Performativity

Irish Woman Refuses to Say Yes or No

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This video clip is a good example of the preservation of traits from older languages. Many Irish people "refuse" to say yes or no, like in the video, instead simply affirming or denying the verb. This stems from Gaelic, where the words "yes" and "no" are newer words that aren't seen as grammatical. Although many Irish people are beginning to speak only in English, characteristics from Gaelic still live on.

Posted by Taylor Allen on July 1, 2018

Tags:
Performativity;
Crossing

Sonic girls making new words

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These girls are taking words that already exist and combining them to make a new word with a new meaning.

Speech Communities and Ideology from "The Breakfast Club"

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This video shows how each family is their own speech community and that each speech community has their own language ideology. The parents and the children have certain ways to talking to each other that seem normal and necessary in the situation. Also, the teachers are their own speech community with their own language ideology based around how they talk to the students as we can interpret from the line "you see us as you want to see us".

Posted by Harlan Shoemaker on June 17, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Youth;
Communities of Practice;
Education

Performativity, Ideology, Power and Disability

In this article, it shows how the performativity of the writer matters when discussing the r-word, and how the word harms people like the persons being quoted. Ideology is represented in that those who are quoted discuss the usage of the r-word and how it is inappropriate. Power is represented in the dichotomy between abled and non-abled persons discussed in the article, while also mentioning that the r-word is exclusionary. One quote also notes the r-word dehumanizes people. Trigger Warning: The r-word is written out in full in the article

Posted by Matthew Ferrel on May 10, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Power

For Best Hookup Results, Use Your Words

A young woman voices her frustrations with partners who feel it necessary to say certain words/phrases that get into her head so that they can get into her pants. [Published on 01-12-2018]

Posted by Jenna Giele on May 10, 2018

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Gender

Excerpt from Donald Glover's

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I used these four songs, a clip from "Weirdo," and this interview of Donald Glover's coronal stop deletion.

Iggy Azalea Freestyle

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Iggy Azalea's attempt at her rap persona and linguistic repertoire without practice. Citation: Eberhardt, M. & Freeman, K. 2015. 'First things first, I'm the realest': linguistic appropriation, white privilege, and the hip-hop persona of Iggy Azalea.

Hillary Clinton's accent evolution (1983–2015)

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A video about one individual, Hillary Clinton's intense and possibly intentional accent changes throughout her life. I thought it was an interesting case study in individual language change, and why someone might want to change the way the speak.

Foreign Word Pronounciation

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College Humor showing how trying to fit in with the culture is not always a positive thing.

Posted by Sam Georgiana on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Accent;
Monolingualism

Hood Politics

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Kendrick Lamar mixes Democrats and Republicans with Crips and Bloods to demonstrate language performance as verbal art. He also demonstrates the multifunctionality of language by comparing gang allegiance that splits neighborhouds to political allegiance that splits the country, all without explicitly saying anything explicitly.

Posted by Peter Campbell on December 15, 2017

Tags:
Performativity

Spanish Words "White" People Can't Say

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A comedic take on "white" people trying to pronounce Spanish words and their struggle in the performance of a basic Spanish lexicon—even in words that share a striking spelling resemblance to its English cognate. Some noteworthy examples appear when the participants are asked to pronounce “refrigerador” and “negar,” with some subjects showing visible apprehension to merely attempt the latter.

The Pronoun They

This article explains how we have gender pronouns in the English language. By drawing examples from how English developed, McCulloch provides information of why gender pronouns are important and are used today. #Ideology #Lexicon #Performativity #Gender non conforming #Gender binary [Published on 06-02-2014]

Posted by Jane Wallerstedt on November 9, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Gender Binary;
gender non-conforming;
Lexicon

Lake Bell Calls Girls Out On "Sexy Baby Vocal Virus"

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This video clip shows Lake Bell on Conan O’Brien’s talk show. While discussing her upcoming movie, Bell goes into discussion about her annoyance with what she calls “sexy baby vocal virus” and vocal fry. Lake demonstrates what she means by each of these, as well as explains what they are. Both pitch and vocal fry are the main features of these vocal habits. Bell also makes a gender specific claim, that it is women who fall into this habit of speech. Also, during the clip, while talking about her new movie about voice overs, both Bell and O’Brien style-shift between voices and different ways of speaking, representing performativity.

Posted by Cassiti Wright on October 17, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Femininity;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Creaky Voice;
Pitch

Linguist Jennifer Scalfani’s analysis on Trump’s “unique” use of language

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This video is about Jennifer Scalfani, a linguist at Georgetown University, who analyzed Donald Trump’s “unique” use of language that he uses as the President of the United States. His language is unique in a way that it is different than the language that other Presidents spoke in the past. He uses much more simple vocabulary and grammar, jumps from one topic to another, involves a variety of hand gestures, and uses an expression at the end of the phrase to emphasize his message. Scalfani analyzed how Trump’s unique use of language is a representation of how language can create a brand, construct an identity that is recognizable, and create an authentic persona.

You Should Watch The Way You Punctuate Your Text Messages - Period

This article shows and interesting way of performativity in regards to the way texting has evolved over time. [Published on 12-20-2015]

Posted by Morgan Amsel on October 11, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Code-switching

This Is How I talk SNL Skit

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This is a skit from SNL in which Donald is a new employee at Sprint. The video starts off with him talking in his normal voice to his other coworkers and then his boss comes in and starts talking in African American slang. After she walks away, Donald starts impersonating the way she speaks and she walks back by and hears his impersonation. In order to not get fired, Donald talks that same way every time she’s around so she thinks that’s just the way he talks. Every time his boss would walk by, he would accommodate his speech style by shifting from his normal voice to African American slang.

Posted by Brittany Outler on October 9, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
African American English;
Accommodation;
Style-shifting

Ellen DeGeneres' coming out episode

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In a televised talk show this year host Ellen DeGeneres celebrated the twentieth anniversary of her revelation on national prime time television that she was a lesbian. Forty-two million viewers tuned in to watch Ellen’s sitcom character declare “I am gay”, and this challenging and controversial decision made television history. A media frenzy followed with heated debates on gay rights and lifestyles. Ellen’s difficult and personal decision to reveal her lesbianism led to her sitcom show being cancelled in 1997. By 2004 she returned to television as a talk show host, and since then has earned ten Emmys for excellence in television. By making it acceptable for a public figure to declare a sexual preference, social change has occurred, and since then, gay marriage has become legal in the United States.

Posted by Mary Jo Frazier on October 8, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Sexual Orientation;
Politics and Policy;
Sexism

How the triplet flow took over rap

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Although the usage of triplets (i.e. the “Migos” flow) has become very popular as of late, and is currently heard on just about every rap track that hits the Billboard 100, the usage of triplets in rap is not something new. It has its roots in Midwestern and Southern rap communities in the 80s onward. In rap, a triplet is essentially like setting your verse to 3/4 time - three beats per bar rather than 4. In rap, it can be used as a sort of verbal trick - it could slow down a song by throwing off the expected rhythm our brain is expecting to hear or even speed it up. Listening to verses in triplets can also make the rappers’ flow feel cleaner. Lyrically, the songs can be flexible or rigid, allowing a diverse range of rap styles to be done over the beat.

Steve Martin vs. the word "hamburger"

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This link shows an excerpt from the movie "Pink Panther" where Steve Martin plays the role of someone from another country. A woman attempts to teach him what she thinks is the "correct" way to pronunciate the word "hamburger". This video is a good example of how people in different language barriers pronounce words much differently.

Posted by Libby Ferguson on October 3, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity

John Oliver interviews the Dalai Lama

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“Last Week Tonight” host John Oliver interviewed the Dalai Lama, a Nobel Peace laureate and Tibet’s spiritual and political exiled leader. With a hint of investigative journalism, Oliver used his gift of humor to engage the Dalai Lama in broad discussions from conflicts with the Chinese Government to claims that drinking horse milk will cure alcoholism. The interview demonstrated a self-reflective Dalai Lama laughing at labels from the Chinese Government. This televised comedy show provoked the Chinese government so much that they proclaimed the interview to be politically motivated and propaganda for an anti-China separatist movement.

Posted by Mary Jo Frazier on October 2, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Globalization;
Politics and Policy;
Religion

Movie Accent Expert Breaks Down 31 Actors Playing Real People

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Not directly related to gender and language but it's fun and linguistic. This linguist critiques movie accents (this is the second video of his that I've seen) & often talks about how the usage of certain sounds or aspects of a person's speech help create a sense of the character as well as the setting, which I think goes along with some of the themes we've already started to address in the area of language as it constructs identity.

Vladimir Putin Speaks English for the International Expositions Bureau

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This artifact shows Russia´s president Vladimir Putin welcoming the members of the 2013 International Exhibitions Bureau while speaking entirely in English. Putin usually avoids speaking in English even though he is known for knowing enough English to even correct his translators. Speaking English in this welcome video shows his appreciation and respect to the members and guests of the exhibition.

Posted by Giovanni Artavia on July 27, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
English;
Accommodation;
Multilingualism

Vin Diesel Says I Am Groot in Multiple Languages

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In this clip from The Tonight Show, Vin Diesel says the same phrase in multiple languages, as he learned to do for his role in Guardians of the Galaxy. Interestingly enough, the language spoken by his character Groot is one that uses only those three words, with variation in tone that indicates different meanings and emotions.

Posted by Garrett Girard on July 27, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Code-switching;
Variation;
Multilingualism

The Many Amazing Voices Of Critical Role

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The linguistic artifacts that can be found on Geek and Sundry's Critical Role are amazing to ponder on. A group of incredibly talented voice actors have come together and created a symphony of hundreds of unique voices over the course of one hundred episodes.

Posted by Zachary Belcher on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Accent;
Creaky Voice;
falsetto

Mark Zuckerberg speaks fluent Mandarin during Q&A in Beijing

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Mark Zuckerberg, the creator and owner of Facebook, speaking fluent Mandarin in a Question and Answer forum. This clip shows how the ability to communicate with people from other parts of the world, in their native tongue can go along way and make a powerful connection.

Posted by Chandler Butler on July 25, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Contact;
Linguistic Relativity;
Multilingualism

Ad Meter 2016: Jeep Super Bowl Portraits

The commercial exemplifies prosody, indexicality and performativity. The speaker's poetic fluctuations are amplified by literary devices such as alliteration making prosody evident. By pointing to the individual (and eventually concluding "we don't make jeep. You do"), indexicality is evident. Performativity is also relevant because Jeep constructs identity in its audience by giving the audience something to identify with (via speech and photographs).

Posted by Robyn Payne on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Performativity;
Prosody

Key and Peele- Job Interview

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In this video, the scene depicts a situation where Jordan Peele is acting out as a guy waiting to go into an interview for a new job. Peele hears laughing from the room where the interview is going on, and Peele sees the boss and the other potential new employee get along well. Peele at the end of the video changes his behavior and becomes more eccentric and outgoing.

Posted by Caroline Kane on June 27, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Accommodation

Keye & Peele - Text Message Confusion

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This comedy skit, called “Text Message Confusion”, shows the potential pitfalls of non-verbal communication. Text communication can lack tone and lead to confusion. This skit showcases two friends texting back and forth about evening plans. Though they are reading the same messages, the context (the person’s overall mood) for each friend is different. One is relaxed and the other is on edge, leading to two very different interpretations of the same written words.

Posted by Samantha Mackey on June 26, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Silence

Fabricated Cognates as Memes

In October 2016 a trend began of tweets that were probably photos of food, with a caption that ended with a nonsense phrase; a phrase that when read, makes no sense, but when spoken, sounds oddly like "bon appetít." The use of this and related phrases indexed the users/tweeters as cool, hip, and knowledgeable about pop culture, and it allowed them to show off their creativity as the actual photos of food became more and more ridiculous. This meme is particularly interesting from a sociolinguist viewpoint because there's no actual speaking occurring, but anyone in on the joke knows that speech is a vital part of the humor - this entire phenomenon is text-based, and yet intimately tied to the pronunciation of English.

Posted by Logan Hotz on June 26, 2017

Tags:
Indexicality;
Performativity;
Language Shift;
Internet Language

Why Germans Can Say Things No One Else Can

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This video talks about language and it's ability to allow for thought, emotion, and the expression of feelings. It talks specifically about the German language and how they have a wide variety of words they can use to better describe a situation or feeling other languages might not be able to do as effectively. It explains many examples of this, along with the appropriate meaning in English. Having a different set of words to think with and use allows for a wide variety of unique knowledge one can obtain. This video just scratches the surface of the importance of language, and how language in our lives can change the way we think and interpret the world around us.

Die Antwoord's Evil Boy: A Dynamic Crossroad of Language, Culture, and Rap in South Africa

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Die Antwoord is a controversial rap group from Cape Town, South Africa fronted by Ninja Yolandi Vi$$er. Speaking from a post-apartheid perspective, this group offers an underrepresented view of young, lower-middle class, white Afrikaans - a subculture known as "Zef." Historically, Zef has been considered a derogatory term describing someone who was white, poor, and "trashy." However, Die Antwoord and others have looked to transform this into a self-reflective, somewhat satirical, parody that Ninja described as being "apocalyptic debris that we’ve stuck together." In this music video, they display their unique code-switching between Afrikaans and English, as well as Xhosa - the Bantu language of the Xhosa people. Adding to their mixed-bag controversial nature, is the relationship of the Afrikaans languages’ association with apartheid. Through dynamic language and visual use, this video reflects the complex sociocultural and sociolinguistic interactions that occur in this region. The lyrical narrative told is a statement on the clash between traditional tribal circumcision rituals, and the modern subcultures that seem to offer an alternative path to "manhood." This can be heard in the verse by the guest rapper Wanga, sung in his native tongue: "Mamelapa umnqunduwakho! (listen here, you fucking asshole) Andifuni ukuyaehlatini! (I don't want to go to the bush with you) Sukubammba incanca yam! (don't touch my penis) Andi so stabani! (I’m not a gay) Incanca yam yeyamantobi! (this penis is for the girls) Incanca yam iclean! (my penis is clean) Incanca yam inamandla! (my penis is strong) Ndiyinkwekwe enkulu! (I am a big boy) Angi funi ukuba yeendota! (don't want to be a man) Evil boy 4 life! yebo! (yes) Evil boy 4 life!" Through the use of polyglossic code-switching, performativity, sociocultural and racial integration, and a revamping of contextual meanings, Die Antwoord is doing its part to redefine what it means to be young and Zef in South Africa, and what a socioculturally- and sociolinguistically-complex rebellion sounds like.

Weird Ways People Talk

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This video entitled, "Weird Ways People Talk," attempts at humor by mocking several different North American dialects of English. In so much that he can faithfully articulate English off the standard variant, he creates a divide between certain mocked groups and raises the so-called standard on a pedestal. In a similar light to mock-Spanish, these variants he mimics can be the origins of stereotypically thought.

Posted by McKale Wiley on May 11, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Standard Language Ideology;
Prescriptivism

Massive Online Community Collaboration: Reddit's "Place" Experiment

Reddit did an experiment on April 1st 2017 involving a blank canvas where users of the popular forum site could collaborate within a structure of only a few rules. The rules were simple, take a pixel of any color out of 16 choices, and place it on the blank canvas, then wait 5 minutes before placing another, single pixel. The experiment was literally titled "Place.” The experiment itself was not a linguistic one, but due to the nature of open forum as well as the Reddit community structure, we see a manifestation of linguistic practice on a grand scale. Place was only open for seventy-two hours, and the limit of one pixel every five minutes per user meant that people had to come together en mass to create the grand masterpiece that ultimately ensued. What we see is a massive community of practice coming together to discuss, and make decisions based upon both shared, and conflicting ideologies as to what should be done to the canvas. A war between the color red, and the color blue began, until green swooped in as well, and collaborators had to decide whether or not to cover the canvas in one color, or allow the art that other collaborative groups were creating to maintain its existence. Not to mention the shear existence of an artistic rendering in Place means massive collaboration within other forums had to exist first, no one person could possibly make a complex rendering come to fruition without the help of many, possibly hundreds of other people. Therefore, communication was rampant, and for seventy-two hours people who would typically avoid each other, or otherwise attempt to rip each other apart, as is the nature of the Internet, came together to put aside ideology for a moment in order to create something beautiful. [Published on 04-16-2017]

"Why Explaining 'The N-Word' To Non-Black People Is So Damn Exhausting"

Article on Cultural Perceptions of the N-Word. Deals with which groups have responsibility or control over a word (and if they can have this control). This also shows lay-person perspective on key socio-linguistic issues. [Published on 05-09-2017]

British Villains -Tom Hiddleston en Jaguar F-Type Coupé

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This Jaguar car commercial adds to an ideology that an English accent sounds villainous. Indexically and through performativity the actor, Tom Hiddleston, describing how to successfully sound "villainous". This commercial is a part of a series featuring other British actors describing how to sound "villainous".

Covert Racism Found in Grey's Anatomy

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During this scene of Grey’s Anatomy, Amelia approaches Maggie, who is African American, about a situation where she felt like she may have come off racist. There are several points during their conversation in which anthropological elements are highlighted. One major example is presented when Maggie talks about about how people assume things about her based on her race. She mentions that she approached an airline ticket booth with a first class ticket and the attendant said, “We aren’t boarding coach yet.” Although this isn’t an overtly racist statement, the subtle racist ideas are still present. This example is similar to the statement “You can turn the air conditioning on if you want to” that we talked about during lecture. When we make implicit statements like these, we are giving power to racist ideas without coming out and using actual racist language. We let our assumptions do the talking and reinforce the racial stereotypes that already exist in our society.

Posted by Brianna Johnson on May 10, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Race,Ethnicity;
Slang

British Villains -Tom Hiddleston en Jaguar F-Type Coupé

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This Jaguar car commercial adds to an ideology that an English accent sounds villainous. Indexically and through performativity the actor, Tom Hiddleston, describing how to successfully sound "villainous". This commercial is a part of a series featuring other British actors describing how to sound "villainous".

Last F**able Day

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This is a link from Amy Schumer's Comedy Central show called "Inside Amy Schumer" including the guest appearances of well known actresses Tina Fey, Patricia Arquette and Julia Louis-Dreyfus. In this Comedy Sketch they are holding a party to celebrate Julia's so called "Last Fuckable Day." When Amy asks what a Last Fuckable Day is the women proceed to tell her since they are all women age 45 and above that they have reached a point where they are no longer portrayed in the media as "fuckable" and this was worth celebrating because they no longer had to worry about acting sexy, looking sexy or preforming their feminine gender stereotypes. You will see examples when you watch the clip of how they are straying from their roles as women in today's society and of coarse with this being a comedy sketch everything is exaggerated and dramatized. This clip relates to what we have talked about in class and read in our "Living Language" book discussing preforming a certain role through language use. From the clip the use of language relating to their gender roles as older women is mentioned when they discuss the titles of the movies they will be cast in from now on as older women and what type of characters in movies they will be limited to because of their age and gender.

Posted by Isabelle E. Huyett on May 9, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Gender;
gender non-conforming

Outsiders' Views of English Speakers

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This video is one point of view of how non-native English speakers view English. The main point of the video was the focus on how English speakers are perceived based on gender roles, accents, and the cultural views of English speakers. The intonation from both the male and female actor show the gender roles of language. The girl tends to be speaking softly and gently while the boy is a little bit more outgoing in his speech. When they start to argue again the roles come into play with the girl's voice going higher in pitch and sharper in tone. The classic American type of accent is also prevalent in the blurry sentences that are spoken by either actors. The scene also played what one might call a normative view on American dinners between couples; low light, soft talking, homemade meal and then an argument. All of this just screamed stereotypical America.

“Do You Understand the Words That Are Coming Out of My Mouth? - Rush Hour

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This is a clip from the movie Rush Hour where Agent Carter misunderstood that Jackie Chan (Lee) cannot understand English; therefore he got frustrated and started to change his tone and volume while talking to him. This clip touches on the issue of performativity, racial and linguistic ideologies, Standard Language Ideology and Language socialization.

“Do You Understand the Words That Are Coming Out of My Mouth? - Rush Hour

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This is a clip from the movie Rush Hour where Agent Carter misunderstood that Jackie Chan (Lee) cannot understand English; therefore he got frustrated and started to change his tone and volume while talking to him. This clip touches on the issue of performativity, racial and linguistic ideologies, and Standard Language Ideology and Language socialization.

Political Speech Comparison

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In this clip from "The Daily Show" Trevor Noah compares the speech of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. He comments on the surprise of hearing a politician "speak in full sentences", but also comments on how after listening to Donald Trump for so long a fruitful and complex political discussion is difficult to continue paying attention to.

Posted by Janet Sebastian-Coleman on May 4, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Power

Invisible Man - Thug Notes Summary and Analysis

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thug notes is a youtube series about a well read "thug" how wishes to share the gift of classic literature with his fellow gangster.

Posted by kyle clawson on May 4, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Code-switching;
Slang

Howard Stern on vocal fry

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This video is a voice recording of Howard Stern discussing vocal fry used by a contestant on the show the Bachelor. Stern discusses the use of vocal fry and refers to it as "an epidemic" that women are using where they begin to switch back in forth between a croaking voice and their "feminine voice"

Posted by Katie Vavuris on May 2, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Language Shift;
Femininity;
Pitch

Always #LikeAGirl

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This term, “like a girl,” can show not only gender differences but also the power of masculinity in the United States. This commercial was able to take adults and ask a series of simple questions, for example, “show me how to run like a girl?” and everyone had their own way of “running like a girl.” However, when they asked younger girls, those who haven’t experienced the hegemony of our society, they showed “running like a girl” no different than “running like a boy.” Moreover, there are clear language ideologies between men and women in our society. This constitutes the fact that there are deep gender inequalities especially with the use and the meaning of certain phrases. However, this phrase and the way the younger girls interpret shows that there is performativity of gender, meaning that people constantly strengthen or reconfigure their gender ideologies.

Posted by Sarah Zimmerman on May 2, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Standard Language Ideology

Troy and Abed Being Normal Scene from Community

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In this scene Troy and Abed, who typically behave far from socially acceptable, try to be "normal" so they do not embarrass their friend Shirley at her wedding. They each change their voice to diminish any distinctive characteristics and accents as well choosing words and using grammar that supports what might be considered a "standard" form of English. They do their best not to be sarcastic and to talk to others in a way that follows social norms.

Tumblr User cailleachan on Gendered Interruption

This is a post from tumblr reflecting on how women and men speak differently and characterizing the way that women interrupt others as different from the way that men do the same. The post reminded me of our class discussion, in which we explored 1. how people of different genders use different linguistic features and methods to index gender and 2. how we conceptualize the speech of women and men and are influenced by confirmation bias even when faced with actual linguistic data. [Published on 04-19-2017]

Posted by Io Blanchett on April 19, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Gender;
Womens Language

Do You Speak American?

This is an article and analytical piece by Robert MacNeil, an employee of PBS since the 1980s. He talks about how moving to America and adopting American grammatical policies in order to work for television. [Published on 2005]

Different Types to Speak English

Jamila Lyiscott describes her perception of the various types of slang and vocabulary that she uses based off of the people she is surrounded by [Published on 02-15-2014]

Posted by Bri Smith on March 14, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
African American English;
Multilingualism

SNL Skit

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In a business meeting with four Americans and a Latino man, the Americans over pronounce the Spanish words and act like they cannot understand the Latino man when he speaks normally. They attempt to incorporate many Spanish words when speaking English.

Posted by Jennifer Boyce on March 9, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Mock Spanish

Performativity in Home Alone

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This is a clip from the movie Home Alone. Kevin goes grocery shopping and while at the register he talks to the cashier as if he is an adult. Kevin also pulls out coupons just as an adult might do, and tells the cashier the toys are “for the kids.” Kevin is using performativity in order to make himself appear as an adult shopping alone at the store before the cashier starts asking him about his real age and why he is alone.

Posted by Emily F on March 9, 2017

Tags:
Performativity

Anjelah Johnson- nail salon

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This video is a stand-up comedy act about an experience in a nail salon. Her voice changes as she impersonates herself and a nail technician. This video shows code switching between Vietnamese and English. She does a very good job imitating her visit at the salon by the facial expressions, accent, and specific word choice.

Posted by Lauren Snyder on March 9, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting

Tim Kaine Speech in Spanish

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Tim Kaine made a campaign speech done entirely in Spanish. The speech was done in Phoenix, AZ and was given to invited Latino groups. This is the first time a vice presidential candidate has given a speech entirely in Spanish.

Hillary Clinton - Southern Accent

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In this clip from an interview with the South Carolina Democratic Chairman, Jaime Harrison, Hillary Clinton accommodates her speech style by speaking with a Southern accent. The accent is a speech style that only appears in speeches with Southern audiences.

Posted by Callie Hawkins on March 8, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Accommodation;
Style-shifting;
Accent

Be Free- J. Cole

The artist J. Cole uses his lyrics to express the danger of blacks and the hardships they face. He shares the pain and sorrow they go through his words.

Posted by Kayla Springs on February 28, 2017

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Grammaticalization;
Youth;
Race,Ethnicity

lesson 7.1 Tokyo vs Osaka Accent - same words, different sounds

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The differences in intonation between Osaka dialect and Tokyo dialect. Tokyo dialect is accepted as standard Japanese and is what is taught outside of Japan. In the video, the Osaka dialect speaker says that she is able to speak standard Japanese very well, but her pronunciation of "sensei" is what clued people in to her Osaka origins.

Posted by Katie Allen on October 16, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Performativity;
Japanese;
Style-shifting

Plan Now to Avoid Post - Brexit Languages Crisis

There is a focus right now on the education system of the UK, with areas most at risk being language performance. If a crisis was to emerge in language performance from the UK split areas of official practice; such as trade, could be jeopardized. There are plans as of right now to push and ensure the emphasis on particularly language skills to ensure the enhancement post Brexit. This plan includes residency and a national plan to better primary education to even the post graduate level. With the quality of education slipping in the UK as it is, and a nation wide crisis within the linguistics field, the Brexit could only worsen the matter with children potentially receiving a lacking education. The goal of these reforms and education plan is to ensure a quality education to students at all levels, and hopefully encourage the emergence of language skill teachers and even linguistics majors. [Published on 10-16-2016]

Stunning animated game helps teach endangered Aboriginal language

In recent times there has been a resurgence for Australians to get in touch with their families native languages, possibly noticing that once their family members die off, there is no one left to speak it. With this game being released, it's hopes are to draw enough attention to Merra, by interactively engaging players with words, and icons to keep the language alive. There are only a handful of people in the world that speak Merra, and the creator related with his own native Indigenous language being almost lost within his family as well. Hopefully this game takes off and is successful enough to spur other similar games that bring attention to Indigenous Australian languages globally. [Published on 10-06-2016]

The performativity of different speech communities

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The video is a speech made by Donald Trump who used to be a host of a famous TV show but is now a candidate for president. It would be difficult to connect the image of a host with a candidate of president. It is obvious that the different speech communities that Donald Trump is a part of contribute to the different styles of speaking.

Posted by Jingshu Zhao on October 5, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Communities of Practice

An English Language Cop

This is a clip from Larry David's Curb Your Enthusiasm. Larry David corrects Richard Lewis' speech. Richard says, "in their private homes," and Larry corrects him with , "the privacy of their homes?" Larry David's correction displays language ideology because there was no misunderstanding, he was just being, as Richard Lewis points out, "an English language cop." Then, Larry notes that Richard utters the word "collapse" in the same way he does. It makes sense that these two would speak with the same dialect or accent since they are lifelong friends and both from New York City. When this is brought to Richard's attention, he denies sharing this with Larry and pronounces "collapse" according to Standard American English. [Published on 01-05-2015]

Gender Differences in Communication

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An animated video attempts to explain questions such as: why men and women communicate differently; how the gender difference affects the communication style, and how gender-based forms of speech lead to miscommunication.

Posted by Yanan Fu on October 2, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Gender;
Womens Language

Ron Clark President Rap.

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Teacher Ron Clark uses performativity to connect with his students by rapping to them. He uses both linguistic changes as well as props in order to engage his students in a way that they will understand, according to his idea of their generational culture. The use of rapping provides a way for the speaker to affiliate themselves with the audience. Ron Clark performs for his audience in order to a send a message of inclusion with hopes of audience participation.

Posted by Danielle Gibson on October 2, 2016

Tags:
Performativity

Perfomativity of language in different speech communities

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The video is a speech made by Donald Trump. Trump used to be a host in a famous show. It would be difficult to connect the image of a host with a candidate of president. It is obvious that the different speech communities that Donald Trump are in contribute to the different styles of speaking.

Why Linguists are Fascinated by the American Jewish Accent

In this article, the various features of what is commonly thought of as the American Jewish accent are detailed. This accent is most commonly associated with comedians such as Mel Brooks, Larry David, and Don Rickles. The accent, while not as common as it used to be, is still recognizable to listeners by the word order and intonation it borrows from Yiddish, as well as its "sing-songy" quality. [Published on 09-26-2016]

“Things You Do Online That’d Be Creepy In Real Life”

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This video draws attention to how social media has gone further than just coining new slang terms; it has created a new language with entirely different governing rules. It points out the significant differences in styles of communication between face-to-face contact and social media interactions. The most striking examples are the performative declarations that would seem strange if spoken in front of a live audience. Here we see just how easily we take for granted this major shift in our everyday life.

Posted by Allison Maxfield on September 26, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Communities of Practice;
Internet Language;
Slang

The Office “I declare bankruptcy” Michael Scott

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Michael Scott, the lead role in The Office, is seen here proclaiming that he is declaring bankruptcy. The comedy of this statement is that he believes that saying “I declare bankruptcy!” in front of others will officially clear him from his financial obligations. He even goes as far as performing the card cutting ritual he associates with his “bankrupt” status. His co-worker, Oscar, has to inform him that this performance does not have the power to change his current financial standing in the way he intended.

Posted by Allison Maxfield on September 26, 2016

Tags:
Indexicality;
Performativity;
Semantics

How WSJ Used an Algorithm to Analyze ‘Hamilton’ the Musical

Joel Eastwood and Erik Hinton wrote an algorithm to analyze the different types of rhymes used in the tony Award Winning Broadway Musical "Hamilton", and reveal their Hip-Hop influences. [Published on 06-06-2016]

Jon Stewart - Daily Show - Accents

Clips from Jon Stewart's "The Daily Show" of him performing different accents throughout many different episodes. [Published on 08-29-2011]

Posted by Halie Carr on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity;
whiteness;
Accent

The office: Andy talks baby talk.

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Clip from the show The Office. The greatest character of all time, Michael Scott, confronts Andy about his baby talk around the office. Andy confronts Michael about his Elvis impersonation.

Posted by Haley Mahon on July 28, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Code-switching;
Motherese;
Style-shifting;
Youth

Cinco de Mayo at the White House 2011

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This is a fantastic example of the type of "performativity" President Obama brings to anything he delivers. He plays to his audience so well. No mater if you agree with him or not he always bring a performance to any speech he delivers.

Posted by Erin Patterson on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Performativity

How to Speak Hip

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This is the intro to a 13 part "album" instructing listeners on how to speak and understand "hip" language. Those who want to appear "cool" to this subculture that includes hipsters, juvenile delinquents, jazz musicians, etc.

Issues of Hispandering

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Comedienne Cristela Alonzo discusses Hispandering in her own experience growing up in South Texas, often referring to political campaigns and gender issues.

Posted by Caitlin Ogren on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Mock Spanish

Variety of Spanish Accents

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Joanna Rants uses analogies to compare different Spanish accents.

Posted by Caitlin Ogren on July 27, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Spanglish;
Spanish;
Code-switching;
Mock Spanish

Jon Stewart - Thank Donald Trump

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Jon Stewart mocks the 'inspiration' of new Latino voters for Donald Trump's run for presidency.

The Foreigner's Guide to Irish Accents

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Video shows how tightly a language can be held to a very small geographic region, even when in close proximity to others of a different dialect.

Code-Switching and Performativity in MMA

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UFC Mixed Martial Arts fighter John Lineker is interviewed following his 07-13-16 victory in the promotion's first event in South Dakota, responding primarily in Portuguese. Lineker code-switches to English at the end of the interview to direct a message to the champion (U.S. mixed martial artist Dominick Cruz) of his weight division. His promise of "coming for" the champion demonstrates a performative illocutionary act: by directing these words to Cruz, he is simultaneously performing the very action of threatening and talking about this action.

Posted by Jill Vesta on July 21, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
American English;
Code-switching

Melania Trump Echoes Michelle Obama in Convention Speech

As the title suggests, presidential hopeful, Donald Trump's wife Melania Trump gave her first major political speech last night. Many found striking similarities between her speech last night and that of First Lady Michelle Obama's earlier DNC speech. These similarities bring up the question of "shared values" or plagiarism. Also notable are factors such as Melania's native language not being English: how did this affect the speech and the way it was received? [Published on 07-18-2016]

Posted by Erika Huff on July 19, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Power;
Accent;
Politics and Policy

BET Comic Travina Springer Lesson on Code-Switching

This comic provides several examples of code-switching that she learned upon entering a new school. (A new linguistic community.)

Ebonics Dictionary

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In this video stand up comedian Steve Harvey explains the complexity of Ebonics. Although he is African American Steve Harvey's stand up routine plays into certain African American stereotypes while pointing out the differences between American English and AAVE.

Coca Cola por el orgullo de ser latino

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In this video that is supposed to celebrate Hispanic Heritage month Coca Cola has been accused of hispandering. This is evident in that the men and women in the video are discussing their pride in their heritage and family names as they are printed on the side of Coca Cola cans. Not only did Coke decide to put the names on the cans but they made them temporary tattoos. Many latinos have condemned the video as a pathetic attempt to bring in more latino customers. They have also said the tattoos could play into latino stereotypes. Check it out and decide for yourself.

Posted by Ariana Moll on March 14, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
American English;
Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

Formation - Beyonce

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In this video, singer Beyonce uses her lyrics and video to demonstrate her frustration with society, police brutality, and racism.

Posted by Zana Pascoe on March 9, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Race,Ethnicity;
Hip Hop Nation;
Slang

Trump Debate

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This is an example of performance, as Donald Trump places an emphasis on the way he delivers his response to Jeb Bush. His delivery and the way he speaks is very aggressive and confident in tone. His style of speech, that is in a very straight forward, relaxed manner, has resulted in his popularity around the country. He tells it as it is and throws the "political correctness" out the door in all of his debates.

Posted by Jeremy Gutovitz on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Politics and Policy

Key & Peele - Awkward Conversation

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In this video, Key & Peele use a sketch to poke fun at people they feel simply react to others instead of sharing actual views. Jordan Peele's character uses types of performativity, including drawn-out words and phrases, eye rolls, and looking at his friends while excluding Keegan's character to express his displeasure with Keegan's opinions on pop culture.

Posted by Dante Colombo on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Variation;
Youth;
Internet Language

Code-switching

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This video explains some of the main reasons why people engage in code switching. Code switching can be used in many different ways, but the primary function of this practice is to switch between two languages in a single conversation.

Luis Von Ahn- Massive Online Scale

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This video explains how one company plans to make learning a second language free. By setting a goal of translating the web into every major language for free, these researchers created the website Duolingo. Students are presented with sentences that vary in difficulty depending on their level of understanding. This program has found that students translating material are as proficient as paid translators. This could be a glance into the future of affordable bilingual education.

Be Free

Rapper J. Cole uses his words to express the danger of African Americans and the struggle that they go through. He uses his words as symbols and powerful words to paint the picture of the pain.

Teacher raps to relate to students

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Teacher uses rap song to teach children. She uses rap and dance movements to relate to the children because she knew that the kids would catch on to what she was teaching if she used methods that would keep the kids wanting to learn.

Posted by Zana Pascoe on March 6, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Acquisition

Stephen Fry - The power of words in Nazi Germany

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Stephen Fry speaks about the power of language during the time of Nazi Germany and how using certain words to describe others can change everyone's perception of those people. This video significantly shows how language influences world-view.

Posted by Samuel Schmidgall on March 5, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Race,Ethnicity

Language Could Diagnose Parkinson's, ALS and Schizophrenia before Lab Tests

A recent study shows the use, or lack of, certain words by patients could be diagnostic indicators of a future disease or ailment. [Published on 02-01-2016]

Posted by Jamie Schnee on March 4, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Change;
Language Shift;
Variation;
Contact

Rudy Giuliani: Beyoncé’s halftime show was an ‘outrageous’ affront to police

Rudy Giuliani describes Beyonce's halftime show as being inappropriate for the middle american audience of the Super Bowl. He states “This is football, not Hollywood, and I thought it was really outrageous that she used it as a platform to attack police officers who are the people who protect her and protect us, and keep us alive." [Published on 02-08-2016]

Posted by Jared Nietfeld on March 1, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Hip Hop Nation;
Politics and Policy

Polyglots Might Have Multiple Personalities

Nathan Collins reports that psychologists at Hong Kong Polytechnic University have found that people who speak multiple languages adopt the personality traits associated with the language they are currently speaking. [Published on 05-01-2011]

Posted by Jared Nietfeld on March 1, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
English;
Code-switching

The "White Voice" of Radio

This clip points out the style-shifting of the particular speaker, and attributes it to race, performativity, and accommodation to his audience. [Published on 02-02-2015]

Posted by Jamie Schnee on February 27, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Accommodation;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity

28 Reasons to Hug a Black Guy

In this Saturday Night Live skit they are discussing Black history month in class and the teacher lets three of her students come up to give the class a lesson on what it means. The first thing they start to do is rap which is stigmatizing blacks. Next they start talking about slavery and how "white" people need to show them love for this month because this is the only time a year they get love which brings in the issue of race and ideology and much more. [Published on 02-25-2016]

Posted by Madison Rigdon on February 25, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
Style-shifting;
Race,Ethnicity;
Stigma

Judith Butler on Performativity

Philosopher and feminist theorist Judith Butler describes performativity as “that reiterative power of discourse to produce the phenomena that it regulates and constrains.” She has largely used this concept in her analysis of gender development. Working in the fields of feminist, queer, and literary studies.

Posted by Shane Bessette on February 25, 2016

Tags:
Performativity

Carlton

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This particular clip shows the comparisons of what some specific groups might think of how someone should be because of color and class when it is society who defines these boundaries.

President Bill Clinton Grand Jury testimony: Meaning of the word "is"

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What do words mean? It depends on how you think about it.

Posted by Jasmine E. Thompson on February 23, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Politics and Policy

"Hispandering" through food.

I am starting my proposal for my research paper and we are tasked with investigating "Hispandering" from a linguistic anthropological perspective. This add personifies "Hispandering" it uses performance to elicit feelings about stereotypes of ethnicity. [Published on 09-30-2014]

Posted by Tricia Roberson on February 12, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
Power;
Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity;
Multilingualism

3 Ways To Speak English

This is a TED talk about this women who breaks down the english language saying there are three ways to speak. She is saying that the way you speak comes from your background and the culture you experienced growing up. You can speak differently based on where you are. For example in the work community people have been taught to be polite and say "hello" but around your friends the vernacular changes to maybe a "whats good" meaning the same as hello or hi. Jamilia Lyiscott is putting on a performance for people conveying different identities. She also says the word "articulate" multiple times representing language ideologies.

Empire "Without a Country"

Season 2, Episode 2 of Empire. A family drama about a record company, Empire focuses on the Lyon family, who are African-American; much of the dialog is heavy on AAE features. The relatively consistent in-group setting sets up some potentially interesting controlled differences in style by topic and persona.

Obama's Eulogy of Reverend Pinckney

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This is an excerpt of the eulogy for Reverend Clementa Pinckney delivered by President Obama after the Charleston shooting at the Emanuel AME Church. He makes strategic use of preaching style to establish a rapport and sense of belonging with a black audience in a religious setting.

The "lumberjack" aesthetic as a performed masculinity

This article somewhat disparagingly describes and attempts to interpret a recent trend popular among middle-class urban white men. Beards, flannel shirts, and other symbols index a "lumberjack"-inspired identity that the author feels is disconnected from the actual history of lumberjacks. Are these men attempting to reclaim a romanticized masculine image of hard work, strength, and daring (and do they fear masculinity is "in crisis")? Or are they performing a new, exclusively urban masculinity that symbolizes some other set of attributes? [Published on 12-10-2014]

Posted by Emma Rennie on October 6, 2015

Tags:
Indexicality;
Performativity;
Masculinity

Trevor Noah -- African American

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Trevor Noah's standup--he talks about moving from South Africa to the U.S. and his preparation for being Black in America. He also gives us some performances of AAE.

Posted by Richard Adcock on September 2, 2015

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity

LGBTQ girls and the heterosexual marketplace

This article isn't specifically linguistic, but relates to Eckert's notion of the heterosexual marketplace, where adolescents learn how to speak/act/dress/present in the best way possible to attract people of the 'opposite' sex and thus gain popularity. This article deals with how lesbian and queer girls fair in this social structure as people who essentially do not participate in the heterosexual marketplace. Interestingly, the article posits that a good way to combat the isolation of non-conforming young people would be for schools/institutions to reward non-physical and non-sexual achievements. I find this a strange concept because I think of popularity/success in the heterosexual marketplace as being determined almost entirely separately from school-sanctioned recognition of achievement; in fact, I think institutional recognition often detracts from a person's success in the marketplace, and I wonder how/whether institutions are capable of causing a shift in the dynamics of young people's social structure. [Published on 3132013]

Posted by Chase Doremus on April 16, 2015

Tags:
Eckert, Penelope;
Performativity;
Power;
Femininity;
Sexual Orientation

"Ask" versus "Ax"

This article examines the social stigma of using "ax" instead of "axe". NPR labels "Ax" as a distinguishable feature of AAE that many associate with being "poor, black, and uneducated". Garrard McClendon of Chicago State University stated that his parents were "well aware" of the stigma, and taught him that "there's a time and place to use it", encouraging purposeful code switching. Comedians Key and Peele joke that being half black and half white causes them to use both depending on whether they are with friends ("ax") or being pulled over ("ask"). This feature, however, dates back over 1000 years. Jesse Sheidlower, president of the American Dialect Society, says it is in the first English translation of the bible as "axe". Professor John Rickford of Stanford remarks, "so at that point it wasn't a mark of people who weren't highly educated", and that we can't be sure where the popularity of "ax" stopped yet stayed put in the American South and Caribbean. He says it could be "the empire striking back: taking language that has been imposed and making it our own". Rickford also notes, "I don't think any linguist is recommending that you get rid of your vernacular, because you need it - in a sense - for your soul". This article highlights the significance of linguistic versatility; the use of "ax" is only as "right" or "wrong" as a person labels it - and there are multiple opinions! [Published on 12-03-2013]

Chris Rock on Race in the 2008 Election

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Chris Rock uses contrastive AAE and SE to highlight a political point about the role of race in the 2008 election.

Posted by Sydney Alysse Negus on February 26, 2013

Tags:
Performativity;
African American English;
Code-switching

Southern Dialects: Talkin' Tar-Heel

Transcript of interview with Walt Wolfram in which many aspects of Southern English are discussed. Audio available on website.

Obama's English

Discussion of Obama's use of AAE in his acceptance speech at the 2012 Democratic National Convention and the significance of style-shifting.