley both played by Regina King, an African American actress. Riley and Huey have been painted as the yin and yang of Black urban maleness, now look how both use AAE differently.

Ice T, Cop Killer

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Ice T's song Cop Killer, cited as an example of baited indirectness in Morgan's 2002 book "Language, Discourse and Power in African American culture."

Posted by Kara Becker on February 21, 2013

Tags:
Morgan, Marcyliena;
African American English;
Discourse

Having Trouble Being Black

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Two African American men employ code-switching while making a video, prompting one to accuse the other acting white.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 21, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

Know Your Meme: Been Had Money

A description of the internet meme "been had money," which started with a 2009 viral video entitled "Been counting money." Citation: Green, Lisa. 1998. Remote past and states in African American English. American Speech.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 14, 2013

Tags:
African American English;
Remote past BIN

The Whispers: Rock Steady

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"Steady rockin' all night long" from The Whispers' 1987 demonstrates the AAE marker "steady." Citation: Baugh, John. 1984. Steady: Progressive Aspect in Black Vernacular English. American Speech.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 14, 2013

Tags:
Baugh, John;
Steady;
African American English

When Presidents say "Y'all:" The Strange Story of Dialects in America

A 2013 Atlantic interview with Walt Woflram on dialects and politics.

Yo Momma Jokes

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A You Tuber in 2007 demonstrating his best "Yo Momma" jokes. I use this with the reading: Labov, William. 1972. Rules for Ritual Insults. In Language in the Inner City.

Flavor Flav and Doctor Dre Play the Dozens

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A video from 1988 of Flavor Flav and Doctor Dre trading ritual insults. I use this with the reading: Labov, William. 1972. Rules for Ritual Insults. In Language and the Inner City.

A Life of Learning: Six People I have Learned From

Text and audio from a 2009 ACLS lecture by William Labov profiling six speakers: Donald Poole from Martha's Vineyard; Jacob Schissel from New York City; Larry Hawthorne from Harlem; Celeste Sullivan from Philadelphia; and Jackie Garopedean from Chicago

Black vs. African American

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A 2008 video on the use of the terms "black" and "African American" as terms of self-reference. I use this with the reading: Smitherman, Geneva. 1991. "What is African to me?" Language, ideology and African American. American Speech.

Slate: The Ebonic Plague?

A 1997 article in Slate Magazine on the Ebonics Controversy.

NY Times: If Black English isn't a language, then tell me, what is?

A 1979 New York Times article by James Baldwin arguing for the legitimacy of Black English.

Posted on November 13, 2012

Tags:
African American English

30 Rock: Therapy and African American English

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Actor Alec Baldwin parodies a number of African American English-speaking characters in a scene with African American actor Tracy Morgan.

African American English: The Wren

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An audio file of an African American man reading the poem The Wren.

Posted on October 23, 2012

Tags:
African American English

NPR: Code-swtiching: Are we all guilty?

A 2010 NPR piece about the criticism of President Obama's "negro dialect," with a broader discussing of both style-shifting and code-switching.

Prescription and African American English

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A 2006 Fox News Chicago story about Garrard McClendon and his visits to classrooms with African American students where he highlights their grammatical "mistakes."

Special K, Can't Hardly Wait

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The character Special K from the 1998 movie Can't Hardly Wait is a good example of the linguistic practice of crossing.

African American and white ASL varieties

An article outlining research into Black American Sign Language and the ways it differs from a white ASL variety.

Ebonics "Translator" Tool

One of a few websites that will "translate" a standard English phrase into Ebonics.

DEA to hire Ebonics "Translators"

In 2010, The DEA put out a job ad for nine speakers of African American English to serve as "translators."

Obama's English

Discussion of Obama's use of AAE in his acceptance speech at the 2012 Democratic National Convention and the significance of style-shifting.

Linguistic Profiling on 20/20

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20/20 feature on racial linguistic profiling and housing discrimination with linguist John Baugh.

Racism (Linguistic Profiling) Caught on Tape

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White office manager at Tennessee car rental company makes racist remarks over the phone after wrongly guessing the race of the customer based on linguistic profiling.

Slave trade map

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Posted on July 24, 2012

Tags:
African American English

Copula deletion by environment

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