Office of the Registrar

Courses 2022–23

Ancient Mediterranean Studies 251 - Ancient Greek Athletics

One-unit semester course. For better or worse, the ancient Olympics (motto now “Faster, Higher, Strong—Together”) has proved itself one of the most influential of Greek institutions. This course will study the values and meanings given to the ancient Olympics by studying the representation of athletic victory in the poetry and dedications that celebrated victors. What ideas of athletic victory did these memorials produce? How did they link athletic success to moral excellence, natural talent, family history, masculinity, beauty or divine favor, and build up these very notions so that they seemed real and significant? Who could claim the political capital of athletic excellence for their own—victors? Their cities? Second-place finishers? Non-Greeks? What events counted as events—women’s events, team events, running with a shield, dog racing? And what kind of work even qualified you as a victor? Throughout we will use comparisons to the meanings that other sporting movements have sought to claim, and so we will take time to study Roman sports and the modern Olympic movement, again focusing on how various artistic forms (poetry, film, mass choreographed performances) construct victory. Course conducted in English; no Greek required. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 251.

Ancient Mediterranean Studies 261 - Greek and Roman Mythology

One-unit semester course. We will study different theoretical approaches to mythology and a variety of literary and material sources for Greek and Roman myths. Where do myths come from and how are they perpetuated and made distinct? How do they contribute to different forms of knowledge, custom, and creative expression? What role do they have in the formation and maintenance of group identities? How have Greek and Roman myths been received and revised to comment on contemporary experiences? Ancient authors studied may include Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Plato, Apollonius, Virgil, Ovid, and Apuleius. Prerequisite: first semester of Humanities 110. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 261.

Ancient Mediterranean Studies 371 - The Greek World from 776 to 404 BCE

One-unit semester course. This course offers a chronological survey of archaic and classical Greek history and civilization from the traditional foundation of the Olympic games in 776 BCE to the fall of the Athenian Empire in 404 BCE. After beginning with a brief look at Bronze and Dark Age Greece, we will cover the following topics: the rise of the polis; Greek colonization; the “Age of Revolution”; hoplite warfare, aristocracy, and the spread of tyranny; the rise of Athens and Sparta; the Persian Wars; the development of Athens’s democracy and empire; the causes and course of the Peloponnesian War; the development of ethnography and historical inquiry; and the nature of Greek social relations, with an emphasis on slavery and gender dynamics in Athens and Sparta. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of ancient evidence, including primary literary works, inscriptions, and relevant archaeological material. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as History 391.

Not offered 2022–23.

Ancient Mediterranean Studies 373 - The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic

One-unit semester course. This course offers a chronological survey of Republican Roman history from Rome’s consolidation of power on the Italian peninsula in 266 BCE to the death of the Emperor Augustus in 14 CE. We will begin with a consideration of Rome’s rapid growth from 264 to 146 BCE and the various theories concerning the factors behind Roman imperial expansion. We will then explore the political, social, economic, and cultural repercussions of Rome’s transformation into the leading power in the Mediterranean and the various factors that led to the fall of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire under Augustus. During the semester we will cover the following topics: the structure and evolution of the Roman constitution; the development of the “professional” Roman army and its political ramifications; changing gender relations in Roman society; imperial governance; the growth and practice of slavery; Rome’s cultural interaction with Greece and the East; the social and cultural function of gladiatorial combat; Rome’s relations with its allies; the politicization of the Roman people and the rise of “popular” politicians; and the Augustan settlement. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of ancient evidence, including primary literary works, inscriptions, and relevant archaeological material. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as History 393.

Ancient Mediterranean Studies 374 - The Athenians and the “Other”

One-unit semester course. This course examines the conception and construction of otherness from the vantage point of the male citizen in fifth- and fourth-century Athens, who framed himself as the ultimate insider. We will begin by briefly considering both the “other” as the object of historical analysis and the various lenses through which male Athenians constructed their identity during this period. We will then spend the rest of the semester examining the Athenians’ construction of self and other via a number of intertwined categories including ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, religion, and disability. This examination will involve the close study of a number of different genres, such as historical accounts, tragedy, comedy, and oratory. In addition to reading authors such as Herodotus, Euripides, Aristophanes, and selections from the Hippocratic corpus, this course will also examine relevant archaeological evidence. Prerequisite: Humanities 110. Conference. Cross-listed as History 394.

Ancient Mediterranean Studies 377 - Women in the Ancient World

One-unit semester course. This course examines the female experience in the ancient Mediterranean from the middle of the eighth century BCE to the second century CE. We will begin by briefly considering some main themes in women’s history and the applicability of gender as a category of historical analysis to the study of the ancient world. We will then turn to a close analysis of the available literary, documentary, and archaeological evidence that illuminates ancient attitudes toward women, women’s daily lives, the female life cycle, and the various practical and symbolic roles that women played in Greece, Rome, and the broader Mediterranean world. Topics include the portrayal of women in ancient myth, literature, and art; the political, legal, economic, and social status of women; women’s roles in state and private religious activities; women in the family and household organization; women’s education and female literacy; philosophical treatments of gender; scientific knowledge and folklore concerning gender and sexuality; and the function of gender in ancient ideologies. The course follows these topics chronologically, with special emphasis given to the coincidences and conflicts between literary images of women and the realities of their everyday experience recoverable through documentary and archaeological evidence. Prerequisite: Humanities 110. Conference. Cross-listed as History 397.

Not offered 2022–23.

Ancient Mediterranean Studies 382 - Material Culture and Empire: The Archaeology of the Roman World

One-unit semester course. This course considers the archaeology and material culture of the Roman Empire, including the city of Rome, Italy, and the provinces. This course is theoretically grounded in the archaeology of empire, but will also be content-based, covering major sites throughout the empire and classes of material culture. Topics to be covered may include the origin and development of the city of Rome; imperial display; daily life in the Roman Empire; the archaeology of the Roman economy; the archaeology of cult and religion; provincial archaeology and the relationship between center and periphery; the archaeology of border regions; and methodological and disciplinary issues in approaching a vast territorial empire. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on the archaeology of identity in an imperial context. Prerequisite: Humanities 110, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. 

Not offered 2022–23.

Ancient Mediterranean Studies 383 - Contact and Exchange in the Mediterranean: The Archaeology of the Greek World

One-unit semester course. This course considers the archaeology and material culture of the Greek world, centering on the Aegean and the wider eastern Mediterranean and Near East, as well as other areas of Greek settlement. The focus will be both theoretical and content-based, covering important sites, objects, and classes of material culture. Topics to be covered may include the development of urban and public space; monumental architecture; sculpture and other fine arts; houses, households, and the archaeology of daily life; Greek colonization and city foundations; ceramics and the use of pottery as archaeological evidence; and funerary practices. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on the interaction between Greeks and other groups in the Mediterranean, and the material effects of that interaction. Prerequisite: Humanities 110, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. 

Not offered 2022–23.

Ancient Mediterranean Studies 385 - Mummies, Urns, and Ancestors: The Archaeology of Death and Burial

One-unit semester course. This course examines archaeological approaches to human death and burial, introducing how archaeologists use the material remains of mortuary practice to analyze ritual, social, economic, and ideological institutions, structures, and identities in past societies. Using case studies drawn from ancient Egypt and the wider ancient Mediterranean, this course will present a theoretical grounding for the archaeological investigation of human burial, including bioarchaeological and osteological approaches. From the perspective of funerary practice, we will examine social structure, class, and rank; religion and belief systems; ethnicity and cultural identity; age, sex, and gender; and memory and ancestor veneration. This course will also consider aspects of archaeological ethics as it relates to the study of human remains. Lecture-conference. 

Not offered 2022–23.

Ancient Mediterranean Studies 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Ancient Mediterranean Studies 481 - Independent Reading

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Prerequisite: approval of instructor and division.

Ancient Mediterranean Studies 502 - Rome, City of Complaints

One-half unit semester course. In this course we will look beyond la dolce vita to scour the dark underbelly of the eternal city. Each week we will read selections of ancient literary sources that complain about the city and its inhabitants, covering issues such as poverty, housing, social climbing, urban blight, disease, noise, violence, litigation, moral decline, privilege, and responsibility. From this unusual angle, we will study the literature, social history, art, architecture, and topography of the ancient city. We will also consider the rhetorical, political, and social aspects of complaint across time, looking at the multilayered history of Rome and comparisons from other cultures. Primary readings will include inscriptions and graffiti, Plautus, Catullus, Cicero, Livy, Virgil, Horace, Ovid, Petronius, Juvenal, and Martial. Conference. Offered spring 2023.

Anthropology 201 - Topics in Contemporary Anthropology

One-unit semester course. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

Anthropology of Global Health
One-unit semester course. This course is designed to be a gateway course in cultural and medical anthropology geared toward first- and second-year students. Global health presents itself as a timely intervention that redistributes the means of physical and mental well-being to those who lack it, typically in resource-poor or underserved settings. But in what sense is global health “global” if it is driven by the agendas of specific nations and institutions? How can it command such implicit recognition as a force for good and yet seem to recapitulate the imperial agendas and perspectives of the colonial era? Rather than considering global health as obvious, coherent, and necessary, we will examine its foundations: What assumptions does global health reflect about bodies, families, history, and biomedicine itself? In what ways do global health programs build upon or distinguish themselves from colonial-era medical campaigns that tied biomedical interventions to Christianity, modernization, and the demands of industrial labor? How does global health both reflect and perpetuate transnational political and economic shifts? What are the unexpected consequences of global health programs—for the individuals who compose target populations, but also for global health professionals themselves as well as local experts? In exploring answers to these questions, we will draw on recent ethnographic analyses from around the world as well as historical studies that illuminate global health’s antecedents. This course applies to the department’s SETS concentration. No prerequisite. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

Bodies, Spaces, Subjectivities
One-unit semester course. This course is designed to be a gateway course in cultural-phenomenological anthropology geared toward first- and second-year students. It introduces basic concepts and methods in anthropology through a sustained attention to human bodies as the preeminent space of subject making in different cultural contexts. Drawing on phenomenology, practice theory, urban studies, performance studies, and gender theory, the course approaches culture as a form of doing rather than of being, as first and foremost a set of embodied, material practices and cultivated dispositions. It explores both how corporeality connects people with others and their environments, and how, in the process, bodies become objects of individual attention and social action. Readings connect classics in social theory (Merleau-Ponty, Schutz, Bourdieu, Simmel, Goffman) with canonical anthropological texts (Boas, Sapir, Mauss, Gluckman, Sahlins), and ethnographies focusing on particular forms of embodiment and space making in the Americas, Africa, Europe, the Middle East, and Oceania. Topics include dwelling, working, playing, learning, making, modifying, exchanging, and contesting. Students will partner to conduct small fieldwork projects in the Portland area, learning basic qualitative methods in the process. No prerequisite. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Decolonizing Archaeology
One-unit semester course. This course is designed to expand students’ notions about just what archaeologists do and what questions archaeology can answer. Through a review of archaeology’s history, goals, theories, and methods, we will explore the ways in which archaeology is practiced, focusing in particular on the questions and techniques that shape our knowledge of the human past. In addition to dispelling misconceptions about archaeologists studying dinosaurs or ancient aliens, this course will be candid and critical of the colonial and imperialist histories of archaeology while also highlighting the positive ways in which it has been practiced. We will examine how it is that archaeologists develop ideas about the past through its material remains and the relevance of their research in the present. We will pay particular attention to the challenges and ethical dilemmas that come from collecting, studying, and displaying the material remains of ancient cultures, especially those with descendant communities in the present who have historically been marginalized by archaeology. Thinking about how archaeologists can build relationships and partner with contemporary communities will be a core component of this course. While this course is not meant to be a survey of world history, we will explore the history of archaeology through references to studies from all over the world that investigate periods ranging from prehistory to the present. Students will be encouraged to develop and pursue interests in any regions, time periods, and topics they feel drawn to and will be given frequent opportunities to explore these further through various assignments. This course applies to the department’s SETS concentration. No prerequisite. Conference.

Global Political Ecology
One-unit semester course. This course is designed to be a gateway course in the anthropology of political ecology geared toward first- and second-year students. Despite enormous scientific and political efforts, scientists and activists have found themselves unable to bring about the political changes that might reverse climate change and environmental degradation. The degradation of earth’s environment has been caused by humans, but somehow humans have not been able to stop or reverse the social processes that cause this degradation. This course examines case studies of environmental degradation at multiple scales, from Superfund sites in Oregon to deforestation in the Amazon to global climate change, to three ends: to explore fundamental questions in social theory about the relationship between humans and the world, to understand why coordinated scientific and political efforts to prevent environmental degradation have tended to fail, and to think through new political and environmental interventions that might succeed. The course readings are drawn from both environmental science and anthropology, and one of the tasks of the course is to introduce students to anthropology through the multiple ways in which the discipline has dealt with knowledge produced in the natural sciences. By putting environmental science in conversation with anthropology, we will also think through ways to reconcile the disciplines in political practice. This course applies to the department’s SETS concentration. No prerequisite. Conference.

Language, Culture, Power
One-unit semester course. This course is designed to be a gateway course in linguistic anthropology geared toward first- and second-year students. Language permeates our lives, identities, and relationships, yet most of us take it for granted. This course introduces students to some of the foundational concepts, methods, and issues addressed in linguistic anthropology. Starting with the basic premise that language, thought, and culture are inextricably intertwined in practice, we take a fundamentally comparative and global perspective on the study of language. We will consider language not as a simple means of communication, but as a medium through which values, subjectivities, and sociopolitical relationships are created and transformed. We ask: How do differences in language affect how we think and act? How do people do things with language, and how does this vary across cultures, times, and places? How does linguistic communication interact with nonverbal or embodied forms of communication? What ideologies of language shape our understandings of difference and hierarchy? In exploring answers to these questions, we will draw on media resources, natural language examples, and recent ethnographic analyses from around the world to consider the ways in which language is implicated in power struggles within specific domains of social relationships (race, class, gender, sexuality) and institutions (education, medicine, law, immigration, electoral politics). This course applies to the department’s linguistic anthropology concentration. No prerequisite. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 211 - Introduction to Anthropology: History, Theory, Method

One-unit semester course. An introduction to the history, theory, methods, and subject matter of the field of social and cultural anthropology. Students become familiar with the conceptual framework of the discipline and with some of its techniques of research and interpretation. Anthropology is considered in its role as a social science and as a discipline with ties to the humanities and natural sciences. Emphasis is on close integration of analytic abstractions with empirical particulars. Conference. Not open to first-year students.

Anthropology 300 - African Technoscience

One-unit semester course. In the global North, Africans frequently appear as the beneficiaries and consumers of global flows of science and technology or, conversely, science and technology’s misusers and refusers. Rarely do they figure as its authors, producers, or animators. This course interrogates the conditions of possibility for African technoscience. What do the key themes of the anthropology of science—the politics of knowledge production, naturalizations as a site of investigation, the role of the state in shaping scientific infrastructures—look like when viewed from the African continent? What is at stake in claiming a particularly African logic, or in insisting on the rationality of witchcraft? Foregrounding the work of African anthropologists and historians, this course will examine Africans’ participation in and contestation of science as a practice of knowledge production, as a technique of colonial governance, as a site of anticolonial resistance, as a tool of postcolonial nation building, and as a potential instrument of decolonization. Drawn from across sub-Saharan Africa, our readings will analyze knowledge production practices such as molecular biology, geology, mathematics, and anthropology while also grappling with how the boundaries of these practices have emerged and the people, objects, and forms of knowledge that exceed those boundaries. This course meets the department’s area requirement and applies to the department’s SETS concentration. Prerequisites: Anthropology 201 or 211. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 390.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 305 - Musical Ethnography

See Music 305 for description.

Music 305 Description

Anthropology 306 - #CentralAmericanTwitter: Continuity and Rupture in Central American Indigenous Histories

One-unit semester course. Of the 250,000 Guatemalan migrants apprehended at the US-Mexico border between 2018 and 2019, many Americans may be surprised to learn that at least half are Indigenous, often with little fluency in Spanish and with a distinct cultural background. Understanding the forces driving this modern-day migration, and its effects on these Indigenous migrants, requires a historically situated understanding of Central American Indigeneity itself and its unique legacy within countries like Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica. This course provides that historical background, beginning with the archaeology and ancient history of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica and continuing through the conquest of the Americas to the present day. By focusing on topics such as Indigenous culture, social inequality, and religion, we will track historical currents through time and discuss what effect they continue to have today. From this framing, we will use a multimedia approach that includes films, excerpts of novels, ethnographies, photographs, and social media to access firsthand accounts of the topics discussed in class. This course meets the department’s area requirement. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 396.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 307 - “One Good Turkey Hen is Worth 100 Cacao Beans”: An Introduction to Economic Anthropology

One-unit semester course. What does it mean to be in debt? What is the difference between exchange and barter? Why do things have prices? What are gifts? What is value? These are questions that are fundamental to economics, yet their answers vary significantly between different cultures and time periods. In this course, we examine these questions through the lens of economic anthropology and adopt a holistic framework that considers the diversity of preferences, behaviors, and activities that relate to how people meet their basic (or not) human needs. We will consider behaviors like production, consumption, and exchange from a cross-cultural perspective that shows alternative practices and understandings that confront conventional arguments about human economic behavior. To do so, we will learn about the principles and history of economic anthropology and consider how we might study the economic practices of people today and in the past. What kind of material evidence do we look at? How do we know what was valued in the past? Through a combination of ethnographic texts, museum collections, and archaeological reports, we will consider these questions and call into question the assumed logics and structures of our current economic system. Students will be encouraged to develop and pursue interests in any regions, time periods, and topics they feel drawn to and will be given frequent opportunities to explore these further through various assignments. This course applies to the department’s SETS concentration. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 308 - Obsidian Rocks! A Natural and Social History

One-unit semester course. Today, most people have little if any relationship to the dark, black, brittle volcanic glass we know as obsidian. But from early Neolithic farmers trading throughout the Mediterranean, to Maya priests conducting ritual sacrifices, to Polynesian explorers sailing across the Pacific, obsidian can tell us about the daily lives, practices, technologies, and relationships of ancient peoples. For much of human antiquity, obsidian was prized not only for its sharpness, but also for its distinct physical properties. Its translucency, color, and shimmer have made an aesthetically pleasing material as well, with obsidian used as often for elaborate figurines, mirrors, and weapons as used for tools. Moreover, the volcanic conditions necessary to create obsidian make it a scarce resource in many regions of the world, and therefore traded for over great distances. The various uses and cultural connotations of obsidian persist up to the present day, whether in its use in jewelry, in surgical tools, or in popular media (as dragonglass in Game of Thrones). This course examines the history of this unique material, its many uses, its cultural and symbolic meanings, and the ways in which archaeologists study it today. In investigating the natural and social history of obsidian, this course will not only draw on scientific articles and archaeological reports, but also include hands-on tutorials in obsidian knapping, chemical sourcing, artifact illustration, and quantitative and qualitative lithic analyses. By analyzing obsidian firsthand, students will learn the diversity of approaches that archaeologists employ to understand the use, function, history, and meaning of ancient materials. This course applies to the department’s SETS concentration. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 320 - Social Movements, Protests, and Historical Change in South Asia

One-unit semester course. The Arab uprisings, the Black Lives Matter movement, the ongoing student movement in India, and the rise of far-right movements in the United States and elsewhere have given a new urgency to an examination of the tactics and possibilities of mass movements and protests: How and why do large groups of people come together to protest? When and how do some people and issues become political, and when and how do they not? How and when are these movements successful in achieving their aims? What social, cultural, and political effects do they have beyond their explicit aims? How, finally, do these movements interact with existing state and legal structures, whether antagonistically or through participation and engagement? By examining South Asian social movements with a focus on India, this conference analyzes current and historical attempts to reconfigure the relationships between people, laws, and states. In the process, the conference engages with challenges facing anthropology in theorizing historical change and in finding methodologies suited to large- and multi-scaled social processes. South Asia, with its vast scale and its complex and constantly shifting political landscape, is both an ideal and an important site for these inquiries. This conference also serves as an introduction to the anthropology of South Asia. It begins with a historical and theoretical consideration of the play of domination and hegemony in the colonial period, moves to a study of nationalist movements in India and Bangladesh, and then draws on the theoretical frameworks studied in the beginning of the semester to consider a range of contemporary social movements, including the Indian Maoist uprising, Dalit and anticaste movements, and the Sri Lankan Civil War. This course asks what an anthropological approach to the specific and local can bring to the study of politics, and what a study of large-scale movements can bring to anthropological understandings of historical change. This course meets the department’s area requirement. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211. Conference. 

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 324 - Sport and Society

One-unit semester course. Sports are deeply entangled with and imbricated in social processes, cultural institutions, and everyday life across much of the globe. The course approaches sports play as a set of embodied practices and performances, as a primary site for the reproduction and innovation of fundamental categories of gender/sex/sexuality, class, race/ethnicity, and nationality. Through case studies of situated sporting practices (notably football/soccer, cricket/baseball, basketball, bodybuilding, boxing, capoeira, skateboarding, and parkour), we will examine how colonial legacies are literally embodied in contemporary forms of urban space, nationalism, and globalization. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 332 - Mesoamerican Archaeology

One-unit semester course. This course serves as an introduction to the field of Mesoamerican studies, focusing on the peoples and cultures of this region that includes modern-day Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Belize, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Costa Rica. We will explore the development of the great Olmec civilization of the Gulf Coast, the city of Teotihuacan in central Mexico, the Maya civilization in Central America and the Yucatan Peninsula, and the Aztec Empire of central Mexico. Through studying these sites and cultures, we will investigate the political organization, economy, and belief systems of these ancient people through their material culture, architecture, and texts. We will also explore the ways in which archaeology is practiced in this region, focusing in particular on the questions and techniques that have shaped our knowledge of these ancient civilizations, while also being mindful and critical of the colonial and imperialist histories of archaeology. Though this course will primarily focus on Mesoamerica’s pre-Columbian history, this course will also include frequent readings from colonial documents and modern-day ethnographies to explore how this ancient past remains relevant and impactful in the present. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211. Lecture-conference.

Anthropology 341 - Medical Anthropology

One-unit semester course. This course will consider the ways in which medical anthropology has historically been influenced by debates within the discipline of anthropology as well as by broader social and political movements. Particular emphasis will be placed on the importance of viewing biomedicine as one among many cultural systems of healing. Some key issues we will explore include: concepts of health, healing and illness; the political economy of disease; the role of medicine in the state and citizenship; medicine’s role in the assignment and mediation of deviance; applied medical anthropology; medical anthropology as ambassador and translator for biomedicine; and contemporary global health crises, including the HIV and TB pandemics. This course applies to the department’s SETS concentration. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 342 - Language and Medicine

One-unit semester course. This course examines the intersection of language with practices of health and healing in anthropological analyses. While medical anthropologists have long pointed to healing as a cultural practice, they have given less attention to its linguistic dimensions. Within anthropological analyses, moreover, language as a tool of healing is consigned to biomedicine’s suspect others (e.g., traditional healing, ritual) and to the treatment of what biomedicine frames as ephemeral phenomena (minds, emotions, selves, subjectivities) relative to the body’s seeming concrete reality. This course will take a cross-cultural approach to healing, asking how linguistic anthropology can contribute to analyses of affliction broadly construed. We will also look at the history of the subdisciplinary division of labor that has made language and biomedicine seem incompatible as objects of anthropological analysis. This course applies to the department’s SETS and linguistic anthropology concentrations. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 343 - African Pasts, African Futures

One-unit semester course. This course examines the ways Africans engage the past and imagine the future. How do the slave trade, colonial rule, anticolonial resistance, the development initiatives of the Cold War era, and lingering promises of modernity figure in Africans’ perceptions, experiences, and visions of the world? The first goal of the course is to attend to the conditions of possibility that make African pasts and futures thinkable and inhabitable. We will examine the conceptions of time that have shaped Africans’ lived experiences of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, giving close attention to the material and symbolic structures these conceptions have reflected and reinforced. Our second goal is to interrogate Africa as a site of knowledge production. What would it mean to decolonize African studies, or to center Africa in planetary accounts? Drawn from across sub-Saharan Africa, our readings foreground the work of African scholars and engage themes such as the significance of “custom” and “tradition,” transformations in intergenerational relations, the ethics and politics of remembering and forgetting, the built environment as a site of memory and resistance, and the place of Africa in the world. Topics may include the politics of race and ethnicity, the appropriation of African knowledge in the colonial encounter, the consequences of colonial and postcolonial development projects, and efforts to decolonize higher education. The syllabus pairs works of empirical research with suggested contemporary African novels. This course meets the department’s area requirement. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 392.

Anthropology 344 - The Anthropology of Sex and Gender

One-unit semester course. What are the differences between sex, gender, and sexuality? And why is this important in today’s world? This course introduces students to an anthropological perspective on the relationships among sex, the biological attributes by which a person is deemed “male” or “female”; gender, the norms, ideals, and practices defining what it means to become “men,” “women,” or nonbinary persons; and sexuality, ideas and practices related to erotic desire and sexual reproduction. In order to understand the various debates and their stakes, we will read anthropological accounts of communities in which sex, gender and sexuality are construed very differently from our own, and combine these with discussions of documentary and popular movies and video clips. The course will provide students with ways to understand how we come to consider and express ourselves as “men,” “women,” or someone other to those categories; the social and cultural processes that shape us to act and think as particular kinds of sexed, gendered, and sexualized persons, including the complexities and dilemmas posed by intersecting subjectivities (e.g., race, class, ethnicity, religion); and the potential consequences for not conforming to those norms. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 345 - Black Queer Diaspora

One-unit semester course. This course examines ethnographies of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people across the Black diaspora. The history of colonialism, the transatlantic slave trade, and their ongoing aftermaths have created both interlinked and locally variant lifeways across the Americas, Africa, and Europe. Black queer studies queries the creativity and variation with which Black people have been shaped by and continuously reshape these histories, undermining presupposed norms of race, gender, and sexuality. We will look at ethnographic explorations of these particulars, differences, and commonalities as documented in texts, images, and sounds across multiple disciplines. We interrogate how conceptions of race, gender, and sexuality shift across time and space and as lived by Black social actors who both participate in and defy colonial and nationalist projects. This course meets the department’s area requirement. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 395.

Anthropology 347 - Outbreak, Emergency, Pandemic: Anthropology of Health Systems

One-unit semester course. In the past few decades, infectious diseases such as HIV, Ebola, and COVID-19 have illuminated the urgency of health systems research. These mass infections have also highlighted the strengths and weakness of different health systems, while also illustrating just how complex and unwieldy public health interventions can be. Even in supposedly “developed” or “wealthy” countries, public health interventions in mass infections can exacerbate existing inequalities along lines of race, class, and gender, sharpen political antagonisms, prop up cronyism, erode existing health services by redirecting resources in ways that negatively impact public health in the process, and radically transform how individuals and groups regard themselves and others. Ethnographic research provides a critical vantage point for thinking about what health policy and health systems do and what they mean beyond their stated intentions and actions. Focusing on epidemics past, present, and future, this class will pose the following questions: What can ethnographic research illuminate about health systems, particularly health systems under immense strain? What do strategies implemented to respond to mass infections tell us about how public health policymakers view the world, and the historical and political contexts that give rise to these visions? In what ways must ethnographers modify their research methodologies to respond to outbreaks of infectious disease? We will also explore different ways anthropologists engage with health policy making and health systems reform, and critically examine the ramifications of these engagements. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211. Conference.

Anthropology 351 - Postcolonial Europe

One-unit semester course. The liberal democratic model in Europe appears to be very much in question. On the one hand, public debates over national identity and the electoral success of neonationalist populist parties challenge cosmopolitan visions and threaten to reinvigorate intra-EU cultural borders. On the other hand, European people of color have increasingly adapted Anglo-American identity politics into local social movements which call for a reckoning with and reparations for Europe’s history of colonial violence and enslavement. While postcolonial studies have largely addressed the legacies of such violence in the former colonial periphery, recent scholarship has emphasized the immanently postcolonial character of the contemporary European metropole as well. The course explores these dynamics through a set of critical and comparative ethnographies of Europe’s multicultural, multiracial, and multireligious situation. Attention will be paid to categories of Blackness and Islam as they emerge within challenges to liberal secularism, as well as to intersectionalities of gender, sexuality, and class within such ethno-racial and religious politics. This course meets the department’s area requirement. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 357 - Comparative Fascisms

One-unit semester course. This course attempts to provincialize the category of fascism, using it to analyze moments both historically and geographically distant from mid-twentieth-century Europe. We will begin with a set of historical apologetics and critiques from European fascists, American white supremacists, intellectuals associated with European imperialism, and right-wing nationalist intellectuals from across the globe, alongside their contemporary critics. Drawing upon the analyses we build of ideologies, tactics, and historical conditions of the various political projects, we spend the second unit of the course reading ethnographic accounts of contemporary fascist and right-wing movements from India, Europe, and the United States. We end the semester with readings from contemporary antifascist movements, comparing their analyses with those that have emerged from our readings. Prerequisites: Anthropology 201 or 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Anthropology 360 - Country and City in Latin America

One-unit semester course. This course focuses on such elements as social movements, agro-industrialization, crime, and urban planning, as well as ideas regarding race, gender, and sexuality that have come with so-called modernization. We examine scholarship on both contemporary rural life and large urban areas in order to raise questions about relations between the two. The course will take up theoretical examinations of the transformations of city-country relations by such figures as Marx, Lefebvre, and Raymond Williams, as well as anthropological works of both the canon and contemporary scholarship on Latin America. We will also explore original works of literature, cinema, television, and music to present ways of thinking about contemporary rural and urban life in light of the organization of the countryside. This course meets the department’s area requirement, and applies to the department’s SETS concentration. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 361 - The Middle East: Culture and Politics

One-unit semester course. The Middle East has been the focus of increased scrutiny over the past few decades in light of U.S. economic and political interests, and yet the region’s internal cultural complexity is poorly understood and often overlooked. This course provides both an anthropological overview of the region’s political culture and cultural politics, as well as a critical inquiry into the very anthropo-geographic categories that have historically sustained a sense of unity in the region, including tribalism, honor and shame, religious piety, and poetic practices. In the process, the course explores larger comparative issues of colonialism, nationalism, state formation, sectarianism, urbanism, and globalization. This course meets the department’s area requirement. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211, or consent of instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 362 - Gender and Ethnicity in China and Tibet

One-unit semester course. Chinese and Tibetan peoples have interacted for centuries, but it is only in the last half of the twentieth century that the “Tibet question” in China has risen to global attention. This course looks at modern Sino-Tibetan relations through the lens of ethnicity and gender as a way to understand the contentious process through which the Chinese nation-state and national identity have been constructed. Through readings, films, discussions, and lectures, we will explore the diversity of Tibetan and Han Chinese family organization, gender ideologies, and ethnic identities just prior to, during, and after the Communist revolutionary period. This perspective will shed light on the incorporation of Tibetans as a “minority nationality” in the Chinese “multinational state,” the role of such minorities in constructing Han Chinese majority identity, and the differing impact of state policies on men and women in the context of rapid economic reform and globalization in the PRC. This course meets the department’s area requirement. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 363 - Race and Transnational China

One-unit semester course. Debates about forms of perceived or imagined social difference have a long history among people who identify as Chinese, including negotiations of diasporic relations with a Chinese homeland, now claimed by the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Those debates took on new urgency in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries for Chinese intellectuals faced with the threat of Western colonialism, the imperative to establish a sovereign nation-state, and the concomitant rise of Western modernity discourses that were grounded in notions of essential biological differences hierarchizing human “races.” Yet since the emergence of the PRC as global power in the 2010s and President Xi Jinping’s effort to extend Chinese infrastructure development and investment programs to over 70 countries worldwide, transnational China has seen reintensified debates about social difference and the meaning of Chineseness, as well as the rise of new mass-mediated Han Chinese nationalisms. In this course we engage multimedia sources (texts, videos, images) to explore these most recent debates in historical context. We do this as a way to dialogue with critical race theory, and to delve into the high-stakes interpretive politics of “race” and “racism” transnationally. As many Chinese scholars and netizens ask: are these English language terms even applicable in the very different cultural, historical, and political economic contexts of transnational China? We start with comparative theoretical debates about the nature of “race” as historically situated perceptions and claims about biological/embodied difference. We then turn to debates in recent Chinese contexts to consider for example the relationship between discourses of “race” and “nation,” the nature of “Han-ness,” the status of “ethnic minorities,” and the status of “Blackness” amidst increased Sino-African engagement. Our goal will be to expand our understandings of the stakes and contexts of cosmologies and ontologies of social difference and inequality transnationally. This course meets the department’s area requirement. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 393.

Anthropology 364 - The Anthropology of Global Tibet

One-unit semester course. Since the Dalai Lama fled to exile in India in 1959, Tibet and Tibetans have garnered emblematic status in global debates on Indigenous cultures and human rights. The widespread Tibetan unrest and subsequent military crackdown during China’s summer “Olympic year” (2007–2008) focused renewed international attention on the issue of Tibet in the face of China’s rise as an important political and economic power. Meanwhile, tightening political constraints and rapid development under president Xi Jinping have ushered in a new and complicated era for the transnational Tibetan community. Yet Tibet has long been both a cosmopolitan place and an object of translocal interest and desire. This course draws on anthropological theories of ethnicity, modernity, nationalism, space, and globalization to understand this phenomenon in its historical and ethnographic contexts. Working with a wide range of theoretical, historical, and ethnographic writings, as well as a variety of other media such as film, popular songs, websites, and blogs from in and outside of China, we consider the transnational contexts and causes of changing meanings of Tibetanness before and after Chinese Communist intervention. We focus especially on the historical and contemporary diversity among Tibetans across the Himalayan region and into the diaspora, as well as the changing political economic conditions of Chinese-Tibetan relations. Prerequisite: Anthropology 211 or 201. Conference.

Anthropology 365 - The Anthropology of Development in Post-Mao China

One-unit semester course. Since the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949, state leaders have struggled to chart a course to a Chinese modernity that would break with the perceived humiliations of European domination in the nineteenth century and bring China commensurate status in a newly configured world stage of nations. Since Deng Xiaoping’s post-Mao reforms in the early 1980s, the PRC has been one of the fastest growing economies in the world. As such, it is poised to have major impacts globally, and especially since the PRC’s entrance into the World Trade Organization in 2001, these meteoric socioeconomic changes have complex implications for its diverse 1.4 billion people, as well as for many communities abroad now impacted by the expanding reach of Chinese investment and development efforts. This course draws on anthropological theories of modernity, capitalism, globalization, and development to turn a critical eye on discourses and practices of “development” in the PRC. Drawing on theoretical, historical, and ethnographic writings, as well as on other media such as government policy papers, advertising, and documentary and feature films, we consider the contexts and contradictions of various development efforts just before, during, and after the Maoist period, focusing especially on the post-Mao era of economic reforms. The PRC thus will serve as a case study for our broader examination of theories conceptualizing the relationships among transregional capitalisms, changing forms of governance, and local communities’ experiences. This course meets the department’s area requirement. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 366 - Black, Indian, and Other in Brazil

One-unit semester course. This course focuses on the status and meaning of multiculturalism in contemporary Brazil. We will raise questions on the legacies of older models of racial ideology, including such concepts as acculturation, “racial democracy,” and luso-tropicalismo. The course gives primacy to intersections of race with the production of class and gender. The course further seeks to situate social movements like the Movimento Negro (Black Movement) and indigenist politics within the larger international production and exchange of ideas regarding race, ethnicity, and social justice. Finally, in addition to core course materials focusing on academic literature, we will examine pieces from Brazilian fine art, cinema, music, and television. This course meets the department’s area requirement. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 397.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 374 - Urban Anthropology

One-unit semester course. The course provides an introduction to urban anthropology, with a particular focus on the colonial and postcolonial metropole as an exemplary site for the reciprocal influences of global and local processes. It explores how the city functions simultaneously as a locus for the negotiation of cultural diversity and for utopian ideals of rational communication. Drawing from cases throughout the “developed” and “developing” worlds, the course examines how urban culture is produced and reproduced under regimes of industrialization, colonialism, modernism, and globalization. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 375 - Anthropology of Science

One-unit semester course. This course examines scientific practices and knowledge as cultural, social, and political phenomena. Scientific knowledge often appears to be none of these things, and so central questions of the course are how such knowledge is produced and how it is able to transcend its context. The course begins with a set of orienting texts from Kuhn, Foucault, and Latour before turning to ethnographic and historical work on science and expertise, with an emphasis on feminist and postcolonial approaches. Along the way, we ask how the questions and methods drawn from the study of science can reshape larger anthropological understandings of the political and the social. This course applies to the department’s SETS concentration. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211. Conference.

Anthropology 378 - Nature, Culture, and Environmentalism

One-unit semester course. This course examines canonical and contemporary anthropological treatments of the concept of nature and human relations with the natural environment. We discuss how conceptions of nature are always shaped, transformed, and produced by social relations. Course materials focus primarily on ethnographies oriented towards the intersections of political ecology, science studies, and postcolonial theory. Course topics include the history of the Western nature-culture opposition and its critics, as well as recent scholarship on such topics as food studies, the social life of forests, human-animal interactions, race and the genome, and the supposed advent of the “posthuman.” This course applies to the department’s SETS concentration. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211. Conference.

Anthropology 379 - Critical Interventions in American Indian Studies

One-unit semester course. The course begins with a critical examination of the origins of American Indian/Native American studies. After situating the field we will engage with leading tribal scholars addressing contemporary topics such as representation and identity, queer indigeneity, social and political activism, decolonization movements, tribal justice systems, and tribal sovereignties. Note: this course is not an encyclopedic and/or historical/archaeological overview of native North America. This course meets the department’s area requirement. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 387 - African Bodies: Medicine, Labor, Modernity

One-unit semester course. This seminar uses historical and ethnographic analyses of bodies and the politics of health, healing, and embodiment to explore central issues in the anthropology of sub-Saharan Africa. Our focus is on central, eastern, and southern Africa. Topics we will examine include Africans’ responses to colonialism, missionization, and incorporation into regimes of industrial labor and mass consumption; debates over “modernity” in colonial and postcolonial contexts; the impact of colonialism on forms and experiences of intimacy, affliction, and kinship; and recent tensions around efforts to situate “global health” in Africa. We will analyze the historical forms of affliction and its amelioration in Africa, as well as the place of history and the historical imagination in experiences of and claims to suffering and healing. As we engage with arguments about African bodies as the objects of moral and political contests over the longue durée, students will acquire a familiarity with key questions, texts, and arguments within African history and anthropology. Students are encouraged to explore the recommended works of African fiction that complement and complicate the historical and ethnographic accounts provided by course texts. This course meets the department’s area requirement and applies to the department’s SETS concentration. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 391 - Legal Anthropology

One-unit semester course. The course examines the concept of legality as a social institution and a prominent feature of popular culture. Beginning with the emergence of legal anthropology and its history within the larger discipline, the course will focus on the relationships human actors have with the law as both an embedded social institution, and a disembodied set of authoritative doctrines. The course will orient students to productive ways of studying law and legality anthropologically. Topical areas will include Rule of Law, crime and punishment, sovereignty, alternative legal institutions, colonial and postcoloniality, environmental law, and transnationality. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Anthropology 393 - Ethnographic Methods

One-unit semester course. This course is designed to help students develop the necessary skillset to conduct anthropological fieldwork. Throughout the course, we will address many of the current methodological and ethical quandaries of the discipline during our engagement with contemporary ethnographic work. Students will learn qualitative methods, including participant observation, interviewing, and ethnography. We will practice these skills by developing research questions, designing viable studies, and conducting original research. We will focus these practical applications to develop the students’ ability to productively and ethically record, analyze, and represent anthropological findings in writing. Students will mobilize these skills, and utilize qualitative research software, in the completion of a semester-long ethnographic project. Prerequisite: Anthropology 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 395 - Globalization

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction from an anthropological perspective to recent theories and debates about the nature of “globalization.” What is “globalization?” Why has this term become so prevalent in social theory and popular discourse in the past 20 years? What competing worldviews and political economic visions does it encompass? Beginning with influential debates outside of anthropology, we move quickly to consider the criticisms and alternatives offered by anthropologists and their interlocutors, especially since the late 1980s. Drawing on the recent spate of theoretical literature, ethnographies, and award-winning films on globalization and capitalism at a variety of scales, discussions and written assignments will address some of the most pressing and conflictual issues facing humankind today. How new are the translocal processes now labeled “globalization?” What is the nature of capitalism in a so-called “postcolonial” or “neoliberal” age? How are new forms of infrastructure, networks, economic development, and exploitation connecting different regions of the world? What forms of social and spatial mobility are emerging? What are the roles of both national states and transnational organizations and associations in these changes? How are forms of racial, ethnic, and gender difference constructed through these processes? What alternatives and resistances have been constructed? While course readings will touch on perspectives from a variety of disciplines, the course is designed to provide a specifically anthropological lens on these issues. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 397 - Media Persons Publics

One-unit semester course. The meteoric rise of new forms of digital data and social media in the past 20 years has generated, on the one hand, fantasies of utopic intimacy (the immediacy promised in a new “global village”), and on the other, moral panics about unprecedented estrangement (the hypermediation of virtual worlds and corporate or government “big data”). In this course, we challenge this dichotomy of intimacy/immediacy versus estrangement/mediation by taking an anthropological approach to the question of human communication. Drawing on interdisciplinary debates in philosophy, linguistic anthropology, and media studies, we develop tools for understanding all communication as both mediated and material, grounded in embodied practices and technological infrastructures and situated in historical events. This in turn will allow us to grasp how circulations of media forms and commodities participate in the creation of types of persons and publics across multiple scales of time and space. Bringing those theoretical and methodological debates into dialogue with ethnographic studies and other forms of media, we ask: How do people sense and interpret themselves, others, and their worlds? What is the boundary between the human and nonhuman in a digital age? What roles do states or transregional capitalisms play in the mediation of valued and devalued persons and publics? What are the possibilities for communication amidst great gaps in access to valued forms of media? This course applies to the department’s SETS and linguistic anthropology concentrations. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211. Conference.

Anthropology 405 - Semiotic Anthropology

One-unit semester course. This course engages students with central concepts and approaches of semiotic anthropology. In our efforts to apprehend the cultural meaningfulness of language as a form of social action, we will consider the impact that theories of the sign have had on social and cultural theory. The goal is for students to gain a theoretical and methodological toolkit for understanding the fundamental role of semiotic processes in sociocultural life. In examining language as denotational code and a system of signs, we will explore linguistic ideology, agency, pragmatics and metapragmatics, and dynamics of language change (synchrony and diachrony). The readings include the classic texts of Peirce, Saussure, Boas, Sapir, Bakhtin, Voloshinov, Jakobson, Austin, Searle, Bourdieu, Labov, and M. Silverstein, among others. This course applies to the department’s linguistic anthropology concentration. Prerequisite: Anthropology 211. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 413 - Protean Sovereignties

One-unit semester course. The course examines “sovereignties,” paying particular attention to the shifting conceptions attached to the term from early modernity to contemporary times. Drawing upon a wide range of literature on the topic, we will situate the discussion within anthropology as deeply intersubjective juridical, political, and social phenomena. A critical discussion of “sovereignties” will help us better understand related sociocultural phenomena such as nationhood and nationalisms, bureaucratization, power, and hegemony. We will begin with early authors and follow a historical trajectory, which we will use to critically examine moments of sovereign enactment occurring throughout recent history. Prerequisite: Anthropology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 425 - Marx from the South

One-unit semester course. This course engages with a long history of Marx and political economic thought in relation to the global South. The course is organized around key concepts, such as labor, value, capital, property, and class. We examine these concepts through readings of foundational texts in political economy including Marx, Locke, and Smith and the historical context of empire in which these texts were written. Alongside this historical context, we examine these concepts as they have been drawn upon analytically by anthropologists working on and politically by social movements working in the global South. Prerequisite: Anthropology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 432 - Archaeological Method and Theory

One-unit semester course. This course is a survey of the aims, methodology, theory, and practice of archaeology with a focus on the key questions of contemporary archaeological research. We will begin the semester by considering the broad goals of the discipline and review the diverse kinds of data that can help address questions about the past. We will then turn towards reviewing various archaeological approaches that investigate those data, focusing on methods for 1) understanding the sediment and stratigraphy of sites, 2) the materials and artifacts found therein, and 3) the contextualization of those remains within the broader landscape. In addressing these various methods, we will explore how theoretical approaches influence the kinds of questions that are asked in archaeology and the kinds of interpretations that are made. By doing so, we will emphasize throughout the semester the interdisciplinary nature of archaeology and the broad kinds of issues and topics to which it can be applied. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 211. Lecture-conference.

Anthropology 442 - Ontological Politics

One-unit semester course. This course offers a critical examination of anthropology’s recent “ontological turn,” notable for the influence of such scholars as Philippe Descola and Eduardo Viveiros de Castro. Challenging universalist assumptions that posit an inert and inanimate world of objects as a backdrop to human action, the study of the cultural and historical specificity of ontologies presents alternative views about the nature of what exists. Observing the things that populate, and the processes that make, the lived and known experience of anthropology’s ethnographic subjects draws attention to contrasting knowledge regimes. Consideration of alternate ontologies allows Euro-modernity’s “others” articulation of their own bases of knowledge, logics of practice, and courses of action. However, how anthropologists approach such considerations entails its own sets of political terms and stakes in knowledge production. This seminar examines anthropological debates about how to analyze and address the political tensions that arise in settings where nonmodern beings and forces are recognized and addressed by “other” political actors. This course applies to the department’s SETS concentration. Prerequisite: Anthropology 211 or 201 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Anthropology 461 - Theories of Practice

One-unit semester course. Social theorists have long struggled with delineating the precise relationship between social structure and human agency in the explanation of extant cultural forms and their transformations over time. This course explores one set of proposed solutions generally classified under the rubric of “practice theory.” Building from the social philosophies of Elias, Bourdieu, Giddens, and de Certeau, the course examines how practice theory has informed anthropological inquiry and constituted a response to seemingly determinist theories of human behavior associated with structuralism and structural functionalism. Contemporary anthropological work by Marshall Sahlins, Sherry Ortner, and the Comaroffs, among others, will be read in light of earlier disciplinary engagement with the structure-agency question, including by Manchester School ethnographers. Prerequisite: Anthropology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 465 - Suffering, Narrative, and Subjectivity

One-unit semester course. “The subject living in pain, in poverty, or under conditions of violence or oppression,” Joel Robbins contended a decade ago, “now very often stands at the center of anthropological work.” This course examines the emergence of what Robbins calls “the suffering slot,” that is, the displacement of difference in late twentieth-century and early twenty-first-century anthropology as the discipline’s organizing principle, and a reorientation toward universal human vulnerability. Our concern is with how this turn has shaped both the substantive and ethical contours of anthropological investigation and ethnographic writing: What can, and ought, anthropologists know and say about the world and those who inhabit it? What can, and ought to, be the relationship between anthropologists and their objects of study? We will give particular attention to philosophical arguments that emphasize the ineffability of suffering—that is, the ways that suffering defies narrative—and the implications of these arguments for theories of subjectivity. Of particular interest is how these ideas have shaped the generic conventions that have emerged in anthropological studies of suffering, and how these conventions in turn reflect a particular moment in anthropology’s self-understanding as a discipline. This course applies to the department’s SETS and linguistic anthropology concentrations. Prerequisite: Anthropology 211. Conference.

Anthropology 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Anthropology 481 - Independent Reading

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Open only to upper-class students with special permission.

Art 170 - Introductory Drawing

One-unit semester course. An introduction to studio art through the processes, concepts and subjects of drawing. Work in the first half of the semester involves the apprehension of landscape spaces and natural forms through contour, shape, gesture, and chiaroscuro, leading to the study of the human form and self-representation. The second half of the semester focuses on spatial representation (isometric projection and Western perspective, and chiaroscuro) in still life and architectural spaces. The final project is a series of eight drawings exploring a particular interior or exterior space each student has chosen. Throughout the semester there are also nontraditional assignments that involve working from memory, working from nonvisual sensory experiences, abstraction, and collaboration. Art 170, 173, and 175 are alternative prerequisites for Art 271 (Painting I) and Art 272 (Painting II). Enrollment limited to 18. Studio.

Art 171 - The Figure

One-unit semester course. Making an image of the human body is one of the most basic artistic acts. It involves sympathy with another body, self-identification and empirical observation. As practiced by Western artists it serves as both the basic roots of drawing and the height of artistic facility. In this class we explore all dimensions of the studio practice of rendering the figure. The course begins with observational drawing moves through figure sculpture and finally ends with portraiture. We will create a rigorous studio practice centered on the act of drawing. Readings, homework assignments, and discussions will unpack traditions based in gender and race. Through field trips to galleries and museums we will look at the uses of the figure in art history and contemporary art. The bulk of the studio work will be done in class. An average of one to three hours outside of class per week is expected. Aside from the work of observing and sussing out the details of the figure, classes will include discussions of assigned readings. Enrollment limited to 18. Studio.

Art 173 - Intaglio Printmaking

One-unit semester course. An introduction to studio art through the processes, concepts, and subjects of printmaking. Intaglio printmaking includes drypoint, linear etching, aquatint, soft ground, sugar lift, and multiple tone and color processes. In the first half of the semester these techniques will be introduced and applied to thematic projects involving natural and manmade forms, landscape and architectural spaces, self-representation, relationships of images and text, etc. Two large projects will occupy the second half of the semester: a class-sized edition of a print on an agreed-upon theme, and a final project, a large, complex image or a sequence of images, involving several processes. Additional sketchbook work will study the styles and compositions of master and contemporary printmakers. The class will also study prints in the Reed College collection, the Portland Art Museum, and local galleries. This course is offered in alternate years with Art 175. Art 173, 175, and 170 are alternative prerequisites for Art 271 (Painting I) and Art 272 (Painting II). Enrollment limited to 18. Studio.

Art 174 - New Media/Old Media

One-unit semester course. The course will examine and experiment with various forms of old and analog media combined with new and speculative twenty-first-century media technology to see if they can be productively rethought and integrated into contemporary art practices. Our goal is to defamiliarize photography and new/digital media by finding alternative uses, or by revisiting a time when they have not separated themselves into distinct and different discourses looking at historical devices, methods, and tools that shared common aspirations and limitations. Technical, aesthetic, and conceptual possibilities are explored through studio workshops, projects, readings, slide presentations, lab work, and critiques. This course will be taught simultaneously with Art 374 New Media/Old Media. It will share the same readings/conferences as Art 374 with different sets of assignments and experiments. Enrollment limited to 8. Studio.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 175 - Relief Printmaking

One-unit semester course. An introduction to studio art through the processes, concepts, and subjects of printmaking. Relief printmaking includes woodcut, linocut, stencil, nonrectangular-shaped and puzzle-piece blocks, reduction block printing, and multiple-block/multiple-color printing. We will use both hand and press printing in the making of our work. Three main projects focus on the print in different environments: the print on the wall, the print in the book, and the print in the “expanded field.” Some bookbinding will also be taught. We look at a wide variety of both contemporary and historic print; host visiting artists or visit their studios; study prints in the Reed College collection, the Portland Art Museum, and local galleries. Students are required to spend 4–6 additional hours per week in the studio to complete assigned work. The course is offered in alternate years with Art 173. Art 175, 173, and 170 are alternative prerequisites for Art 271 (Painting I) and Art 272 (Painting II). Enrollment limited to 15. Studio.

Art 176 - Beginning Bookbinding

One-unit semester course. This hands-on course offers an introduction to the techniques, tools, materials, and processes used in bookbinding. We begin with basic box construction in order to build eye/hand skills, then follow with a variety of sewn book structures that have evolved in different cultures around the world. We end with a multi-section hardcover binding. Along the way are field trips, artist lectures, and two self-directed assignments that allow students to express their own ideas within the realm of book and box structure. Four hours of additional studio time is required to complete each week’s binding. No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15. Studio.

Art 180 - Art and Language

One-unit semester course. This course will explore text as the crucial element that links a number of avant-garde movements of the twentieth century when artists take cues from literary works. Technically, the course will cover page design, typography, letterpress, and block printing. Students will complete projects that explore the classical use of the page and roman lettering, the potential of the printed word to convey meaning through graphic and pictorial poetry, and creating a sculptural piece of concrete poetry. Readings will focus on the social and political significance text-based works have in society. They will include Essays on Art and Language by Charles Harrison; The Futurist Moment by Marjorie Perloff; interviews with Glenn Ligon and Lorna Simpson; and essays on Ian Hamilton Finlay, Ed Ruscha, Xu Bing, Alison Knowles, and Jenny Holzer. Students are required to attend workshops and do studio work outside of class times. Enrollment limited to 15. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 181 - Architectonic Structures

One-unit semester course. This course introduces students to the structural principles and communicative possibilities of sculpture and architecture. Each project addresses one of the three scales: the architectural, into which the body fits; the human, to which the body relates or which the body physically inhabits; and the intimate, which relates to the hand or head. We will study the fundamentals of wood and aluminum fabrication, including handcrafted joinery, lamination, steam bending, wall construction laser cutting, and 3D printing. Readings will focus on the application of craft-based architectural construction and the direct impact this has on society through communal projects, new types of housing, and personal agency. Students will be exposed to diverse, international contemporary artists and architects. Students are required to attend workshops and do studio work outside of class times. Enrollment limited to 15. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 182 - Material Objects

One-unit semester course. A crafts-based course that focuses on the form, function, and concept of handmade objects in our society. The class will learn skills in hand-built and thrown clay forms, casting and fabricating with ceramics, wax, paper, cloth and glass. The assignments will explore the poetic language of each material, fusing the analog and the digital, and will focus on cooperative and community-based works that can emerge from these mediums. Readings will focus on social practices and culturally significant, politically motivated works made for and with communities. Students will have technical workshops with studio assistant in glass and ceramics weekly. Students are required to attend workshops and do studio work outside of class times. Enrollment limited to 15. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Art 183 - Art and the Printed Word

One-unit semester course. This course explores text and its relationship to image as the focus of a fine art practice. Technically, the course covers page design, typography, letterpress printing, simple bookbinding, and some low-tech image-making processes. Projects explore the space of the calling card, the poster, and the book through three main assignments. We will read Robert Macfarlane’s Landmarks to connect language to the natural world, and other texts that explore the social and political significance that text-based works have in society. Requirements beyond assigned studio projects include written responses to writings and videos, one research presentation, and attendance at organized field trips. Students need 4–6 additional hours per week in the studio to complete assigned work. Enrollment limited to 15. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 188 - Object and Social Context

One-unit semester course. Objectness is the nature of a tangible material or thing. Every object has a number of social contexts surrounding it. It is important to consider the social relationships within the materials we use for artworks to truly express the intention of the maker. In this class we will explore the meanings behind the materials we work with in our practices, and how teasing out and understanding the underlying contexts within those media can be used to make more visually striking and conceptually compelling artwork. To do this we will take mini–field trips around campus to harvest objects, perform white elephant gift exchanges with material, and play with different sculptural techniques with an emphasis on conceptual underpinnings in the work. Technically we will cover the fundamentals of wood and aluminum fabrication, wall construction and laser cutting. Students are required to attend workshops and do studio work outside of class times. Enrollment limited to 15. Studio. May be repeated for credit. 

Art 190 - Art and Photography I

One-unit semester course. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of photography through both analog and digital photographic processes and investigates the use of photography in the context of contemporary art. The class will cover camera operation, principles of exposure, basic understanding of light, film development, and darkroom/digital manipulation of photographic images. Technical, aesthetic, and conceptual possibilities of photography are explored through assignments, readings, slide presentations and critiques. Enrollment limited to 16. Studio.

Art 195 - Digital Imaging and Coding with Processing

One-unit semester course. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of digital imaging. Technical and conceptual units will be presented in a historical context and that of contemporary art practice. The class will cover digital camera operation, as well as the use of scanners, phones, tablets, and other digital tools and techniques to produce work. We will explore the link between art, technology, and the computer through readings, slide presentations, and class discussions. Students will learn to acquire, manipulate, and print digital images using Photoshop and Illustrator. Students are meant to develop a solid understanding of these digital imaging practices as well as an adaptable approach to emerging technologies. Students will be expected to respond to assignments with technical competence and critical clarity. No prerequisite. Enrollment limited to 12. Studio.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 196 - Digital Video and Coding Interactivity

One-unit semester course. We will explore the use of the moving image, digital video, and interactivity as related to art. Students will be exposed to the concepts and visual strategies surrounding digital media, and techniques of nonlinear, nondestructive video editing and interactivity. We will look at the various ways in which artists employ these technologies and tools in their works through readings, class discussions, and slide presentations. First, students will deal with moving image as a medium as practiced in art and will be exposed to media software such as Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects. Then, we will take apart and reexamine the moving image and the tools artist use to edit the moving image in an attempt to expand our understanding of the medium through a graphical programming environment for video, music, and data called Max/MSP/Jitter. Students will be expected to respond to assignments with technical competence and critical clarity. Enrollment limited to 12. Studio.

Art 201 - Introduction to the History of Art

One-unit semester course. Basic art-historical methods and examples of recent scholarship are examined in relationship to a chronologically, geographically, or thematically defined body of art. Lecture-conference.

Art 251 - Making Graphic Novels

One-unit semester course. This course will examine the history of comics as well as contemporary trends. Students will study the mechanics and structure of the medium. We will also refer to other forms of visual storytelling, such as serial television, film, and art-historical references. Students will apply these directly to their own work. Each student will create a self-published comic. Discussions and lectures will cover topics such as character studies, format, size, material choice, etc. Occasional field trips to printers, comic shops, and comic companies will give students a sense of professional resources. The class will produce an anthology based on a selection of work produced in class. Prerequisite: one 100-level studio art course, consent of the instructor based on senior standing, or consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16. Studio.

Art 271 - Painting I

One-unit semester course. The class explores color structure, interaction, and illusions (transparency, luminosity, atmosphere), through abstraction and various compositional strategies. Major projects involve creating a “shape alphabet” and a series of variations on it; paintings in which there is a close correspondence, or a tension, between image and support; paintings that focus on process and nontraditional techniques; and an independent final project that builds upon previous work in the class. Weekly slide lectures focus on color and composition in representational and abstract painting. Prerequisite: Art 170, 173, or 175, or consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 18. Studio.

Art 272 - Painting II

One-unit semester course. The class extends many of the color relationships and compositional models from Art 271 to an exploration of different styles of representation and genres, including still life, interior and landscape spaces, portraiture and self-portraiture, and narrative painting. Weekly slide lectures focus on how different artists have explored these genres over their careers. A sketchbook of compositional and color studies of historical and modern paintings is also required. Prerequisite: Art 170, 173, or 175, or consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 18. Studio.

Art 275 - Bookbinding: History and Practice

One-unit semester course. The book has evolved for 2,000 years as an extension of the human mind and body. Its various forms express unique understandings of materials, technologies, tools, and usage. Students in this course will create 4–6 book models, ranging from simple pamphlet and accordion structures to a case binding and a Coptic binding with wooden board covers. In order to develop clean and precise hand skills, we begin with a four-walled box and a clamshell box before turning to the sewing of book structures. Visits to Reed’s Special Collections offer us the opportunity to view and handle many historic and contemporary examples, including the William Morris masterpiece known as The Kelmscott Chaucer. Readings cover both bookbinding history and current directions in the field of artists’ books. Together with successful completion of the taught structures, there are two main assignments: a historically based structure based on independent research, and a final project responding to an excerpt from Italo Calvino’s book Invisible Cities. Class time will be spent introducing, demonstrating, and beginning work on each book structure. 4–6 hours of additional studio time is required to complete each week’s binding. Prerequisites: Art 170, 171, 173, 175, or 180; consent of the instructor based on senior standing; or consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Studio.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 276 - The Artist Book

One-unit semester course. This studio course focuses on the book as a vehicle for artistic voice. We will explore the intrinsic nature of books: that they are physical objects operating in one moment as sculpture, in the next moment as a piece of interactive time art; that they are understood in the hands of a reader who performs the book’s content; and that they speak to us not only through words and images but through the weight, texture and body language of the object itself. Students will learn techniques of ideation, model making, material manipulation, print/binding processes and more as they create two artist book projects. The course will also delve into the history of artist books in their many iterations, from unique objects to hand-printed editions to zines and other forms of artist publications. Visits to Reed’s artist book collection as well as other field trips and artist talks supplement this course. Four-to-six hours of outside studio time is required for this course. Prerequisite: two semesters of studio art. Enrollment limited to 15. Studio.

Art 282 - Sculpture in the Expanded Field

One-unit semester course. A studio sculpture course exploring the human body as a site for transformation through clothing, performance, and architectural construction. We will explore wearable works as well as spatially dynamic and temporal art form, directly related to the human form and phenomenological experience. Readings and discussions will focus on feminist theory, queer theory, and critical race theory, and the representation of the body throughout art history, fashion, and performance art. Technically, we will focus on metal fabrication, welding, and sewing. Prerequisite: Art 181, Art 182, or any 100-level studio course or consent of the instructor. Students are required to attend workshops and do studio work outside of class times. Enrollment limited to 15. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 284 - Craft and Culture

One-unit semester course. This is a studio art course covering the craft of ceramics and glass, their historical and cultural context, and contemporary culture’s engagement with these craft forms. The course will focus on how and why artists have explored materials, methods, and strategies of craft over the last seven decades. Many have chosen to expand on their own cultural histories of craft while others have been experimental. In all studio work, the labor and process will be focused on with an eye to training and practice as the core of the craft. Projects will be both utilitarian and conceptually based. Students will advance their skills in hand building, throwing, glazing, glass casting, and 3D ceramic printing. Discussion will cover crafts subversion of the so-called “fine art” and the political stance that the works take. New perspectives on subjects that have been central to artists, including popular culture, feminist and queer aesthetics, and recent explorations of identity and relationships to place will be explored. All students will keep a research notebook/sketchbook in which they will respond to all readings, research artists, and design projects. Prerequisite: Art 181 or 182. Students are required to attend workshops and do studio work outside of class times. Enrollment limited to 15. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Art 288 - Engaged Objects

One-unit semester course. Much of the material culture in the arts is poised towards the creation and sale of objects. While this practice is valuable in and of itself, there are other ways to apply skilled craftwork. What if the objects one made were designed for application and use? Beyond a cup or a plate, artists have the ability to design unique creations that serve uncharted ends. In this course we will imagine new potentials for the work we make, merging studio practice with interactivity as an additional medium for consideration. We will consider particular audiences and design artistic objects for integration into their lives. To do this we will think about site, participant engagement, and material design solutions that tie these ideas together Technically, we will focus on metal fabrication, welding, and sewing. Students are required to attend workshops and do studio work outside of class times. Prerequisite: Art 181, Art 182, or any 100-level studio course or consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Art 291 - Art and Photography II

One-unit semester course. The course will introduce advanced topics such as color, large-format, and medium-format photography. Technical, aesthetic, and conceptual possibilities of photography are explored through projects, readings, slide presentations, lab work, and critiques. Class time will be spent in lecture, slide presentations, lab work, critique, and occasional field trips. Students will be expected to respond to assignments with technical competence and critical clarity. Prerequisite: Art 190 or consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16. Studio.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 293 - Internet Literacy, Culture, and Practice

One-unit semester course. Students will develop an understanding of the technology and the issues surrounding the internet and the web through studio activities, readings, and online and/or physical fieldwork. Students will gain literacy in web development languages (HTML, CSS, and JavaScript). We will cover the history of the use of computers and networks as a tool for empowerment and for creating art. We will explore topics such as hypertextuality, nonlinearity, interactivity, authorship, web as archive, net neutrality, and the open-source movement. With the newly acquired literacy in hand we will investigate how the convergence of the web/social media with social practice/activism reconfigures the ways in which artists and citizens view, participate in, understand, and narrate real-world issues. Prerequisite: Art 190, 195, or 196, or one 200-level studio course, or consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. Studio.

Art 301 - Recent Writing About Art

One-half-unit semester course. This team-taught course will introduce students to innovative examples of recent art-historical scholarship, spanning a broad geographical and chronological range of topics. Texts will be read with an eye to understanding the methods currently engaged within the discipline of art history and its allied fields to interpret visual and material artifacts. While open to all students with the prerequisites, it is also a required course for all declared art history majors in their junior year. Juniors will have additional assignments that will serve as the junior qualifying exam in art history. Prerequisites: Art 201 and one 300-level course in art history or studio art. May be repeated for credit. Conference.

Art 305 - The Camera in South Asia

One-unit semester course. The paradox of photography is such that photographs reveal and conceal, obscure and illuminate, mutate and remain static. How do we read a photograph? What does it transmit? This course will investigate the development and reception of photography in South Asia, from the introduction of the camera in the mid-nineteenth century to the present. We will explore photography’s diverse iterations, including its role as an apparatus of colonial surveillance, a transcript of historical knowledge, a material technology, and a performative practice, to investigate how photographic practices evolved in response to shifting social, political, and aesthetic concerns. We will examine a wide range of case studies, including the works of nineteenth-century British and Indian photographers; vernacular uses of photography in local studios; the translation of the aesthetics of photography into painting (and vice-versa), panoramas, stereographic views, early seminal films such as Raja Harishchandra (1913), and the works of contemporary photographers such as Dayanita Singh, Raghubir Singh and Pushpamala N. We will also delve into photographic theory by reading Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, and Christopher Pinney’s writings. The aim of the course would be to develop the analytical tools for the evaluation of photography that take seriously the protean nature of photographic technology. Prerequisite: Art 201. Conference.

Art 308 - Gothic Architecture and Art

One-unit semester course. This class will examine Gothic art and especially architecture in western and central Europe from the twelfth to the fifteenth century. The focus will be on Gothic buildings and their related artistic decoration (sculpture, stained glass), but we will also consider other media (manuscript illumination, metalwork, ivory carving). The study of Gothic architecture has been one of the most historiographically rich in the Western tradition of writing about the visual, so there will be special emphasis on art- and architectural-historical methods. Prerequisite: Art 201 or a course in some aspect of medieval culture, or permission of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 313 - Art and Life in Renaissance Florence

One-unit semester course. In Lives of the Artists Giorgio Vasari describes how “the arts were born anew” in Renaissance Florence. The city’s streets and piazzas, palaces and churches, paintings and sculptures all give visual form to the cultural and social changes that affected Florentine life. In its study of artists such as Brunelleschi, Botticelli, Leonardo, and Michelangelo, this course concentrates on the 15th and 16th centuries as a period of innovation, in terms of both artistic theory and practice. Through an examination of Florence’s public, ecclesiastical, and domestic spaces, we will consider how visual and material culture served as markers of civic identity and social distinction. Prerequisite: Art 201 or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 320 - Iconoclasm

One-unit semester course. Iconoclasm, the purposeful destruction of images, and aniconism—the refusal to produce images—have been recurring phenomena throughout the history of Western art. Whether iconoclasm is an exclusively Western practice will be one of the subjects considered in this course. Prominent examples of iconoclasm and aniconism across time include the ancient practice of destroying the monuments of previous rulers; the prohibition on images in the Hebrew Bible; Christian iconoclasm in medieval Byzantium and in the wake of the Protestant Reformation; state-sponsored destruction of images during the French, Russian, and Nazi revolutions; vandalism; and contemporary attempts to censor the visual arts. Long neglected by art historians, the study of iconoclasm is now considered central to understanding the historical function of images. By examining theories of iconoclasm and selected case studies, this course will attempt to understand the phenomenon and its importance for the study of past art; over the course of the semester each student will conduct a detailed examination of an iconoclastic incident of their choice. Prerequisite: Art 201 or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 321 - Moving Pictures: The Migration and Manipulation of Images in the Early Modern Period

One-unit semester course. Images in the early modern period moved further and more regularly than at any other time in history up until that point. While scholars have increasingly taken an interest in the movement of early modern images in recent years, we still lack a study that takes into account the many different ways in which images were understood to move. This class is an attempt to understand and synthesize the early modern concept of movement in its many forms, and by extension the role and status of images. We will explore movement from the micro to the macro, and both literal and figurative. Topics will include the transportation of images between Europe and the rest of the world, representations of travel and movement, translation and mistranslation, prints that were meant to be altered and interacted with, automata, affective and miraculous images, and works of art that were meant to make viewers move in particular ways. Prerequisite: Art 201, or permission of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 322 - Early Modern Things

One-unit semester course. Things expose relations in and between societies that inform the past. As Arjun Appadurai argues, “Even though from a theoretical point of view human actors encode things with significance, from a methodological point of view it is the things-in-motion that illuminate their human and social context.” In this course, we will mobilize early modern things to explore what inanimate objects reveal about the animate world. We will study the social significance and cultural value of such things to look at and beyond their materiality. In particular, we will examine objects such as clothing from England, earthenware from Italy, featherwork from the New World, and carpets from the Ottoman Empire to rethink how such things construct biography, impact memory, produce ambiguity, and dictate taste. Prerequisite: Art 201 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 323 - Global Early Modern Visual Culture

One-unit semester course. This course explores art produced around the world during the sixteenth through the mid-eighteenth centuries, a period of intense contact between cultures with widely varying ideas about what constitutes art. Out of this contact came a myriad of strange works of art that speak to the pressures of often violent colonial and economic encounters. We will look at the impact on European art of contact with Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and the Americas, as well as the ways in which European art and culture changed the local traditions of art making in the rest of the world. We will consider what happens to culturally specific forms and styles when they cross cultural, geographical, ideological, political, and theological boundaries. Among the topics we will discuss are the Italian Renaissance nude, miraculous images in New Spain and Peru, Mughal miniatures, African ivory carvings, one-point perspective, Protestant European printed representations of Native Americans, Japanese iconoclasm, and chinoiserie. Prerequisite: Art 201 or permission of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 325 - Appropriation and Transformation in Early Modern Art

One-unit semester course. This course will explore the myriad ways in which early modern European artists took forms, media, materials, and subjects from other cultures and transformed them into something different. These acts of transformations could be violent, ignorant, admiring, relatively benign, or even unintentional. We will consider what was at stake in these transformations, what was changed, how and why they happened, and what role they played in the broader context of cultural contact in the early modern period. We will analyze the terminology of these “transformations,” and focus in particular on the term “appropriation” and its relationship to power. The latter part of the semester will be devoted to looking at how early modern European art has been commented upon, transformed, remade, and translated by curators and contemporary artists. Prerequisite: Art 201. Conference.

Art 327 - Colonial Pasts, Decolonial Futures: Museums and the Global South

One-unit semester course. This course will trace the histories of displaying and interpreting the art of South Asia from the nineteenth century to the present and explore new possibilities for curating South Asian art in the future. While focusing on shifts in the display of South Asian art, we will also interrogate the political and theoretical stakes of curating non-Western art more broadly. A study of the history of the museum from its colonial inception to its postcolonial iterations will foreground the ways in which museums were mobilized for imperial and nationalist aspirations in and beyond South Asia. We will examine key exhibitions including the 1984–85 “Primitivism” in 20th Century Art show at the MOMA, the 1985–86 Festival of India, and the 2014 Yoga exhibition at the Freer Sackler Museum. A speaking Shiva sculpture will open for us the arguments for and against the repatriation of stolen antiquities. We will conclude with a reflection on museums’ varying roles in the present and an invitation to imagine new ways to transform museums into spaces of diversity, inclusion, social justice, and anti-racism. Prerequisite: Art 201. Conference.

Art 328 - Nonextant Art and the Early Modern World

One-unit semester course. What do we learn from objects, images, texts, and performances that no longer exist? How do we write histories of things that have been violently destroyed, involuntarily lost, or deliberately left to decay over time? What is the role of the conservator in recreating lost works of art? What do nonextant things tell us about trauma and collective memory? In this course, we study works that can no longer be experienced firsthand to explore how nonextant art informs our understanding of the past. This course is a team-taught collaboration between the art departments at Reed College and Lewis & Clark College. Prerequisite: Art 201 or consent of the instructors. Conference.

Art 332 - Art and Archaeology in Early China

One-unit semester course. This course will explore artifacts excavated in China from the height of the Neolithic period (c. 4000–2000 BCE) to the end of the eastern Han dynasty (25–220 CE). Excavated objects from these periods rarely have accompanying textual explanations. Instead, we rely primarily on archaeology, which provides the raw material for understanding the distant past and constructs temporal narratives that account for the categorical differences between artifacts. With the rise of material culture studies in the field of art history, enigmatic objects that fell within the domain of archaeology may now have art-historical explanations. The course is organized chronologically by archaeological site. Secondary textual sources and comparative studies with other sites will be used to refine our understanding of artisans and their craft and the social and cultural functions of objects. What types of training did artisans undergo? What sources (manuals, tacit knowledge, guild practices, etc.) provided the necessary skills for artisans to work? How was labor divided and what were the social structures in place that dictated artisans’ modes of production? How were these objects used and circulated by the living and the dead? Prerequisite: Art 201, or Humanities 231 and 232 (previously numbered Humanities 230), or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 346 - Introduction to Media Studies

See German 346 for description. 

German 346 Description

Art 351 - Making Space

One-unit semester course. Space isn’t an empty, neutral vehicle in which artworks simply appear for public consumption. While an artwork makes the space for its own display, spaces do their own work to determine the range, impact, and execution of an artwork within them. But when all space is necessarily coded as real estate, all but the most famous and privileged artists will struggle to make space not just for their own work, but to support other artists and build various forms of community. In this, present-day Portland is both an exemplary and a distinctive case. This art history class will visit a number of art spaces that are commonly understood as small, alternative, or experimental, although this in no way predefines their relationship to institutionality. Each week we will spend time with and, most weeks, in a different space around Portland, talking to the people who established and run those spaces. In these conversations, we will ask about their engagement with their communities, why and how they established their space, the uses and valences of institutionality, and the relationship between art’s attempts to make space and the ongoing processes of gentrification in and around Portland. Participating spaces/collectives include home school, Physical Education, Pochas Radicales, Portland Museum of Modern Art, Sunday Painters Group, The Residency in the Garden, and more. We will meet once per week, in the evening, for 3 hours in order to facilitate travel. Prerequisite: Art 201 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Art 353 - Making an Exhibition

One-unit semester course. This course will conceive, research, and execute an exhibition in Reed’s academic museum—the Cooley Art Gallery. The exhibition will be curated from nearly 100 works of art given to Reed over the last decade by the Peter Norton Family Foundation. The works are contemporary, with a special emphasis on artists of color and LGBTQ artists. Many of the works address the body, and explore race, gender, sexuality, and marginalization. Students and faculty will collaborate with the director of the Cooley Gallery to organize the exhibition and design its installation. Students will also research and write the materials accompanying the exhibition. The exhibition will open in the Cooley in the fall semester of 2022. To inform the exhibition, the course will also study the history and theory of museums, especially museum exhibitions related to the artworks donated by Norton. Prerequisites: Art 201. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 365 - Intersection: Architecture, Landscape Sculpture

One-unit semester course. This advanced studio sculpture course explores architectural and landscape-based works. Reading and research will focus on artists and architects from the 1970s to the present who use public process and sustainable materials to design and build innovative forms within urban spaces. The class will create a set of potential design solutions for a site in Portland. Studio training will include drafting, drawing, and planning strategies and building scale models in wood and metal. Knowledge of Google SketchUp and or Photoshop desired. Students are required to attend workshops and do studio work outside of class times. Prerequisite: one 100-level studio art course and Art 281 or 282 or consent of the instructor. Studio. 

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 368 - Image and Text: The Book as a Sculptural Object

One-unit semester course. This course explores the significant role artists’ books have played among the avant-garde of eastern and western Europe and the United States from the turn of the twentieth century to the present. The structural format book works take and their social and political functions will be viewed, discussed, and fabricated. The course will cover binding both codex and accordion books, reproducing images using palmer plates, and setting and printing type and images using a Reprex letterpress. Reed’s special collections will provide a spectrum of professional artists’ books, including magazine works, anthologies, diaries, manifestos, visual poetry, word works, documentation, albums, comic books, and mail art. We will read and discuss essays relating to each studio problem. Students are required to attend workshops and do studio work outside of class times. Prerequisites: one 100-level studio art course and one 200-level studio course or consent of the instructor. Studio-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 371 - Intermediate Painting, Drawing, and Printmaking I

One-unit semester course. The first part of the course will involve exploratory drawing toward a project to be proposed and executed over the rest of the semester. The project might involve continued work in drawing, painting, printmaking, collage, or two-dimensional mixed media. The course serves as a junior seminar with weekly discussions of critical essays and articles, and short papers. Past readings have focused on modernist art and theory from 1940 to 1970; postmodernism and critical issues in art since 1970; nineteenth- and twentieth-century aesthetics; notions of beauty in contemporary art; pictorial representations of irony; and artist self-representation and intentionality. Prerequisite: Art 271 or 272, or Art 173 or 175 with the permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 18. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Art 374 - New Media/Old Media—Experiments in Optical Media and Computation

One-unit semester course. The course will examine and experiment with various forms of old and analog media combined with new and speculative twenty-first-century media technology to see if they can be productively remade and integrated into contemporary art practices. Our goal is to defamiliarize photography and new/digital media by finding alternative uses, or by revisiting a time when they had not separated themselves into distinct and different discourses looking at historical devices, methods, and tools that shared common aspirations and limitations. Technical, aesthetic, and conceptual possibilities are explored through studio workshops, projects, readings, slide presentations, lab work, and critiques. Students must be highly self-motivated and will be expected to design independent projects. Prerequisite: two 200-level studio art courses; or two of Art 190, 195, or 196; or one of Art 291, 292, 293, or 294. Enrollment limited to 16. Studio.

Art 382 - Installation/Participation

One-unit semester course. An advanced sculpture/multimedia course investigating research-based and social art practices including the intersection of art, science, and society. Students may make work in any 2D, 3D, or time-based medium they are comfortable with, including performance and electronic media, to create installation-based works that inform and immerse the viewer. All sculpture construction shops and tools are available, including laser cutting, 3D printing, and casting. Weekly readings will include contemporary art theory, feminist theory, and critical race theory, and will center on artists working directly with social and political issues at the intersection of art, science, and society. Prerequisite: Art 181, Art 182, or any 100-level studio course, or consent of the instructor. Students are required to attend workshops and do studio work outside of class times. Enrollment limited to 15. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 388 - Social Practice as Exhibition

One-unit semester course. Social practice is a rapidly developing area of the contemporary art world. Much of this work is embedded within the contexts from which the works are derived—a distinctive component of how this work functions. An additional consideration for social practice is how it shows up in museums and exhibition spaces. In this course we will explore the potential for merging a studio practice with socially engaged projects, and how to design the two together from start to finish. To do this students will explore materials and projects that center specific people and communities. All sculpture construction shops and tools are available, including laser cutting, 3D printing, and casting. Students are required to attend workshops and do studio work outside of class times. Prerequisite: Art 181, Art 182, or any 100-level studio course, or consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Art 390 - Realism and Its Discontents in Contemporary Chinese Visual Media

One-unit semester course. With the opening up and economic reforms beginning in the late 1970s in China, a new aesthetic question confronted literature and the arts: what constitutes the real and what counts now as legitimate modes/means of its representation? While socialist realism was on the wane, realism continued to condition various forms of cultural production and took myriad guises—from an attempt at complete objectivity devoid of emotion to a complete dependence on subjectivity and affect for delivering a sense of the real; from drawing on the experiences of everyday life of individuals to the legendary feats of martial artists and utopian ideals of science fiction. This course grapples with these various interpretations of realism in modern and contemporary Chinese media, while reaching back in time to trace the precedents of these new forms that negotiate the blurry lines between truth and fiction, the objective and the subjective, the real and the fantastical. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Conference. Cross-listed as Chinese 390 and Literature 390.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 393 - Chinese Calligraphy

One-unit semester course. This course is a survey of the history and aesthetics of Chinese calligraphy from the late Eastern Han (25–220 CE) through the Song dynasty (960–1279). In addition to familiarizing students with the calligraphy of these periods, this course also seeks to bring into conversation early Chinese theories on writing and contemporary art, historical literature, and the relationship between words and images. Some questions that will guide the general theoretical arc of the course include 1) how the origins and development of the Chinese writing system inform its later incarnations a an inextricable part of literati art; 2) what it might mean to emphasize the look of writing more than its linguistic characteristics; and 3) how closely the notion of being able to know calligraphers through their calligraphy matches the actual practice of writing and self-cultivation during this period. Prerequisite: Art 201. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 408 - Renaissance Space

One-unit semester course. “Whoever holds the piazza is master of the city,” writes the Florentine chronicler Giovanni Cavalcanti. The master of the city was no neutered subject; Cavalcanti’s remarks demonstrate how urban geographies were in fact gendered in the early modern period. Whereas men occupied the piazza and its public architecture, women were ensconced within the folds of the private interior. This course will explore the representations of space in visual and textual culture to reveal how the spatial relations of the Renaissance city articulated the power and social controls delineating the contours of community. Included in our discussion will be the art of Botticelli and Titian; the architecture of prostitutes, patricians, and nuns; and contemporary treatises by Alberti. Prerequisites: two 300-level art history courses. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 412 - Art-Historical Interpretation

One-unit semester course. This course examines in detail some of the fundamental methods of art-historical interpretation and the strategies that have been developed to deal with them. Topics of special attention include the social history of art, phenomenology, gender and race studies, and the relationship between art history and art criticism. To assess these issues, the course will concentrate on recent scholarship on French painting of the second half of the 19th century, especially the art of Édouard Manet. This limitation allows us to take advantage of a diverse body of high-quality scholarship and to use the collections of the Portland Art Museum. Scholars who will be studied in depth include Carol Armstrong, T.J. Clark, Michael Fried, Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby, Linda Nochlin, and Griselda Pollock. Prerequisite: two 300-level art history courses. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 414 - Appropriation and Transformation in Early Modern Art

One-unit semester course. This course will explore the myriad ways in which early modern European artists took forms, media, materials, and subjects from other cultures and transformed them into something different. These acts of transformations could be violent, ignorant, admiring, relatively benign, or even unintentional. We will consider what was at stake in these transformations, what was changed, how and why they happened, and what role they played in the broader context of cultural contact in the early modern period. We will analyze the terminology of these “transformations,” and focus in particular on the term “appropriation” and its relationship to power. The latter part of the semester will be devoted to looking at how early modern European art has been commented upon, transformed, remade, and translated by curators and contemporary artists. Prerequisites: Art 201 and two 300-level art history courses. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 451 - Oceans, Rivers, Rains, Pools: Histories of Water

One-unit semester course. Why did artists from the regional courts of India paint poetic visions of rains, lakes, and rivers during periods of drought? How can the ocean serve as an archive, metaphor, and method for thinking about early modern and colonial material cultures, trade, and mobility? How do media images of environmental catastrophes like Hurricane Katrina make visible, and invisible, the ocular tactics of biopolitical racism? How do our current water crises demand a wholesale rethinking of how we write and think about art? This class will focus on water as a subject and a methodology for studying early modern, colonial, and contemporary visual cultures. We will study a range of case studies, including regional Indian paintings, early modern hydro-architecture in South Asia, material cultures shaped by the Manila galleon trade and Indian Ocean trade networks, media images of environmental catastrophes, recent museum exhibitions on climate change, and more. Our studies will be supplemented by writings in art history, environmental humanities, anthropology, and new materialism. We will also consider the emergence of an art historiography of water that has been shaped by the ecological turn in the humanities. Prerequisites: Art 201, and two 300-level art history courses. Conference.

Art 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Art 481 - Independent Projects or Independent Reading

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Independent courses are usually offered only to students already admitted to the division as art majors. Such courses cannot be used to satisfy the basic course requirements of the department. Prerequisite: approval of instructor and division.

Biology 101 - Topics in Biology I

One-unit semester course, taught by several staff members. The course furnishes an understanding of biological principles and the properties of life. Among topics considered are structure and function of plants and animals, relations of organisms to each other and to their environment, energy relations of organisms, integrative and coordinating mechanisms of organisms, cell biology principles, genetics, molecular biology, reproduction, development and growth, and the evidence for organic evolution. The laboratory deals with the descriptive and experimental aspects of the topics covered in the lectures. Biology 101 and 102 comprise a full year of introductory biology, and may be taken in either order. Lecture-laboratory.

Biology 102 - Topics in Biology II

One-unit semester course, taught by several staff members. The course furnishes an understanding of biological principles and the properties of life. Among topics considered are structure and function of plants and animals, relations of organisms to each other and to their environment, energy relations of organisms, integrative and coordinating mechanisms of organisms, cell biology principles, genetics, molecular biology, reproduction, development and growth, and the evidence for organic evolution. The laboratory deals with the descriptive and experimental aspects of the topics covered in the lectures. Biology 101 and 102 comprise a full year of introductory biology, and may be taken in either order. Lecture-laboratory.

Biology 131 - Introduction to Computational Biology

One-unit semester course. This course provides an integrated survey of fundamental questions in molecular biology and the computational tools that are used to solve them. Elements of molecular biology and computer programming are presented in parallel throughout the semester. Topics include molecular sequence analysis (identifying repeats, regulatory/binding motifs, and genetic variation) using pattern-matching operations on text strings. Assignments will include writing Python programs to analyze human DNA, RNA, and protein sequences. Prerequisite: Biology 101 or 102, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-laboratory.

Not offered 2022–23.

Biology 211 - Introduction to Scientific Literature and Discourse

One-half-unit semester course. In parallel with the biology department seminar series, this conference course explores current topics in biology through reading and discussion of primary literature. The course is designed to deepen understanding of the many forms of biological inquiry; students will learn to evaluate biology scholarship, pose questions, and participate in scientific discourse. Prerequisite: Biology 101 and 102 and sophomore standing, or consent of the instructor. Credit/no credit only. Conference.

Biology 251 - Plant Communities of the Pacific Northwest

One-half-unit semester course. An exploration of the principles underlying the distribution and abundance of plants in the Pacific Northwest. Topics include the structure and basic ecological features of communities, adaptation of organisms to their abiotic and biotic environments, symbiotic relationships, success, endemism, and biogeography. These concepts will be developed to address current environmental problems such as resource extraction, climate change, invasive species, pollution, and loss of biodiversity. The course will include field trips. Suitable for nonmajors. Prerequisite: Biology 101 and 102 or equivalent. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Biology 256 - Human Genetics

One-unit semester course. The nature and function of genes and genomes, using human case studies. Readings will include classic and modern examples from the primary literature to illustrate fundamental genetic approaches and concepts. How do genes influence human phenotypes, and how does the study of human phenotypes illuminate the working of genes? What are the applications of DNA variation, and the implications of a postgenomics world? Consent of the instructor is required for students who have completed related 300-level coursework. Prerequisite: Biology 101 or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Biology 273 - Evolution

One-unit semester course. This course will focus on the central, unifying tenet of biology—evolution. Despite its centrality, evolution is often misunderstood. Learning objectives 1) provide an accurate and integrative understanding of evolutionary biology, generally; 2) introduce patterns of micro- and macroevolution, as well as the use of phylogenetic analysis to understand relatedness; 3) connect biological phenomena (e.g., adaptation or horizontal transfer) to their evolutionary consequences; 4) review evolutionary theory and debate (e.g., selectionist vs. neutralist); 5) learn to read papers detailing experimental evolution and evaluate evidence for evolutionary change in populations; 6) explore human origins and evolution; 7) confront the problematic and racist roots of evolutionary biology as a field; 8) examine the current-day issues related to the acceptance of evolution in society; and 9) discuss the relevance of evolution in other contexts (e.g., the COVID-19 pandemic). Prerequisite: Biology 101 or 102, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Biology 301 - Ecology

One-unit semester course. This course examines fundamental concepts in ecology such as limits to distribution, behavioral ecology, population ecology, species interactions, community ecology, and ecosystem ecology, and will examine the relevance of such topics for addressing contemporary applied issues of global change, human health, and sustainability. Central objectives of this course are to 1) evaluate the evidence that supports major theories in ecology and 2) actively participate in the process by which theories are tested, falsified, and refined. Weekly laboratories will help facilitate the latter objective. Lectures and laboratories will emphasize how ecologists gain inference from experiments, observations, and ecological models. Prerequisite: Biology 101 and 102, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-laboratory.

Biology 303 - Leaves to Landscapes

One-unit semester course. This is a field experience–based course that examines the underlying structure, function, diversity, and ecology of Pacific Northwest (PNW) Forests. The heart of this course is the weekly and extended (weekend) natural history field trips that allow for exploration of our amazing native forests and the identification of all the major tree species in the PNW. These trips provide an outdoor classroom for us to discuss topics such as plant water and carbon relations, plant life history and resource use, resilience of trees and forests to disturbance, and plant responses to global change. In addition, we will explore how our forests operate as complex socio-ecological systems through direct interaction with the natural resource managers, conservationists, and decision makers who steward these lands. In the latter part of the semester, an independent course project will be undertaken that focuses on (1) building skills for testing hypotheses about the patterns and processes of trees and forests and (2) employing a translational-science approach that connects decision-makers to the scientific process. It is important to note that this is a FIELD-BASED COURSE. As often as possible, class will occur outdoors. As such, the course requires the willingness to spend considerable time in challenging and unpredictable field conditions. Prerequisite: Biology 101 and 102. Lecture-laboratory.

Biology 308 - Restoration Ecology

One-unit semester course. This is a project-based field course that examines the biological concepts that drive our efforts to restore natural ecosystems. Successful restoration projects require a multiscale biological approach, from understanding the role of local genetic adaptations in individual species to making predictions about the response of whole ecosystems to disturbance and global change. In the lab portion of the class, students will have the opportunity to directly apply the concepts covered in lecture as they take on the role of ecological consultants for a local restoration site. Working in small groups and interacting with local restoration professionals, students will design a monitoring plan to shed light on the patterns and processes that affect restoration potential at the field site. Methods will include biodiversity monitoring, demographic analyses, species behavioral observations, and soil and water quality testing. Students will learn to collect and analyze the data in the context of setting management goals, identifying uncertainties and tradeoffs, and practicing adaptive decision-making. This class effort will be synthesized into a management plan that would aid the landowner in the restoration of the site. Note that this is a field-based course, and requires the willingness to spend time in unpredictable field conditions. Prerequisite: Biology 101 and 102. Lecture-laboratory.

Not offered 2022–23.

Biology 324 - Molecular Plant Development

One-unit semester course. An exploration of molecular and cellular programs that underlie plant development and physiology. Course will emphasize evolutionary innovations and broader implications of climate change. Lecture topics include plant genetics and genomics, molecular and cell biology, water relations and mineral nutrition, biochemistry and metabolism, growth and development, and responses to environmental cues. Laboratories will investigate models of plant development and incorporate functional genomics, molecular genetics, and cell biology approaches. Prerequisite: Biology 101 and 102, Chemistry 101 and 102. Chemistry 201 and 202 are recommended. Lecture-laboratory.

Biology 331 - Computational Systems Biology

One-unit semester course. A survey of network models used to gain a systems-level understanding of biological processes. Topics include computational models of gene regulation, signal transduction pathways, protein-protein interactions, and metabolic pathways. Laboratory exercises will involve building a collection of biological networks from public data, implementing a graph library and foundational algorithms, and interpreting computational results. A programming-based independent project will answer biological questions by applying graph algorithms to experimental data. Prerequisite: Biology 101 and 102, and either Biology 131, or Computer Science 121, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-laboratory.

Not offered 2022–23.

Biology 332 - Vascular Plant Diversity

One-unit semester course. A survey of vascular plants using evolutionary and ecological principles to interpret patterns of diversity in vascular plant form and function. Topics include plant species, methods of phylogenetic reconstruction, paleobotany, plant reproductive biology, and plant ecological interactions. Laboratory work will include a survey of flowering plant families with an emphasis on learning elements of the flora of the Pacific Northwest. Laboratory projects will demonstrate methods used for establishing evolutionary relationships, assessing genetic structure in natural populations, and identifying adaptive features of plant form and function, and will include independent research in the laboratory or field. Prerequisite: Biology 101 and 102. Lecture-laboratory.

Not offered 2022–23.

Biology 342 - Animal Behavior

One-unit semester course. An integrated approach to the study of behavior—the phenotype through which an organism interacts with, and also modifies, its environment. We will study how behavioral phenotypes are shaped by the social and physical environment and analyze how they are implemented through development by neural physiology, gene networks, and individual genes. Conversely, we will study how behaviors modify the environment and thus impact the physiology and genetics of organisms as well as the evolution of species. Examples will be drawn from both laboratory and field studies using comparative molecular and behavioral approaches to identify patterns and recurring themes, which will be discussed in the context of existing theories about animal behavior. The laboratory will cover both bench skills and field techniques that will then be applied in independent student projects. Prerequisite: Biology 101 and 102. Lecture-laboratory.

Biology 351 - Developmental Biology

One-unit semester course. Analysis of one of the most remarkable events in biology—the formation of a complex, multicellular organism from a single cell. With an emphasis on principles common among many species, this course explores how cellular, molecular, and genetic events contribute to distinct stages of embryogenesis. How are body patterns generated? What are the morphogenetic processes that give rise to specific organ systems? How is cell fate decided? What are the processes that guide tissue growth, regeneration, and differentiation? We will address these and other fundamental questions, discussing primary literature, recreating classic experiments, and performing new investigations. Students will apply the techniques and skills gained during the first part of the course to carry out an independent laboratory project. Prerequisites: Biology 101 and 102, Chemistry 101 and 102. A course in genetics or cell biology is strongly recommended. Lecture-laboratory.

Biology 352 - Bioinformatics

One-unit semester course. This course will explore the range of biological questions being addressed with genomic approaches, the specific genomic methods employed to address these questions, and the kinds of bioinformatic challenges and solutions that exist for working with genomic data. The primary objectives of this course are 1) to understand the biological principles that underpin and are illuminated by specific genomic techniques and 2) to be able to evaluate and utilize existing bioinformatics tools to work with genomic datasets. Lectures will focus on contemporary studies from the primary literature that utilize genomic approaches. These will provide case studies to critically assess the utility of these approaches for addressing specific biological questions, as well as to examine the kinds of data that are produced and the challenges presented in analyzing them. Computer-based laboratories will provide opportunities to develop and implement bioinformatics pipelines to analyze genomic datasets. Prerequisites: Biology 101 and 102. Lecture-laboratory.

Biology 356 - Gene Regulation

One-unit semester course. The molecular biology of eukaryotes, particularly as it relates to the control of gene expression. Genome organization, packaging and perpetuation, and mechanisms of gene regulation will be treated in depth, with the focus on experimental approaches and what they reveal about the conversion of genotype to phenotype. The laboratory will emphasize molecular approaches to analysis of genomes and gene expression, which will then be used in independent projects. Prerequisites: Biology 101 and 102, Chemistry 101 and 102. Chemistry 201 and 202 are recommended. Lecture-laboratory.

Biology 358 - Microbiology

One-unit semester course. The biology of microorganisms, including structure and function of the prokaryotic cell, metabolism, genetics interactions with host organisms, and cell-to-cell communication. Course will emphasize current areas of active research using the primary literature to illustrate key concepts discussed in lecture. Laboratory exercises emphasize interactions of bacteria with their environment and with host organisms, using classical and molecular genetic techniques to address biological problems. An advanced independent research project is required. Prerequisites: Biology 101 and 102, Chemistry 101 and 102. Lecture-laboratory.

Not offered 2022–23.

Biology 363 - Genes, Genetics, and Genomes

One-unit semester course. Overview and exploration of fundamental concepts and processes in genetics including heredity, mitosis, meiosis, DNA replication, transcription, translation, segregation, linkage, recombination, epistasis, selection, migration, drift, and evolution. Topics will also include DNA and RNA structure, coding and noncoding DNA, chromosomes, genome architecture, mechanisms of mutation, horizontal transfer, and genomics. Laboratories will provide the opportunity to investigate genetic questions and concepts using molecular and bioinformatic tools. Prerequisites: Biology 101 and 102, Chemistry 101 and 102. Lecture-laboratory.

Biology 372 - Cellular Biology

One-unit semester course. An in-depth study of the structure-function relationships within eukaryotic cells. The course emphasizes macromolecular organization and compartmentation of cellular activities. Lecture topics include evolution of cells, cellular reproduction, motility, signal transduction, cell-cell interactions, energy transduction, functional specialization, cell death, and cancer. Laboratories investigate models of cellular regulation and incorporate methods that integrate morphological and biochemical techniques. Prerequisites: Biology 101 and 102, Chemistry 101 and 102. Chemistry 201 and 202 are recommended. Lecture-laboratory.

Biology 381 - Neurobiology and Physiology

One-unit semester course. An examination of the nervous and endocrine systems, especially as they relate to the unique physiological challenges faced by animals. The course begins with fundamental concepts and mechanisms of nervous system function, followed by an exploration of the role that endocrine systems play in integrating a range of interdependent physiological processes. Readings from the primary literature will be chosen to demonstrate the multidisciplinary approaches used by researchers to investigate neurobiological and physiological processes. The laboratory will provide hands-on training in neurophysiological techniques that students will use to investigate their own questions. Prerequisites: Biology 101 and 102, Chemistry 101 and 102. Chemistry 201 and 202 are recommended. Lecture-laboratory.

Biology 431 - Seminar in Biology: Contemporary Topics

One-half-unit semester course. An examination of current topics and areas in biology with an emphasis on primary literature. Participants will lead group discussions and/or make oral presentations. Prerequisites: Biology 101 and 102, two additional units of biology with laboratory, and junior or senior standing. Conference. Not all topics offered every year. May be repeated for credit.

Advances in Forest Canopy Research. Most research to understand the forest ecosystem has taken place from the forest floor. Yet many of the ecological and physiological processes that drive forest ecosystem function take place far above the ground in the complex intersection of branches that forms the forest canopy environment. This class will explore the history of, common techniques in, and recent advances for studying this unique and important environment through study of the academic literature and hands-on investigation of canopy access techniques, including tree climbing and canopy sampling using drone-based technology.

Bacterial Pathogenesis. An examination of how bacterial pathogens interact with host organisms in order to cause disease. Topics include adhesion, colonization, invasion, toxins, subversion of host cell signaling events, immune evasion, and bacteria-to-bacteria communication as they pertain to pathogenesis.

Behavioral Genomics. An exploration of current research that pairs genomic techniques and bioinformatics approaches with classic questions in animal behavior.

Computational Cancer Biology. Investigation of computational methods to analyze high-throughput biological measurements collected from hundreds to thousands of cancer samples. Biological topics include tumor classification, tumor heterogeneity, and dysregulated signaling pathways. Computational topics include algorithms and models to synthesize, integrate, and manage large-scale cancer datasets.

Conservation Genetics. An exploration of issues of current controversy and active research in conservation biology, highlighting places where molecular genetic techniques and data are providing new insights for classical problems in the management and conservation of rare and threatened species.

Cytoskeletal Dynamics. An exploration of our current understanding of the cytoskeleton and its role in cell migration, morphogenesis, and disease. We will explore the primary literature and discuss how the cytoskeleton (actin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments) is regulated and how the molecular motors (kinesin, dynein, and myosin) contribute to cellular function.

Developmental Neurobiology. An exploration of our current understanding of how brains and eyes form, focusing on the visual system. Our investigations will focus on patterning, size determination, morphogenesis, neuronal connectivity, regeneration, stem cells, and cancer. Examples of developmental diseases will provide context. This course includes a collaborative writing component.

Ecology and Evolution of Plant-Human Interactions. Ecological and evolutionary contexts of interactions between plants and humans. Potential topics include agricultural ecology, grazing, plant-resource extraction, crop evolution and their diseases/pests, plant breeding, transgenic species, and invasive plants.

The Genetics and Cell Biology of Cancer. In this course, students and faculty will work together to explore and interrogate current literature about how the genetics of cancer dictates the behavior of tumor cells. We will be exploring this relationship through the eyes of computational biology, genetics, and cell biology.

Global Change Ecology. In light of ongoing environmental change, how are the Earth’s ecological systems likely to respond? We will discuss and present primary literature related to advanced basic and applied concepts in ecology to 1) explore the theories and tools for understanding the ecological response to environmental change and 2) identify sources of uncertainty for accurately understanding such issues.

Integrative Animal Behavior Animal behavior is the product of intrinsic properties (physiology, genetics, etc.) and extrinsic properties (environmental interactions, ecology, etc.) that have been shaped by evolutionary forces including both natural selection and sexual selection. This course will seek out research that integrates mechanistic studies with an ecological and evolutionary approach.

Integrative Neuroethology. Neuroethology is an integrative approach to understanding the neural basis of behavior. While the discipline has historically been dominated by physiological approaches, neuroethologists today increasingly rely on genomic and bioinformatic tools to address their questions. We will explore modern research that integrates physiological and genomic approaches to understanding how evolution has shaped behaviors and the neural circuits that generate them.

Mobile DNA. The course will focus on reading, discussing, and presenting papers from the primary literature on mobile genetic elements and viruses, including research about transposition, horizontal transfer, silencing, accumulation, and domestication.

Molecular Genetic Analysis of Plant Evolution. An exploration of issues of current controversy and active research in plant evolution, highlighting places where molecular techniques and data are providing new insights for classical problems in plant evolution.

Neuroethology. Exploration of modern and classic research aimed at understanding the neural basis of behavior. Neuroethologists investigate how the brains of diverse species generate natural behaviors, with the goal of elucidating fundamental principles of brain function. Topics may include animal communication, learning and memory, locomotion, prey capture, and escape behavior.

New Views on Sexual Selection. All fields of biology are constantly updated with current knowledge and new thinking, sexual selection is no exception. From Darwin’s view of female passivity to Bateman’s and Trivers’s male-centric description of sexual selection, the field has suffered from a restricted viewpoint. The course will read works that have successfully altered these views as well as other works that seek to expand upon and/or challenge current thinking. Discussions will focus on what concepts the authors claim need improvement or abandonment and how the proposed alternatives can be tested and lead to new insights into sexual selection.

Novel Ecosystems. As anthropogenic influences continue to shape our natural world, we are witnessing the emergence of historically unprecedented, “novel” ecosystems composed of both native and nonnative species. Some biologists argue that these ecosystems should be embraced and even curated, as they can fill important ecological niches that would otherwise be lost. Others view this concept as an acceptance of environmental destruction. In this course, we will read excerpts from foundational texts, take a tour of novel ecosystems across the globe, and study the ecological dynamics that shape them. Through this course, students will be encouraged to formulate their own personal “land ethic” and to articulate opposing viewpoints on how to approach novel ecosystems.

Plant Biotechnology. An exploration of emerging technologies, especially genetic engineering, that are revolutionizing agriculture and allowing for the production of plants with enhanced qualities. Emphasis will be placed on the molecular and physiological principles involved as well as the ecological risks and benefits.

Plant Cell Collectives. Dynamic cell identities and transitions underlie flexible developmental events and thereby orchestrate plant responses to changing climates. In this course, we will examine fundamental principles that define coordinated cell collectives by leveraging emerging insights from functional genomics, molecular genetics, and cell biology.

Socio-ecology of Fire and Drought. The impact of wildfires and droughts is increasing in many regions. Addressing these risks requires an understanding of how fires and droughts operate as natural ecosystem processes, as well as how they affect and are affected by human society. We will explore these complex socio-ecological issues through study of the academic literature and discuss the science and management of fire- and drought-impacted systems in the twenty-first century.

Telomeres and Telomerase. Investigation of elements needed for chromosome stability, using contemporary studies of telomere metabolism, regulation of telomere length, and the role telomeres play in cellular senescence and cancer. Prior coursework in genetics or cell biology is required.

Biology 463 - Immunology

One-unit semester course. A discussion of the properties of innate and adaptive immunity, the cells of the immune system, antibody structure and function, antigen recognition, lymphocyte activation, and immunity to microbes. Topics also covered will include immunodeficiency and AIDS, and transplantation. An inquiry-based laboratory exercise will be required. Prerequisite: Biology 101 and 102, and one of Biology 351, 358 or 372, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-laboratory.

Biology 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Biology 481 - Special Topics

One-half unit semester course. Independent laboratory or library research on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. A final written report is required. Prerequisites: standing as a junior or senior biology major, or approval of instructor. Independent study requires approval by the instructor, the department, and the division.

Chemistry 101 - Molecular Structure and Properties

One-unit semester course. Introduction to the chemist’s description and use of light and matter. Specific topics include the interaction of light and matter (spectroscopy), the structure of the atom and the atomic structure of matter, chemical bonds and intermolecular forces, and chemical descriptions of color and solubility. Lecture-conference-laboratory.

Chemistry 102 - Chemical Reactivity

One-unit semester course. An introduction to the reactions of atoms and molecules. Specific topics include gas laws, solution phenomena, thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and kinetics. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101. Lecture-conference-laboratory.

Chemistry 201 - Organic Chemistry

One-unit semester course. Introduction to theories describing the structure and reactivity of organic compounds. Theoretical principles are illustrated using computer-based molecular models. Structure, methods of preparation, and reactions of important classes of organic compounds are examined. Laboratory work introduces techniques used in the preparation, purification, and spectroscopic identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite for 201: Chemistry 101/102 or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference-laboratory.

Chemistry 202 - Organic Chemistry

One-unit semester course. A continuation of Chemistry 201. Structure, methods of preparation, and reactions of important classes of organic compounds will be stressed. Laboratory work includes the preparation, purification, and spectroscopic identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: Chemistry 201 or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference-laboratory.

Chemistry 212 - Inorganic Chemistry

One-unit semester course. An introduction to inorganic chemistry, including the structure, bonding, and reactions of main-group molecules, transition metal complexes, and organometallic compounds. Laboratory work is focused on scientific inquiry, along with synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of inorganic compounds. Prerequisites: Chemistry 101, 102, and 201, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-laboratory. May be taken without the lab for one-half unit.

Chemistry 220 - Geology

See Environmental Studies 220 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Environmental Studies 220 Description

Chemistry 230 - Environmental Chemistry

One-unit semester course. An introduction to the chemistry of natural and polluted environments. Fundamental principles of chemistry are used to understand the sources, reactivity, and fate of compounds in the Earth’s atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. Topics include the stratospheric ozone layer, photochemical smog and particulate air pollution, climate change and energy use, water toxics and treatment, and agricultural modification of the surface environment. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101/102. Lecture-conference.

Chemistry 311 - Analytical Chemistry and Instrumentation

One-unit semester course. An examination of the principles of data acquisition and statistical analysis, chemical equilibria, and the principles and methods of chemical and instrumental analysis. The functions of classical volumetric and gravimetric techniques, along with electronic, optical, and mechanical instrument components and features of their organization into measurement systems, are discussed. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101/102 or consent of the instructor. Lecture-laboratory.

Chemistry 315 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory

One-half-unit semester course. An exploration of various experimental strategies and techniques in physical chemistry, as applied to inorganic, organic, and/or biochemical problems. Laboratory work includes investigations of energetics, molecular structure, and reaction dynamics requiring the use of large instrument systems and critical analysis and interpretation of experimental data. Corequisite: Chemistry 311, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-laboratory.

Chemistry 316 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory: Spectra of Diatomic Molecules

One-half-unit semester course. An exploration of various experimental strategies and techniques in physical chemistry, as applied to the study of diatomic molecules. Laboratory work includes investigations of energetics, molecular structure, and/or reaction dynamics requiring the use of large instrument systems and critical analysis and interpretation of experimental data. Prerequisites: Chemistry 311 and 333, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-laboratory.

Chemistry 324 - Advanced Physical Organic Chemistry

One-unit semester course. An introduction to modern concepts in experimental, computational (molecular modeling), and theoretical methods used to understand foundational interrelationships between structure and reactivity in organic molecules. Topics include chemical structure and reactivity, intermolecular interactions, molecular recognition, photochemistry, pericyclic reactions, and review of applications in state-of-the-art research. Hands-on experience with single-crystal X-ray diffraction will provide additional insight to the analysis of organic molecules. Prerequisite: Chemistry 201 and 202. Lecture-Conference.

Chemistry 332 - Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics

One-unit semester course. An introduction to statistical mechanics, which provides a bridge between the quantum mechanical description of properties pertaining to microscopic systems and the classical thermodynamic description of properties pertaining to macroscopic systems. An examination of the relations between molecular dynamics, observed rates, and inferred mechanisms of chemical reactions will be included. Prerequisites: Chemistry 102, Mathematics 111, and Physics 101, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Chemistry 333 - Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Structure

One-unit semester course. An introduction to principles of quantum mechanics and their application to problems in atomic and molecular structure. Meets four days per week to incorporate study of multivariable calculus, linear algebra, and differential equations. Prerequisites: Mathematics 111 and Physics 101 and 102. Lecture-conference.

Chemistry 345 - Advanced Synthetic Chemistry

One-unit semester course. A study of advanced synthetic methods and design. Topics include methods of building carbon skeletons and changing functional groups as well as strategies for multi-step synthesis. Predictive models for selectivity and the use of organometallic reagents will be emphasized. Advanced spectroscopic techniques, such as multidimensional NMR, are discussed as critical tools for structure determination. Prerequisite: Chemistry 201 and 202. Lecture.

Chemistry 347 - Advanced Synthesis Lab

One-half-unit semester course. An introduction to performing multistep synthesis in the context of a semester-long research project. The course focuses on the use of organometallic reagents, application of selectivity in synthesis, and the use of spectroscopic techniques, such as multidimensional high-field NMR, for structure determination. Prerequisite: Chemistry 201 and 202. Corequisite: Chemistry 345, or consent of the instructor. Laboratory.

Chemistry 391 - Structural Biochemistry

One-unit semester course. An examination of the structure and function of biological molecules, including lipids, polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. Areas of study include protein stability and folding, protein-ligand interactions, enzyme kinetics and catalysis, and protein biosynthesis. Special attention will be given to biophysical techniques employed in the characterization of biological molecules. Prerequisite: Chemistry 201, 202. Lecture-conference.

Chemistry 392 - Metabolic Biochemical Homeostasis

One-unit semester course. This course describes the energetics, bioinorganic, and bioorganic chemistry of the cell as it maintains stable internal conditions despite changes in external conditions. Focus will be placed on the origins and chemical evolution of metabolism, principles of metal ion homeostasis, and the energy-producing pathways: glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and fatty acid oxidation. Prerequisites: Chemistry 201, 202, and 391, or consent of the instructor. Lecture.

Chemistry 394 - Biochemical Methods

One-half-unit semester course. An introduction to the laboratory techniques commonly used in biochemistry. Experiments demonstrate methods used in the purification and characterization of proteins with attention to a variety of biophysical techniques. Prerequisites: Chemistry 391 or 392, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-laboratory.

Chemistry 396 - Bioinorganic Chemistry Seminar

One-half-unit semester course. A study of the role of metals in biological systems and biomedical applications. Topics will include the structure and function of metalloproteins, including electron transfer systems, small molecule transport, storage, and activation, and the use of metals in pharmaceuticals. Discussion will focus on techniques used to characterize the active sites of the native biomolecules and the mechanisms of the reactions they promote with an emphasis on spectroscopy and the use of small molecule model complexes. Prerequisites: Chemistry 212 or 391. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chemistry 403 - Topics in Physical Chemistry

One-half-unit semester course. An examination of current topics relating to the use of spectroscopy to study electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and chemical reactivity with an emphasis on the primary literature. Prerequisites: Chemistry 316, or 332, or 333, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Chemistry 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Chemistry 481 - Individual Work in Special Fields

One-half-unit semester course.

Chinese 110 - First-Year Chinese

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester. A beginner’s course in standard (Mandarin) modern spoken and written Chinese, aimed at building a solid foundation in all its aspects: pronunciation (especially the tones), syntax, and basic vocabulary. Attention is given to a balanced development of all the basic skills of the language: listening and reading comprehension, speaking, and writing. Pinyin is the romanization system used in this and all other Chinese language courses. Both the traditional and simplified characters are taught. Students are expected to read both and write one of the two versions. Lecture-conference.

Chinese 210 - Second-Year Chinese

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester. This course is designed to build the skills of students who have studied at least one year of Chinese (or equivalent) to achieve intermediate-level proficiency in the oral and written use of the language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Emphasis in the course will be placed on learning to recognize and reproduce the natural flow of the spoken language, expanding vocabulary, and learning to write short essays in Chinese. Prerequisite: Chinese 110 or acceptance through placement test. Lecture-conference.

Chinese 311 - Third-Year Chinese

One-unit semester course. This course is designed for students who have completed at least two years of Chinese language (or equivalent). The course will focus on student acquisition of near-native fluency in spoken Chinese, competence in reading a variety of contemporary texts (with a dictionary), and employment of different registers and genres of Chinese in students’ writing. Prerequisite: Chinese 210 or acceptance through placement test. Conference.

Chinese 312 - Advanced Chinese

One-unit semester course. Topics vary, selected from Chinese literature, journalistic writing, essays, and contemporary prose. Readings and instruction in Chinese. Prerequisite: third-year level of Chinese proficiency or equivalent, or instructor approval. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 316 - Classical Chinese

One-unit semester course. Intensive introduction to the grammar of classical Chinese through the study of selections from ancient literary, historical, and philosophical texts. Readings include the Analects, Mencius, Zhuangzi, Shiji, and Tang-Song prose essays. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: Chinese 210 or equivalent. Conference.

Chinese 325 - Songs to Lost Music: Ci-Poetry

One-unit semester course. This course investigates the rise and the development of ci-poetry, a genre related closely to music. Its formal features and their emotional qualities, major modes of expression, and different stages of its development from the ninth to the thirteenth century are the foci in the close reading of selected poems. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor; for students enrolling in Chinese credit, Chinese 210 or equivalent. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 325.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 327 - Chinese Inhumanities: Construction of the Other in Chinese Literature

One-unit semester course. This course explores the construction, preservation, and interrogation of class, race, and ethnicity within China’s literary traditions. Through reading and analysis of narratives treating its alleged “others”—uncultured barbarians from the territories that surround the middle kingdom; the myriad undead who haunt the living; shape-shifting animals who beguile, seduce, and love hapless humans; or individuals who transcend humanity through alchemy, physical and mental inhumanity, monstrosity, or posthuman existence—who are used to define and exclude communities, to express or explore cultural fears, anxieties, or doubts, and to reinforce or undermine belief in China’s cultural superiority. All readings in translation. Students taking the course for Chinese credit will meet for an additional hour of reading in the original language. Prerequisites: Chinese 210 or equivalent (for Chinese credit), and sophomore standing. May be repeated for credit. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 327.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 329 - Stranger Things in Medieval China

One-unit semester course. This course will introduce students to the “accounts of the strange” (zhiguai 志怪) and “tales of the extraordinary” (chuanqi 傳奇) produced in China between the fourth and tenth centuries. These narratives feature a rich cast of protagonists, from accomplished martial artists, demon-quelling monks, and hell-visiting filial sons to undead lovers, punitive deities, and shapeshifting animals and objects. In this course, students will explore what these works reveal about cultural fears, anxieties, and aspirations, the relationships between self and “Other,” the competing idea systems—Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism—that shaped their worldview, and the different realms—human, animal, natural, supernatural—that made up the world within which the inhabitants of medieval China lived. All readings in translation. An additional hour session of guided readings in the original will be offered for students taking the course for Chinese credit. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor; for students enrolling in Chinese credit, Chinese 210 or equivalent. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 329.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 330 - Chinese Ghost Stories and Supernatural Tales

One-unit semester course. Powerful spirits, vengeful ghosts, and monstrous creatures—stories of oddities abound in Chinese literature. In this class, students will explore mythologies, tales of the strange, novels of deities and demons in translation, and explore Chinese conceptions of the body and soul(s), the afterlife, and the relationship between the living and the dead. Materials will include original stories in translation, scholarly works, and modern reinterpretations of these tales in film and other media. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor; for students enrolling in Chinese credit, Chinese 210 or equivalent. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 330.

Chinese 334 - The Yijing: Text and Tradition of the Book of Changes

One-unit semester course. The Yijing, or Book of Changes, is a text of limitless possibilities. This course explores various strategies of reading the text and examines philosophical, religious, historical, and literary critical implications of the text and the tradition associated with it. The system and the language of the 64 hexagrams and various layers of attached verbalization are the focus of investigation. Readings are in English. Students who take the course for Chinese credit meet for additional tutoring to read parts of the text in the original. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor; for students enrolling in Chinese credit, Chinese 210 or equivalent. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 334.

Chinese 346 - From Allegories to Documentaries: Screening Postsocialist China

One-unit semester course. This course investigates interactions between literary production (focusing primarily on fiction) and filmmaking since the end of the Cultural Revolution in 1976. Issues to be explored include the shared sociohistorical context that conditioned the production of these two cultural forms and the multivalent differences between them in terms of intended audience, narrative modes, and thematic concerns. Readings are in translation, and films selected are subtitled in English. No Chinese language training is required. Readings in the original Chinese and additional instruction will be offered for students taking this course for Chinese credit. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor; for students enrolling in Chinese credit, Chinese 210 or equivalent. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 346.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 347 - Modern Sinophone Fiction and Film

One-unit semester course. This course examines the rich corpus of modern Sinophone literary and cinematic works produced within and beyond China proper, highlighting the historical and cultural contexts of the literature and such issues as multiculturalism, complex identities, and global perspectives. Throughout this course, students will examine Sinophone literature and films of varied historical and geographical backgrounds and construct a critical understanding of the diverse Sinophone culture. An additional session of guided readings in the original text will be offered for students taking the course for Chinese credit. Prerequisite for Chinese credit: sophomore standing and Chinese 210 or equivalent. Prerequisite for literature credit: sophomore standing. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 347.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 348 - Reading for Translation

One-unit semester course. This course examines theories of literary translation, including various ideas of equivalence, purposes, causes of uncertainty, and the formation of paradigms. Further, it will attempt to practice the theories, by exploring methods of reading particularly for translation and strategies of rendering such a reading into another language. A reading knowledge of Chinese is necessary. For exceptional cases, students with a reading knowledge of Japanese and Korean can be permitted to join the class. Prerequisite for students enrolling in Chinese credit, Chinese 210 or equivalent. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 348.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 355 - Early Chinese Philosophical Texts

One-unit semester course. This course examines various philosophical discourses in the early period leading to the unification in 221 BCE. It is a selective discussion of a few major philosophical texts and schools of thought. We investigate the predominant interest in human nature and cultivation, the epistemological models for understanding such emphases, and the implications of Chinese epistemology. Readings in translation. Students taking the course for Chinese credit will meet for additional hours for the guided reading of selected texts in the original Chinese. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 355.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 367 - Love in Late Imperial China

One-unit semester course. This course will examine representations of love and lovers in the literary and historical discourses of the fourteenth through nineteenth centuries. Approaching “love” (qing 情) through key words, conceptions, ideals, and acts with which it was associated, we will explore a number of questions, including: What kinds of behaviors or speech were coded as “romantic?” Were representations of “love” consistent across different discursive contexts (fictional, dramatic, poetic, historical)? Were literary representations of love seen as promoting positive ideals of romance and marriage or encouraging socially deviant and dangerous behaviors? We will also explore the discursive boundaries of love, places where words and deeds shift from love to desire, lust, madness, and obsession. Within what contexts were otherwise romantic words and deeds suddenly viewed as transgressive or disturbing? How did different forms of discourse (medical, legal) identify pathologies of love and/or propose to treat them? All readings in translation. An additional hour session of guided readings in the original will be offered for students taking the course for Chinese credit. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor; for students enrolling in Chinese credit, Chinese 210 or equivalent. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 367.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 374 - Reading Early Chinese Novels: The Four Masterworks

One-unit semester course. This course explores the development of the novel as an artistic literary form in late imperial China by introducing students to representative novels from the Ming dynasty (fourteenth through seventeenth century), particularly the “four masterworks” (四大奇書) including Romance of the Three Kingdoms (三國志通俗演義), Outlaws of the Marsh (水滸傳), Journey to the West (西遊記), and Jin Ping Mei (金瓶梅). Through reading poetry, drama, short story, and commentary alongside selected chapters of the novels, we will discuss how these works creatively appropriate motifs, conventions, and character types from China’s long narrative tradition. Close textual analyses of the primary readings will be supplemented by critical and theoretical readings to support our interpretations and allow us to assess current scholarly approaches to the study of early modern Chinese fiction. We will also examine adaptations of these monumental novels in a variety of other literary genres and artistic media to appreciate their long-lasting cultural influences across East Asia. All readings are available in translation. Students taking the course for Chinese credit will meet for an additional hour of reading in the original language. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor; for students enrolling in Chinese credit, Chinese 210 or equivalent. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 374.

Chinese 380 - The Story of the Stone and the Literary Traditions of China

One-unit semester course. This course will approach the Chinese narrative tradition through close reading of The Story of the Stone and its literary antecedents. First published in 1792The Story of the Stone (石頭記, also commonly known as Dream of the Red Chamber 紅樓夢) recounts the experiences of a magical stone from heaven reborn as the male heir of the immensely wealthy and aristocratic Jia family. Through reading and discussion of poetry, drama, short story, and longer works of fiction from earlier periods alongside selected chapters from the novel, we will explore the ways in which The Story of the Stone self-consciously adapts literary conventions, techniques, and motifs from the narrative tradition, and learn to appreciate both China’s rich literary tradition and the unique artistic achievements of this novel. An additional hour of class of guided readings in the original will be offered for students taking the course for Chinese credit. Readings in English. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor; for students enrolling in Chinese credit, Chinese 210 or equivalent. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 380.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 390 - Realism and Its Discontents in Contemporary Chinese Visual Media

One-unit semester course. With the opening up and economic reforms beginning in the late 1970s in China, a new aesthetic question confronted literature and the arts: what constitutes the real and what counts now as legitimate modes/means of its representation? While socialist realism was on the wane, realism continued to condition various forms of cultural production and took myriad guises—from an attempt at complete objectivity devoid of emotion to a complete dependence on subjectivity and affect for delivering a sense of the real; from drawing on the experiences of everyday life of individuals to the legendary feats of martial artists and utopian ideals of science fiction. This course grapples with these various interpretations of realism in modern and contemporary Chinese media, while reaching back in time to trace the precedents of these new forms that negotiate the blurry lines between truth and fiction, the objective and the subjective, the real and the fantastical. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Conference. Cross-listed as Art 390 and Literature 390.

Not offered 2022–23.

Art 390 Description

Chinese 412 - Selected Topics in Chinese Literature

One-unit semester course. Topics vary, selected from Chinese literature. Readings and instruction in Chinese. Prerequisite: third-year level of Chinese proficiency. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

Chinese 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Chinese 481 - Independent Study

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Prerequisite: approval of instructor and division.

Comparative Literature 201 - Introduction to Comparative Literature

One-unit semester course. In forgoing the national framework as its organizing principle, comparative literature is becoming increasingly synonymous with world literature today. What is a world? Is it a spatial or temporal category, lived realities or literary constructs? And how does literature interact with the world in its many forms? What does it mean to study literature across the boundaries of histories, cultures, languages, and art forms? What are some of the pitfalls and payoffs of the comparative practice? In this course we will read theoretical reflections on some core concepts of the discipline, along with a selection of works organized largely around the theme of “action and its impediments.” Key topics to explore will include translation and transculturation; intertextuality and interdisciplinarity; realism and its discontents; colonialism and postcolonialism. Conference.

Comparative Literature 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 150 - The Cultural Study of Music

See Music 150 for description.

Music 150 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 225 - Religion, Race, and Ethnicity

See Religion 215 for description.

Religion 215 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 226 - Islam in America

See Religion 226 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 226 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 254 - Africa in the Black Musical Imagination

See Music 254 for description.

Music 254 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 260 - Dance, Race, and Gender

See Dance 270 for description. 

Dance 270 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 261 - Dancing Latin/x America

See Dance 241 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Dance 241 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 270 - Race and Identity in American Theatre

See Theatre 270 for description.

Theatre 270 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 276 - Community-Based Performance

See Theatre 276 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Theatre 276 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 284 - Latinx History in the United States

See History 284 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 284 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 286 - Histories of Immigration and Migration in the United States

See History 286 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 286 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 300 - Junior Seminar: Race, Violence, and Power

One-unit semester course. This course for CRES majors explores the way race and ethnicity can be analyzed from interdisciplinary perspectives, considering categories of “race” and “ethnicity” a) both together and in relation to each other, and b) as designating or emerging out of separate politics of difference and otherness. Course topics may change from year to year. Conference.

Race, Violence, and Power
One-unit semester course. How do different disciplines engage in questions of race, violence, and power? What are the different theoretical and methodological approaches used by researchers? This course surveys a variety of different approaches to the topic of race, violence, and power through conversations among the participants. Guest faculty will share key theoretical and methodological texts from their respective fields to discuss how those texts influence their own research and how they make connections within and across disciplines. Students will develop a final project to create their own interdisciplinary project on the topic of race, violence, and power. Prerequisite for sociology credit: Sociology 211. Prerequisite for CRES credit: completion of or concurrent enrollment in any CRES foundational course, or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Sociology 346 for 2022–23.

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 327 - Erasure and Location of Muslims in Western Humanities

See Religion 327 for description.

Religion 327 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 330 - Modernity and Memory in the Indian Ocean

See English 370, Modernity and Memory in the Indian Ocean, for description. 

Not offered 2022–23.

English 370 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 333 - Jews across the Americas

See English 303, Jews across the Americas, for description.

English 303 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 336 - Douglass/Delany

See English 356, Douglass/Delany, for description.

English 356 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 342 - Sociology of Asian America

See Sociology 342 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Sociology 342 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 343 - Sociology of Race and Racism

See Sociology 343 for description.

Sociology 343 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 348 - Race, Economy, Public Policy

See Sociology 348 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Sociology 348 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 359 - Music and the Black Freedom Struggle, 1865–1965

See Music 360 for description. 

Music 360 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 365 - Contemporary Global Dance

See Dance 365 for description.

Dance 365 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 381 - Race and Ethnicity in the U.S. since 1865

See History 381 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 381 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 383 - Race and Oral Histories in the United States

See History 383 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 383 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 384 - Race and the Politics of Decolonization

See History 334 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 334 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 385 - Defining and Defying Difference: Race, Ethnicity, and Empire

See History 315 for description. 

Not offered 2022–23.

History 315 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 388 - Race and Ethnicity in the Andes

See History 388 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 388 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 389 - Race and the Law in American History

See History 369 for description.

History 369 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 390 - African Technoscience

See Anthropology 300 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 300 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 392 - African Pasts, African Futures

See Anthropology 343 for description.

Anthropology 343 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 393 - Race and Transnational China

See Anthropology 363 for description.

Anthropology 363 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 395 - Black Queer Diaspora

See Anthropology 345 for description.

Anthropology 345 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 396 - #CentralAmericanTwitter: Continuity and Rupture in Central American Indigenous Histories

See Anthropology 306 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 306 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 397 - Black, Indian, and Other in Brazil

See Anthropology 366 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Anthropology 366 Description

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Creative Writing 201 - Introduction to Creative Writing

Making Fiction
One-unit semester course. In this course, students will learn about and experiment with the tools of fiction writing. Students will complete numerous generative, exploratory forays into the world of fiction, honing their craft as well as considering the ethical, political, and personal implications that arise when one transmits language to the page. Our reading list will be composed of work by contemporary writers who represent the range of what gets classified as “fiction” today, such as Carmen Maria Machado, Percival Everett, Stephen Graham Jones, Kelly Link, and NoViolet Bulawayo. Class sessions will be used primarily for discussion of assigned readings and student work. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five pages, at least sophomore standing, and consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

The Short Story
One-unit semester course. In this course students will write short stories, and read the work of their classmates as well as that of published authors. Close attention will be paid to the narrative strategies used by writers such as Alice Munro, Jamaica Kincaid, Lydia Davis, George Saunders, and Yasunari Kawabata to help the students in writing their own fiction. We will consider these various strategies when reading and responding to the work of peers. Class sessions will be used for discussion of assigned readings and work in progress. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five pages, at least sophomore standing, and consent of the instructor. Conference. 

Creative Writing 207 - Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

The Lyric Essay
One-unit semester course. For many of us, our first impression of the lyric essay is that it’s basically autobiography, or maybe memoir. And this is often the case. But “personal” is also about a tone, a relationship with the reader, a sense of intimacy established, often, through the use of the first person. Which is to say that the lyric essay may look outward as much as it looks inward. In this workshop students will write personal essays that cover a range of genres (such as memoir, analytic meditation, and portrait) and discuss the work of writers such as Montaigne, Didion, and Baldwin, as well as more contemporary essayists. Students will also read and discuss the work of their peers. Class sessions will be used for discussion of assigned readings and work in progress. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a prose writing sample of three to five pages, at least sophomore standing, and consent of the instructor. Conference.

Creative Writing 224 - Poetry Studio I

Awakenings and Connections
One-unit semester course. According to Lucille Clifton, “Poetry began when somebody walked off a savanna or out of a cave, looked up at the sky with wonder and said, ‘Ah-h-h!’” In this introductory poetry studio students will engage in writing exercises designed to help them strengthen their poetry-writing skills. We will read, listen to, and analyze poetry written by nationally recognized authors in an attempt to find a common critical language that we will use while discussing student work. To that end, students will write poetry, both in and out of class, and will workshop that poetry with their peers. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five poems, at least sophomore standing, and consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Rearranging the Mirrors
One-unit semester courseIn Cole Swensen’s poem “The Painter Rearranges the Mirrors,” she writes “you open a little door. the door could be anywhere.” This line will serve as our governing precept to create entry points for approaching and writing poems. We will examine the poem as portal, as all-access pass of our own making with any other door left ajar ours to enter at will. In practical terms, this translates to weekly writing exercises and in-depth class discussion while reading a wide range of published works to develop critical skills and creative strategies beneficial to a sustainable writing practice. Emphasis will be placed on encouraging and reviewing student work within a workshop format. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: a writing sample of three to five pages of poems and consent of instructor. Conference.  

Creative Writing 274 - Poetry Studio II

One-unit semester course. Variable topics. Enrollment limited to 15. Writing sample required. See specific listing for other prerequisites. Conference. May be repeated for credit. 

Not offered 2022–23.

Creative Writing 321 - Special Topics Studio

One-unit semester course. Variable topics. Enrollment limited to 15. Writing sample required. See specific listing for other prerequisites. Conference. May be repeated for credit. 

Flash Nonfiction 
One-unit semester course. This workshop is designed for students with considerable experience in writing short prose. Students will read essays by authors such as Ross Gay, Lydia Davis, Sei Shōnagon, Sarah Manguso and Brian Blanchfield in order to learn to manage effects economically and to write with maximum efficiency and suggestion. Students will write one short piece of prose every or every other week; critically responding to others’ work, and the revision of one’s own stories, will also be emphasized. Class sessions will be used for discussion of assigned readings and work in progress. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five pages, one 200-level creative writing course, at least sophomore standing, and consent of the instructor. Conference.

Inspiration as Reaction
One-unit semester course. This workshop will investigate where our writing (fiction and nonfiction) comes from, and how to provoke it from within us. We will endeavor to investigate the objects of our personal curiosity, and how to pursue our curiosity to productive and entertaining ends. Such investigations might generate reactions to other writings and works of art, music, the news, our memories, animals, and will involve additional delving into our fears, hopes, and blind spots. Class time will be spent in conversation, generating and critiquing work, observing art and perhaps traveling to witness it, show and tell, etc.; a fair portion of the reading for this course will be assigned as we go, reacting to the atmospheres that are generated. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five pages, one 200-level creative writing course, at least sophomore standing, and/or consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

Mutable Pleasures: Possibilities in Multiplying Forms
One-unit semester course. The focus of this upper-level writing course is to provide students with an immersive forum to engage deeply with and as poets writing across narrative forms. Our collaborative investigation will include a brief overview of the enigmatic prose poem; considerations of the personal essay, autobiography, and rangier, unbridled cadences (manifesto!); and rigorous readings of three book-length experiments that undo the sentence and elude/elide the line. Heavy emphasis will be placed on weekly writing exercises and attentive peer-centered review within a workshop format. The course will culminate with a collective writing project modeled after Anne Carson’s Float. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a previous workshop course, a writing sample of three to five poems, and consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Poets in Prose
One-unit semester course. From prose poetry to lyric essay, and from memoir to microfiction and more, poets working outside the boundaries of the poetic line continue to create some of the most vibrant new works in contemporary literature. The prose poem itself resists the romance of the line to embody a poetry of multidirectional resistance. In this creative nonfiction course, we will begin with a study of prose poetries which span seventeenth-century Japan, where Matsuo Bashō originated the haibun form, through the nineteenth-century French writings of Aloysius Bertrand and Charles Baudelaire, who called for “a miracle of poetic prose.” After considering the modernist work of Gertrude Stein, we will engage the work of contemporary practitioners of poetry in prose such as Syrian Nobel laureate Adonis, who Edward Said called “today’s most daring and provocative Arab poet,” and American writers like Juan Felipe Herrera, Naomi Shihab Nye, Campbell McGrath, Harryette Mullen, Ray Gonzalez, Anne Carson, and the late “Little Mr. Prose Poem,” himself, Russell Edson, each of whom offers a unique road map through the promise of form. Then, as rich an excavation site as prose poetry is on its own, much of this class will explore the various ways that today’s poets work in prose outside of its poetic form. Troubling the waters of creative nonfiction with their own style of lyrical language arts, contemporary poets enliven the current literary moment through experimentation as well as their own slant embrace of traditional narrative. We will read the prose writing of poets like Natasha Trethewey, Mark Doty, Tracy K. Smith, Don Mee Choi, Asha Bandele, Elizabeth Alexander, Reginald Dwayne Betts, Lucia Perillo, Richard Blanco, June Jordan, Dao Strom, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Maggie Nelson, and Mary Karr. Through the study of their work, and our own, we will write toward our own lyric prose, challenging narrative norms to sing true stories like song. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five pages, one 200-level creative writing course, at least sophomore standing, and/or consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

The Realistic and the Fantastic
One-unit semester course. This workshop is designed for students with considerable experience in writing short fiction. Readings and discussion will focus on storytelling that relies upon a “realistic” depiction of our world, combined with narratives that contain events and situations that are exaggerated, surreal, speculative, and/or out of the “ordinary.” How are such stories similar, and how are they different? Students will read published stories by writers such as Munro, Gaitskill, Hemingway, Cheever, Dybek, McPherson, Poe, Bradbury, Borges, Cortázar, Henry James, Octavia Butler, Kelly Link, Shirley Jackson, Haruki Murakami, and Angela Carter, as well as fairy tales, folktales, and other texts. Special emphasis will be given to individual voices, critically responding to others’ work, and the revision of one’s own stories. Class sessions will be used for discussion of assigned readings and work in progress. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five pages, one 200-level creative writing course, at least sophomore standing, and/or consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Conference.

Revision and Beyond
One-unit semester course. This workshop is designed for students with considerable experience in writing short fiction. Often, we talk about writing as if the bulk of the work is in generating the first draft, and revision isn’t much more than a final polish. But most writers eventually find that revision is as creative and gratifying a part of the writing practice as the earlier stages. In this course, students will practice and develop strategies for revision from sentence to story level, focusing on elements of craft as well as considerations of audience, genre, and the ethical dimension of fiction writing. The course will also offer students the opportunity to familiarize themselves with the contemporary literary landscape through discussion and research around publishing, literary community building, the practice of creative writing in the academy, and other timely conversations in the field. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five pages, one 200-­level creative writing course, sophomore standing, and consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

Short Prose Forms
One-unit semester course. This workshop is designed for students with considerable experience in writing short prose. Students will read stories and essays by authors such as Ross Gay, Lydia Davis, Yasunari Kawabata, and Sandra Cisneros in order to learn how to manage effects economically, and to write with maximum efficiency and suggestion. Students will write one short piece of prose per week; critically responding to others’ work, and the revision of one’s own stories, will also be emphasized. Class sessions will be used for discussion of assigned readings and work in progress. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five pages, one 200-level creative writing course, at least sophomore standing, and consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Writing Resistance
One-unit semester course. Our current cultural climate may more easily stick the word “resistance” to a car bumper than to substantive declaration or action. But as writers, we have the power to remake language with intention—or even choose to altogether reclaim or create language anew. In this open-genre course, we will ask what it means for writing to be “political,” to “resist” through form and structure, content and sentiment. To be didactic and subtle. To be barbed and tender. To affect change. While considering the presence and practice of resistance in fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry, we’ll also ask why or whether genre needs to exist at all. Is that a political question? Our reading of published authors will focus on contemporary work by writers such as Solmaz Sharif, Juliana Spahr, Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah, Etel Adnan, and Hilary Plum. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a three- to five-page writing sample of any genre, one 200-­level creative writing course, at least sophomore standing, and consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

Creative Writing 331 - Special Topics Studio

One-unit semester course. Variable topics. Enrollment limited to 15. Writing sample required. See specific listing for other prerequisites. Conference. May be repeated for credit. 

From Intent to Accident (Unfolding the Poem by Chance)
One-unit semester course. The focus of this course is to provide an intensive, critical forum for students to engage with poems within a workshop format as a process-oriented activity and to test or tease out the relationship between chance and necessity (“Everything existing in the universe is the fruit of chance and necessity” —Democritus), between the subconscious and conscious mind. We will explore ways chance has been used and can be used as a motivating instrument, but with a steady eye on how it introduces possibilities for objectivity and care. Heavy emphasis will be placed on appreciating the draft as a means of sourcing resonance and primacing intuition. Our lively, collaborative investigation will include weekly exercises aimed squarely at stimulating and disrupting our current reading and writing strategies, group discussion exploring wider questions of freedom, mystery, and the utility of disorder. Be prepared for rigorous reading of a range of poetry and essays by poets, artists, and other dedicated thinkers-at-play. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: Creative Writing 224, sophomore standing, a writing sample of three to five poems, and consent of the instructor. Conference.

Limning the Line
One-unit semester course. The poetic line is among the most studied and considered elements of form for poets and scholars alike. A “musical construct,” in the words of Tim Seibles, the line structures and orders its poem—even in its absence. In this advanced poetry-writing course, we will explore the way the line pushes pattern and rhythm, pacing and rhyme, to create meaning through fracture and route. Choices about lineation, enjambment, and stanzaic structure steer the reader through a poem’s turnings and leanings—its “verse.” Taking our poetic paintbrushes in hand, we will limn the hinges which connect the line to every other formal element. “To proceed line by line,” writes poet Kazim Ali, “means not to feel yourself forward in the dark but to throw yourself with abandon into the arms of darkness.” We will read into the ways that contemporary poets write through, around, and about the poetic line and generate our own work following prompts that guide us to the line, the sentence, the stanza, and the poem as a whole. Poets whose work we will engage include Mei-mei Berssenbrugge (Reed ’69), Charles Bernstein, Camille Dungy, James Logenbach, Mary Oliver, Arielle Greenberg, Heather McHugh, Carl Phillips, and even late-published poet Toni Morrison. [Find her limited-edition book of poetry, Five Poems, with original artwork by Kara Walker, in Reed’s Special Collections!] Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five pages, one 200-level creative writing course, at least sophomore standing, and/or consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

The Long Poem
One-unit semester course. The long-view focus of this advanced workshop is to provide an intensive critical forum for students to engage deeply with the practice of poetry with a specific focus on reading and writing long poem(s). We will work diligently to further the development of each poem/poet, exploring various strategies to generate and extend new work, and giving close consideration to the different modes of time expressed and experienced in poetry. This is primarily a workshop, but each participant will be responsible for presenting/explicating a long work in class discussion. Given the advanced nature of the course, students must have completed at least two course-long poetry workshops at Reed. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: Creative Writing 224, a writing sample of three to five poems, and consent of the instructor. Conference.

Multimedia Poetries
One-unit semester course. This course will be an inquiry into craft and discovery of the multimedia poetries around us and within us. We examine the recent landscape to understand how these poetries and poetics work, how and where they succeed (and fail), and how they might move into the future. We will critically study the work of others, including our peers, while working through regular skills-building creative assignments toward the completion of our own capstone project. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: Creative Writing 224 and one other creative writing course, a writing sample, at least sophomore standing, and consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

The Poem, Visualized
One-unit semester course. In this course, we’ll explore what it means to consider the poem as a visual object, beyond concrete poetry. Looking to films, paintings, dance, fashion, graphic novels, and other media, we’ll test and expand where our poems can live on and off the white page. Our lively and collaborative investigation will include weekly writing exercises and a freewheeling range of poetry and essays. Heavy emphasis will be placed on encouraging and examining student work within a workshop format, but this course will also include gallery visits and engagements with local working poets and artists. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: Creative Writing 224, sophomore standing, a writing sample of three to five poems, and consent of the instructor. Conference. 

Regarding Revision
One-unit semester course. “I don’t write poems,” poet Robert Lowell famously said, “I rewrite them.” In this special topics studio we will focus intently on the art of re-visioning your poetry through multiple drafts to explore how the poem might become its truest self. While not a workshop in the traditional sense, this course will operate closer to the mode of a workshop in an old garage: placing our previously written (and occasionally newly written) poems on metaphorical sawhorses and trying their shape, their sound, their polish or exposed rough edges. Students will be presented with a variety of revision strategies employed by multiple generations of poets while also testing methods to re-vision old strategies anew and in particular for their own voice and their own poems. Together we will work to demystify the often confounding, yet very gratifying, task of revision. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: any 200-level poetry-writing course (instructor may consider exceptions on a case-by-case basis), and a writing sample of three to five poems, sophomore standing, and consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

“When Ecstasy is Inconvenient”—The Poet and the Problem of Livelihood
One-unit semester course. Joanne Kyger writes: “The whole occupation of poet, if it does exist as an identity in the current society, is one that has to do with a spiritual, cultural practice of words, and can’t be ‘bought.’” In pursuit of that ideal, a fundamental concern remains—how then does the poet live? What independence is available in the current economy to the working poet? In this advanced topics poetry workshop, our collaborative investigation will include weekly writing exercises, readings focused on resilience and community in art and art making, and a candid engagement with questions (some dirtier than others) attendant to money, vocation, and viable, spirited practice. Heavy emphasis will be placed on weekly writing exercises and attentive peer-centered review within a workshop format, but the course will also introduce professional practices with recommended tools, considerations, and reservations. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a previous poetry course at Reed, a writing sample of three to five poems, and consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Creative Writing 481 - Independent Study

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Independent writing projects. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor and the division.

Computer Science 121 - Computer Science Fundamentals I

One-unit semester course. An introduction to computer science, covering topics including elementary algorithms and data structures, functional and procedural abstraction, data abstraction, object orientation, logic, and the digital representations of numbers. Emphasis is on mathematical problems and calculations and on recursive algorithms and data structures. The course includes a significant programming laboratory component where students will solve computational problems using a high-level language. The mechanisms for processing and executing programs will be surveyed. Prerequisite: three years of high school mathematics. Lecture-laboratory. 

Computer Science 122 - Intermediate Computer Science Fundamentals I

One-half-unit semester course. An introduction to computer science, covering topics including elementary algorithms and data structures, functional and procedural abstraction, data abstraction, object orientation, logic, and the digital representations of numbers. Emphasis is on mathematical problems and calculations and on recursive algorithms and data structures. The course includes a significant programming laboratory component where students will solve computational problems using a high-level language. The mechanisms for processing and executing programs will be surveyed. This is an accelerated version of Computer Science 121 for students with significant programming experience. Prerequisite: three years of high school mathematics. Lecture-laboratory.

Computer Science 221 - Computer Science Fundamentals II

One-unit semester course. A second course in computer science, an introduction to advanced structures and techniques. The course will develop the foundations of computing, providing an introduction to theoretical models of computation and also to practical computer system construction. Selected topics include digital design, from gates to processors; the construction of interpreters, including language parsing and run-time systems; parallelism and concurrency; and universality. There will be significant programming projects exploring a number of these topics, and students will be introduced to the advanced programming techniques and data structures that support their construction. Prerequisite: Computer Science 121 or equivalent. Lecture-laboratory. 

Computer Science 315 - Ethics and Public Policy

One-unit semester course. This course examines the ethical and public policy questions raised by new computer technologies. Topics vary by year but usually include criminal hacking and cyber warfare, intellectual property laws, data privacy, and fairness of algorithmic decision-making. Prerequisite: Computer Science 221 and Humanities 110 or equivalent. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Computer Science 351 - Software Engineering

One-unit semester course. This course explores the process of designing and implementing software. The course will cover software design methodologies, requirements design, design patterns, software design diagrams, testing strategies, code reviews, project plans, and software presentation. Students will work in groups on both writing and programming assignments. Prerequisite: Computer Science 221. Lecture-conference.

Computer Science 361 - Parallelism and Concurrency

One-unit semester course. We investigate the theory behind achieving high performance on high-throughput multiprocessor systems. In the first half of the course we develop and analyze parallel algorithms for tightly coupled synchronous systems that use either shared memory or message passing to communicate. In the second half we look at loosely coupled systems, studying efficient mechanisms for synchronizing access to shared data structures, and focusing particularly on proving their correctness. Though we look at abstract models of these systems throughout, students will also be asked to implement their ideas on current multiprocessor hardware. Prerequisites: Computer Science 221 and 382. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Computer Science 377 - Artificial Intelligence

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to the construction of software systems that emulate intelligent behavior. Topics include knowledge representation, reasoning under uncertainty, logic programming, planning, and algorithmic strategies for large-scale combinatorial search. Students will explore these topics with a series of implementation projects. Prerequisite: Computer Science 382. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Computer Science 378 - Deep Learning

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to deep neural architectures and their training. Beginning with the fundamentals of regression, optimization, and regularization, the course will then survey a variety of architectures and their associated applications. Students will develop projects that implement deep-learning systems to perform various tasks. Prerequisites: Mathematics 201 and Computer Science 121. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Computer Science 379 - Natural Language Processing

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to natural language processing and computational linguistics. Topics include computational approaches to text categorization, syntactic analysis, semantic analysis, and machine translation. The course emphasizes modern techniques that leverage deep learning models. Prerequisite: Computer Science 378. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Computer Science 381 - Algorithms Programming Seminar

One-half-unit semester course. This course is a natural companion to the study of algorithms and data structures as covered in Computer Science 382, the required companion to this course, building from the implementation experience gained in Computer Science Fundamentals I and II. In weekly sessions, students work on programming problems together and discuss their solutions. Group work is strongly emphasized and encouraged. The goal of the course is to give students more programming practice with the material they are learning in Computer Science 382. Prerequisite: Computer Science 221. Corequisite: Computer Science 382. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Computer Science 382 - Algorithms and Data Structures

One-unit semester course. An introduction to the design and analysis of algorithms. The course will focus on various abstract data types and associated algorithms. The course will include implementation of some of these ideas on a computer. Prerequisite: Computer Science 121 or equivalent and Mathematics 112 and 113. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as Mathematics 382. 

Computer Science 383 - Advanced Programming Seminar

One-half-unit semester course. This course is an advanced follow-up to the study of algorithms and data structures, as covered in Computer Science Fundamentals I and II and in Computer Science 382, with emphasis on the problem-solving and implementation related to the concepts learned in those courses. In weekly sessions, students work on programming problems together and discuss their solutions. Group work is strongly emphasized and encouraged. The goal of the course is to give students exposure to a variety of programming puzzles and to give them practice carrying their algorithmic ideas into working code. Prerequisites: Computer Science 221 and 382. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Computer Science 384 - Programming Language Design and Implementation

One-unit semester course. A study of the organization and structure of modern programming languages. This course will survey key programming language paradigms, including functional, object-oriented, and logic-based languages, with particular focus on the fundamental concepts underlying them, including their syntax, semantics, and type systems. It will take a mathematical approach, examining several strong ties with formal logic and the mechanization of proof, especially logics and proof methods related to the properties of programs. Prerequisites: Computer Science 221 and one of Mathematics 112 or 113. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Computer Science 385 - Computer Graphics

One-unit semester course. Introduction to computer image synthesis and mathematical modeling for computer graphics applications. Topics include image processing, 2-D and 3-D modeling techniques such as curve and surface representation, geometric algorithms for intersection and hidden surface removal, 3-D rendering, and animation. Prerequisite: Computer Science 121 and Mathematics 201. Lecture-conference. 

Computer Science 387 - Computability and Complexity

One-unit semester course. Introduction to models of computation including finite automata, formal languages, and Turing machines, culminating in universality and undecidability. An introduction to resource-bounded models of computation and algorithmic complexity classes, including NP and PSPACE, and the notions of relative hardness and completeness. Prerequisites: Computer Science 121 or equivalent and Mathematics 112 and 113. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as Mathematics 387. 

Computer Science 388 - Cryptography

One-unit semester course. An introduction to modern cryptography. Topics include private- and public-key encryption, message authentication codes, pseudorandomness, and digital signatures. Emphasis is placed on formal definitions of security, proofs of security, and key constructions. Prerequisite: Computer Science 382 or 387 or Mathematics 382, 387, or 332. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as Mathematics 388. 

Computer Science 389 - Computer Systems

One-unit semester course. A study of the design and implementation of computing systems, surveying computer architecture, machine organization, the hardware-software interface, memory and storage subsystems, compilation and run time, and concurrent and networked programming. Students learn to pay particular attention to the underlying factors that affect a program’s performance. An introduction to approaches to problems related to the synchronization and coordination of independently executing processes, and also to the structure of distributed and network-based services. Prerequisite: Computer Science 221. Lecture-conference. 

Computer Science 393 - Operating System Design and Implementation

One-unit semester course. This course covers the low-level details of the software that drives computing hardware, spanning such disparate systems as supercomputers, the internet backbone, laptops, and smartphones. Topics include kernel architectures, scheduling, memory management, security policies and mechanisms, assurance, file systems, networking, virtualization, real time, safety-critical and security-critical systems. Students will implement several operating system components. Prerequisite: Computer Science 389. Lecture-conference.

Computer Science 394 - Principles of Compiler Design

One-unit semester course. An in-depth look at the design and construction of programming language compilers, covering the basic phases of the compilation process, including syntactic analysis and parsing, semantic analysis, intermediate representations of code, dataflow analysis, register allocation, code generation, and other optimizations. Students will develop a working compiler and run-time system for a programming language. Time permitting, the course surveys advanced techniques such as compilation of functional programming languages or compilation for high-performance hardware. Prerequisite: Computer Science 389 or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Computer Science 395 - Computer Architecture

One-unit semester course. A course that explores the implementation of computer processors, with focus on techniques and designs that seek high performance. We look at pipelining, superscalar designs, multiprocessor systems, cache coherence in multiprocessors, graphics processing units, embedded systems, and network processors. Prerequisite: Computer Science 389 or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Computer Science 396 - Computer Networks

One-unit semester course. A broad-ranging exploration of topics in computer networks that includes history, communications theory, network architectures, internet protocols, client-server models, strategies for improving network security, and the social impact of modern networking. The course emphasizes both theory and practice and therefore includes both mathematical analysis and programming projects written in Python. Prerequisites: Computer Science 221 and one of Mathematics 112 or 113. Lecture-conference.

Computer Science 421 - Computing Theory Research Seminar

One-half-unit semester course. This course is an exploration of research in an area of theoretical computer science. Example topics include randomized or parallel algorithms, approximation algorithms, quantum computation or complexity, and zero-knowledge proof systems. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: Computer Science 382 and 387. Lecture-conference. May be repeated for credit.

Computer Science 441 - Topics in Computer Science Theory

One-unit semester course. Exploration of topics from advanced algorithm design and theoretical computer science including complexity theory, quantum computation, and approximation algorithms, as selected by the instructor. Prerequisites: Mathematics 201 and Computer Science or Mathematics 382 and 387, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years. Cross-listed as Mathematics 441. 

Not offered 2022–23.

Computer Science 442 - Topics in Computer Science Systems

One-unit semester course. A study of the design and implementation techniques used in a particular area of computer science as selected by the instructor. Students will implement a working system in that area. Recent offerings have covered distributed and networked systems, compilers, and computer game design. Prerequisite: Computer Science 389 or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years. 

Not offered 2022–23.

Computer Science 470 - Thesis (Computer Science)

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Computer Science 481 - Independent Study

One-half-unit semester course. Primarily for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: approval of the instructor and the division.

Dance 100 - Dance Production

Variable (zero or one-half)-unit semester course. Students, faculty, and staff work together to create departmental dance productions. In this class, students learn the different parts of onstage and backstage work that are required to make a dance production. Students also learn the practices of collaborating and producing. Roles available include performer in thesis concerts or work as a dramaturg, designer, stage manager, or assistant choreographer in thesis and/or biannual departmental concerts. This course is available to majors and nonmajors, and students are admitted to the course by audition or departmental approval. All students, regardless of experience, are welcome to take this class, and if a student is interested in this class, the faculty will work with the student to help them find a role. Credit/no credit only. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Dance 101 - Dance Technique

One-half-unit semester course. Through this course, students may take technique classes in ballet, Argentine tango, hip-hop, or other dance forms; students should consult the schedule of classes for specific techniques and levels offered in a given semester. Technique classes will be accompanied by readings and discussions that place movement practices in their historical and contemporary contexts. To qualify for one-half credit, students must have taken or be currently enrolled in a graded (rather than a credit/no credit) dance department course; each graded dance department course taken allows a student to earn credit for two semesters (one unit) in Dance 101. Students may repeat Dance 101 and/or enroll in more than one section for credit. A maximum of four units (eight semesters) in Dance 101 may be accrued overall. This course may be applied toward the dance studio requirements for majors and minors. Credit/no credit only. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Dance 111 - Introduction to Contemporary Dance: Mind in Motion

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Designed for students with no previous dance training, this course provides a foundation for the further study of a variety of dance forms. Principles of alignment, body mechanics, and locomotion will be explored through the practice of movement vocabularies drawn from modern and contemporary concert dance. Though primary work will be in the studio, the course includes a discussion of critical perspectives from which to view contemporary dance performance, and viewing of dance performances both live and on video. Students enrolled in the course for one unit will undertake additional reading, viewing, and writing assignments. This course may be applied toward the dance studio requirements. Studio.

Dance 112 - Introduction to Contemporary Dance: Cross-Cultural Contexts

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. This course emphasizes the study of modern and contemporary dance technique and introduces elements of movement composition through the creation of collaborative choreography projects. Active work in the studio, along with readings and discussions, is designed to locate contemporary dance within cross-cultural contexts. Students enrolled in the course for one unit will carry out additional projects in choreography and additional written work. Dance 111 strongly recommended but not required. This course may be applied toward the dance studio requirements. Studio.

Dance 201 - Introduction to Dance Studies: History and Culture

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to dance studies as an interdisciplinary field within the humanities and social sciences. Broadly defined, dance studies engages in critical analyses of dance practices from historical and cultural perspectives. Throughout the course of the semester, students explore and affirm dance as a vital cultural practice by considering a broad range of concert and social dance practices across time and geographic place. Course material pays particular attention to how dance articulates complex questions around race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, and nation. Written and embodied assignments introduce and explore key methodologies in the field, including movement description and analysis, critical assessment of embodied practice, archival research, and interviews. No previous dance experience is necessary. This course may be applied toward the dance studies requirements. Conference.

Dance 202 - Ballet for All of Us

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Ballet classes serve a wide demographic of student, professional, and recreational dancers of diverse backgrounds. However, ballet continues to be among the least racially diverse of the performing arts, one that can reinforce gender stereotypes and unhealthy body images. How might we reenvision the practice of ballet to include our own bodies, histories, and perspectives and to serve our goals as individuals? How might ballet be for all of us? In this course, we will disrupt the hierarchy of ballet as “high art,” instead approaching it as “an art” that we can use towards our own agendas. Our primary work will be movement based; we will investigate how ballet class can enhance our own dance practices. We will also draw on our individual embodied histories and movement practices, putting these into dialogue with ballet to deepen our understanding of dance practice more broadly. For those taking the course for full credit, readings on race, gender, and body image in ballet will contextualize our studio work. Previous experience in choreographed movement (any form of dance, martial arts, etc.) is recommended but not required. This course may be applied toward dance studio requirements for majors and minors. Studio. May be repeated for credit. 

Dance 211 - Contemporary Dance I: Invention and Design

One-unit semester course. Designed for the intermediate dancer, this course combines an exploration of modern and contemporary dance techniques with an extensive introduction to movement composition. Work in both areas emphasizes movement invention, design, and development. Course work includes attendance at professional dance performances, video viewings, discussions, and critiques. Students will perform their work in the end-of-semester concert. This course is appropriate for students with previous training in dance technique. This course may be applied toward the dance studio requirements. Studio.

Dance 212 - Contemporary Dance II: Analysis in Motion

One-unit semester course. This course is designed to deepen students’ technical and compositional development in contemporary dance with an emphasis on movement analysis. Broadly defined, movement analysis refers to methods for describing, visualizing, interpreting, and documenting human movement. In terms of technique, students develop strength, flexibility, and versatility in movement through immersion in classic and contemporary vocabularies, focusing on the use of weight, musicality, articulation, and alignment in dance. This technical work complements compositional work, viewings, readings, and writing assignments that approach movement analysis from a variety of perspectives, including aesthetic and quotidian movement. This course may be applied toward the dance studio requirements. Studio.

Not offered 2022–23.

Dance 232 - Community Dance and Collective Creation

One-unit semester course. Community Dance at Reed (2016–present, www.reed.edu/dance/community-dance) aims to bring together members of the Reed College and broader Portland communities through community dance as a form of social intervention and collective creation. Community Dance at Reed welcomes all bodies, with a critical awareness of how race, class, ability, gender, age, and sexuality impact the ways we relate to ourselves and one another. As a community project, the program offers creative movement sessions that are free and open to the public. Practice sessions employ improvisation-based techniques that strive to connect movement with salient social and political questions. Across the semester, we collaboratively create a dance work based on social, cultural, and identity-based themes of shared importance to group members. Enrolled students read and discuss the literature on community dance and performance, consider ethical and practice-based questions, and critically engage with case studies of community performance projects. Students develop and lead community movement sessions, and codirect the creation of the dance work with community members. No previous dance experience is necessary. This course may be applied toward either the dance studio or studies requirements. Studio-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Dance 241 - Dancing Latinx America

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to Latinx American dance studies. This course takes a hemispheric perspective and considers a wide range of social, concert, and popular dance practices from the United States, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. From a disciplinary perspective, this course explores the intersection of three fields: dance studies, Latin American studies, and Latinx studies. At this intersection, it engages the methods used by scholars working from historical, ethnographic, queer, feminist, and ethnic studies standpoints to ask: What is the relationship between dance and Latinx American identity (national, personal, and/or transnational)? How do dance practices reinforce and/or deconstruct racialized, gendered, and classed stereotypes? How do movement forms and performance styles mobilize, remember, or reimagine Latinx identities and histories? No previous dance experience is necessary. This course may be applied toward the dance studies requirements. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 261.

Not offered 2022–23.

Dance 252 - Improvisation

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Since the early 1960s, improvisation has played an increasingly sophisticated role in contemporary dance. This course will investigate contemporary improvisational practices that are at once creative, performative, and philosophic. Our primary mode of investigation will be moving—delving into a wide variety of improvisational practices that may include solo dance practices intended to extend or deepen our ranges (artistic, technical, thematic) as dance artists; choreographic improvisation, a constellation of improvisational practices in which movement scores are developed and refined over time, and which has influenced changing views of the function of performance and the relationships between makers, performers, and viewers of dance; and contact improvisation, a partnering form that explores the exchange of physical support, the practice of which has challenged notions of gender roles, ability and disability, and community structure. Our practice-based research will be contextualized by readings and viewings. Students enrolled in the course for one unit will undertake additional readings and an extended research project. One year of dance technique or one year of creative work in visual art, music, theatre, or creative writing is highly recommended. This course may be applied toward either the dance studio or studies requirements. Studio-conference. May be repeated for credit.

Not offered 2022–23.

Dance 253 - Improvisation: Solo Forms and Shared Practices

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. This course will investigate a variety of solo improvisational practices that enhance holistic experiences of dancing; expand solo movement repertoires artistically, physically, and conceptually; and attend to personal movement aesthetics, philosophies, and intentions. Drawing on a variety of influential dance practices including authentic movement, site dance, improvisational technologies, and others, we will focus on the potential of these practices to expand and deepen our improvisational knowledge as soloists while sharing our solo practices within a community of artists/movers/peers. Students enrolled in the course for one unit will undertake additional reading, viewing, and studio-based work. This course may apply toward the dance studio or studies requirement for majors and minors. Studio-conference. May be repeated for credit.

Dance 260 - Dances of Bali, Indonesia

One-unit semester course. This course offers the opportunity for students to combine contextual study of Southeast Asian culture and performance arts with studio activities in dance. The class provides social, cultural, and aesthetic views of the performing arts in Southeast Asia with a special focus on Bali, Indonesia. The course will examine selected ritual, social, and court dances of Bali such as Kechak and Legong in cultural and historical context. Students will be introduced to technical aspects of Balinese dance and its relation to music. Studio sessions will bring these ideas to life as students learn basic dance movements and musical structures. Lectures, readings, films, and images will cover the diversity of the island, the role of dance and music in Balinese culture, and the challenges of globalization. No previous dance experience is necessary. This course may be applied toward either the dance studio or studies requirements. Conference-studio.

Not offered 2022–23.

Dance 270 - Dance, Race, and Gender

One-unit semester course. How do global dance practices perform and/or contest racial and gender identities? What is the relationship between quotidian and danced identities? This course introduces and explores the intersections between dance studies and constructions of race and gender with special attention to how these fields intersect with questions of labor, class, ability, and sexuality. It considers a wide range of historical and contemporary practices ranging across social dance, concert dance, site-specific performance, dance as visual art, and popular forms. Work inside and outside the classroom focuses on readings, viewings, class discussion, and written assignments; however, students also engage in movement workshops and dance practice–based classes throughout the course of the semester. Dance 201 is recommended but not required. This course may be applied toward the dance studies requirements. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 260.

Dance 311 - Contemporary Dance III: Action and Interaction

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Designed for high-intermediate- and advanced-level dancers, this course will combine rigorous technical training with work in choreography. Work in contemporary dance technique will include detailed work in alignment and focus on moving with energy and precision. Choreographic work will address compositional elements of dance—including action, space, time, gesture, structure, image, and interaction—as inherently meaningful catalysts for thinking choreographically. Studio work will be supported by video viewings, discussions, and critiques, as well as attendance at professional dance performances. Student work will be performed in the end-of-semester concert. Prerequisite: Dance 211, 212, 312, or 313, or equivalent experience. This course may be applied toward the dance studio requirements. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Not offered 2022–23.

Dance 312 - Contemporary Dance IV: Embodied Research

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Designed for high-intermediate- and advanced-level dancers, this course combines rigorous technical training with work in choreography. Work in contemporary dance technique will emphasize clarity and specificity within complex movement phrases and include floor work and partnering. Choreographic work will focus on embodied research through projects that consider conceptual, thematic, and processual frameworks for generating performance works. Studio work will be supported by attendance at professional dance performances, video viewings, discussions, and critiques, and students will perform in the end-of-semester concert. Prerequisite: Dance 211, 212, 311, or 313, or equivalent experience. This course may be applied toward the dance studio requirements. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Not offered 2022–23.

Dance 313 - Contemporary Dance V: Biography/Autobiography

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Designed for high-intermediate- and advanced-level dancers, this course combines rigorous technical training with work in choreography. Contemporary dance vocabularies will provide a platform from which to hone technical facilities and approach nuanced movement material. Work in choreography will investigate biographical and autobiographical sources as source materials for performance. A critical review of significant choreographic works employing biography or autobiography will inform our on-going investigation of ways to approach and develop these source materials. Through the use of movement, text, vocalizations, journal writing, memory games and storytelling, students will create performances based on biographical narratives and real-life experiences. Work in this course will include attendance at professional dance performances, video viewings, discussions, and critiques, and students will perform in the end-of-semester concert. Prerequisite: Dance 211, 212, 311, or 312, or equivalent experience. This course may be applied toward the dance studio requirements. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Not offered 2022–23.

Dance 321 - Contemporary Performance Ensemble

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. This course focuses on performance through the development, rehearsal, and production of contemporary dance works. Students will address the technical, stylistic, and interpretive challenges of choreographic material presented as well as develop and manipulate choreographic material of their own. Work in and out of class leading to performance will be supported through small group sessions and movement-based projects, as well as readings, viewings, written responses, and critiques. Requires rehearsal outside of class times. Prerequisite: instructor’s permission or by audition. This course may be applied toward the dance studio requirements. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Not offered 2022–23.

Dance 335 - Special Projects in Choreography: Political Bodies

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. This special-topics course will explore moments in history when dance and politics intersect and how these moments can inform our creative processes. The power dynamics of where, when, how, and by whom dances are performed will be investigated alongside perspectives and value systems. Prerequisite: one year of dance technique and one year of creative work in dance, music, theatre, writing, or the visual arts. This course may be applied toward either the dance studio or studies requirements. Studio-conference. May be repeated for credit.

Dance 351 - Dance Traditions of Southeast Asia

One-unit semester course. This course provides an in-depth investigation of the cultural, historical, and artistic significance of choreographic works from Southeast Asia in the context of religious, social, and political development. We will explore classical dance forms including the Peking Opera of China, court dances of Cambodia, ceremonial and ritual dances of Myanmar and Indonesia, and the performing arts of Vietnam, along with contemporary Southeast Asian dance works. Students will learn excerpts of traditional dances as a base from which to explore cultural and anthropological perspectives of performing arts in Southeast Asia, and how these perspectives influence creative processes of contemporary Southeast Asian dance artists. This course may be applied toward either the dance studio or studies requirements. Lecture-conference-studio.

Not offered 2022–23.

Dance 362 - Dance Ethnography

One-unit semester course. This research seminar examines methods and theories that engage in and emerge from cultural analysis of dance practices. It explores the relationship between dance and ethnography through readings, performance, discussion, and independent research. Students read foundational texts in the field as well as recent ethnographies to address the politics of representing and engaging others, situating positionality, accounting for the transnational circulation of performance practices, and serving as advocate and/or witness. Assigned ethnographies emphasize the relationships between dance and race, nation, class, sexuality, and gender. Dance 201 recommended but not required. This course may be applied toward the dance studies requirements and as a junior seminar. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Dance 365 - Contemporary Global Dance

One-unit semester course. This course asks what it means to dance “locally” in a global world. It considers how contemporary global dance practices in historical context challenge neat distinctions between Western and non-Western traditions and serve as active sites that construct and/or critique these classifications. To explore dance as a complex site of cultural negotiation, contestation, and exchange, the course traces transnational dance diasporas across the global north/south axis and across the Atlantic Ocean. Students examine how global dance flows animate the formation of national, racial, ethnic, and gendered (post)colonial identities, chart global migration patterns, mobilize transnational political economies, and complicate facile understandings of cultural authenticity. Prerequisite: Dance 201 or consent of the instructor. This course may be applied toward the dance studies requirements and as a junior seminar. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 365.

Dance 411 - Advanced Technique: Performance Practices

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Designed for the advanced dancer, this course offers a rigorous examination of technique, integrating vocabulary from classical and contemporary dance with choreological conceptions of the body in motion. Emphasis will be placed on understanding and embodying the conceptual framework of movement material and the ways in which that understanding is integrated in performance. Focused assignments will center on how varying approaches to dance performance relate to genre and conceptions of the performative. With permission of the instructor, the course may be repeated as an advanced practicum. Prerequisite: Dance 311, 312, or 313 or equivalent experience. This course may be applied toward the dance studio requirements. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Dance 470 - Thesis (Dance)

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Dance 481 - Independent Study

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Prerequisite: approval of instructor and division.

Economics 201 - Introduction to Economic Analysis

One-unit semester course. This course will introduce students to the analytical approaches and tools of the economics discipline, and how these are used to examine current issues and problems that arise in the functioning of economic systems. Microeconomic theories of consumption, production, and exchange provide much of the analytical framework that will be utilized, although we will also explore some relevant applications to the macroeconomy. A central feature of this course is the examination of markets and how they determine what is produced and how it is allocated. We also devote some attention to evaluating market outcomes, to thinking about remedies to resource allocation problems that markets cannot solve, and to thinking about the factors that determine long-run productive capacity and income potential. Lecture-conference.

Economics 304 - Intermediate Macroeconomics

One-unit semester course. A survey of basic theories of economic growth and business cycles using graphical and algebraic methods. Studies the relationships among aggregate economic variables such as GDP, inflation, interest rates, unemployment, and exchange rates. Analysis of macroeconomic policy issues. Prerequisite: Economics 201 or consent of instructor. Lecture-conference.

Economics 311 - Survey of Econometric Methods

One-unit semester course. An introduction to applications of empirical methods in economics. Students are introduced to the nature and sources of economic data and basic concepts of statistics and econometrics. Topics include the estimation of econometric models, hypothesis testing, and forecasting. Emphasis is placed on the use of these techniques in empirical economic literature. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Lecture-conference.

Economics 312 - Theory and Practice of Econometrics

One-unit semester course. An introduction to the statistical methods commonly used in economic research. Classroom development of theoretical material is combined with extensive hands-on practice of econometric techniques. Statistical methods discussed include estimation and inference in simple and multiple linear regression models, detection and correction of autocorrelation and heteroskedasticity, time-series models and distributed lags, and estimation of systems of simultaneous equations. Considerable emphasis is placed on learning to specify, implement, and evaluate tests of economic hypotheses. Prerequisites: Economics 201 and Mathematics 141 or similar introduction to statistics, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Economics 313 - Microeconomic Theory

One-unit semester course. This course provides a thorough exposition of neoclassical theories of producer and consumer behavior. Considerable attention is devoted to understanding the economic concept of efficiency and demonstrating the efficiency of competitive equilibrium in a general equilibrium framework. The efficiency of market outcomes under alternative assumptions is also examined, and some time is devoted to discussing social choice theory and the limits of the market. Prerequisites: Economics 201 and Mathematics 111, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Economics 314 - Macroeconomic Theory

One-unit semester course. A detailed introduction to modern theories of economic growth and business cycles. Emphasizes the derivation of relationships among aggregate variables from assumptions about the behavior of households and firms. Examines empirical evidence for and against macroeconomic theories. Prerequisites: Economics 201 and Mathematics 111, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Economics 315 - Game Theory

One-unit semester course. Game theory is the study of strategy. This course introduces students to game theory and its application in a wide range of situations. We study various classes of games, including static and dynamic games as well as those of complete and incomplete information. We also consider various solution concepts, including iterated elimination of dominant strategies and Nash equilibrium. Numerous refinements of the Nash equilibrium concept, including subgame perfect Nash equilibrium, Bayesian Nash equilibrium, and perfect Bayesian equilibrium, are also considered. We apply game theory to the study of competition, the commons, bargaining, auctions, conventions, institutions, and political decision-making. Prerequisite: Economics 201 and Mathematics 111, or the equivalent. Lecture-conference.

Economics 323 - American Economic History

One-unit semester course. This course introduces the student to the economic history of the United States from colonial times to the present. Emphasis is placed on understanding the sources of economic growth and key developments in the historical economy. Topics to be covered include colonial markets for labor and land, the economics of slavery, and the Great Depression. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Economics 311 or 312 recommended. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Economics 328 - Latin America: Economic History and Policy Challenges

One-unit semester course. This course traces the economic development of Latin America from colonial times to the present. The first half of the course explores the economic history of Latin America, focusing on the creation of economic institutions that have shaped the growth and specific features of Latin American economies from the Spanish and Portuguese conquests through the second half of the twentieth century. Among the topics that will be studied in this part of the course are land property and reform, coercive labor institutions, development of export-oriented sectors, and the political economy of reform in the Latin American republics. The second part of the course examines current public policy issues such as crime, housing, inequality, and education from a microeconomic perspective. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Economics 342 - International Macroeconomics

One-unit semester course. This course examines the macroeconomic linkages between countries. The core of macroeconomic theory is extended to the open economy. In this context, a number of issues are addressed, including current account imbalances, the role of fiscal and monetary policy in an open economy, and the choice of an exchange rate regime. Illustrations come from the adoption and abandonment of the gold standard, the European monetary union, and financial crises both past and present. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Economics 343 - Behavioral Finance

One-unit semester course. This course will provide an introductory overview of the structure and operations of financial markets, basic theories of portfolio management, and how recent contributions from behavioral economics have improved our understanding of human decision-making within a social and highly interactive context. Students will learn about the basic functioning of financial markets in terms of trading, arbitraging, hedging, leveraging, etc.; their major products, like commodities, bonds, stock, options; and the basic theories of portfolio management and price formation. We will discuss how original theories have evolved to include contributions from behavioral economics about decision-making under risk and uncertainty, including behavioral biases. A discussion of price equilibria and the efficient market hypothesis will be combined with criticisms from behavioral finance on the existence of market bubbles and price anomalies, like the equity puzzle, herding, over-under reaction to new information, etc. The course will be mostly theoretical, but it will include occasional practical exercises in which students will gather actual financial data and perform simple corporate stock valuations. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Economics 344 - International Monetary Systems

One-unit semester course. This course explores the history and functioning of international monetary arrangements and economic relations from the nineteenth century to the present day. Topics include the operation of the gold standard, the Bretton Woods exchange rate regime, the collapse of this regime and the advent of flexible exchange rates, the implementation of the European monetary union, and recent exchange rate and financial crises experienced in Europe, Asia, and Latin America. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Economics 348 - Economics of the Public Sector

One-unit semester course. This course considers the role of government in the economy. We examine the theoretical rationale for government intervention in the economy and the economic consequences of such government intervention, with examples coming primarily from the United States. In addition, the course studies how taxation affects economic efficiency, income distribution, capital formation, and microeconomic incentives. Major topics include environmental regulation, publicly funded education, welfare, social security, health care, tax reform, and international public finance. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Conference.

Economics 351 - Environmental Economics

One-unit semester course. This course presents an economic analysis of environmental issues and policies. We will examine the impact of the economy on the environment, the importance of the environment to the economy, and how policies such as transferable permits, subsidies, taxes, and regulations affect the environment and economy. Concepts covered in this course include static efficiency, equity, property rights, discounting, cost-benefit analysis, risk and uncertainty, market failure, nonmarket valuation techniques, and sustainability. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Conference.

Economics 352 - Natural Resource Economics

One-unit semester course. This course presents an economic analysis of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources. Concepts introduced include static and dynamic efficiency, equity, property rights, discounting, market failure, nonmarket valuation, and sustainability. The course will cover current and proposed policies for resource management such as transferable quotas, taxes, subsidies, regulations, and public versus private ownership. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Economics 358 - Urban Economics

One-unit semester course. In this course, the focus is on the city, in determining its costs and benefits as well as location and land use. We explore policy issues specific to local governments in urban areas, including zoning, housing and segregation, poverty, homelessness, transportation, education, and crime. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Economics 362 - Industrial Organization

One-unit semester course. In a market economy, firms decide what and how much is produced. This course introduces the student to the study of firm behavior, providing a solid foundation on the core theory that explains firms’ incentives and market structures. We also explore real-world application of these concepts with an emphasis on the modern U.S. economy. Topics to be covered include perfect competition, monopoly, dynamic oligopoly and collusion, antitrust and mergers, and vertical relationships. Prerequisite: Economics 201 and Mathematics 111, or the equivalent. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Economics 364 - Economics of Population, Gender, and Race

One-unit semester course. This course will consider race and gender as they influence and are reflected in decisions about schooling, work, and family. Using microeconomic models of marriage, fertility, migration, labor supply, and human capital investment, we will analyze and try to explain observed trends. Drawing on well-established literatures in the fields of labor economics and economic demography to provide frameworks for our discussions, we will consider the theoretical and empirical findings in light of their potential contributions to policy. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Conference.

Economics 366 - Jobs, Technology, and Trade

One-unit semester course. Investigation of the causes and consequences of changing patterns of labor demand. We will seek to understand how technological innovation and a rising volume of trade influence the structure of labor demand and the organization of the workplace. Effects on wage levels, wage inequality, and patterns of employment will be examined. The role of worker representation, in various forms, will be considered along with an analysis of factors that contribute to labor organizing efforts and outcomes. We will focus our attention on the U.S. labor market although comparative analysis with the experiences of other industrialized countries will enhance our understanding. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Economics 369 - Growth and Inequality

One-unit semester course. This course will examine the historical evolution of modeling economic growth and development. We will first survey theories of economic growth and the associated empirical evidence in order to understand inequality across countries. We will then examine policies, at both the macroeconomic and microeconomic level, aimed at alleviating poverty and improving the lives of individuals in developing economies. This course will conclude with a brief examination of inequality in developed countries, focusing on the sources and evolution of inequality in the United States. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Economics 371 - Law and Economics

One-unit semester course. Applications of microeconomic theory focused on common law and the legal system. Topics include the effect of the legal system on resource allocation, the establishment and scope of property rights, allocation of risk and efficient investments in precaution, product liability, and an economic analysis of criminal behavior and punishment. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Economics 382 - Economics of Development

One-unit semester course. We consider the economic problems and policies of poor countries, with attention to the concept and measurement of economic development; human capital investments over the life cycle; gender and household decision-making; land, labor, credit, and insurance markets; inequality and development; the role of institutions and the state; and debates over the effectiveness of foreign aid. Factors and constraints influencing economic decision-making, including market failures and potential strategies for their resolution, are a recurring theme. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Economics 383 - International Trade

One-unit semester course. This course analyzes the causes and consequences of international trade. The theory of international trade and the effects of trade policy tools are developed in both perfect and imperfect competition, with reference to the empirical evidence. This framework serves as a context for a discussion of several important issues: the effect of trade on income inequality, the relationship between trade and the environment, the importance of the World Trade Organization, strategic trade policy, the role of trade in developing countries, and the effects of free trade agreements. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Conference.

Economics 385 - China‘s Economy in Transition

One-unit semester course. In the course of a few decades, China has launched itself from a poor country to a rising world power, at the same time substantially improving living standards and dramatically transforming its production base. What steps did China take to bring about these changes? We will examine China’s economic reforms and development, considering the goals and impacts of various policy measures along with ongoing challenges. Topics to be considered include population, labor, income inequality, land, food production, industry, foreign relations, credit and financial markets, macroeconomic policy, and the environment. While China will be our central focus, students will have some opportunities to compare and contrast with other country experiences. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Conference.

Economics 391 - Health Economics

One-unit semester course. This course is a survey of major topics in health economics with a focus on the United States and other developed countries. We will examine health behaviors, health services, and health outcomes through the lens of microeconomic theory. Much of the course will examine market failures in health and public policies designed to address them. Substantive topics include Medicaid, Medicare, obesity, smoking, alcohol, early life health conditions, domestic violence, and pollution. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Economics 392 - Health in Poor Countries

One-unit semester course. Poor health is one of the biggest problems facing poor people in poor countries. Diarrhea, HIV/AIDS, intestinal helminths, iodine deficiency, malaria, sleeping sickness, tuberculosis, vitamin A deficiency, and yellow fever are common problems in much of the developing world. These health problems reduce happiness directly, as well as indirectly through decreased cognitive and physical ability in productive activities. This course uses microeconomic and econometric tools to examine the causes and consequences of a few of these sources of poor health. Unlike a medical or public health approach to these topics, we will focus on behavioral aspects of these problems. Some of the questions we will explore include: How responsive is demand for health inputs to changes in the price of health inputs? How does economic activity affect health behavior? How does information affect health behavior? Prerequisite: Economics 201. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Economics 393 - Global Health and Consumer Behavior

One-unit semester course. This course explores global health care, health outcomes, and health insurance markets from a consumer’s perspective. Students will apply health insurance theory to health care systems across the globe. We will read and discuss current literature about health phenomena and disease burdens in both developed and developing countries. Students will learn to analyze health behaviors from an economic perspective by, for example, evaluating how responsive demand for health inputs is to changes in the price of those inputs, exploring how information affects health behaviors, and determining the value of health insurance. Prerequisite: Economics 201. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Economics 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Economics 481 - Independent Reading

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Credit in proportion to work done. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

English 201 - Introduction to Narrative

British Jewish Experience
One-unit semester course. Expelled in 1290, Jews officially returned to England in 1656, and then only because their entrance was interpreted by the Puritan government as a harbinger of the Messiah’s own return. Despite this promise, it would take nearly 200 more years for British Jews to achieve full rights as citizens. The British Jewish Experience covers Jews’ presence as both authors and figures in British literature between 1840 and the present, during which Jews grappled with belonging and negotiated their contribution to English society. This course serves as an introduction to narrative and covers a range of genres such as fiction, diaries, autobiography, biography, television, and drama. Authors include Grace Aguilar, Benjamin Disraeli, Lady Montefiore, George Eliot, Amy Levy, Israel Zangwill, Daniel Abse, Andrea Levy, Charlotte Mendelsohn, and Naomi Alderman. Conference. 

Medieval Celtic Literatures
One-unit semester course. This course will focus on early medieval texts from Ireland, Wales, and England in order to understand the particular concerns and narrative techniques of Celtic literatures and to consider their transformation and integration into later English traditions. At the same time, students will interrogate the usefulness of the term “Celtic” as an accurate descriptor of Welsh and Irish cultures. Other issues under consideration will include the shift from orality to literacy in early Ireland and Wales; the tensions between the pagan past and the Christian present; the construction of notions of gender, heroism, and sovereignty; and, most importantly, the impact of twelfth-century Anglo-Norman colonization upon Welsh and Irish literary cultures. Specific texts under consideration will include the Irish TáinThe Voyage of BranThe Wooing of EtaínThe Destruction of Da Derga’s Hostel, and The Tales of the Elders of Ireland; Welsh texts from The Mabinogion and from the Arthurian, Aneirin, Merlin, Taliesin, and Heledd traditions; and finally Anglo-oriented texts by Geoffrey of Monmouth, Giraldus Cambrensis, and Chrétien de Troyes. All texts will be read in translation. This course applies toward the pre-1700 requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

Medieval Women Writers
One-unit semester course. Although the secular and religious cultures of medieval Europe were often flagrantly patriarchal, medieval women nonetheless produced a host of some of the richest and most interesting narratives of the period. In this course we will practice the basic tools of literary analysis by exploring writings such as the Carolingian noblewoman Dhuoda’s book of advice to her son; the closet dramas of the Saxon nun Hrotsvitha of Gandersheim; the enigmatic account of the canny and saintly Englishwoman Christina of Markyate; the impassioned love letters of Heloise of Argenteuil to her castrated husband; the mystical visions of the German abbess Hildegard of Bingen and of the English anchoress Julian of Norwich; the illustrated encyclopedia of Herrad of Landsberg; the erotic and often tragic Breton lais of Marie de France; the spiritual adventures and misadventures of Margery Kempe; and the protofeminist manifestos of Christine de Pisan. The course will begin with a review of the most relevant early Christian contexts for medieval women’s writing, including excerpts from the book of Genesis and the Psalms, the Gospel according to Luke, and the account of the martyrdom of Sts. Perpetua and Felicitas. We will also study aspects of the material culture these women and their colleagues used and produced: manuscript illumination, psalters, books of hours, textiles. This course fulfills the English department’s pre-1700 requirement. Conference.

Monsters and Marvels in the Middle Ages
One-unit semester course. In this course we will explore the contours of the medieval imagination as it made sense of the world in a variety of literary and historical texts from the sixth through the fourteenth centuries. We will focus on the function of marvels and monsters as plot devices, as ways of representing cultural anxieties, and as modes of construing the relationship between self and “other” and between the natural world and the social world. We will focus mainly on texts from the British Isles and France, including BeowulfThe Travels of Sir John Mandeville, the Lais of Marie de France, Geoffrey of Monmouth’s History of the Kings of Britain, Gerald of Wales’s Journey Through Wales, Chrétien de Troyes’s Arthurian romances, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and the Middle Welsh Mabinogion, as well as shorter excerpts from Isidore of Seville, Walter Map, Gervase of Tilbury, and others. This course applies toward the pre-1700 requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

English 205 - Introduction to Fiction

The American Short Story
One-unit semester course. This course introduces students to the techniques of analyzing narrative fiction with a focus on the American short story as it has developed over the last two centuries. By beginning with the contemporary short stories in a recent Best American Short Stories volume, we initiate questions about the trajectories of an American literary history of the short story; by ending with a focus on the Canadian writer Alice Munro, we question the boundaries of the “American” short story. We will analyze traditional and innovative narrative techniques in the short story, including point of view and focalization, literary economy, space, plot compression, the relation of narrative structure and temporality, and the range of styles manifested in the American short story (e.g., realism, naturalism, allegory, impressionism, experimentalism). Additionally, we will consider the diversity of American experience, and of American literary movements. Readings will be drawn from works by classic writers such as Melville and Sarah Orne Jewett, and contemporary writers such as Jhumpa Lahiri and Junot Díaz. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

Decolonization and the Novel in Africa
One-unit semester course. Taking root during late colonialism, the novel emerged as a prominent genre in the shaping of postcolonial societies in Africa. In the wake of decolonization, African writers turned to the novel, reinventing the genre to imagine new individual and collective identities and assess the legacies left behind by the colonial past. This course will examine various novelistic responses to the sociopolitical changes in different parts of Africa during the late twentieth and the twenty-first century. In what ways did the novel become a catalyst for cultural transformation in postcolonial Africa? How did the novel become the privileged genre of decolonization? Starting with the critiques of colonialism in the early decolonial period, we will explore topics including narratives of modernity and tradition, the failures of the nation-state, critique of patriarchy and gender, migration, displacement, neocolonial formations, and the promises and pitfalls of globalization. Readings may include novels by Tayeb Salih, Chinua Achebe, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, Ama Ata Aidoo, Bessie Head, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Chimamanda Adichie, and Helon Habila. Theoretical readings may include writings of Aimé Césaire, Frantz Fanon, Oyèrónkẹ́ Oyěwùmí, and Achille Mbembe, among others. Conference.

Detective Stories and Crime Fiction
One-unit semester course. Often derided as a “lower” form of storytelling, crime fiction has been for decades one of the most popular genres of literature on both sides of the Atlantic. Engaged with central questions of what constitutes illicit actions in civilized societies, and how they might be detected and policed, the form also crucially concerns itself with matters both epistemological and ontological (especially concerning hidden identities). This course examines the development of classic crime and detective fiction, starting in the nineteenth century with Edgar Allen Poe’s pathfinding C. Auguste Dupin stories, Wilkie Collins’s The Moonstone (often called the first popular detective novel in English), and Arthur Conan Doyle’s wildly popular Sherlock Holmes stories. The course will then proceed through the so-called golden age of detective fiction in the United Kingdom and the rise of hard-boiled detective fiction in the United States (both of which coincided with the era of literary modernism). We will finish by looking at how in recent decades the genre’s codes have been rewritten, particularly in light of questions about identity politics with regards to established social orders. Primary texts will also include works by Dorothy L. Sayers, Raymond Chandler, Chester Himes, Patricia Highsmith, P. D. James, and China Miéville. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

Memory, Desire, and the Modern Novel
One-unit semester course. T.S. Eliot begins his 1922 poem The Waste Land evoking the admixture of memory and desire, reflecting literary modernism’s preoccupations both with the subjective life and with time and historicity. This course will examine the ways in which fictions from roughly the first half of the twentieth century repeatedly return to questions of a remembrance of eros past, both in their thematic content and in their formal narrative complexities. Marcel Proust, the most influential literary explorer of these questions, will occupy a central position in our analysis, but we will also examine novels by transatlantic modern authors who may include Rebecca West, Willa Cather, Nella Larsen, Jean Rhys, Graham Greene, and James Baldwin. There will be brief critical readings by Stephen Kern, Anne Carson, Sigmund Freud, René Girard, and Michel Foucault, among others. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

The Nineteenth-Century Novel: The Bildungsroman
One-unit semester course. Young man from the provinces moves to the big city; young woman takes a new job. The youthful protagonists of the nineteenth-century Bildungsroman, or novel of formation, set out on journeys to seek their fortune and find their place in a society where, for the first time, social identity was not assumed to be identical with social rank and simply established at birth. The major novelists of the period depict a society fascinated with the idea of upward mobility, and return almost obsessively to narratives tracking the ways in which their protagonists react to a hierarchical but dynamic social structure and how they forge their identities within it. We will examine the multiple variations on this theme in works drawn from among the following: Sir Walter Scott, Jane Austen, Honoré de Balzac, Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Thomas Hardy. In addition to works of fiction we will read a number of critical texts on linked topics including narrators and narrative structure, the function of novelistic character, the concept of realism, and the nature and history of literary genres. This course applies toward the pre-1900 requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

South Asian Women Writers
One-unit semester courseThis course will introduce students to South Asian women writers from the twentieth and twenty-first century who offer fierce challenges to the foundations of patriarchy, class, and caste structures in South Asian contexts. We will examine their works placing them in specific historical and cultural contexts including colonialism, the Partition, nationalism, religious fundamentalism, and the caste system. We will pay particular attention to how these writers articulate the female experience in South Asian societies from the intersections of caste, class, gender, and sexuality and how these perspectives challenge, redefine, and queer the category of “woman.” Readings may include short stories by Mahasweta Devi, Ismat Chughtai, and Urmila Pawar; non-fiction by Sara Suleri, Bama, and Living Smile Vidya; novels by Bapsi Sidhwa, Arundhati Roy, Tahmima Anam, and Meena Kandasamy; and films by Mira Nair, Sabiha Sumar, and Deepa Mehta. Works not originally in English will be read in translation. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

Tolkien and Lewis
One-unit semester course. The imaginative writings of the Oxford scholars J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis constitute some of the most widely read, most beloved, and most pervasively influential fiction of the twentieth century. The two friends shared drafts of their work and presided together over a group of like-minded writers and thinkers. Across all their varied writings—and especially in their construction of fictive worlds—Tolkien and Lewis both thought of themselves as effecting a resistance to the prevailing literary and cultural pieties of modernity. And yet the two men were also temperamentally quite different and often aesthetically in deep tension with one another. In this course, we will compare the ways Lewis and Tolkien deploy genre, character, diction, narrative voice, imagery, and other literary techniques in the construction of their various fantastic worlds. We will consider too, the ways in which both writers articulated their commitment to a Christian worldview (and their opposition to “the machine”) and how they both came to understand the power and purpose of mythology. We will also have occasion to think through together how Tolkien and Lewis reproduced certain problematic aspects of the racism and sexism of their culture and how these might affect our evaluation of their works. To all these ends, we will read a generous selection from their most important writings, including J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings (in its entirety), and Smith of Wootton Major, his essay “On Fairy Stories,” and excerpts from his Silmarillion; as well as C.S. Lewis’s Screwtape Letters, his science-fiction novels Out of the Silent Planet and Perelandra, two volumes of his Chronicles of Narnia, and his late, possibly brilliant novel Till We Have Faces. We will preface our analysis of their fictions by reading important works that influenced them by George MacDonald and William Morris. Conference.

The Victorian Gothic
One-unit semester course. The Victorians prided themselves on their commitments to reason, taxonomy, order, and rectitude. The novel, however, which was their dominant cultural form, often concerned itself with the dark underside to their world, where concomitant fascinations with superstition, chaos, crime, and vice instead held sway. These gothic Victorian fictions—dominated particularly by the related forms of the sensation novel, the detective novel, and the imperial romance—will be the object of study for this course, which will examine major works by such potential authors as Emily and Anne Brontë, Charles Dickens, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Wilkie Collins, H. Rider Haggard, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Bram Stoker as a means of understanding not simply Victorian culture but more generally the form of the novel. We will also read short critical and theoretical works in the study of narrative to accompany our readings in gothic fiction. This course applies to the English department’s pre-1900 requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23. 

The Victorian Novel of Family Life
One-unit semester course. During the Victorian period (1837–1901), the United Kingdom often turned to the idealized household as its model for social community, seeking in its nominal stability of roles (for husband and wife, parents and children, and employers and servants) organizing principles for the larger national culture. This paradigm turned out to be neither as stable nor as uniform as often proposed, however, and the exploration of family life by means of the novel—the most popular cultural form of the era—showed the fault lines in the model structure of the “happy home,” which echoed wider Victorian social problems regarding gender, class, sexuality, labor, inclusivity, and authority. This course looks at the Victorian novel through its characteristic focus on family life and its discontents, surveying works by famous practitioners who may include Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, and/or Thomas Hardy. We will end the semester by reading Virginia Woolf’s 1927 To the Lighthouse, a modernist look backwards at the Victorian family. There will be short critical readings, primarily about the contexts and functions of the novel as a literary genre. Conference.

English 211 - Introduction to Poetry and Poetics

One-unit semester course. This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental elements of a poem, such as rhythm, diction, imagery, metaphor, tone, form, speaker, and audience. We will read texts from a wide historical range and consider the historical development of selected forms and techniques. The course will also examine what some poets and critics have regarded as the nature and function of poetry and what bearing such theories have on the practice of poetry and vice versa. The course will emphasize close reading of the texts, and there will be frequent writing assignments. Conference. May not be repeated for credit. 

Not offered 2022–23.

English 212 - British Poetry

British Romantic Poetry
One-unit semester course. An introduction to literature in Britain from c. 1790 to 1830 with an emphasis on the poetry of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Readings will also include selections from the most influential prose writers of the period, including Edmund Burke, Mary Wollstonecraft, William Godwin, and Hannah More, and recent critical studies of the history, political context, and aesthetic debates of this revolutionary era. This course applies toward the pre-1900 requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Early Modern Woman
One-unit semester course. Queen Elizabeth I was both an exception and an ideal in early modern England: a woman, ruling a patriarchal nation, about whom countless poems were written. She was also a poet in her own right, serving as both literary subject and object, and the same was true of women at all levels of society. This course introduces students to the range of poetry written by and about women in early modern England. In particular, it examines the ways in which sixteenth- and seventeenth-century poets represented the relationship of English womanhood to the world that produced and surrounded it, at home and abroad. What can we learn from both idealized and realistic portrayals of early modern women? To what extent do changes in literature reflect shifts in English history and culture, including the intersections of religion, politics, science, and class and gender relations? In considering these questions, students will develop a formal analytical vocabulary and skills central to the reading and studying of poetry. This course applies toward the pre-1700 requirement. Conference. 

English 213 - American Poetry

Ethnopoetics
One-unit semester course. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the complexity and pleasure of poetry. We will be learning about the aesthetics of ethnic American poetry by reading it in the context of Western and non-Western poetic traditions. We will use the historical circumstances and theories of ethnicity to help us understand both the political and the aesthetic choices behind poetic allusions, language, genre, diction, rhythm, and figurative language. The poems we read are chosen from a variety of genres, authors, and historical periods. Our aim will be to understand how the various techniques and genres open to poets enable them to produce works of art which speak to us and push us to think. The course emphasizes close reading of the texts, and there will be frequent writing assignments. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

English 242 - Introduction to Drama

American Theatre Post–Angels in America
One-unit semester course. In a 2018 article, “The Great Work Continues,” the New York Times asked how American theatre had changed since the first production of Tony Kushner’s Angels in America in 1993, and named the best 25 American plays written since then. The list included plays by Suzan-Lori Parks, Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, Annie Baker, Anne Washburn, Bruce Norris, Lynn Nottage, Paula Vogel, August Wilson, Anna Deveare Smith, Wallace Shawn, Edward Albee, Eve Ensler, and others. This course begins with a study of Kushner, laying the groundwork for further study of the current state of American theater. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

American Theatre Post–Angels in America II
One-unit semester course. In a 2018 article, “The Great Work Continues,” the New York Times asked how American theatre had changed since the first production of Tony Kushner’s Angels in America in 1993, and named the best 25 American plays written since then. This course begins with a study of Kushner, laying the groundwork for further study of the current state of American theater. This semester covers plays produced between 2000 and 2007, and includes plays from the Times’s list as well as Pulitzer Prize winners. Writers will include Suzan-Lori Parks, Wallace Shawn, Stephen Adly Guirgis, Sarah Ruhl, Nilo Cruz, David Auburn, and others. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Black British Playwrights
One-unit semester course. What does it mean to be Black and British in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries? This course will attempt to answer this question by reading a selection of plays written by Black British playwrights between 1998 and 2018. The course will look at how experiments with form, subject matter, and genre explore the experiences of Black people in local, national, and international contexts. Conference.

Introduction to Shakespeare
One-unit semester course. This course serves as a general introduction to Shakespeare’s drama and poetry. We will read major plays in the principal genres of comedy, history, and tragedy, charting the development of Shakespeare’s craft over the course of his nearly 30-year career by contrasting early and late examples of his work. We will consider plays within the performance context of the early modern theater, developing a working knowledge of the theatrical conventions and cultural understandings that inform them. Reading Shakespeare’s narrative poems and sonnets in tandem with this writing for the stage, we will explore the complexities of Shakespeare’s language, including his use of poetic forms and devices. Given the breadth and variety of Shakespeare’s artistic production, we will ask ourselves what shared themes and characteristics allow us to identify a work as “Shakespearean.” Assigned texts will include, among others, Romeo and JulietOthelloHenry VTwelfth Night, and The Tempest, as well as performances recorded at Shakespeare’s Globe and the Royal Shakespeare Theatre. This course applies toward the pre-1700 requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Shakespeare on Screen
One-unit semester course. Although Shakespeare’s plays were written for live performance “in the flesh,” we increasingly engage with his works through screens—in recorded performances, films, television shows, digital archives, and even video games. In this course we will use concepts from the fields of media and performance studies to analyze the implications of these shifts from live performance to screen-based engagement. How does the medium in which we encounter an early modern play influence our understanding of its language? What opportunities for interpretation and creative adaptation are opened or foreclosed by the different media in which a play appears? Conference.

Shakespeare, Text, and Performance
One-unit semester course. This course will consider the relationship between literary analysis and theatrical or cinematic performance in several Shakespearean plays. We will pay particular attention to images of plays and playing in the scripts, to the different political and ethical implications of different performances, and to changes in conventions of representation. Plays to be examined include Hamlet, King LearOthelloThe Tempest, Henry V, and Much Ado about Nothing. This course applies toward the pre-1700 requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Shakespeare’s Comedies
One-unit semester course. We will read six of Shakespeare’s comedies, from the following groups: “romantic comedies”: As You Like It and Twelfth Night; “problem comedies”: The Merchant of Venice and Measure for Measure; and “mixed-genre plays”: Henry IV Part One (history/comedy) and The Winter’s Tale (tragicomedy). Shakespearean comedy works to release constraints on festivity and freely chosen love, deflates pomposity, and allows its characters to undermine authoritarian-imposed limits, solemn conventions, and rigid logic; but Shakespearean comedy also tests the limits of self-indulgence. It often comes close to tragedy and even death before pulling back to a rebirth into social harmony, however questionable it may be. We will analyze the role of gender relations (especially the function of heroines’ cross-dressing), the difficulty of establishing definitive moral norms, the power of erotic desire and the role imagination plays in its fulfillment, and the nature of individual identity, especially as it is tested when characters are immersed in unfamiliar worlds. This course applies toward the pre-1700 requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Shakespeare’s Tragedies
One-unit semester course. In this course we will explore the astonishing breadth of Shakespeare’s tragedies by reading his major masterpieces in the genre (such as Hamlet, Othello, and King Lear) alongside plays that complicate and expand our understanding of the tragic (such as Richard II, Troilus and Cressida, and The Winter’s Tale). We will consider Shakespeare’s tragedies in relation to classical and medieval precedents as well as theoretical accounts of the genre from antiquity to the twentieth century. Engaging with criticism, performances, and films, we will approach the plays both as literary texts and as embodied theatrical events. We will give special attention to Shakespeare’s poetic language, dramaturgy, and complex treatments of power, politics, community, family, sex, and the self. This course applies toward the pre-1700 requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

English 261 - Introduction to Film

Film Noir
One-unit semester course. This course will focus on film noir in American cinema in the 1940s and 1950s, examining its plotlines and narrative methods as well as its distinctive visual style. Students will be introduced to the language of film analysis and trace the genre’s sources in “hard-boiled” detective fiction, German expressionism, and the cultural climate of the United States in the decades in which the films were produced. Questions about visual framing, narrative structure, and genre will inform readings and discussions, as will the films’ representations of tensions in postwar social roles. The course will conclude with a consideration of one or two more recent examples of “neo-noir.” Required readings on film and narrative theory; directors will include Billy Wilder, Orson Welles, Jacques Tourneur, Fritz Lang, Howard Hawks, and Michael Curtiz. Conference-screenings. 

The Western
One-unit semester course. Film studies scholar Robert Ray once wrote that “many of Classic Hollywood’s genre movies, like many of the most important American novels, were thinly camouflaged westerns.” This course seeks to investigate that claim by examining film form, genre, and history through the lens of the cinematic Western, with all of the idealism and ugliness the subject entails. While the beginning of the course will focus primarily on the Western as imagined in classical Hollywood, our analysis will eventually track the genre’s development into the modern day. We will watch and analyze films by directors including John Ford, John Huston, George Stevens, Sergio Leone, Richard Altman, Katherine Bigelow, Mario van Peebles, Ang Lee, and Quentin Tarantino. In addition to illuminating the concept of genre study and the history of US film, this course will view the Western as a barometer of both of American social anxieties and ideologies as the genre (and the nation) continually reinvents itself over time. Conference-screenings. 

English 301 - Junior Seminar in English Literary History

One-unit semester course. This course offers a study of the methods and a sample of the materials of English and American literary history. Offered in two or three sections each year with different emphases, this course engages the in-depth study of one work and its precursors, influences, and effects, or may study a range of works attending to intertextual transformations and generic change. The course will also include substantial reading in literary theory, and students will develop their own critical history, together with an annotated bibliography of the work of a major author. This course is primarily for English majors, for whom the junior seminar is usually required no later than the end of the junior year. Prerequisite: junior standing and two 200-level English courses. Conference. May not be repeated for credit. 

English 303 - American Studies Seminar

Jews across the Americas
One-unit semester course. This course examines the diversity of the American Jewish experiences in South America, North America, and the Caribbean. Moving from the early colonial era to the present, we will examine Jewish life through a variety of literary genres ranging from poetry to fiction to graphic novels. This course offers an introduction to the methods of American studies and digital humanities, and focuses on how to read literature in the context of primary historical sources and material culture. Prerequisites: at least two 200-level English classes or Introduction to Judaism (Religion 151) OR any other course in Jewish literature or history. This course applies toward the pre-1900 requirement. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 333 and Religion 259.

English 320 - Studies in Drama

Renaissance Revenge Tragedies
One-unit semester course. Elizabethan statesman Francis Bacon called revenge “a kind of wild justice” that good government and rule of law should prevent. No wonder, then, that an immense body of drama turned to revenge plots to explore contradictions and failings in the legal, political, and moral codes meant to govern individuals’ relationships with each other and public institutions. In this class, we will explore how the theme of revenge interacted with and spurred the development of drama in Renaissance England. From early translations of the Roman philosopher Seneca’s tragedies through to the decadent plays of the Jacobean stage, tales of clandestine affairs and “murder most foul” spurred innovation in stagecraft while simultaneously providing a means to contemplate power and its abuses. Placing famous examples of the genre, such as William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, in conversation with lesser-known works, such as Elizabeth Cary’s Tragedy of Mariam and John Webster’s The White Devil, we will concern ourselves with three major topics: 1) how the representation of crimes and their discovery on stage influenced plays’ structure and rhetorical style; 2) how allusion and citation among plays produced recognizable character types, including the Machiavel, revenger, and stoic; and 3) how stage conventions regarding the representation of madness and violence interacted with social norms concerning gender and emerging concepts of race. Carrying our discussion of these topics through to contemporary theatrical productions such as Gregory Doran’s Hamlet, starring David Tennant and Patrick Stewart, we will consider the cultural work revenge tragedies and their theatrical legacy continue to perform today. Prerequisites: two English or literature courses at the 200 level or above, or consent of the instructor. This course applies toward the pre-1700 requirement. Conference. 

Not offered 2022–23.

English 333 - Studies in Fiction

American Feminist Fiction, Post-1945
One-unit semester course. Full course for one semester. While some feminist literary history simply traces a teleology—from “prefeminist” to fully feminist to “postfeminist” works—this course asks instead: How is feminist fiction in dialogue with feminist theory? Rather than ask of a work, “Is it feminist?” we will ask (with Rita Felski) “Feminist—for whom?” and “How is it feminist?” We will consider the poetics and politics of (white) women’s liberation novels and fiction that explores women’s identity as intersectional, including race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, age, and [dis]ability. In addition to fictional narratives, readings will include feminist theory. Writers whose works may be studied include Octavia Butler, Louise Erdrich, Joanne Greenberg, Gayl Jones, Maxine Hong Kingston, Ursula Le Guin, Paule Marshall, Gloria Naylor, Joyce Carol Oates, Grace Paley, Marge Piercy, Alice Walker, Rita Felski, Shulamith Firestone, Gilbert and Gubar, Gayle Greene, bell hooks, Teresa de Lauretis, Janice Radway, Adrienne Rich, Sonia Saldívar-Hull, Bonnie Zimmerman. Prerequisites: two English or literature courses at the 200 level or above, or consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Description and Narration
One-unit semester course. This course will focus on the relations between description and narration in examples drawn from American, French, and English fiction. In what ways does description serve various narrative drives? In what ways does description assert its separate purposes and what might those be? Primary texts include Callistratus’s Descriptions, Chrétien de Troyes’s Yvain, Melville’s Typee, Flaubert’s A Sentimental Education, Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Zola’s The Ladies’ Paradise, Woolf’s The Waves, Stein’s Three Lives, and Joyce’s Dubliners. Theoretical readings will be drawn from the work of M.M. Bakhtin, Michel Riffaterre, Roland Barthes, Elaine Scarry, W.T.J. Mitchell, and Paul Ricoeur. Weekly writing assignments and active participation are required. Prerequisites: two English courses at the 200 level or above. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

James Joyce
One-unit semester course. In 2022, the hundredth-anniversary year of the publication of Ulysses, critics and scholars have repeatedly hailed James Joyce as the most influential and important fiction writer of the twentieth century, noting that he effectively rewrote the configurations and capabilities of the short story, novel, and epic. Over the track of his career, Joyce’s fiction progressed from its roots in literary naturalism to more complex modernist forms, exhibiting his uncanny ability to master and also invent different rhetorical discourses. This course tracks the full range of this development, from his earliest fictions in Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man all the way through brief selections from his last and most difficult work, Finnegans Wake; we will focus particular attention on the entirety of Ulysses. We will pay attention as well to critical, biographical, and historical contexts for Joyce’s work. Conference.

The Literary Imagination and the Working Hand
One-unit semester course. American authors have conceived of the writer’s work in ambivalent terms: sometimes as drudgery for pay, sometimes as artisanal craft, and sometimes as a sign of the intellect’s accession to a realm of freedom and truth. In nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature, this ambivalence about the writer’s place in society is manifest in the literary text as a range of attitudes that moves from empathy with the working classes to alienation from their condition. The project of this course is to compare the material and social labor performed by the characters to the imaginative, rhetorical work done by its narrator(s). Our close readings will be grounded in the following questions: Are characters and narrators ontological equals or do they occupy different positions in an allegorical hierarchy? Are the text’s representations of material labor and the work of the literary imagination congruent or in conflict with one another? How prominently and to what purpose does a character’s work figure in the narrator’s consciousness of his or her own project? When and why is a character’s work echoed in the narrative’s style (i.e., the redundant nature of the character’s work is represented by verbal repetition in the text)? Finally, how does the represented status of material, ethical, and artistic work contribute to the text’s argument about which values are either ideally or distinctly American? Primary texts include Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter: A Romance (Broadview 2004), Melville’s Billy Budd and The Piazza Tales (Barnes and Noble 2006), Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn (Modern Library 2001), Willa Cather’s My Antonia (Penguin 1994), Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw (Modern Library 2001), Gertrude Stein’s Three Lives (Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics 1990). Prerequisite: two English or literature courses at the 200 level or above. This course applies toward the pre-1900 requirement. ConferenceNot offered 2022–23.

The Novel and Romanticism
One-unit semester course. What is a romantic novel? Emphasis on the transcendental aspects of romanticism has tended to define the romantic era as one dominated by the great poetic texts of the era, but the period also marks an extraordinary high point in the development of the novel. In this course we will look at the novel’s figuring of transcendence; at its response to the events, aesthetic theories, and dominant figures of romanticism; and at the variety of forms the novel spans at this timeReadings drawn from among the following authors: Rousseau, Goethe, Wollstonecraft, Radcliffe, Mary Shelley, Percy Shelley, Austen, Sir Walter Scott, Emily Brontë. There will also be substantial readings from important critical accounts of romanticism, including Frye, de Man, Butler, and Chandler. Prerequisite: two English or literature courses at the 200 level or above, or consent of the instructor. This course applies toward the pre-1900 requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Postbellum, Pre-Harlem: The Literature of Reconstruction
One-unit semester course. Born too late for the slave narrative and too early for the Harlem Renaissance—“Post-Bellum–Pre-Harlem,” as he puts it—Charles W. Chesnutt missed two major African American literary movements. Chesnutt’s life (1858–1932) spanned crucial moments in American history—the Civil War, Reconstruction, the rise of post-Reconstruction violence, the establishment of schools for Black children led by Black teachers, the emergence of the convict labor system, and the beginnings of the civil rights movement. This course examines Chesnutt’s fiction as the core of the literature of Reconstruction and its aftermath, from the pernicious myths of the plantation school to the protest fiction of the NAACP’s magazine, The Crisis. Methodologically, we will draw on recent work in African American archival recovery and periodical culture, examining the cultural politics of publication history. Genres will include realism, regionalism, and sentimentalism; the slave narrative and the social problem novel; journalism, legal writing, and essays. Prerequisite: Humanities 110 and two 200-level English courses or consent of the instructor. This course applies toward the pre-1900 requirement. Conference. 

Postcolonial Hauntings 
One-unit semester course. Haunting is central to postcolonial thought and literature. This course will examine the aesthetics of haunting in postcolonial novels from the latter half of the twentieth century. These novels invite us to radically rethink the relations between the past and the present in terms of their contemporaneity and interdependence instead of a linear progression from the colonial past to a postcolonial liberated present. We will reflect on alternative temporalities opened up by literary evocations of ghosts, phantoms, and specters, and explore the themes of memory, loss, and trauma in various historical and cultural contexts. How might the language of haunting help us understand the unresolved histories of colonial, racial, nationalist, sexist, and ethnic oppression? How do these texts register the experience of loss in the past sustained through violence in the present? In what ways does the novel imagine the possibility of justice by opening up a space for reinterpreting the past in the present? Putting literary texts in conversation with various postcolonial and poststructuralist theories, psychoanalysis, and Afro-pessimist thought, we will consider how particular writers respond to the failures of decolonization, the contradictions of the postcolonial nation, the possibilities of resistance and revolution, and the afterlives of empire and slavery. Readings may include works of fiction by Tayeb Salih, Arundhati Roy, Salman Rushdie, Leslie Marmon Silko, Erna Brodber, and Fred D’Aguiar, and theoretical writings of Frantz Fanon, Achille Mbembe, Jacques Derrida, Sigmund Freud, Gayatri Spivak, Saidiya Hartman, and Christina Sharpe. Prerequisite: sophomore standing and two English or literature courses at the 200 level or above. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Short Story Cycles
One-unit semester course. In the nineteenth through twenty-first centuries, North America has seen remarkable development in the short story cycle, a form of narrative also found in many other periods, cultures, and languages (The Thousand and One Nights, The Decameron, Dubliners). This narrative form differs from story collections in its degree of unity, and from the novel in the relative independence of its constituent parts (stories rather than chapters). How does the development of this genre inflect the history of the novel? In this class, we will explore the constructions of gender, ethnicity, and the ethics of reading in short story cycles from authors such as Anderson, Anzaldúa, Barth, Hemingway, Garcia, Erdrich, Kingston, Jewett, Munro, Naylor, O’Brien, Salinger, and Stein. Readings will also include critical and theoretical essays on narrative and on the history of the novel. In addition to brief response essays, students will write a research paper. Prerequisite: two English or literature courses at the 200 level or above, or consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Virginia Woolf’s Modernist Networks
One-unit semester course. The idea of the network was central not only to the ways in which Virginia Woolf conceived of relations between and among people in her novels but also according to the terms by which she understood her own fictional career. Woolf’s affiliations with her Bloomsbury Group cohort, her literary collaborators and rivals, and the younger writers she mentored informed her own sense of herself as an author, and were ultimately turned into literary capital regarding the complex manner by which selves are constituted through their engagements with others. This course will explore this dynamic not only through Woolf’s own fiction and essays but also those within the works of Woolf’s modernist network both during her lifetime and after by figures such as Katherine Mansfield, E.M. Forster, Lytton Strachey, T.S. Eliot, Arnold Bennett, Vita Sackville-West, Elizabeth Bowen, and Ali Smith. We will also read critical and theoretical readings relevant to the concept of the network and to these writers. Prerequisite: sophomore standing and two English or literature courses at the 200 level or above. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

English 337 - Studies in British Culture

The Home Front: British Literature of World War II
One-unit semester course. World War II, the deadliest international conflict in world history, destroyed the United Kingdom’s role as one of the great world empires, and also forever transformed the underpinnings of its class system and its system of government. Nevertheless, the British people to this day view their shattering wartime experience as one of the great unifying and refining experiences in their culture and their history. This course will look at literary works brought forth from the wartime experience of primarily British civilians from the period from 1939 to 1945 and its aftermath, paying particular attention to its expression through late literary modernism, and looking at how values of Britain during the time (particularly regarding class, gender, national identity, and national loyalties) were tested and reshaped. In addition to brief critical and historical readings, we will look at fictions by writers who lived through the war, who may include Elizabeth Bowen, Henry Green, Graham Greene, Penelope Lively, W.G. Sebald, Muriel Spark, and Evelyn Waugh. We will also see British films from the era by directors such as Alberto Cavalcanti, Humphrey Jennings, Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger, and Carol Reed. Prerequisite: two English courses at the 200 level or above, or consent of the instructor. Conference. 

Not offered 2022–23.

English 341 - Studies in American Literature

American Pastoral: Literature and Environment
One-unit semester course. This course explores the relationship between idyllic fictions and concrete experience through two transformative centuries of American environmental history. Examining literature’s role as both the product and producer of “nature’s nation,” we trace the changing values attached to wilderness, farming, and the nonhuman environment, from early modern fantasies of the exploration and settlement to present day prophesies of environmental doom. We will examine the many ideological functions of pastoral imagination across literary genres, including enlightenment travel writing, romantic poetry, transcendentalist essays, regionalist fiction, and the naturalist movement. Prerequisites: two English courses at the 200 level or above, American studies or environmental studies background, or consent of the instructor. Conference. 

Not offered 2022–23.

English 352 - Studies in Medieval Literature

Chaucer
One-unit semester course. The late-fourteenth-century poet Geoffrey Chaucer is surely one of the greatest masters of irony in English literature. In this course we will study a generous selection of his masterpiece, The Canterbury Tales. The first section of the course will focus on developing students’ facility with Chaucer’s language and with medieval culture through a study of the General Prologue. As we proceed through the tales, we will pay careful attention to Chaucer’s representation of gender and class through his use of irony and satire, his manipulation of genre, his relationship to his source materials and to medieval Christian authorities, and his subtle exploration of a poetics of instability. Throughout the course we will also consider and reconsider the implications of Chaucer’s ambiguous social status within the Ricardian court, as well the validity of thinking of the poet as a “skeptical fideist.” Students will learn to read Middle English fluently by the end of the semester, though no previous experience with early forms of English is required. Prerequisite: two English courses at the 200 level or above, or consent of the instructor. This course applies toward the pre-1700 requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Dante’s Divine Comedy 
One-unit semester course. In this course we will study Dante Alighieri’s fourteenth-century masterpiece The Divine Comedy, seeking to understand this ambitious poem both on its own merits and as an index of the major literary, artistic, and intellectual currents of European culture during the High Middle Ages. The Divine Comedy as a whole narrates Dante’s fictional journey through the afterlife, where he witnesses the eternal torments of the damned souls in hell, the patient endurance of the restless Christian spirits in purgatory, and the ineffable delights of the blessed in paradise. As we follow Dante-pilgrim on his journey, we will look specifically at the poetic and narrative strategies that Dante-poet employs in thinking through the changing relationships between language and truth in the separate canticles of the poem, thinking about how an infernal poetics, for example, differs from a paradisiacal one. In light of ongoing debates in Dante studies, we will also focus on the extent to which Dante’s poem enjoins readers to a process of conversion and on the ways in which Dante establishes his own poetic and moral authority as a counterweight to the corruptions of the fourteenth-century church. Readings will be from the English translation by Robert and Jean Hollander, with the Italian text of Dante’s poem on the facing page. Prerequisite: two English courses at the 200 level or above, or consent of the instructor. This course applies toward the pre-1700 requirement. Conference. 

English 356 - Studies in African American Literature

African American Women Playwrights 
One-unit semester course. In this course we will study several twentieth-century African American women playwrights. We will look at them both as artists and as writers responding to specific historical circumstances. Writers will include Lorraine Hansberry, Ntozake Shange, Suzan-Lori Parks, Dominique Morisseau, and Adrienne Kennedy. Prerequisite: two English or literature courses at the 200 level or above. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

The Black Radical Tradition V: The Black Arts Movement
One-unit semester courseThe Black Arts Movement is often referred to as the artistic wing of the Black Power movement. The artists who participated in the BAM were “cultural nationalists,” as opposed to the “revolutionary nationalists,” who were best represented by the Black Panther Party. Members of the BAM believed in the need for racial pride among Black people, self-determination, and the need for cultural institutions. The official start of the Black Arts Movement is identified by the creation of one such cultural institution: the Black Arts Repertory Theatre and School (BARTS), founded by Amiri Baraka in Harlem in 1965. Amiri Baraka is widely known as the father of the Black Arts Movement. He set the tone for the type of politically conscious work that the Black artists at the time would create. In 1965, he wrote an essay for The Liberator called “The Revolutionary Theatre.” In it, he details many things that the Revolutionary Theatre must do. He claims it must “force change,” it must “be change,” and it must “EXPOSE!” Baraka thought the revolutionary theatre, the theatre of the Black Arts Movement, must be political, and antithetical to what he believed Western theatre was doing at the time. This course will examine some of the major works produced during this period by writers such as Baraka, Larry Neal, Sonia Sanchez, Ed Bullins, and others. Prerequisites: two English or literature courses at the 200 level or above. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Douglass/Delany
One-unit semester course. Most people are aware of the seemingly opposed positions of Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X during the 1960s about what course African Americans should take to achieve full freedom. This debate, however, goes back to the nineteenth century, with Frederick Douglass and Martin Delany taking opposing positions. Delany, despite having been admitted to Harvard Medical School in 1850 and kicked out after a month because white students protested, and having served as a major in the Civil War, believed, long before Marcus Garvey, that African Americans had no future in the United States and started a movement to emigrate to Africa. Douglass, in opposition, believed the only future was in the United States. We will read fiction and speeches by both men, including Delany’s novel Blake; or the Huts of America (1862), written in response to Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, which he believed portrayed slaves as too passive. Prerequisite: two English courses at the 200 level or above, or consent of the instructor. This course applies toward the pre-1900 requirement. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 336.

English 362 - Studies in Early Modern Literature

Gender, Sex, and Sexuality in Early Modern Drama
One-unit semester course. This course explores early modern drama’s engagement with intersecting questions of gender, sex, and sexuality in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. Readings will include an introduction to influential criticism in the history of sexuality and literary criticism employing feminist and queer approaches to the plays. Authors will include Elizabeth Cary, Margaret Cavendish, Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare, Mary Sidney, and Ben Jonson. Prerequisite: two English courses at the 200 level or above. This course applies toward the pre-1700 requirement. Conference.

John Donne
One-unit semester course. Obsessed with death, love, piety, loss, science, and the power of the written word, John Donne lived and worked on very private and public levels throughout his career. This course will consider the writer who noted that “no man is an island” and pondered “for whom the bell tolls,” reading the prose works in which these words first appeared together with his poetry and letters. We will also consider adaptations of Donne’s poetry and concerns by other writers in other genres in the seventeenth century; modern engagements with his work; and critical receptions from his death to the present. This course will assume familiarity with prosodic analysis. Prerequisite: two English courses at the 200 level or above (English 211, 212, or 213 strongly recommended), or consent of the instructor. This course applies toward the pre-1700 requirement. Conference.

John Milton
One-unit semester course. From imagining his presence at the birth of Christ, attacking censorship, defending divorce, and ultimately justifying the ways of God to man, John Milton’s literary, political, and religious interests were both wide-ranging and impassioned. This course immerses students in Milton’s major works with attention to generic range, reading his political prose, shorter poems, dramas, and the complete Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained. This course will assume familiarity with and skills in prosodic analysis. Prerequisite: two English courses at the 200 level or above (English 211, 212, or 213 strongly recommended), or consent of the instructor. This course applies toward the pre-1700 requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

English 363 - Studies in Shakespeare

Protest and Petition in Shakespeare’s Drama
One-unit semester course. Across his career and experiments in different genres, Shakespeare returned again and again to the issue of rule, in particular exploring the language and tactics subordinated people used to make requests and issue demands to those in power. Analyzing the language of “petition” and “protest” in Shakespeare’s plays allows us to regard communication between rulers and the ruled, social superiors and inferiors, as a source not only of compelling plot lines and theatrical spectacles, but also of artful rhetoric and poetic expression. Placing Shakespeare’s plays in conversation with early modern prose works that discuss hierarchies constructed along intersecting lines of gender and social rank, we will assess the language and function of “speaking up” in Shakespeare’s works, as well as the ways in which his plays explore the consequences of such speech—or its absence. Assigned texts will include early modern prose and contemporary criticism. Plays will include Henry VCoriolanusKing LearMeasure for Measure, and The Winter’s Tale, among others. Prerequisite: two English courses at the 200 level or above. This course applies toward the pre-1700 requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

English 366 - Studies in Poetry

Beauty and the Poetic Text
One-unit semester course. What makes us perceive things as beautiful? Why do certain works of art move us emotionally, while others engage us intellectually? The concept of aesthetics is nothing if not fluid: it can relate to perception through the senses; the philosophy of beauty; the art (or science!) of what is pleasing; the study of good taste; the standards by which art is judged—the list goes on. We will embark on a transhistorical exploration of beauty and the senses in Western literature across multiple genres, beginning with Plato and moving through the ideas of beauty and the sublime in the medieval world, representation and the self in the Renaissance, taste, sentiment, and the senses in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, finally ending with the modern period and the turn toward self-conscious artistic creation. Likely texts include Shakespeare’s Sonnets and T.S. Eliot’s Four Quartets, as well as works by Longinus, Aquinas, Donne, Thomas Gray, Edmund Burke, Wordsworth, Emerson, Dickinson, Wilde, and Walter Benjamin. Prerequisite: two English courses at the 200 level, one of which must be English 211, 212, or 213. This course applies toward the pre-1900 requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Phenomenology of Early Modern Lyric
One-unit semester course. Early modern England was home to a flourishing of lyric poetry arguably unmatched before or since. Often used as a blanket term for short-form poetry, the essence of lyric lies in its vivid representation of a voice, whether as a script for the reader or a dramatic depiction of a scene, rendering the reader a spectator. But how is this voice on the page made “real” to readers? How do early modern poems situate readers with respect to the action or moment of a lyric poem? Literary and linguistic theory interested in semiotics, phenomenology, reader response, and material culture will frame our approach to answering these questions, testing the boundaries between spoken and silently read word and song to better understand the ways lyric was and can be read and used. Focusing in equal part on the major poets (Wyatt, Sidney, Shakespeare, Spenser, Donne, Milton) and less canonical figures like Anne Locke, Richard Barnfield, and Mary Wroth, we will consider the reader’s relationship to the speaker imagined in a poem—how readers are interpolated by texts rhetorically, grammatically, and materially, as audiences and as speakers. Students will develop a working knowledge of ancient and early modern rhetoric; modern theoretical texts will include Bergson, Saussure, Jakobson, Agamben, Austin, Barthes, de Certeau, de Man, Derrida, Wright, Culler, and Johnson, among others. This course will assume familiarity with prosodic analysis. Prerequisite: two English courses at the 200 level or above (English 211, 212, or 213 strongly recommended), or consent of the instructor. This course applies toward the pre-1700 requirement. Conference. 

English 370 - Studies in Cultural Contacts

Modern Irish Literature
One-unit semester courseStarting with the late nineteenth-century Celtic Revival and Irish Literary Renaissance and continuing up to the present, this course will explore the extraordinary achievement and impact of twentieth- and twenty-first-century Irish literature. A particular emphasis will be the complex relationship between literature and colonialism in Ireland. We will devote some time to the forces that led to the creation of two states, the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, a century ago in 1922, and to the Troubles of the late 1960s to the late 1990s in Northern Ireland; and to the literary response to both events. We will focus on questions about the relationship between politics and language; the roles of myth, folklore, and religion; how Irish nationalism interacts with the discourses of gender, class, and race; and the complicated relationships of Irish exiles like James Joyce and Samuel Beckett with their homeland. Authors will include W.B. Yeats, Lady Gregory, J.M Synge, James Joyce, Sean O’Casey, Samuel Beckett, Seamus Heaney, Eavan Boland, and Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill. Prerequisite: two English courses at the 200 level or above, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Modernity and Memory in the Indian Ocean
One-unit semester course. The Indian Ocean has been a site of cultural exchange across continents for several millennia, but it has often been marginalized from discussions of modernity based on Euro-American and trans-Atlantic models. What does it mean to be modern in the context of the Indian Ocean, a region crisscrossed by multiple empires, competing religions, and movements of migrants, merchants, slaves, pilgrims and soldiers? How have individuals and communities in the Indian Ocean been framed by larger transnational processes like colonization, decolonization, slavery, trade, migration, and displacement? Using literature as the primary mode of thinking, this course will consider the ways in which the unique history of circulation of people, objects, and ideas in the Indian Ocean shapes ideas of modernity distinct from those developed in the West. The aim is to explore the refashioning of modernity in literary and theoretical texts that return to archival sources to announce critical rewritings of the past. Paying close attention to narrative techniques and forms, the course will examine how the use of non-Western modes of representation and epistemologies provide modes for critiquing various theoretical positions on modernity. Prerequisite: two English or literature courses at the 200 level or above. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 330. Not offered 2022–23.

Strindberg and O’Neill
One-unit semester course. This course will be an in-depth study of two giants of modern drama from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, August Strindberg (1849–1912) from Sweden and Eugene O’Neill (1888–1953) from the United States. Topics to be discussed will include naturalism, expressionism, surrealism, family, heredity, alcoholism, drugs, and pipe dreams. Strindberg plays will likely include The Father (1887), Miss Julie (1888), To Damascus (1898/1904), and The Dance of Death (1900). O’Neill texts will include Anna Christie (1920), The Emperor Jones (1920), Mourning Becomes Electra (1931), The Iceman Cometh (1939), and Long Day’s Journey into Night (1941). Prerequisites: two English courses at the 200 level or above, or consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

English 381 - Film and New Media Studies

Agency and Identity in New Media Narratives
One-unit semester course. From hypertexts to video games to livestreams, the storytelling affordances of digital media have captivated creators for nearly half a century. While new media narratives have expressed the liberatory potentials of interactivity and connectivity in their works, they have also raised deep questions about human agency, responsibility, and identity within our increasingly technological world. How are users interpellated within constructs of race, gender, sexuality, and ability as they create an avatar or act within digital spaces? How does the ability to interface with creators or transform narrative outcomes alter one’s relationship to any given story? What are the ethical dilemmas inherent in taking control of virtual bodies, especially those that differ from one’s own? This course aims to allow students to explore these questions for themselves by analyzing a variety of new media texts and putting them in conversation with theories of technology and identity. Potential texts to be analyzed include literary hypertexts such as Shelley Jackson’s Patchwork Girl, digital games such as the Fulbright Company’s Gone Home, and digital-native visual media such as Janelle Monáe’s Dirty Computer. Prerequisite: two English courses at the 200 level or above (preferably one in film and media studies), or consent of the instructor. Conference–screenings. 

The City in Film
One-unit semester course. Shots of the Manhattan skyline or its crowded streets and subways, car chases filmed on new freeways, views into apartments across the way: American cinema of the postwar period showed a particular fascination with the excitement, mobility, and alienation of urban life. These settings in turn shaped the narrative possibilities of film storytelling in the era. In this course we will focus on films from the 1940s and ’50s that set their action in cities and address the experience of urban life, especially in the contrasting examples of Los Angeles and New York. Film screenings will be accompanied by required readings on the language of film analysis, and on contemporary literature, art, and criticism focused on the modern and postmodern city. Directors will be drawn from among the following: Robert Aldrich, Samuel Fuller, Alfred Hitchcock, Phil Karlson, Fritz Lang, Joseph Lewis, Joseph Losey, Ida Lupino, Anthony Mann, Otto Preminger, Nicholas Ray, Edgar Ulmer, Fred Zinnemann. Prerequisite: two English courses at the 200 level or above, or consent of the instructor. Conference-screenings. Not offered 2022–23.

English 384 - Poetry and History

American Modernism
One-unit semester course. Virginia Woolf wrote that on “or about December, 1910, human character changed,” voicing a widely shared excitement over an anticipated revolution in the arts. The American poets who stayed in the United States shared this excitement, but also faced unique cultural circumstances. We will do close readings of poems written over the first three decades or so of the twentieth century. The poets on whom the class will focus may include William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, Melvin Tolson, Wallace Stevens, and Gertrude Stein; in particular, we will look at how these writers responded to and helped shape attitudes toward and practices in the visual arts transnationally, looking at and reading pieces by artists who may include Alfred Stieglitz, Charles DeMuth, Pablo Picasso, Juan Gris, and Wifredo Lam. Prerequisite: two English courses at the 200 level, or English 211, or consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Contemporary American Poetry
One-unit semester course. This course is devoted to the works of American poets writing in the decades after 1945, beginning with poets ranging from Richard Wilbur to Charles Olson and ending with those writing now. The emphasis will be on the heterogeneous nature of poetic practices and poetic traditions and practices in the United States in the last half of the twentieth century, and most class discussions will focus on individual poems and essays about poetics, especially those less commonly read these days. We will also consider questions about the relationships between poetry, poetics, and American culture, characterizing major historical changes in the United States in the period. Prerequisite: English 211, 212, or 213; and one upper-division English course, or consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Poetics of Resistance and Resilience
One-unit semester course. The purpose of this class is to examine the intersection of aesthetics, politics, and poetics in contemporary resistance poetry (1945–present). How do poets draw on traditions and update those traditions to meet new needs? Special attention will be paid to the influence of non-Western aesthetics and the role of sex and gender in the creation of poetic legacies. The course emphasizes close reading of the texts. Prerequisite: two 200-level English classes, or one CRES foundational course, or two regular CRES courses. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

English 386 - Word and Image

One-unit semester course. “Written words have been combined with visual images in forms which range from the explanatory to the enigmatic, from the constructive to the contradictory, from the iconic to the irreverent,” writes Leslie Ross. This course will focus on text-image relations in paper and print media, including illuminated texts, illustrated texts, collage, texts with photographs, paintings with captions, graphic novels, and fine art books. Our study will be guided by the following questions: How do text-image compositions deploy their media to enrich meaning-making potential while also engaging their dissonance or dissociation? How do text and image differently engage the senses, the intellect, and the emotions? How do words and images each convey symbolic or metaphoric content or use syntax and argument? How do text and image illuminate, distort, or amplify aspects of individual consciousness or historical narrative? Primary texts may include Haida tradition in Raven Steals the Light, Plains Indian ledger narratives, Christine de Pizan’s Epistre D’Othéa, Gustave Doré’s and William Blake’s illustrations of Milton’s Paradise Lost, William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and Experience, Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series, Max Ernst’s The Hundred Headless Woman, Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home, W.G. Sebald’s Austerlitz, and Theresa Hak Kyung Cha’s Dictee. Theorists may include Bill Holm, Karl Kroeber, Michael Camille, W.J.T. Mitchell, Lisa Lowe, Marianne Hirsch, Scott McCloud, Hillary Chute, John Bateman, Neil Cohn. Prerequisite: two English courses at the 200 level or above, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

English 393 - Literary Theory

Meaning and Interpretation
One-unit semester course. In this course we address debates within philosophy of language, literary theory, and legal analysis concerning our practices of interpreting texts. In ordinary personal communication, people use various sounds, gestures, and marks to express thought and feeling. The course begins by examining this activity, asking what factors determine what we mean, and what we interpret each other to mean. Several distinctions matter to our investigation: 1) the distinction between what we directly mean or say and what we indirectly mean or imply; 2) the distinction between what we literally or explicitly mean and what we nonliterally, figuratively, or inexplicitly mean; 3) the distinction among texts as conveyers of authorial meaning, texts as understandable according to publicly available meaning, and texts as socially interpretable objects; and 4) the (putative) distinction between the exchange of sounds, gestures, and marks in a shared present context and the production, reception, and cultural and political deployment of text(s) across some distance in space and time. We examine the phenomena of vagueness, ambiguity, underspecificity, indeterminacy, and undecidability; develop accounts of lying, pretense, irony, and fiction; and finally engage controversies about the nature of genre, the meanings of texts, and the interpretation of statutes. Readings are drawn from the philosophy of language (e.g., Austin, Grice, and Kripke), from literary theory (e.g., de Man, Derrida, and Tamen), and from legal theory (e.g. Scalia). We also use a few short literary texts as test cases for some of our analyses. Prerequisites: two upper-division courses in philosophy or two courses in English, or Literature 400, or consent of instructors. Conference. Cross-listed as Philosophy 414: Meaning and Interpretation. Not offered 2022–23.

The Novel and Narrative Theory
One-unit semester course. “Narrative is to be found wherever someone tells us about something,” according to Monika Fludernik; hence, almost everywhere. In this course we will explore some of the most important critical terms and categories for understanding the workings of fictional narrative. These include point of view and focalization; temporality and the conversion of raw “event” into plot structure; the nature of literary characters and reader investment in them; endings and closure; atmosphere and tone; fiction and metafiction. We will work by pairing critical concepts with example texts, mostly drawn from novels and short stories (including Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy and works from Aphra Behn, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Edgar Allan Poe, and James Joyce), but will conclude with one or two film texts in order to compare narrative methods. Theorists will include Barthes, Booth, Chatman, Culler, Foucault, Genette, Moretti, Ngai, Propp, and Shklovsky. Prerequisite: two English courses at the 200 level or above, or consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

English 400 - Introduction to Literary Theory

See Literature 400 for description.

Literature 400 Description

English 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

English 481 - Independent Reading

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Prerequisite: approval of the instructor and the division.

Environmental Studies 200 - Introduction to Environmental Studies Research Methods

One-unit semester course. This course is designed to provide an introduction to environmental studies research methods and design, including widely used techniques in natural and social sciences. Specific topics include spatial analysis, statistical modeling, document coding, case study, and archival research; students will also learn about and practice field study design and oral and visual data presentation. This course is designed for first- and second-year students. Prerequisites: completion of one semester of either Biology 101 or 102 or Chemistry 101 and one semester of Humanities 110. Conference.

Environmental Studies 220 - Geology

One-unit semester course. An introduction to the composition of the earth and the physical forces acting upon it. The course will focus on minerals and rocks and the processes that affect their micro- and macroscopic structure. Topics will include the formation of the earth, plate tectonics, mountain building, volcanism, erosion, and earth history as revealed through the geological record. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as Chemistry 220.

Not offered 2022–23.

Environmental Studies 300 - Junior Seminar

One-unit semester course. This course for ES majors explores the way environmental themes can be analyzed from interdisciplinary perspectives. Prerequisites: completion of or concurrent enrollment in the ES–history and social science core requirements and both of the 100 level ES–mathematical and natural sciences core requirements. Conference.

Environmental Studies 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

French 110 - First-Year French

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester. A study of elements of grammar, speaking, and reading. Conference.

French 210 - Second-Year French

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester. Revision of grammar and elementary composition; readings in philosophy, lyric poetry, novel, and theatre. Prerequisite: French 110 or equivalent. Conference.

French 320 - Advanced French Conversation and Composition

One-unit semester course. This course is designed to help students develop strong written skills and near-native fluency in spoken French through frequent discussions and composition assignments pertaining to French and francophone texts of various genres, as well as a wide variety of cultural materials and media. Discussion in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference. (May not be repeated for credit if previously completed as a yearlong course.)

French 321 - Advanced French Conversation

One-unit semester course. This course is designed to help advanced students develop near-native fluency in spoken French through pronunciation drills, discussions, and diverse types of oral presentations on a broad corpus of cultural materials and media, such as film, fiction and nonfiction literature, theoretical texts, news articles and videos, and podcasts. Students will be evaluated on spontaneous output (such as discussions and oral exams) and rehearsed output (such as recordings and recitations). Class conducted entirely in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

French 331 - French Literature and Culture of the Middle Ages

One-unit semester course. From bird-men to werewolves, from crumbling political and social structures to farcical judicial proceedings, this course explores several eleventh- to fifteenth-century literary works that stage a “culture clash” of one kind or another. Through formal analysis and close reading of works from several different genres (including the chanson de geste, the lai, the romance, the farce, and the fabliau), we will be particularly interested in how the figuring of discord might suggest certain paradigm shifts in the period. We will ask how these works navigate, for example, questions of cultural or gender difference, changing social structure, or the waning of different institutions. Works will include the Chanson de Roland, the Lais of Marie de France, a romance of Chrétien de Troyes, La Mort du roi Arthur, La Farce de Maistre Pathelin, and several other short works. Discussion in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

French 332 - Early Modern French Literature and Culture

One-unit semester course. This course will take “time and narration” as its principal area of inquiry. We will examine French works of literature from the early modern and Enlightenment periods (as well as a few works from the twentieth century that are inspired by these thinkers) that engage with one of the major philosophic questions of the period: the nature of temporality and its relation to representation. We will look especially at the work of Montaigne, Pascal, Racine, Mme de Lafayette, and Rousseau in an effort to discern how their experiments with representing time and the nature of becoming (rather than just being) inspire later twentieth-century thinkers such as Sartre, Deleuze, and Beckett. Discussion in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

French 334 - Nineteenth-Century French Literature and Culture

One-unit semester course. This course centers on the notion of l’imaginaire fantastique and looks at the peculiar fascination with the supernatural and the uncanny that permeates nineteenth-century French literature and art. We will not only read a selection of short stories, poems, and essays of the period, but also consider a variety of contemporary media (painting, photography, and early cinema) with an eye to understanding how the supernatural was conceived and recaptured and what new problems of representation and formal experimentations came in its wake. Authors studied include major French writers and poets, such as Nodier, Mérimée, Gautier, Balzac, Hugo, Baudelaire, Barbey d’Aurevilly, Villiers de L’Isle Adam, and Maupassant, as well as influential “theorists” of the uncanny, such as E.T.A. Hoffmann, Poe, Marx, Freud, Caillois, Todorov, and Cixous. Discussion in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

French 341 - French Narrative and the Novel Prior to Realism

One-unit semester course. An examination of the novel and other narrative forms that developed in France from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century. The course will focus on the function of these new narrative forms within their social and historical contexts, with special emphasis on the institutionalized forms of public discourse that developed during the period and the various theories of representation upon which they drew. Authors covered will include Mme de La Fayette, Laclos, Rousseau, Balzac, and Flaubert. Discussion in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

French 342 - Novel from Flaubert to the New Novel: The Collapse of Realism and the Undoing of the Subject

One-unit semester course. The theory and decline of realism in the French novel will be discussed in Flaubert, Proust, Sartre, Robbe-Grillet, and Sarraute. Focusing primarily on the evolution in narrative form from 1850 to 1960, this course will examine the shift in the modern novel from representing social structures or systems objectively to evoking subjectivity and provoking more complex reader-text transactions. Discussion in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

French 343 - Late Twentieth-Century French Fiction

One-unit semester course. This course will examine narrative strategies since the late 1950s and their underlying aesthetic theories. The course will focus on several issues or problems, including the autonomy of the literary text, narrative as a space of encounter between objective reality and the creative imagination, and the construction of the subject through autofiction. How do the formal aspects of prose fiction place into question our experience of the self and the world? To what extent are the self and the world disclosed through narrative, and what is the nature of this process? Readings will include Robbe-Grillet, Perec, Duras, Hébert, Barthes, Modiano, Ernaux, and Condé. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

French 363 - Introduction to Francophone Literature

One-unit semester course. This course is intended to introduce students to some of the issues (social, historical, and literary) at the core of francophone studies. To this end the syllabus will include literary works and critical essays by authors writing in French from a variety of cultural situations and geographic locations (the Maghreb, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Caribbean). It will treat, on the one hand, the thematic presence of the questions of identity, language, resistance to colonial power, religion, race, etc.; and on the other hand, the ways in which these issues become the object of specifically literary or formal analysis. It will seek out the interpenetration of theme and form in francophone works by exploring the ways in which narrative strategies, for example, transpose the problems and struggles of individuals and societies coming to grips with historical and cultural transformations. The authors studied will include Glissant, Schwartz-Bart, Kane, Kourouma, Ben Jelloun, Condé, and Chamoiseau. The syllabus will on occasion include works of theater by Césaire and poetry by Senghor, Bebey, Damas, and Tirolien. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

French 366 - Intro to Haitian Culture and Literature

One-unit semester course. In the last few decades, Haiti has come to be known for repeated calamities: earthquakes, hurricanes, droughts followed by floods and vice versa, dictatorships, cholera, etc. These catastrophes tend to overshadow a truly unique history—Haiti’s is the only successful slave revolution in the Caribbean—and thriving avant-garde movements. In this course, we will explore the relationship between historical conditions and literary form, beginning with Haiti’s 1804 declaration of independence from France. Reading a selection of poetry, novels, and recent short stories with noir leanings, we will think through how, in time, Haitian authors reinvented their literature in the wake of the revolution, and later negotiated the dangerous necessity of writing under the brutal Duvalier dictatorships. Texts by women authors will also allow us to explore what it means to write at the intersection of race and gender. Finally, the prolific Haitian diaspora will help us consider the poetics of exile. Authors will include Jacques Roumain, Frankétienne, Dany Laferrière, and Edwidge Danticat. Discussion in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

French 371 - Nineteenth-Century French Poetry and Poetics

One-unit semester course. This course explores the blossoming of new poetic forms and changing conceptions of poetry and the role of the poet in the years spanning the romantic, Parnassian, and symbolist movements. Through close readings, we will develop a broad understanding of French versification and prosody, but we will also study and discuss various practices and trends that transformed the composition, the diffusion, and even the reading of poetry in this period: the work of translation; the increased circulation of non-Western texts; the dialogue between poetry and other arts such as music and painting; women’s effort to undermine the gendering of the cannon; the mythologization of the poet as prophet, seer, flaneur, or poète maudit; revolutionary politics; the expansion of the press; and so forth. Works studied include poems by Marceline Desbordes-Valmore, Alphonse de Lamartine, Victor Hugo, Gérard de Nerval, Louis Bertrand, Charles Baudelaire, Louisa Siefert, Judith Gautier, Paul Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, and Stéphane Mallarmé. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

French 381 - Twentieth-Century French Poetry and Poetics

One-unit semester course. This course will focus on poets since Mallarmé and the theoretical, aesthetic, and ethical projects of poetry in the context of modernity. We will explore approaches to reading figurative language and its challenges to representation and referentiality; relationships of poetic language to ordinary speech; the structure of lyric address; selfhood and the modern lyric subject; and the emergence of a poetics of the nonhuman in late modernity. First and foremost, this course aims to develop the skills of close rhetorical reading as the foundation for all analysis and theoretical commentary. Authors studied include Apollinaire, Reverdy, Desnos, Eluard, Ponge, Bonnefoy, Guillevic, Réda, Leiris, and Roubaud. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

French 382 - Modern French and Francophone Theater

One-unit semester course. This course explores a wide spectrum of experimental and theoretical avenues in twentieth- and twenty-first-century French and francophone theater. Taking the notion of interprétation as a point of departure, we will examine the various intersections between modern theories of dramaturgy, acting, and stage production with a view to opening up the theatrical space to new modalities of reading. Texts studied include plays by Jarry, Tzara, Anouilh, Sartre, Beckett, Ionesco, Césaire, Genet, Sarraute, Cixous, Duras, Koltès, and Ndiaye, and theories of avant-garde theater by Artaud, Brecht, Barthes, Lehmann, among others. In counterpoint to the study of these works, the course will also discuss the demise of the very notions of “author” and “spectacle” and the impact of these changes on theatrical creation in the aftermath of mai ‘68. Class activities include close reading, discussion, video footage analysis, and a performance. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

French 383 - The Matter of Poetry

One-unit semester course. This course focuses on the 20th-century French poets Francis Ponge and Yves Bonnefoy, whose work displays an acute interest in materiality. By looking in depth at the poetry and essays of these authors, we will explore questions arising at the intersection of literary texts and the world of material things and bodies that they name, figure, or represent. Can language influence our understanding of the real? Do texts declare their autonomy from a world of referents and fortify their own self-enclosure, or can we conceive of a continuity between text and material reality? How are human beings alienated from nature and how can they be reconciled with it? In addition to Ponge and Bonnefoy, we will read other pertinent authors such as Camus, Sartre, Derrida, and Pascal. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement examination. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

French 390 - Postwar French Cinema (1945–1975)

One-unit semester course. This course examines the testimonial and critical function taken on by French cinema in the second half of the twentieth century. Focusing on films that problematize significant trends or crises in this historical period (the Occupation, the Holocaust, decolonization, the rise of consumer society, student protests in May ’68, etc.), we will discuss what formal strategies allow the filmic medium to propose critical alternatives to traditional historical narratives. Additionally, we will read key essays by film critics and theorists that examine the commitment of postwar French cinema to politics and ethics. Films viewed include works by filmmakers Melville, Resnais, Bresson, Tati, Varda, Truffaut, Godard, Marker, Eustache, and Akerman, as well as various cinétracts. Course includes weekly film screenings. Discussion in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference-screenings. 

Not offered 2022–23.

French 391 - French Literature and Cultural Studies

One-unit semester course. In an age when truth is conflated with “alternative facts” and facts with spin, it is necessary to investigate how theories of subjectivity, science, and philosophy have successively redefined authenticity, factuality, and the concept of truth itself. We will establish a historical inventory of these changing notions of truth, and analyze how literary works, especially fiction, rely on them to ground their own verisimilitude and meaning. We will read a variety of texts covering five centuries, including texts by Montaigne, Descartes, Pascal, Mme d’Aulnoy, Mme de Graffigny, Rousseau, Flaubert, Sartre, Foucault, Lyotard, Sarraute, Beckett, and Marie NDiaye as well as contemporary theory. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement examination. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

French 392 - French Connections: The Intertwined Histories of French and American Cinema

One-unit semester course. This course explores the deep connections between French and American cinema, which stem from over a century of reciprocal influences disseminated through powerful images and intersecting discourses on film as an autonomous language and art form. Structured around exchanges among cinephilic filmmakers, actors, camera operators, composers, and defiant critics from both sides of the Atlantic, it offers an introduction to the parallel histories of two major filmic traditions, while also questioning the very notion of national cinema. As we move in time from the contested origins of moving images and the development of national cinemas to the emergence of successive “new waves” to the transnational film industry of today, we will examine how the dialogue between French and American artists contributed to shaping significant periods in film history (silent film, surrealism, poetic realism, the French New Wave, New American Cinema), distinctive genres (the film noir, thriller, teen pic, musical, comedy of manners, road movie), and common themes (alienation, precarity, urban violence, police brutality, exile) in both commercial and independent films. Filmmakers discussed include Alice Guy-Blaché, Germaine Dulac, Maya Deren, Jean Renoir, Orson Welles, Nicholas Ray, Jean-Luc Godard, John Cassavetes, Robert Bresson, Martin Scorsese, Alfred Hitchcock, François Truffaut, Charles Burnett, Mambéty, Eric Rohmer, Spike Lee, Mathieu Kassovitz, Agnès Varda, Kelly Reichardt, and Mati Diop. Conducted in English. No previous experience with film analysis is required. Students taking the course for French literature credit will meet in extra sessions. Prerequisite for students taking the course for French credit: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference-screenings. Cross-listed as Literature 392.

French 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

French 481 - Independent Reading

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by examination; approval of instructor and division.

German 110 - First-Year German: A Foundation

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester. This class is an introduction to reading, writing, and speaking German. Grammar instruction is supplemented with cultural materials from German-speaking countries. Classroom activities include poetry readings, film clips, and internet research. The class is reserved for students with no background in the language. Conference.

German 220 - Second-Year German: Cultural and Literary Perspectives

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester. This class is designed to enhance one’s skills in reading, writing, and speaking German. Along with a systematic grammar review, we explore literary, historical, and cultural topics, drawing on a variety of texts, including films, artworks, advertisements, and newspaper articles. One hour per week is spent in small conversation workshops, and students regularly complete listening comprehension exercises online. Prerequisite: German 110 or placement by examination. Conference.

German 311 - Advanced German I: Twentieth-Century Art and Politics (Berlin)

One-unit semester course. This class is designed to help students develop advanced competence in written and spoken German. There will be regular essay assignments, oral presentations, and group projects. We will discuss twentieth-century German culture and history, primarily through literary and filmic representations of Berlin. We will explore the city as the center of emergent mass culture in the early twentieth century, the capital of National Socialism, the divided capital of the Cold War era, the symbol of the united Germany, and the multicultural core of contemporary German society. Prerequisite: German 220 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

German 312 - Advanced German II

One-unit semester course. This course is designed to further students’ advanced competence in written and spoken German. Students will participate in a literature course but will write short papers in German and complete weekly grammar assignments. Prerequisite: German 311 or consent of the instructor. Conference. 

Not offered 2022–23.

German 335 - Contemporary German Literature

One-unit semester course. This seminar focuses on literature written between 1990 and the present. We will explore topics such as the unification of Germany, multiculturalism, globalization, postfeminism, and the representation of the German past. Special attention will be paid to experimental forms of writing such as the prose poem, pop literature, the deconstruction of narrative patterns, and “the new storytelling.” Authors include Ingo Schulze, Christian Kracht, Judith Hermann, Zafer Şenocak, Jenny Erpenbeck, W.G. Sebald, Katja Petrowskaja, Herta Müller, and Yoko Tawada. Conducted in German. Prerequisite: German 311 or consent of instructor. Conference. 

Not offered 2022–23.

German 346 - Introduction to Media Studies

One-unit semester course. Since Marshall McLuhan’s pronouncement that “the medium is the message,” scholars have studied the ways in which media technologies—from the printing press and the postal service to electric lighting and WiFi—support and transform our lives. This course offers and introduction to major theorists and debates in media studies through close analyses of films, literature, and theoretical texts. In keeping with McLuhan’s dictum, our focus will be not so much on understanding individual media, but on understanding from the perspective of media. Questions that will concern us include: What is (and isn’t) a medium? What do media do? To what extent do we create media, and to what extent do media create us? Readings from Plato, McLuhan, Kittler, Benjamin, Adorno, Heidegger, and Donna Haraway; art by Antonioni, Lang, Kafka, Hitchcock, Hoffman, H.D., Gertrude Stein, and Spike Jonze. Conducted in English. Students taking the course for German literature credit will meet in extra sessions. Prerequisite for students taking the course for German credit: German 220 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 346 and Art 346. For 2022–23, the course is only offered as Literature and Art.

German 349 - Cinema and Politics

One-unit semester course. This course offers an introduction to German cinema, focusing on the question: “What makes a film political?” From expressionist film to new wave cinema to the contemporary Berlin school, the German cinematic tradition includes numerous films with a political agenda. The “political” may take on the form of critique: of authorities and hierarchies, of racism and anti-Semitism, of the repression of the Nazi past, of capitalism and consumer society. Or it may aid the creation of inclusive communities by expanding our sense of who can talk and be heard, what can be seen and felt. We will watch groundbreaking films by German and other European directors, including G.W. Pabst, Fritz Lang, Sergei Eisenstein, Leni Riefenstahl, Roberto Rossellini, Alain Resnais, Helke Sander, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Ulrike Ottinger, Fatih Akin, and Christian Petzold. Theoretical readings by Brecht, Benjamin, Adorno, Arendt, Mulvey, Rancière, and others. Conducted in English. No previous experience with film analysis is required. Students taking the course for German literature credit will meet in extra sessions. Prerequisite for students taking the course for German credit: German 220 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Conference-screenings. Cross-listed as Literature 349.

Not offered 2022–23.

German 358 - Representing Genocide

One-unit semester course. This course asks how film and literature can help us recognize, explain, and respond to genocide, a crucial feature of twentieth-century history. In the first half of the semester, we will focus on representations of the Holocaust, asking questions such as: How do authors and filmmakers grapple with events that shatter traditional forms of perception and comprehension? How do they portray human agency in an age of bureaucratically administered mass destruction? In the second half of the semester, we will compare the Holocaust to other cases of genocide and mass violence, including American slavery and the genocides in Turkey, Cambodia, and Rwanda. Throughout, we will explore a wide range of genres and media, including testimonies, memoirs, fiction, graphic novels, and feature films. We will also discuss the representation of victims and perpetrators, different forms of witnessing, and the aesthetics of shock and horror. Conducted in English. Students taking the course for German literature credit will meet in extra sessions. Prerequisite for students taking the course for German credit: German 220 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 358.

German 372 - Psychoanalysis and Literature

One-unit semester course. Freud liked to joke that he invented psychoanalysis because it had no literature. He meant secondary or scientific literature, of course; this is why the foundational texts of psychoanalysis cite not academic essays or monographs but instead the works of Shakespeare and Sophocles, Heine and Hoffmann. This course offers an introduction to major concepts of psychoanalysis through close study of Freud’s work and the works of literature that it was inspired by. We will also consider some of the literature and film that Freud inspired in his turn. Throughout, our focus will be on understanding psychoanalysis not as a set of facts about infants, their development, and their desires, but instead as mode and practice of interpreting individuals and objects. Subjects to be studied include dreams, desire, sexual object choice, mourning, melancholia, and narcissism; authors will range from Sophocles, Ovid, and Kafka to Alfred Hitchcock, Hélène Cixous, and Chris Kraus. Students taking the course for German literature credit will meet in extra sessions. Prerequisite for students taking the course for German credit: German 220 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 372.

Not offered 2022–23.

German 375 - Thinking Machines: Androids and Automatons in Science and Literature

One-unit semester course. At the onset of modernity, the human being acquired a new kind of shadow: the android or machine-man, an automaton capable of replicating behaviors that had previously been the exclusive domain of humans. Since then, the question of what a human being is has been closely bound up with the question of what an automaton isn’t. This course tracks the interwoven fates of androids and humans from Descartes through to the present day, examining the ways in which machines have served as a foil for artists, scientists, and philosophers to understand what (if anything) is particularly human about human beings. Questions that will occupy us include: What abilities have historically been thought to distinguish humans from mere machines? And what happens when, as a result of scientific and technological progress, machines become capable of replicating human speech, motion, affection, thought, or labor? Texts and films from Diderot, Hoffmann, Freud, Kafka, Foucault, Marx, Lang, Turing, and Scott, among others. Conducted in English. Students taking the course for German literature credit will meet in extra sessions. Prerequisite for students taking the course for German credit: German 220 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 375.

German 391 - German Theory I

One-unit semester course. Variable topics. See specific listing for prerequisites. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

Plants and Politics
One-unit semester course. In the modern era, botany and colonialism have been inseparable. With the rise of European imperialism, plants became big business, and their study and cultivation were as much a part of trade and conquest as scientific inquiry. To create an empire meant remaking ecosystems abroad and at home. Botany has also been a preoccupation of modern artists, poets, and philosophers, who have asked why it is so difficult to represent plants and what it means that flowers are one of the most venerable models of language. In this course, we will explore the intimate relationships between aesthetic and scientific conceptualizations of the plant kingdom from the eighteenth century to the present, looking at works of poetry and prose, photography, and film. We will also consider attempts to envision a postcolonial botany. Authors will include Rousseau, Goethe, Kant, Hegel, Dickinson, Nietzsche, Benjamin, Freud, Rilke, Celan, Mayröcker, Kincaid, and Moten. Conducted in English. Students taking the course for German literature credit will meet in extra sessions. Prerequisite for students taking the course for German credit: German 220 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 391.

Introduction to Critical Theory
One-unit semester course. This course explores the German philosophical tradition since Kant, focusing on the emergence of the modern notions of class, race, and gender. We will be particularly concerned with how these traditional concepts are being rethought in contemporary postcolonial studies, critical race theory, and Afropessimism. In addition to philosophical texts, we will be working with literature, film, and video art. Authors will include Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Benjamin, Heidegger, Arendt, Spivak, Mbembe, and Moten. Conducted in English. Students taking the course for German literature credit will meet in extra sessions. Prerequisite for students taking the course for German credit: German 220 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 391. Not offered 2022–23.

German 392 - German Theory II

One-unit semester course. Variable topics. See specific listing for prerequisites. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

Revolutions in Poetic Language
One-unit semester course. Between 1750 and 1850, virtually every assumption about poetry’s forms, powers, and goals underwent a series of radical transformations that would shape the modern understanding of art and literature. Reading lyric, dramatic, and prose works, as well as critical and philosophical essays, we will concentrate on developing skills in interpreting texts and formalizing the theoretical challenges they present. Authors will include Büchner, Dickinson, Gilroy, Goethe, Hegel, Heidegger, Kleist, Marx, Mörike, Poe, Rousseau, F. Schlegel, C. Smith, and Wheatley. Conducted in English. Students taking the course for German literature credit will meet in extra sessions. Prerequisite for students taking the course for German credit: German 220 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 392. Not offered 2022–23.

German 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

German 481 - Independent Study

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Prerequisite: approval of instructor and division.

Greek 111 - First-Year Greek: Part I

One-unit semester course. This course offers a study of the elements of ancient Greek grammar and syntax, introduces students to the cultures that used ancient Greek, and conducts first readings in Greek prose and poetry. Conference.

Greek 112 - First-Year Greek: Part II

One-unit semester course. This course offers a study of the elements of ancient Greek grammar and syntax, introduces students to the cultures that used ancient Greek, and conducts first readings in Greek prose and poetry. Prerequisite: Greek 111 or equivalent. Conference.

Greek 201 - Intermediate Greek

One-unit semester course. This course offers an intensive review of the grammar and syntax studied in first-year Greek, while refining and extending students’ facility with the Greek language. Students will develop close reading and interpretive skills as well as familiarity with a variety of literary styles and authors. Prerequisite: Greek 112 or equivalent. Full course for one semester. Conference.

Greek 301 - Advanced Greek I

One-unit semester course. This seminar focuses on expanding students’ interpretive skills and critical vocabulary. Students analyze primary texts in the original and in translation, and employ and critique relevant scholarship and theory that aids the reading and understanding of these texts. Students typically study one landmark work of Greek literature, such as the Iliad or Odyssey or an Attic tragedy. Students also gain a broader understanding of Greek literary production. Prerequisite: Greek 201 or equivalent. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

Greek 302 - Advanced Greek II

One-unit semester course. This seminar utilizes and expands the linguistic and interpretive skills that students have developed in first-year and intermediate Greek. Students analyze primary texts in the original and in translation, and employ and critique relevant scholarship and theory that aids the reading and understanding of these texts. A wide range of seminars is offered over a four-year period. While some seminars are organized around specific works, others focus on authors, genres, and periods or places. Recent seminars have explored fifth-century Athenian tragedy, the development of historiography and ethnography, the politics and representation of athletics, the transformation of Greek literature in the Hellenistic world, and the Hellenistic urban environment. Prerequisite: Greek 301 or consent of the instructor. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

-

Note: 300-level history courses are ordinarily open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, and to first-year students only with the consent of the instructor.

History 205 - The Twentieth-Century Middle East through Music

One-unit semester course. This course is a survey of the modern history of the Middle East and North Africa region, using the lens of music to approach that history, from the early twentieth century to the present. The course will focus on the Arabic-speaking countries of the region, particularly the Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia), Egypt, and the Levant (Syria, Lebanon, Palestine/Israel, Jordan). Taking a critical cultural approach, we will learn how music can be a window into a broader understanding of political and social histories, and how musical traditions have shaped and been shaped by their historical contexts. Special attention will be given to race, gender, class, religion, colonialism, nationalism and state-building, Orientalism, and the politics of knowledge production in the region’s history. Lecture-conference.

History 210 - Educating Americans in the Long Nineteenth Century

One-unit semester course. What does it mean to be educated? Is education a system of social control or a pathway to liberation? Should schooling cultivate collective values and traditions, nurture democratic citizens, or encourage economic productivity? What is the relationship between “education” and “school”? In this course, we will investigate how Americans from the revolution to the end of the nineteenth century grappled with these questions. We will examine a variety of educational institutions (such as chartered academies, female seminaries, Native American boarding schools, and freedpeople’s schools), but we will give special attention to the rise of public education (the common school system), considering both why some Americans in the early republic thought that mandatory public schooling was essential and why others resisted it. We will also study the myriad ways that Americans were educated outside formal schooling, including apprenticeship and the “binding out” of children, the lyceum and Chautauqua movements, libraries and reading societies, Sunday schools, settlement houses, and clandestine education under slavery. Along the way, we will pay particular attention to the ways in which educational practices and philosophies in the United States either exacerbated or mitigated social inequalities along the lines of gender, race, and class. By closely considering how education worked (and didn’t) in the nineteenth century, we will aim to develop greater insights into what we want from education—on an individual and societal level—in the twenty-first century. Conference.

History 220 - Late Imperial China

One-unit semester course. This course surveys the history of late imperial China (sixteenth through nineteenth centuries) by examining several critical issues in the historiography of this period. Weekly discussions will address the following topics: despots, ritualized rulers and the growth of a “bureaucratic monarchy”; global economic crisis, peasant rebellion, and the Ming–Qing cataclysm; ethnicity, violence, and exchange on Chinese frontiers; lineage formation, strategic marriages, and the consolidation of gentry rule; local magistrates and scholars and their popular tales; migration, mobility, and social anxiety in a prosperous age; gender and sexuality in Qing Confucian ideology; exploration, trade, and emigration on the south China coast; and the challenge of seaborne imperialists in the nineteenth century. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 221 - From Treaty Ports to Megacities: Chinese Urban History

One-unit semester course. In China today, few environments change more rapidly than those in major metropolitan centers. Uncontrollable hypergrowth, large floating populations, and insufficient resources and infrastructure all make efficient urban planning and healthy community development difficult to achieve. This course will examine the origins of these current challenges, as well as solutions posed to solve earlier problems, both imagined and real. Topics to be addressed will include imperial models and spatial legacies; treaty ports, bunds, and foreign concessions; rural migration, sojourning, and movement between cities; hinterlands, regional networks, and global connections; revolutionary hygiene and public health; department stores, desire industries, and Shanghai fashion; the interwar lifestyles of petty urbanites and Westernized capitalists; covert political communities and urban labor organizing; wartime destruction and relocation; purifying the decadent city via socialist governance; hutongs, alleyway houses, and rebuilt residential space; and reassessing the colonial past and the globalized present in China’s megacities. Conference-laboratory.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 223 - Early Modern China and the World: 1300–1900

One-unit semester course. This course surveys the history of China from the fourteenth to the nineteenth centuries, tracing the rise and fall of the Ming dynasty, the Manchu conquest, and the disintegration of the Qing empire. This course will not only “discover history in China,” but also situate China in a global context by discussing the flow of peoples, goods, and ideas into and out of China. After the Silk Road connecting the Eurasian continent declined with the end of the Pax Mongolica, China continued to be an engine of the Afro-Eurasia network and began to interact with the Americas. However, since the Great Divergence in the 1750s, China has scrambled to join a new international order. By analyzing the exchanges between China and other regions, students will understand how the concept of China was in flux and the dynamic role of China in the early modern world. Conference.

History 231 - Crime and Law in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

One-unit semester course. How are societal norms defined and transgressions proven and sanctioned? Why are some wrongdoers forgiven for violating the law and reintegrated into the community, while others are deemed “criminals” who merit stern (even capital) punishment? How can the study of criminal justice and the law help us better understand medieval and early modern European societies and cultures? Through an analysis of law codes, court records, and other historical sources, this course will trace the development of criminal law and justice in premodern Europe. In particular, we will examine how medieval practices such as trial by ordeal, feuds, and the payment of blood prices (weregelds) gave way to more “rational” processes, such as trial by jury, inquisitorial procedure, and the use of judicial torture. We will also discuss the importance of religious attitudes and community norms in shaping the practical application of criminal justice in this period, as well as Enlightenment efforts to standardize criminal justice, abolish torture, and eliminate capital punishment. Conference.

History 240 - World Environmental History

One-unit semester course. This course approaches the study of “world environmental history” as a fascinating problem of historical methodology. We begin by introducing environmental history at its largest scales of time and space, investigating how climate, biodiversity, natural resources, and commodities have affected human history on a global level. We will then move on to a series of more specific case studies that complicate these large-scale historical analyses. As we visit the pastoral landscapes of Nazi Germany, the toxic waters and fields of modern Japan, the denuded countryside of imperial China, and the socially stratified villages of northern India, we will see how culture, memory, religion, and power shape reciprocal relationships between humans and their geographically unique surroundings in a number of different ways. Finally, we will investigate how these different valances of environmental history have informed a twentieth-century regime of global environmental governance—a regime born of good intentions, but one replete with problems of efficacy, equitability, and justice. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 251 - Slander, Censorship, and Surveillance in Modern European History

One-unit semester course. This course seeks to historicize and interrogate the limits on, and protections for, free speech in modern Europe. We will explore topics including libel laws, censorship and public morality, the development of ideas about natural rights, and the influence of changing technologies on practices and beliefs surrounding the liberty of expression. The class will focus on France and Britain between 1644 (the publication of Milton’s crucial text, Areopagitica) and 2016, when the EU adopted a code of conduct for regulating online hate speech. Conference.

History 256 - Migration Histories in the British Imperial World

One-unit semester course. The British Empire was built on migrations both forced and free, and in this course we will examine particular migration stories in wider imperial and global contexts. Some of the migrants that we will examine include settler colonists, enslaved persons, transported radicals, colonial officers, missionaries, and indentured and migrant laborers. The course will present a broad chronological survey of the British imperial world since 1700, paying attention to political, economic, social, and cultural dynamics. The final project for this course will be a digital exhibition to which students will contribute content and explanatory material. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 270 - Introduction to American Environmental History

One-unit semester course. This course introduces students to the major themes, questions, and methods in American environmental history. Environmental historians see the natural world as both a material place and a historical and cultural idea. This course considers how human societies have shaped the natural world, how the natural world has shaped human societies, and how ideas about nature have been created, challenged, and changed in American history. Conference.

History 271 - U.S. Politics and Culture, 1964–2004

One-unit semester course. Like most of U.S. history, the 40 years between the 1964 presidential election and Illinois state senator Barack Obama’s speech at the Democratic National Convention were times of change and conflict. We will explore this time period using secondary works and primary documents. The last baby boomers were born in 1964; Gen X, millennials, and Gen Z were still to come. U.S. involvement in the war in Vietnam was underway; after September 11, 2001, a war on terror would be waged. Women’s labor force participation (including that of married women and married mothers) was on the rise. Americans grappled with grassroots protests and political partisanship, persistent economic inequality, divisive foreign policies, and the so-called culture wars. In 1964, network TV and national and local radio and newspapers provided entertainment and news; by 2004, digital technologies would democratize and fragment access to information. We will examine all these changes, and more. Conference.

History 272 - Gender and the American Family

One-unit semester course. Historians can chart the numbers: from the changing demographics of birth and marriage rates to the rise in divorces and the number of households headed by single parents (usually mothers), families in the United States have changed dramatically in the past century. This course will explore the changing forms and meanings of “family.” We will examine changing family and household structures and look at how gender roles are built into and reproduced through social, legal, and political discourses. Topics include the shifting meanings of marriage and singlehood and the social value placed on children. Policy makers and social scientists privileged some families over others, and we will consider how constructions of race and ethnicity determined welfare benefits. We will also consider adoption practices and the legalization of same-sex marriage. Conference.

History 278 - U.S. Politics and Culture, 1929–1979

One-unit semester course. Examines the immediate and long-term social, cultural, and political effects of the Depression, World War II, and the Cold War, and the changing political landscapes of the 1960s and 1970s. Topics include the rise and fall of organized labor, the emergence of the civil rights movement, suburbanization, the economic and legal status of women, new immigrants after 1965, and the cultural roots of the new American right. The course is open to sophomores considering the history major and transfer students; others, including students in their first year, will be admitted as space permits by consent of the instructor. Conference with occasional lectures.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 282 - The Mexican Revolution

One-unit semester course. This course examines the roots, development, and effect of the Mexican Revolution (1910–17), from the Porfiriato through the institutionalization of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) rule. Principal themes include regionalism and tensions caused by centralization; industrialization, economic development, and dependency; class conflict; gender, race, citizenship, and political participation; and the production of a modern Mexican identity. Lecture-conference.

History 283 - Latin America and the United States

One-unit semester course. Since their respective independence, relations between the United States and the Latin American republics have been of great importance to the domestic politics in both, and have disproportionately affected the political and economic trajectory of the latter. Topics addressed will include competing visions of the proper relationship between the two regions; overt and covert U.S. military intervention; foreign investment in economic ties; and popular attitudes toward the United States in Latin America, and vice versa. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 284 - Latinx History in the United States

One-unit semester course. This course is a survey of Latina/o/x history in the United States from the pre-Columbian period to the present. It will examine the historical, social, political, cultural, and economic roots of several Spanish-speaking communities that reside in the U.S. Attention will be given to issues of race, class, gender, labor, immigration, community building and identity, political activism, and transnationalism. The class will focus primarily on the histories of Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans, the three largest Latina/o/x groups in the U.S.; but it will also discuss the histories, experiences, and contributions of communities of Central American, South American, and Caribbean backgrounds to U.S. society, culture, politics, and the economy. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 284.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 286 - Histories of Immigration and Migration in the United States

One-unit semester course. This course will cover U.S. immigration and migration histories from 1882 to the present. We will discuss forces that brought people from various parts of the globe to the U.S. and the movements of people within the country; their experiences in migrating and, in subsequent generations, enduring racial and ethnic hierarchies; and the impact of immigration and migration histories on U.S. economics, politics, culture, and society. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 286.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 298 - Music and the Cold War United States

See Music 238 for description. 

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 238 Description

History 303 - The History of the Sahara

One-unit semester course. This course will examine the history of the Sahara, a region that is often treated as a “blank space” or only peripherally included in histories of the Middle East/North Africa and Africa. Beginning in the early Islamic period and the heyday of the trans-Saharan trade (eighth to seventeenth centuries), we will trace the region’s history up to the twentieth and twenty-first centuries and the formation of nation-states and (often contentious) political borders. Employing textual primary sources, literary and cultural representations, ethnographies, and music, we will outline a history that counters the myth of a “blank space” and instead reveals a vibrant and diverse region characterized by long histories of exchange and mobility. While being attentive to themes of race, religion, colonialism, state formation, trade, and environment, we will also problematize the depiction of the Sahara as a natural “borderland” between an imagined North and sub-Saharan Africa, instead bringing the histories of these two areas together. Prerequisite: Humanities 110. Lecture-conference.

History 307 - War and Peace in Europe, 1700–1914

One-unit semester course. This course examines the cultures of war in Europe in the period leading up to World War I, and explores changes in the historiography as well as the history of warfare in this critical period. We will examine theories of peace and the rise of philanthropic organizations alongside developments in military recruitment, technology, and mobilization to question the relationships between military and society, and between pacifism and militarism. Key themes will include the influence of the press and public opinion on European wars, the role of women in modern warfare, and the relationship between war, diplomacy, and the development of national and European identities. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 310 - Water and the American West

One-unit semester course. This course uses the environmental and political history of America’s rivers, streams, reservoirs, and aquifers to introduce students to important issues in water history and contemporary water policy. We will begin by exploring a series of different frameworks for understanding the complex relationships between water, labor, land, and political power as those relationships have changed over time. As we build a deeper and more critical understanding of water as a natural, cultural, and political entity in American history, we will pay particular attention to the ways in which history has helped to shape the way we allocate and regulate water across a geographically and politically diverse continent. Armed with the dual weapons of history and basic legal doctrine, we will then begin to tackle some of the key issues in twentieth-century American water policy, starting with the Columbia and Colorado River basins. Looking toward the future, we will also explore the problems and potential solutions on the cutting edge of water politics both in the Colorado River basin and elsewhere, including groundwater policy, water marketing, and an extended discussion of the potential water implications of global warming. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 313 - Wildlife in America

One-unit semester course. Humans and wild animals have lived together in North America for more than 14,000 years. During that time, around 150 native species have gone extinct, and thousands of exotic species have colonized the landscape. Some formerly rare species have become common, and some common ones have become rare. Wild animals have served as food, clothing, shelter, servants, companions, weapons, and totems. This course will explore the turbulent, contested, and colorful history of wildlife in North America. It will span from the Pleistocene to the present and cover the entire continent. The goal of this course is for students to develop a sophisticated understanding of the changing relationships between people and wild animals over time. There are no easy answers for why things happened the way they did, and no simple lessons for what we should do in the future. But it’s a good story, and one that offers myriad, often unexpected insights for serious students of history and environmental studies. Prerequisite: Humanities 110. Lecture-conference.

History 315 - Defining and Defying Difference: Race, Ethnicity, and Empire

One-unit semester course. From the origins of the British Empire in the sixteenth century, the encounter between Britons and colonial subjects demanded explanations of human difference. In this course, we will consider race and ethnicity as contingent and contested categories shaped by political and economic circumstances. Topics will include the international slave trade and abolition, caste and community in South Asia, color and class in the twentieth-century Caribbean, and immigration and multiculturalism in late twentieth-century Britain. Throughout we will pay attention to gender. Prerequisite: Humanities 110, sophomore standing, or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 385.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 317 - The American Earth: U.S. Environmental History in the Twentieth Century

One-unit semester course. This course will address the concurrent histories of American environmental politics and the changing environment itself in twentieth-century U.S. history. We will approach the American continent both as a unique constellation of material and geographical spaces and as a changing and historically contingent cultural construct dependent on ideas about power, labor, identity, and morality. Topics will include nature and American nationalism, cultural constructions of nature, the American environmental movement, science and environmental management, and climatic change and sustainability in modern environmental politics. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 320 - Merchants and Mariners on the Water Frontier, 1400–1820

One-unit semester course. Indigenous mariners and merchants had traversed the oceans of East and Southeast Asia long before Europeans first ventured into those seas. By 1600 Chinese and Japanese sea lords and interlopers had created vast networks of migration and exchange, peppered with conflict and violence, from Siam and Malacca to Ryukyu and Nagasaki. This seminar explores the social and cultural history of this early modern maritime world. Selective topics include Zheng He’s Indian Ocean voyages; designated ports and unruly hinterlands; seaborne migrations and translocal connections; regional cults and sea goddesses’ miracles; merchants, supercargoes, and the vicissitudes of maritime trade; competing maritime cartographies; pirates and the business of violence; ocean archaeology and mariculture ethnographies; and hybrid identities in a maritime world. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 322 - China‘s Frontiers Since 1600

One-unit semester course. The Qing empire (1644–1911) more than doubled the territory of the Ming dynasty (1368–1644) and bequeathed its vast territory to twentieth-century China. How did the Qing become an empire that straddled Inner and East Asia? How did China manage to claim and retain these non-Han frontiers in its transition from an empire to a modern state? How did these frontiers and ethnic minorities become “problems” for contemporary China? These are the central questions we will explore in this course. In the first half of the class, we will chronologically investigate how the Qing empire originated from Manchuria and then annexed Manchuria, Mongolia, Taiwan, the southwestern borderlands, Tibet, and Xinjiang. In the second half, we will explore how the Qing empire and the Chinese state ruled these non-Han frontiers. Conference.

History 323 - Rice in East Asia

One-unit semester course. This course examines the history of rice in East Asia as crop, food, commodity, genetic resource, and symbol. How were institutions of social cohesion in China and Japan influenced by the particular demands of, and a commitment to, small-scale, labor-intensive riziculture? When and how were relations between consumer tastes and rice markets mediated by “rice masters”? What roles has rice played in linking the histories of East Asia, Southeast Asia, and the world between 1000 and the present? How did the “green revolution” alter that regional regime of rice cultivation, exchange, and consumption? These and other questions will be explored in multidisciplinary fashion with a broad range of original data and recent historiography. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 324 - Early Modern South Asia

One-unit semester course. Whether admired or reviled, there is little doubt that the Mughal dynasty fundamentally changed South Asia and ushered it into the modern world. Connecting Central Asian, Middle Eastern, and South Asian histories, this course will introduce students to the many political, cultural, and social worlds of this dynastic empire that was founded in the sixteenth century and endured until 1857. Beginning with an introduction to the Mughal state and its political alliances, we will then turn to questions of culture. We will read travelogues and courtly poetry, analyze miniature paintings, and think through early modern identities by attending to processes of translation, migration, and the production of scientific knowledge. By the end of the course we will be prepared to scrutinize modern representations of the Mughals in film and political discourse. Prerequisite: Humanities 110 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 327 - Meiji Restoration/Revolution

One-unit semester course. Few events in Japanese history receive more attention than the Meiji Restoration (or Revolution). A critical marker in Japanese political history, the restoration is also perceived as a major watershed in economic, social, and cultural developments. This course will examine the specific drama of imperial restoration, the modernizing revolution initiated from above thereafter, and the historical contexts that help to explain both. Major topics will include agrarian uprisings, new religious movements, and ee ja nai ka dancing; nativism and world rectification thought; the “opening” of Japan and the effect of international trade and diplomacy on internal Japanese conflicts; bakafu attempts at political reform and the avoidance of foreign invasion; the military rebellion of “loyalist” samurai; and the transformative changes initiated by the Meiji oligarchy after 1868. Readings will include both participant observations and post-Meiji assessments. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 328 - Popular Culture in Interwar Japan, 1905–1937

One-unit semester course. Between Japan’s stunning defeat of Russia in 1905 and its invasion of northern China in 1937, citizens of Japan rushed headlong into all manner of modern culture, creating and consuming the forerunners of several well-known forms of contemporary Japanese cultural production. After a brief introduction to the social and economic transformation of Japan in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, this course will address the following topics: silent film and benshi narrators; photography for everyone; detective fiction as a source for modern Japanese novels; cosmetics, advertising and design in department stores; popular songs and jazz; the “modern girl” and the eroticized cafe waitress; the gender-bending Takarazuka Revue; the origins of Japan’s national love affair with baseball; and “middle-classness” and the reform of everyday life. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 329 - Cameras and Photography in Nineteenth-Century East Asia

One-unit semester course. This course examines the early history of photography in China and Japan. Attention will be given to the complex (and disparate) technological histories of the medium, the varied uses to which the camera was put, and the impact of this new technology upon visual cultures in China and Japan. The dissemination of photographs into other media and the impact of consumer preferences upon content and style will also be examined. Travel landscapes, studio portraits, ethnographic photographs, and documentary images by Euro-American, Japanese, and Chinese photographers are among the visual data to be analyzed. Other sources include optical treatises, travel literature, government reports, and early ethnographies. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 332 - Science and Society: Europe and the Wider World, 1620–1850

One-unit semester course. This course will examine the social spaces and cultural practices through which natural knowledge was gathered, affirmed, and circulated between 1620 and 1850, with an emphasis on the relationships between science and the developing empires of western Europe. The opening pages of Francis Bacon’s Great Instauration (1620), often considered a foundational text in the development of empirical scientific methods, portrayed a ship voyaging on the seas, charting paths to new lands and new knowledge. From the start of the so-called Scientific Revolution, European states’ dual projects of exploring and colonizing new lands and acquiring knowledge of the natural world went hand in hand. This class will consider the changing practices of experimentation and modes of communication among natural historians in Europe and between Europe and the wider world, and the reception and circulation of scientific ideas, including in art and literature. Particular attention will be paid to the material objects that made natural inquiry both possible and increasingly popular, including botanical illustration, objects collected on imperial voyages, and museums dedicated to natural history. Prerequisite: Humanities 110. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 334 - Race and the Politics of Decolonization

One-unit semester course. This course examines how the struggle for decolonization in the British Empire was shaped by the politics of race. How did colonial subjects imagine freedom, and how were those visions of freedom constrained by the racial hierarchies of empire? How did they look to other movements within and without the British imperial world to theorize what political, economic, and intellectual decolonization might be? Topics will include intellectual critiques of empires, transcolonial movements, the transfer of power, the postcolonial nation-state, and the Commonwealth. We will pay attention to gender throughout and consider the legacy of the formal era of decolonization in the present day. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 384.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 335 - Development: An Imperial History

One-unit semester course. Improvement and welfare have not always been the work of government. This class traces the origins and uneven history of development through the moments when colonial governments in the British Empire became interested in raising the material and social quality of life of colonial subjects. More than a matter of administering policy, attempts to better conditions arose through political circumstances and impacted the lives of colonial subjects in ways that administrators could not have foreseen. We will consider development as a broad category through efforts to manage and improve education, the economy, and maternal health. We will pay attention to the importance of colonial ethnography to know populations; the way development emerged as a rationale for empire; the international contexts of development; and continuities of colonial development after formal decolonization through nongovernmental organizations such as the World Bank and Oxfam International. Our examples will be drawn from metropolitan Britain; subject colonies such as India, Kenya, and the West Indies; and international organizations working with postcolonial nation-states. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 336 - The Aftermath of World War I in the British Empire

One-unit semester course. While for many years the main historiographical question surrounding World War I concerned its origins, recently scholars have turned to the consequences of the war, particularly the postwar settlements that remade national, imperial, and international politics. The war demanded the mobilization of millions of men and women throughout the world; what was owed to these individuals for their service? In this class, we will approach this question in a variety of contexts and braid together the political and social history of the interwar period. Topics will include the League of Nations, the Commonwealth, anticolonial nationalist movements, international women’s movements, humanitarianism, development programs, and the welfare state. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 337 - Battle of the Books: The Beginnings of the Modern Sciences, c. 1500–c. 1800

One-unit semester course. The early modern period, covering the three centuries between 1500 and 1800, is often characterized as the era of “the Scientific Revolution,” which scholars who use the term portray as overturning traditional philosophy and ancient beliefs about creation and the role in it of the divine and replacing them with radically new forms of knowledge making and conceptions of nature. However, Sir Isaac Newton (1642–1727), who early in his life declared “truth” to be his “best friend,” also proclaimed: “Plato is my friend, Aristotle is my friend.” Along with his researches in mathematics and physics, his studies included alchemy, astrology, biblical chronology, and theology. “If I have seen further,” he said, “it is by standing on the shoulders of Giants.” In this period, the quarrel of the ancients and moderns, focusing on whether thinkers, writers, and artists should imitate the classics or exercise the freedom to innovate, was joined by debates about the relationship of new discoveries in the natural sciences to the arts, history and humanities, and religious scholarship. It was an age, itself a product of the invention of printing, the rise of print culture, and the emergence of new institutions of learning, and of cross-cultural contact and global trade, that brought new facts, methods, and ideas to the arts, literature, philosophy, and historical and religious studies. Rather than a “revolution,” it was a “battle of the books,” embracing knowledge gathered from across the globe, in which rivals clashed about the value, merit, and utility of old and new ideas. This course, focusing on early modern case studies in the several disciplines and drawing on texts, documents, images, and artifacts from the period as well as on recent scholarship will consider these changes in the context of the worldwide advancement of knowledge. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 338 - Crisis & Catastrophe in Modern Europe

One-unit semester course. Between 1720 and 1870, a series of natural and manmade crises forced Europeans to question the purpose of violence in a supposedly “improving” society and the role of rational individuals in a world sometimes beyond their control. This course will consider the political, religious, intellectual, and cultural ramifications of disaster and crisis, including financial collapse, revolution, war, earthquakes, disease, and famine. These crises disrupted the political and intellectual worlds of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europeans, threatening and transforming their ideas about risk, progress, religion, and political authority, and restructuring the relationships between man and the natural world. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 339 - Science and Islam: Global Histories

One-unit semester course. This course will introduce students to the hybrid origins, circulations, and translations of the secular sciences in the Islamic world from the Greco-Arabic translation projects to the high point of European empires. Covering a broad historical sweep from the tenth to the nineteenth century, this course will revolve around several core questions: What has science meant in different places and times? What has been the relationship between religious institutions and scientific thought and practice? How have beliefs about the beautiful, and the human body, found expression in the Islamic sciences? We will work through these questions by studying specific sciences, including medicine, astronomy, cartography, and architecture. By the end of the course we will appreciate the entangled histories of cultural exchange that preceded modern scientific revolutions. Prerequisite: Humanities 110 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 341 - An Intellectual History of Animality

One-unit semester course. This class traces a genealogy of ideas about animality as they have emerged in Western thought and culture. The narrative of the course proceeds from ancient ideas about animality, soul, and dominion to their reception in medieval philosophy and theology, and later in early modern and Enlightenment philosophy, science, and law (“animal trials”); to the Darwinian revolution; to post-Darwinian arguments about animal lives (intelligence, interests, experience), deaths (food, slaughter), laws (rights, legal status), and loves (companion species). Throughout, we will consider the question: How has recourse to the notion of animality helped make sense of what it means to be human? Prerequisite: Humanities 110. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 343 - The Human Condition

One-unit semester course. This course undertakes a systematic study of Hannah Arendt’s The Human Condition (1958), both in its own terms and as a portal into the history of the modern West. We will examine the book’s architecture, along with its conceptual apparatus: earth and world alienation; the vita activa and vita contemplativa; the conditions of natality, mortality, and plurality; the activities of labor, work, and action; the realms of public, private, and the social. We will explore the contexts Arendt invokes—including the ancient world and early modern science—as well as those she doesn’t. That is, we will read in light of Arendt’s own experience: as a German emigre in Cold War America, writing in the shadow of the Nazi death camps and the atom bomb; witnessing the expansion of the welfare state, the acceleration of automation, and the launch of Sputnik. Finally, we will locate the work intertextually, critically assessing Arendt’s readings of Marx, Heidegger, and others. Prerequisite for history credit: Humanities 110. Conference. Cross-listed as Political Science 390.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 344 - Freud and the Psychoanalytic Tradition

One-unit semester course. This class explores how the psychoanalytic tradition inaugurated changes in what we mean when we call ourselves human beings. The first half of the course reviews Freud’s thought as it evolved in the context of clinical practice. The aim is to consider how influential ideas about the unconscious, love and sexuality, dreams, fantasy, and the organization of the psyche developed in response to the peculiar kind of suffering Freud called neurosis. The second half of the course asks what is to be learned by situating psychoanalytic thought in its scientific, cultural, and social contexts, and by following its international dispersion in the work of those who extended (and revised) Freud’s ideas in ways he did not foresee. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 345 - Whole Earths, Globalizations, and World Pictures

One-unit semester course. Hear the word “Earth” or “world” and the image likely to flash through the mind is a photo known as “Whole Earth” (1972), which reveals the disk of our terraqueous planet suspended alone in the void. It is reputed to be the most widely disseminated photograph in human history, and together with other views of the Earth from beyond has prompted a revolution in the global imagination. The aim of this seminar is to assess the plausibility of that claim, by situating these images in their diverse historical contexts. These contexts include the history of humankind’s imaginative self-projection into the beyond from ancient times to our day; how the “whole earth” image has been mobilized by environmental campaigns, political movements, and commercial enterprises; how the view of Earth has figured in economics, anthropology, philosophy, biology, chemistry, cartography, and art; and how this pictorial imaginary has become integrated into the unthought ways we inhabit our natural and human-built worlds. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

History 353 - The French Revolution, 1775–1800

One-unit semester course. Within a generally chronological framework, this course will focus on the social and cultural history of the French Revolution. Particular attention will be given to the ideological origins of the Revolution, the question of class, the popular movement, revolutionary culture, gender and citizenship, the role of terror, and the nature of counterrevolution. Another focus of the course will be the historiography of the French Revolution. Works from both traditional historiography and contemporary revisionist historiography will be included on the syllabus. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 355 - Heretics, Witches, and Inquisitors: Deviance, Orthodoxy, and the Law in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

One-unit semester course. This course will examine the evolution and operation of one of medieval and early modern Europe’s most infamous religious and legal institutions—the Inquisitions of Heretical Depravity. Initially established in the late eleventh and twelfth centuries to affirm the Roman Church’s spiritual authority and to repress religious heterodoxy, Inquisitions could be found across much of Catholic Europe by the early sixteenth century. This course will examine several of the most prominent examples: the Inquisition of medieval Languedoc, the Roman and Venetian Inquisitions, and the Spanish Inquisition, to compare how they functioned as hybrid legal and religious institutions in distinct historical contexts. We will also explore the complex interplay between inquisitors, secular authorities, and the populace by looking at their treatment of a specific heretical crime—witchcraft—during the early modern period. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 356 - Justice and the Law in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

One-unit semester course. “Those who are even a little bit above the common find it impossible to escape the law courts,” lamented one seventeenth-century writer. From the Middle Ages to the eighteenth century, men and women across Europe and its colonies flocked to courts of law in staggering numbers as plaintiffs, defendants, or witnesses. Why did Europeans from all social ranks increasingly seek justice through legal tribunals when other, more traditional methods were readily available? Was the “rule of law” imposed by social elites and political authorities, or did it emerge from premodern Europeans’ use of litigation and other legal practices to manage credit, defend reputations, air marital grievances, remedy injuries, and generally maintain order in their families and communities? What can the “uses of the law,” in other words, tell us about political authority and social relations in medieval and early modern Europe? Prerequisite: Humanities 110 or sophomore standing. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 360 - Histories of Anthropocene

One-unit semester course. Anthropocene. What kind of a word is that? For geologists, Anthropocene refers to the proposition that the history of the planet has entered a new epoch, in which human activity has come to exert the power of a geological force. The proposition has also produced some of the most interesting theoretical work on the practice of history in recent years, animated by the question, is it possible to conjoin human history with geohistory, and if so, how? This class will survey the most prominent answers thus far, above all, efforts inspired by postcolonial and subaltern studies to imagine new histories of capitalism. The class will build on that foundation by considering how phenomenology, a tradition of thought that aims at a thick description of lived experience, can also be of use in writing histories of the Anthropocene. Here, the focus will be on human experiences that embody both the conjunction and disjunction of scale—human time and geological time, human places and planetary spaces—at once. Students will have the opportunity to research and write minihistories of Anthropocenic episodes. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 362 - Revolutionary America

One-unit semester course. In the late eighteenth century, 13 North American colonies severed their colonial ties to Britain and constituted a new nation. This course will assess the causes of these changes, as well as the extent to which they altered the political, economic, social, and cultural landscape of North America. We will address major conflicts of the period from 1763 to 1815, including the tensions between libertarian ideology and institutionalized slavery, household dependence and national independence, centralized authority and local control, enlightenment rationalism and evangelical religion, private property and communal interests, and Indian sovereignty and American expansionism. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 363 - American Social Reform from Revolution to Reconstruction

One-unit semester course. Countless nineteenth-century Americans participated in movements for social reform. What made it possible for ordinary people to believe that they should and could change their world? What were the boundaries of their reformist visions? How did reformers balance radical and conservative impulses within their movements? This course considers these questions with reference to temperance, abolitionism, women’s rights, health reform, and other reform agendas. In contextualizing these movements, the course will consider the transnational dimensions of American reform, as well as connections between social reform and the rise of market capitalism, evangelical Christianity, and democratic politics in the early republic. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 367 - Sources and Methods in Early African American History

One-unit semester course. What do historians know about the early African American past (c. 1619–1865), and how do they know it? This course will explore major problems in African American historiography, including the relationship between the rise of slavery and the development of racial ideology; the nature of slave resistance, rebellion, and revolution; the transmission of African cultural forms and the creation of Black culture(s); the social dynamics of the slave plantation; and the significance of regional differences in the historical experience of African Americans. We will study various historians’ interpretations of these problems, as well as the primary sources that form the basis of those interpretations. While analysis of written texts remains a mainstay of historical practice, scholars in this field have also drawn on less traditional forms of evidence, such as DNA, demography, folklore, oral history, material artifacts, and human remains. We will critically assess the possibilities and pitfalls of using these diverse sources to reconstruct the early African American experience. Students will apply what they have learned from other scholars’ methods to produce their own primary source–based research papers. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 369 - Race and the Law in American History

One-unit semester course. Ranging from the colonial period to the recent past, this course examines the role of the law and the courts in the construction of racial categories and the production of racial inequality in the United States. We will read scholarship from history and other fields concerning the relationship between law and social practice and the possibilities and limitations of law as a means for resisting racism and securing equality. While we will engage a range of primary source material, we will devote particular attention to landmark Supreme Court decisions concerning civil rights, segregation, and immigration and naturalization. Other topics include regional variations in racialization in the United States, race making beyond the Black-white binary, and historical methodology applied to the realm of law. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 389.

History 370 - The Tragedies of American Diplomacy: U.S. Foreign Policy since 1893

One-unit semester course. Building from the framework laid out in William Appleman Williams’ hallmark essay, “The Tragedy of American Diplomacy,” this course will explore the history of American foreign policy since Frederick Jackson Turner declared the end of the American Frontier in 1893. Beginning with Turner’s “Frontier Thesis” and John Hay’s famous “Open Door Note,” we will investigate how the flexible, economically oriented policies of the late nineteenth century became the sacred political ideologies at the heart of twentieth-century American imperialism. Topics will include the Spanish-American War, policies leading up to each of the two world wars, the advent of and decision to drop the atomic bomb, the Marshall Plan, and a variety of political, economic, and military issues associated with the Cold War, including its origins, its institutions, its many phases, and its ultimate end. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 371 - American Inequality, 1865–Present

One-unit semester course. The United States today is as unequal a society as it has been since 1929, on the eve of the Great Depression. Three billionaires—Bezos, Gates, Buffett—own more wealth than 160 million people, or half the population. How did so great a concentration of income and wealth at the very top come to be? Is such stratification the inevitable result of market processes in a globalized world, forces that, whatever their adverse consequences, lead to the most efficient allocation of society’s resources? In this course, we will get at some of these questions by exploring issues of wealth inequality in the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present. We will organize our exploration into the history of inequality around three analytical dimensions: ideas, institutions, and social forces. The course examines the roles of social scientists and other experts in identifying the causes of and cures for inequality, while also paying attention to the lived experiences of Americans from all income brackets. Prerequisite: Humanities 110. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 372 - U.S. Women’s History, 1890–1990

One-unit semester course. This course examines transformations in women’s economic status, political participation, educational opportunities, and familial and reproductive lives from the late nineteenth to the late twentieth century in the United States. We consider how structural changes and political movements involved and affected women of different classes, races, and ethnic groups. Major topics will include: women’s increased participation in the paid labor force, especially wage work by married women with children; political struggles for equal rights (e.g., woman suffrage, pay equity); the separation of sexuality and reproduction; and the intellectual origins and development of feminism, as well as the arguments of those who opposed it. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

History 374 - Gender and Sex

One-unit semester course. Examination of the changing ideas about gender and sex roles in the context of key transformations from the late nineteenth through the late twentieth centuries in America. These include the second industrial revolution, which enabled women and men to live on their own outside of household economies; the emergence of modern consumer culture; service in same-sex militaries during two world wars; the rise of social scientific and psychological experts who named and quantified “deviant” and “normal” sexual practice; and the so-called sexual revolutions of the 1960s and beyond. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 375 - Hannah Arendt and Origins of Totalitarianism

One-unit semester course. Hannah Arendt was one of the most important thinkers of the twentieth century, and her book The Origins of Totalitarianism (1951) is habitually invoked as one of the century’s most important works of nonfiction. The aim of this class is to provide entry to Arendt’s thought and to the history and theory of totalitarianism by way of a close reading of her seminal work and some of its historical and philosophical intertexts. Arendt’s work addresses topics like the rise of anti-Semitism and race thinking in nineteenth-century Europe, mass politics, propaganda, mob-elite alliances, the concentration camp, and terror as a mode of government. We will also consider texts from some of the leading thinkers of Arendt’s time attracted to authoritarianism, such as Carl Schmitt, Georges Bataille, Ernst Jünger, and the Italian futurists. Last, we will consider the reception and extension of Arendt’s work in postwar arguments about Zionism, Nazi criminality, and the Cold War. Throughout, we will ask if Arendt’s work can help us understand contemporary movements in the United States and Europe that explicitly or implicitly seek a renovation of totalitarian rule. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Political Science 385.

History 376 - The United States in the 1970s

One-unit semester course. For many years U.S. historians neglected the 1970s to focus on the political and cultural shifts in the 1950s and 1960s. Drawing on a wealth of new historical studies, we will look at the 1970s to assess the successes and defeats of movements that originated in earlier decades. These include civil rights, feminism, gay and lesbian rights, environmentalism, and organized labor. We will examine transformations in party politics in the wake of Vietnam and Watergate, and chart the changing fortunes of liberals and conservatives. This was a time of economic turmoil and anxiety, and we will consider how inflation, deindustrialization, and the oil crises in 1973 and 1979 influenced the lives of working Americans. We will also look at the changing demographics of families, households, and suburbs in this epoch. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 379 - The Fifties in America

One-unit semester course. We will use a range of secondary texts and primary documents to focus on key events and different historical approaches to the study of this era. The ’50s were shaped by the Great Depression and World War II, and we will look back at those cataclysmic events. Topics include the Cold War and its effects on domestic politics; the baby boom and the ideology of the American family; civil rights battles in the legal and political arenas; medical and public health responses to polio; and the political and economic ramifications of postwar consumer culture. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

History 381 - Race and Ethnicity in the U.S. since 1865

One-unit semester course. The course focuses on the construction of race and the practices of racial oppression in the U.S. since 1865. We will discuss how racialization, racism, and constructions of race and ethnicity were experienced by different groups at significant points in U.S. history; race relations among groups; and how gender, sexuality, and class intersect with race and ethnicity to shape identities and life experiences. Each week, we will analyze, compare, and contrast the experiences of different groups: Native Americans, European Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinx, as well as their complex interactions and interracial and interethnic relations. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 381.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 383 - Race and Oral Histories in the United States

One-unit semester course. This course examines the history of race and ethnicity in the U.S. through a number of different texts—oral histories, autobiographies, testimonies—to gain insights into the different lived experiences of individuals and communities in the past and present. Students will encounter sources that use oral histories as a method to gain insight into the impact of race and ethnicity on society, preparing them for an oral history project of their own centered on race and social justice in the present. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 383.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 385 - Catholicism in the Early Modern Spanish World

One-unit semester course. This course examines the central role of the Catholic church, of Catholic belief and practice, in the Spanish world of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. We start with the transformation of Iberia from a center of religious pluralism to the bastion of Catholic orthodoxy with the expulsion of Jews and Moslems and extreme hostility to Protestantism. The first half of the course looks at the role of the Church and the Inquisition in society; popular religion; and personal spirituality. We then turn to examine the role of the Church in intellectual debates surrounding the colonization of the Americas; Indigenous religion and the campaigns and infrastructure of conversion; and the role of the Church in creole culture. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 388 - Race and Ethnicity in the Andes

One-unit semester course. This course explores the ethnic and racial organization of Andean society from Inca times to the present, and Andean discourses on race. Beginning with the ethnic pluralism of the Inca Andes, we turn to the creation of the colonial categories of “Indian” and “Spanish” and the imposition of two racialized legal republics from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century. We then examine the development of “creole republics” that instituted unified republics with deeply racialized hierarchies; the indigenista critiques of that ordering in the twentieth century; and the emergence of Indigenous and ethnic politics over the past few decades. While attention will be paid to Afro and Asian Andeans, the course focuses on the categories of Indigenous and European. The central focus is on Peru, although ethnicity and race in Ecuador and Bolivia will also be considered. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. This course is recommended for students interested in critical race and ethnic studies. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 388.

Not offered 2022–23.

History 389 - Labor in Modern Latin America

One-unit semester course. This course examines the social relations of labor, labor organization and militancy, and the political and cultural importance of the working classes in twentieth-century Latin America. Particular topics include the emergence of organized labor and its relation both to earlier guild-based relations and to oligarchic rule in the early twentieth century; the role of organized labor in Mexican, Bolivian, Peruvian, and Chilean revolutionary movements; alliances between labor and bureaucratic-authoritarian states; the position of rural laborers in these modernizing economies; the relationship between race, ethnic, and class identities; and the effects of the vast “informal” working class on postmodern Latin American societies. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference.

History 390 - Music and the Black Freedom Struggle, 1865–1945

See Music 360 for description.

Music 360 Description

History 391 - The Greek World from 776 to 404 BCE

See Ancient Mediterranean Studies 371 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Ancient Mediterranean 371 Description

History 393 - The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic

See Ancient Mediterranean Studies 373 for description.

Ancient Mediterranean 373 Description

History 394 - The Athenians and the “Other”

See Ancient Mediterranean Studies 374 for description.

Ancient Mediterranean Studies 374 Description

History 397 - Women in the Ancient World

See Ancient Mediterranean Studies 377 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Ancient Mediterranean 377 Description

History 411 - Junior Seminar

One-unit semester course. Variable topics. See specific listing for prerequisites. Conference. 

Cold War America
One-unit semester course. Between 1948 and 1991, the ideological conflict between American capitalism and its Soviet socialist counterpart helped to shape nearly every aspect of American cultural, political, and economic life. This course will use that half-century conflict as a lens through which to consider the study of postwar American history. In addition to engaging with—and questioning—the geopolitical trends and events that have traditionally defined “Cold War history,” students will also explore the relationships between Cold War foreign policy and the major domestic political struggles of the period, including those over civil rights, the Vietnam War, gender equality, and the environment, among others. Students will develop, research, write, and present a substantial research paper using primary and secondary sources. Prerequisite: junior-standing history major, and two history courses at Reed. Conference.
 
Experiment and Enlightenment: History of Science, 1660–1860
One-unit semester course. This course examines the development and diffusion of scientific practices and ideas in Europe in the 200 years between the founding of the Royal Society of London, a society dedicated to the pursuit of natural knowledge, and the publication of Darwin’s On the Origin of Species. During this time, individuals throughout Europe debated how best to understand the natural world and how to verify and confirm that knowledge: should it be observed or manipulated through experimentation? How would a “fact” be proven? Who constituted a legitimate authority? And were there limits to what man could, and should, know about the natural world? This class will examine these changing practices of experimentation and modes of communication among natural historians in Europe and the reception and circulation of scientific ideas, including in art and literature. Particular attention will be paid to the material objects that made natural inquiry both possible and increasingly popular, including scientific instruments, botanical specimens collected on imperial voyages, and museums dedicated to natural history. Students will develop, research, write, and present a substantial research paper using primary and secondary sources. Prerequisites: junior-standing history major, and two history courses at Reed. Conference.

History 421 - Topics in Historiography

Empires of Law: Legality, Society, and Imperialism in the Early Modern World
One-unit semester course. “The social world is fundamentally a human construct,” the legal historian Christopher L. Tomlins has observed, and “law furnishes one of the most powerful technologies of construction.” Inspired by the work of Tomlins, Lauren Benton, Brian Owensby, and others, historians of early modern British, French, and Iberian colonialism have increasingly focused on the ways various conceptions of law and justice shaped interactions between settlers, imperial officials, Indigenous peoples, and others in the centuries following the Columbian encounter. In this seminar, we will examine several recent works that interrogate how European and Indigenous jurispractices and legalities provided frameworks for constructing, contesting, and co-opting imperial authority, as well as mechanisms for regulating, negotiating, and navigating daily life in a variety of colonial societies. Prerequisites: two history courses at Reed, one of which must be at the 300 level. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

History 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

History 481 - Individual Study

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Individual study in fields either more specialized than the regular courses or not covered by them. Individual reading also may be done in connection with a regular course for one or two units additional to the course. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and approval of instructor and division.

History 511 - Freedom, Movement, Borders: Slavery and American Political Space

One-half unit semester course. This course will study the politics of freedom and slavery in the nineteenth-century United States by focusing on a key legal and ideological problem: the right of human beings to travel freely through space, often understood in the nineteenth century as “the right of locomotion.” American slavery was defined by the antithesis of free movement, insofar as it required the perpetual coercive control of enslaved people. Countermovements against such control invoked the free movement of persons, which became a fundamental principle and practice of the diverse antislavery movement. This course will address these interconnected problems in the history of slavery through reading works in legal and political history, literary studies, and a number of primary sources, including the narratives of Frederick Douglass, Solomon Northup, and Harriet Jacobs. Conference. Offered fall 2022.

Humanities 110 - Introduction to the Humanities

Three unit yearlong course; one and one-half units per semester. “The humanities” referred originally to the study of texts written by human, rather than divine, hands. In modern education, the humanities include the study of literature, history, philosophy, religion, politics, and the arts. Students of the humanities consider how people have represented and reflected on the physical, social, psychological, and ideological features of their worlds. We investigate the various materials that form the basis of cultures and identities and that simultaneously provide key terms for their critique and transformation. As the only course required of all first-year students at Reed, Humanities 110 serves as the college’s foundational writing course and introduces students to the skills and habits of mind necessary for academic inquiry in their future work at Reed. For more information, please see the Humanities 110 information on the academics page of the Reed College website. Lecture-conference.

Humanities 211 - The Birth of the Modern I

One unit semester course. Beginning with the cultural and intellectual entanglements of the Christian and Islamic worlds in the Middle Ages, this course examines how Europeans’ understanding and experience of the world they inhabited were transformed between the thirteenth and sixteenth centuries. Through readings of authors such as Ibn Tufayl, Averroës, Dante, Machiavelli, Diaz, Luther, Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, and Montaigne, we will explore how the momentous social, cultural, political, religious, philosophical, literary, and artistic developments of this period—encounters with non-Christians in the Mediterranean and Atlantic worlds, the emergence of new genres in the literary and visual arts, and the social and religious upheaval of the Protestant Reformation—provoked a period of crisis and creativity that transformed the complex legacies of the ancient world. In particular, we will study how the reconfigured understandings of humanity’s relationship to nature, society, and the divine challenged assumptions about political, intellectual, religious, and gendered authority. Prerequisite: Humanities 110, sophomore standing, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Humanities 212 - The Birth of the Modern II

One unit semester course. In the wake of the political, religious, and cultural upheavals in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Europeans pursued new forms of knowledge, literary and artistic expression, social and religious life, and domestic and political authority. In doing so, however, they also provoked new questions about the individual’s relationship to God, nature, family, and polity. By examining the writings of authors and artists such as Shakespeare, Teresa of Avila, Cervantes, Artemisia Gentileschi, Galileo, Descartes, Molière, Hobbes, and Milton, this course will examine topics such as the Counter-Reformation, the development of philosophical skepticism, the so-called Scientific Revolution, Mediterranean encounters with the Ottoman Empire, and the ongoing tension between absolute monarchy and constitutional government. Lecture-conference.

Humanities 220 - Modern European Humanities

Two unit yearlong course; one unit per semester. An interdisciplinary study of the development of modern European humanities, from the Enlightenment to roughly the mid-twentieth century. Primary attention is given to the transformations of ideas, political institutions, social structures, and forms of artistic, literary, and philosophical expression that characterize the modern world. The course addresses such crucial topics as colonialism and slavery, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, Romanticism, the Industrial Revolution and new technologies, liberalism and socialism, the modern city, imperialism, Darwinism, psychoanalysis, modernist art and literature, the rise of the novel, photography and film, the Bolshevik Revolution, and twentieth-century war, totalitarianism, and genocide. The course includes lectures, discussions, and papers on topics of individual interest that are developed in each conference. Prerequisite: Humanities 110 or equivalent. Students may not register for the course if they have a conflict with the lecture hour. Lecture-conference.

Prior iterations of the course can be viewed at reed.edu/humanities/hum220/.

Humanities 231 - Early Imperial China: The Qin-Han Unification

One unit semester course. In geography and cultural advances, the Qin and Han dynasties surpassed their predecessors, and together they number among the world’s greatest empires. This course examines their heritage through a selection of primary texts including the Confucian Analects, the enigmatic Dao de Jing, the cosmological Book of Changes, and the historical narrative tradition of Sima Qian’s Shi Ji. It samples cultural expression ranging from the poetic discourse of rhapsodies and pentasyllabic verse to the religious endeavors manifested in funerary artifacts. Alongside textual studies, this course explores the Han’s physical remains, including the ruins of its capitals, and its important tombs. The Qin/Han portrays itself as a territorial, political, and cultural unifier, and it sets the benchmark against which all later dynasties must measure themselves. Prerequisite: sophomore standing; however, second-semester freshmen are welcome with instructor’s consent. Lecture-conference.

Humanities 232 - Middle Imperial China: The Great Song Transition

One unit semester course. The transformation of Chinese civilization during the “Song renaissance” (960–1279) is our major concern for the fall semester. China mentally realigned itself, first because it had to acknowledge other players in the world such as the powerful nomad states along its own northern borders and second because those nomads would occupy the northern half of China during what is called the “Southern Song” (1127–1279). Buddhism, a foreign religion though it had been introduced to China many centuries before the Song period, flourished alongside the indigenous popular pantheon. Furthermore, China underwent internal changes such as the emergence of a vibrant urban culture. Self-representation changed in tandem with the rise of a new social stratum, the shidafu, and the literati culture it produced. The change rippled into the fine arts as well. We will study the new contexts of Chinese civilization through travel essays, cartography, and reports and journals of diplomatic envoys. Tiantai Buddhism, Chan Buddhism, and indigenous popular religion will be examined through their primary texts. We will observe the changes in culture via storytelling and dramatic texts and via Song cityscape paintings. We will “learn about the Way” (daoxue) with Zhu Xi, China’s second-most famous scholar, who recast his forerunner Confucius to make him the linchpin of middle and late imperial education. In literature, we will study Song shi- and ci-poetry. Shi-poetry showed expanded topics and the mindset of the new literati class. Ci-poetry transformed the very notion of poetics. In art, we will analyze monumental landscape painting, printed illustrations, and Song calligraphy. The Qin-Han unification may have laid the basic foundation of China, but many have argued that the Song gave modern China its distinctive cultural heritage. Prerequisite: sophomore standing; however, second-semester freshmen are welcome with instructor’s consent. Lecture-conference.

Humanities 411 - Senior Symposium

One-half unit semester course. Each section of the senior symposium is limited to 15 students and is guided by two or three faculty members representing different divisions. The course engages students and faculty from different majors and disciplines to discuss how various authors and artists present and interrogate problems of our age, from the political to the personal. Selected works comprise a variety of genres, such as memoir, graphic novel, short fiction, poetry, sociological case study, film, and investigative journalism. Authors in recent years have included Svetlana Alexievich, Thi Bui, Alexander Chee, James Forman Jr., Annette Gordon-Reed, Andreas Malm, Tommy Orange, Claudia Rankine, Ahmed Saadawi, and Rebecca Solnit. Offered on a credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: senior standing. Discussion.

International and Comparative Policy Studies 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Latin 111 - First-Year Latin: Part I

One-unit semester course. This course offers a study of the elements of Latin grammar and syntax, introduces students to the cultures that used Latin, and conducts first readings in Latin prose and poetry. Lecture-conference.

Latin 112 - First-Year Latin: Part II

One-unit semester course. This course offers a study of the elements of Latin grammar and syntax, introduces students to the cultures that used Latin, and conducts first readings in Latin prose and poetry. Prerequisite: Latin 111 or equivalent. Conference.

Latin 201 - Intermediate Latin

One-unit semester course. This course offers an intensive review of the grammar and syntax studied in first-year Latin, while refining and extending students’ facility with the Latin language. Students will develop close reading and interpretive skills as well as familiarity with a variety of literary styles and authors. Full course for one semester. Prerequisite: Latin 112 or equivalent. Conference.

Latin 301 - Advanced Latin I

One-unit semester course. This seminar focuses on expanding students’ interpretive skills and critical vocabulary. Students analyze primary texts in the original and in translation, and employ and critique relevant scholarship and theory that aids the reading and understanding of these texts. Students typically study one landmark work of Roman literature, such as Vergil’s Aeneid, Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Horace’s Odes, Statius’s Thebaid, or Apuleius’s Metamorphoses. Students also gain a broader understanding of Roman literary production. Prerequisite: Latin 201 or equivalent. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

Latin 302 - Advanced Latin II

One-unit semester course. This seminar utilizes and expands the linguistic and interpretive skills that students have developed in their prior Latin work. Students analyze primary texts in the original and in translation, and employ and critique relevant scholarship and theory that aids the reading and understanding of these texts. A wide range of seminars is offered over a four-year period. While some seminars are organized around specific works, others focus on authors, genres, and periods or places. Recent seminars have explored the genre of Roman love elegy and how it changed in the hands of its different practitioners, the reception of Roman love poetry in English, the politics of bodily change, epic and encyclopedism in relation to the imperial power exercised both on and by the Roman elite male, the decay of the Roman Republic, and the formation of the imperial system. Prerequisite: Latin 301 or consent of the instructor. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

Not offered 2022–23.

Liberal Studies 503 - Introduction to Literary Theory

One-half unit semester course. This course is a historical and analytical introduction to the major theoretical movements of the last 75 years in Russia, Eastern and Western Europe, and the United States. These include structuralism and semiotics; poststructuralism and deconstruction; psychoanalysis; Marxism; postcolonialism; critical race theory; feminist, gender, and transgender theory; and cultural studies theory. On occasion, we will trace the philosophical origins and conceptual affiliations of these movements. More consistently, we will unpack their master tropes to reflect on their function in literary criticism while also experimenting with their use in our own reading practices. Conference. Offered spring 2023.

Liberal Studies 508 - Postbellum, Pre-Harlem: Literature of Reconstruction

One-half unit semester course. Born too late for the slave narrative and too early for the Harlem Renaissance—“Post-Bellum-Pre-Harlem,” as he puts it—Charles W. Chesnutt fell between two major African American literary movements: the nineteenth-century slave narrative and twentieth-century modernism. However, Chesnutt’s life (1858–1932) spanned crucial moments in American history—the Civil War, Reconstruction, the rise of Jim Crow, the Great Migration, and the beginnings of the civil rights movement. This course examines Chesnutt’s fiction as the core of the literature of Reconstruction and its aftermath. Methodologically, we will draw on recent work in African American archival recovery, examining the cultural politics of publication and canonization and the history of the regions that Chesnutt used as settings of his fiction: North Carolina and Ohio. Genres will include sentimentalism, realism, regionalism, and naturalism; the slave narrative and the social problem novel; journalism, legal writing, and essays. In addition to selections from Chesnutt’s Complete Short Stories, and numerous archival materials such as trial transcripts, newspaper articles, periodical illustrations, and advertisements, readings may include Charles Chesnutt, Journals; Albion Tourgee, A Fool’s Errand: A Novel of the South During Reconstruction; Pauline Hopkins, Peculiar Sam; Or, the Underground Railroad; Thomas Nelson Page, “Marse Chan”; Ida B. Wells, Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases; W.E.B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk. Conference. Offered fall 2022.

Linguistics 211 - Introduction to Linguistic Analysis

One-unit semester course. An introduction to the empirical study of human language. This course introduces students to the core subfields of linguistics (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics/pragmatics), focusing on the essential formalisms and analytical techniques needed to pursue more specialized coursework in the field. Through direct engagement with data from a wide range of the world’s languages, students gain experience in describing linguistic structures and formulating testable hypotheses about the organization of mental grammar. Conference.

Linguistics 212 - Introduction to Sociolinguistic Patterns

One-unit semester course. This course is the second semester in the linguistics department’s yearlong introduction to linguistics. We consider the inclusion of social aspects of language in linguistic inquiry. This course is presented as a survey of the central themes in sociolinguistics, focusing on the sociolinguistic patterning of language through the key concepts of variation and change. We will also explore theoretical notions (ideology, indexicality, repertoires), methodologies for gathering sociolinguistic data, perspectives on sociolinguistic analysis at the level of the group (speech communities, communities of practice) and the individual (style, audience design, social practice), and the role of identity and social categories in sociolinguistics (age, race/ethnicity, gender). Students will collect original data and write short research write-ups, moving from a collaborative data project to a final research project of each student’s choosing. Conference.

Linguistics 220 - Language and Discrimination in the United States

One-unit semester course. Linguistic discrimination is one of the last socially acceptable forms of discrimination, in large part because it serves as a proxy for other forms of discrimination (i.e., attitudes about language, like "The Southern accent sounds slow and lazy,” actually function as attitudes about speakers). In this class, we will engage with the myths and language ideologies active in the current U.S. context, from standard language ideology to the myth of monolingualism, to frame our study of individuals and speech communities who experience discrimination. Students will acquire knowledge of key aspects of the linguistic system that support a positive perspective on linguistic diversity. In addition, specific varieties, including African American language and Latinx English, as well as social groups and styles, from young people’s speech to code-switching, will be spotlighted, as will a range of contexts for discrimination, from the law to the workplace to the college classroom. Student work will focus on community engagement and application, with final products that directly relate to linguistic social justice in our local community. Conference.

Linguistics 312 - Topics in Linguistic Analysis

One-unit semester course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: Linguistics 211 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Linguistics 320 - Phonetics

One-unit semester course. This course covers areas such as the articulation of speech, the basic anatomy of the vocal tract, the acoustic properties of speech sounds, and speech perception. Students will become proficient in reading and using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) through extensive practice in transcribing speech sounds drawn from a wide variety of languages, and will obtain practical skills in doing speech analysis with Praat. The course will prepare students for independent field and laboratory work, as well as familiarizing them with basic techniques necessary for conducting phonetic experiments. Conference.

Linguistics 321 - Phonology

One-unit semester course. Although no two utterances sound exactly the same, speakers of a language overlook distinctions to which mechanical recording devices are sensitive, and they “hear” contrasts that are objectively not there. This course examines the nature of the complex links between abstract language-specific perceptual worlds and the real world of actual sounds in light of the major empirical approaches and theoretical currents in the study of linguistic sound systems. It will consider the relations between the articulatory gestures of language and other levels of linguistic description, notably morphology and syntax, and will also explore different models for formulating phonological rules. Prerequisite: Linguistics 211 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Linguistics 322 - Phonological Knowledge

One-unit semester course. The way we understand the phonological grammar has changed as formal phonological theory and psycholinguistic research continue to evolve. Through reading articles, writing reviews, and designing our own experiments, we will seek to answer the question: what do speakers know about the sounds of their language? Topics to cover include exemplar theory, the psychological reality of irregular patterns and morphological structure, the gradient nature of phonotactics, the strength of paradigm uniformity and contrast, and the role of lexical statistics in a speaker’s native language. In addition, we will cover linguistic accommodation, second language phonology, and the effect of having competing phonologies in the same speaker. Prerequisite: Linguistics 211 and Linguistics 321, or consent of the instructor. Conference-laboratory.

Not offered 2022–23.

Linguistics 323 - Introductory Syntax

One-unit semester course. The goal of syntax is to characterize the (largely tacit) knowledge that enables speakers of a language to combine words into larger units such as phrases and sentences, and to “parse” (i.e., assign an abstract structural representation to) the phrases and sentences that they read and hear. This course, accessible to students with no previous training in linguistics, will introduce increasingly explicit grammar fragments of English. The goal is to present a range of phenomena of concern to syntax, and to explore formal devices that have been proposed to account for such phenomena. The course will consider such topics as constituent structure, lexical categories and selectional properties of words, movement and locality, case assignment, empty categories, and the interpretation of pronouns. The course also introduces central concepts and notation from contemporary theoretical syntax, focusing on the principles and parameters framework developed by Noam Chomsky and others. Conference.

Linguistics 324 - Advanced Topics in Syntax

One-unit semester course. This course gives students the opportunity to build on concepts and methodologies learned in introductory syntax by exploring current research problems in formal syntax. Readings for the course include influential papers from the history of generative grammar, as well as more recent contributions to the field. This course also builds on the topics discussed in Linguistics 328 by considering data from a variety of languages, and addressing the issue of how formal syntactic theories handle cross-linguistic variation. Topics covered may include word order variation, constraints on phrase structure and movement, functional categories, and the theory of anaphora. May be repeated for credit with consent of the instructor. Prerequisite: Linguistics 323 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. Linguistics 328 is recommended. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Linguistics 328 - Morphosyntactic Typology

One-unit semester course. The course provides an introduction to cross-linguistic variation and grammatical description. We develop the notion of linguistic typology and explore proposed universals of language, based on the comparative study of the morphology and syntax of the languages of the world. We consider such topics as parts of speech, word order, case marking, grammatical relations, passive and its friends, causatives, and configurationality—all with reference to both the familiar languages of Europe and less familiar languages of the Americas, Africa, Asia, Australia, and Oceania. Prerequisite: Linguistics 211 or equivalent, or Linguistics 323, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Linguistics 330 - Contact Languages

One-unit semester course. An investigation into the linguistic varieties and linguistic practices that emerge from contact situations. Taking into account both diachronic and synchronic perspectives, we focus on the linguistic effects of language contact, including code-switching, admixture, lexical borrowing, and language shift. We emphasize the most striking cases of language contact—pidgins and creoles—identifying the formal structures of these varieties, describing the social contexts that surround their emergence, and discussing the relevance of creole formation to models of universal grammar. Students gain experience working with audio and other primary source data to present case studies of the structural and sociolinguistic properties of contact varieties. Prerequisites: Linguistics 211 and 212, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Linguistics 331 - Laboratory Phonology

One-unit semester course. In this course, we will read and discuss classic and contemporary research papers in experimental phonetics and phonology, while gaining laboratory skills for testing phonetic and phonological theories. We will examine the relationship between the gradience of phonetics and the categoricity of phonology: how is phonological knowledge realized in the acoustic signal, and how are phonological processes grounded in phonetic naturalness? Examples of methods covered include acoustic analysis, data visualization, and designing and running speech perception studies. Prerequisites: Linguistics 211 and either Linguistics 320 or 321. Laboratory-lecture.

Not offered 2022–23.

Linguistics 332 - Dialects of English

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to dialectology—the study of regional variation in language—with an emphasis on the history and description of the varieties of English currently spoken in the United States. Students will acquire a practical knowledge of major linguistic differences among dialects of English, and will gain hands-on experience in collecting linguistic data from varieties of nonstandard English. Forms of English to be discussed include varieties of American English and other global English dialects. Other topics include language attitudes, the rise of “standard” English and its implications, phonological chain shifts and diffusion, and language variation and change. Students will actively collect data on dialects from family, friends, and the media, to be accompanied by audiovisual material in class, including video clips and songs. Students will read scholarly articles and complete short assignments throughout the semester, and conduct a data-driven research project to be submitted at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: Linguistics 211 and 212. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Linguistics 334 - Historical Linguistics

One-unit semester course. This course provides an introduction to the study of language change, linguistic relatedness, the spread of new forms in language, and linguistic prehistory. Students will engage in two methods of reconstructing words in unattested languages: the comparative method and internal reconstruction. The comparative method is traditionally used as the basis for classifying linguistic relatedness, but has been challenged because of assumptions that it makes about how innovations in language occur. Students will be presented with critiques of certain approaches to reconstructing languages at large time depths and will learn about alternative cross-disciplinary methods of understanding language diversification at deep time depths. In addition, students will learn about cultural reconstruction on the basis of linguistic reconstruction and geography. Prerequisite: Linguistics 320 or 321, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Linguistics 335 - Language, Sex, Gender, and Sexuality

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to the large body of literature on language and gender within sociolinguistics and the study of language in context more generally. Students will investigate how language in use mediates, and is mediated by, social constructions of gender and sexuality. An emphasis on the history of research in language and gender, which contains distinct phases and movements in the field, will culminate in a current description of the state of language and gender research today. Particular attention will be paid to the evolution of feminist theory, the political economy, ideology, hegemony, performativity, resistance, and the “borders” of gender identities. Students will read scholarly articles and write critical reflection papers, and complete a final paper on a topic of their choosing related to language and gender. Prerequisite: Linguistics 212 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Linguistics 336 - Linguistic Field Methods

One-unit semester course. This course explores the goals and techniques of elicitation-based fieldwork through the empirical study of an unfamiliar and under-studied language, using native speakers as consultants. Students will work together in a hands-on lab setting to produce fragments of linguistic description based on individual and group elicitation. Prerequisites: Linguistics 211 or equivalent and one 300-level linguistics course. Recommended: Linguistics 328, or at least one course focusing on data collection or formal analysis (such as Linguistics 320, 321, or 323). Conference-laboratory.

Linguistics 337 - Methods of Design and Analysis

One-unit semester course. The tasks of designing, carrying out, and interpreting linguistic research vary across subfields, traditions, and time; in particular, quantitative methods have become increasingly crucial in both formal and social areas of linguistic study. Using a different unifying topic each semester, this course will guide students through the process of quantitative linguistic research from the choice of topic and research design through statistical analysis and presentation. Students will write their own research papers on topics of their choosing using the skills covered here, including devising a feasible research question; designing a study to operationalize that question; gathering, annotating, and analyzing data; visualizing results in various formats; interpreting and evaluating those results; writing a journal article–style paper to present the findings; and preparing a conference-style poster and/or talk presentation to share the conclusions. Students should emerge with a newfound ability to critically engage with journal articles in linguistics and related fields. Throughout the semester, students will make use of software such as Audacity, Praat, Excel, and R, and learn how and when to use statistical tests such as correlations, regressions, t-tests, and ANOVAs. Prerequisite: Linguistics 211 and 212, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Linguistics 338 - African American English

One-unit semester course. The variety currently known as African American English (AAE) is perhaps the most studied by sociolinguists yet remains the least understood by U.S. residents. This course covers the history, linguistic structure, and sociocultural patterns of use of the English of African Americans in the United States. We will place the systematic descriptions of AAE by sociolinguists in the context of critical race theory, and use the concept of strategic essentialism to understand the context for and history of AAE scholarship. We will take a variationist approach to African American English features, focusing on the phonology and morphosyntax that is considered unique to AAE, and discussing lexical and discursive features as well. We will cover the major debates that continue to rage in AAE scholarship: the origins debate, including the Anglicist and creolist positions, and the related divergence/convergence debate over AAE’s relationship to standard American English. Additional topics include AAE and hip-hop, appropriation and crossing, and AAE in education and the public sphere. Prerequisite: Linguistics 212, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Linguistics 341 - Semantics

One-unit semester course. Semantics is the branch of linguistics that deals with the relationship between the form and meaning of linguistic expressions (morphemes, words, phrases, and sentences). The basic project of formal semantics is to develop a theory of how the meaning of a complex linguistic expression is built up, or “computed,” from the meanings of its constituent parts and how those parts are combined. In this course we sketch a formal compositional model for the semantics of English and consider how this model captures speakers’ intuitions about entailment, presupposition, and ambiguity. Topics covered include inference relations and concepts of meaning, developing a metalanguage (based on simple set theory and propositional logic) for representing the denotations of expressions, functions and lambda notation, definiteness, quantification and logical form, modality and possible worlds, and the relationship between semantics and pragmatics. Prerequisite: Linguistics 323 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. Students who have already completed Linguistics 211 may take Linguistics 341 concurrently with Linguistics 323. Conference.

Linguistics 348 - Structure of Austronesian

One-unit semester course. Austronesian is a family of over a thousand languages spoken primarily in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Taiwan, and Madagascar. Some of these languages (e.g., Malay, Tagalog, Javanese) are well documented and spoken by millions of people, while many others are highly endangered and have received little attention in the linguistics literature. In this course we discuss the grammatical diversity of the Austronesian family and probe some of the distinctive features of these languages, focusing on morpho-phonological and morpho-syntactic properties such as word order, reduplication, ergativity, case marking, and wh-question formation. By surveying both classic and contemporary research on Austronesian, we explore how the study of these languages has contributed to developments in linguistic theory. As part of the work for this course, each student will conduct research on a different Austronesian language and report on the grammatical features of that language through a series of in-class presentations and short papers. Prerequisite: Linguistics 211 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. Recommended: Linguistics 328. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Linguistics 350 - Languages of South Asia

One-unit semester course. The Indian subcontinent is home to five typologically divergent language families (Indo-European, Dravidian, Tibeto-Burman, Austroasiatic, Tai-Kadai) in addition to at least two language isolates, creating an ideal setting for the areal spreading of diverse linguistic features across genetic affiliations, affecting all areas of the grammar, from phonetics (e.g., retroflexion) and intonation (e.g., macrorhythmicity) to morphology (e.g., fixed segment reduplication) and syntax (e.g., head finality). In class, we will take a broad typological view of the languages of South Asia while also making more detailed observations of specific languages representing the diversity of the region. Outside of class, each student will focus on a South Asian language of their choice—collecting data from native speakers or from available language grammars—to examine the phonetic, phonological, lexical, morphological, syntactic, semantic, and other features, from a synchronic formal perspective as well as from historical and sociolinguistic perspectives. Prerequisite: Linguistics 211 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Linguistics 352 - Intonation

One-unit semester course. This course will explore linguistic prosody from a range of theoretical, structural, and functional perspectives. We will begin by first contextualizing prosodic research historically, philosophically, and academically—focusing on the long-term relative neglect of prosody in twentieth-century linguistic theory—and, second, constructing a (more or less) theory-neutral metalanguage appropriate to the cross-linguistic description and analysis of prosody. We will turn our attention to the major prosodic features and structures (e.g., length, stress/accent, tone, intonation) in terms of their phonetic manifestation, their phonological organization, and their pragmatic function. We will compare, contrast, and critically evaluate the most important contemporary theoretical perspectives on prosody and, finally, investigate the potential utility of a distinctly semiotic anthropological approach to its study. Prerequisite: Linguistics 211 or equivalent and one other linguistics course. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Linguistics 412 - Sociolinguistic Variation

One-unit semester course. The contemporary field of sociolinguistics is most often associated with the program on language variation and change (or variationism), which focuses on the orderly heterogeneity of the linguistic system and how that variation is indicative of language change. This approach to language in use utilizes quantitative methods to track the patterns of linguistic variables according to both linguistic and social constraints. This course explores the theories that motivate variations as a means to a deeper understanding of the linguistic system. In particular, we will use the “three waves” model of variations to follow the evolution of variations theory over the last 50 years. In tandem, students will work as variationists, collecting data and analyzing it within the quantitative paradigm. Prerequisites: Linguistics 212 and 337. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Linguistics 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Linguistics 481 - Independent Reading

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Open only to upper-class students with special permission.

Literature 209 - Introduction to Film Studies: Form and History on the Big Screen

One unit semester course. This course introduces students to film aesthetics through the analysis of film form and style with the aim of acquiring fluency in and understanding of film’s unique language as it evolved technologically, historically, and generically. Students shall explore the specificity of the language of cinema and its development in the twentieth century, paying special attention to how the big screen responded to and represented major events and historical trauma. In addition to dissecting and identifying formal choices and techniques, students will undertake close readings of films and place them in the larger context of directorial oeuvre, critical schools, period or movement in European and American cinema, and beyond. Lecture-conference.

Literature 309 - Introduction to Film Theory

One unit semester course. The goal of this course is to introduce students to the main ideas and debates on film theory and criticism, from the early days of silent film to the most recent approaches to digital cinema. The discussion will focus on the most significant movements and film schools in Europe, the United States, Latin America, and other parts of the world: realism, formalism, apparatus theory, psychoanalysis, feminism, auteurism, genre criticism, theories of spectatorship and reception, postmodernism, and third world and postcolonial cinema, among others. In addition to theoretical approaches, students will become familiar with cinematic language, including mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and sound. The course will explore the work of directors such as D.W. Griffith, Sergei M. Eisenstein, F.W. Murnau, Fritz Lang, Alfred Hitchcock, Luis Buñuel, Vittorio De Sica, Jean-Luc Godard, Octavio Getino and Fernando Solanas, Akira Kurosawa, Ingmar Bergman, Ousmane Sembene, Pedro Almodóvar, Agnès Varda, Wong Kar-wai, and Asghar Farhadi. Course includes weekly film screenings. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference-screenings. 

Literature 324 - Self-Narration Before and After Proust

One unit semester course. This course will explore examples of self-narration in French literary works (in English translation) prior to and throughout the twentieth century, with Marcel Proust’s Swann’s Way situated as the text alongside which and against which we will read other texts of self-narration, both autobiographical and fictional. The modes, gestures, and habits of self-narration that dominate contemporary life and that are immediately familiar today have rich literary examples. Self-fashioning, self-exploration, giving an account of oneself, organizing the relationship between one’s past and present, identifying meaningful patterns in the experiences of daily life; all of these may be considered components of a project of self-narration. Although this course will entail discussion of theoretical questions surrounding the project of self-narration (for instance, autofiction, the autobiographical pact, writing and memory, writing and the self), the primary focus of the course will be careful reading of the literary texts themselves, with emphasis on formal analysis. Authors read include Montaigne, Rousseau, Proust, Sartre, Leiris, Perec, Sarraute, Modiano, and Roubaud. Conference.

Literature 400 - Introduction to Literary Theory

One unit semester course. This course is a historical and analytical introduction to the major theoretical movements of the last 50 years in Western Europe and America. We will trace the philosophical origins and conceptual affiliations of the major developments in these movements. We will unpack the central concepts or master tropes of these theories to think about their function in literary criticism and learn how to use them purposefully. The course will cover structuralism and semiotics, poststructuralism and deconstruction, psychoanalytic theory, poststructuralist Marxist theory, Foucauldian theory and new historicism, postcolonial studies, and gender and feminist studies. The course will be taught as a seminar, with each student responsible for organizing the discussion of a reading or topic. It is designed for literature majors, but non–literature majors with adequate preparation may be admitted at the discretion of the instructors. Prerequisite: junior standing or at least two literature courses. Conference. Cross-listed as English 400.

Literature 501 - Shakespeare’s Comedies

One-half unit semester course. We will read four or five of Shakespeare’s comedies, from the following groups: “romantic comedies”: As You Like It and Twelfth Night; “problem comedies”: The Merchant of Venice and Measure for Measure; and “mixed-genre plays”: Henry IV, Part I (history/comedy) and The Winter’s Tale (tragi-comedy). Shakespearean comedy works to release constraints on festivity and freely chosen love, as its characters question and undermine authoritarian-imposed limits, solemn conventions, rigid logic, and officially countenanced violence. But Shakespearean comedy also tests the limits of self-indulgence, often coming close to tragedy and even death before pulling back to a rebirth into social harmony, however questionable such resolutions may seem. We will analyze gender relations in the comedies with respect to power (especially the function and significance of heroines’ cross-dressing); erotic desire and the role imagination plays in its fulfillment; the nature of identity, especially when characters are immersed in unfamiliar worlds; and the difficulty of establishing definitive moral norms. We will examine Elizabethan attitudes towards women and gender relations as they are expressed in both society and in theatrical practice, given boy heroines on the Elizabethan stage; and we will see how the politics of a female monarchy influenced depictions of women in Shakespeare’s comedies. We will also examine attitudes towards Jews and historic anti-Semitism in England in the sixteenth century. Finally, we will explore various theories of comedy and test their relevance to the plays; such readings may include essays by Bakhtin, Terry Eagleton, Harold Bloom, Northrop Frye, and Stephen Greenblatt. Conference. Offered fall 2022.

Literature 549 - Memory & Modernity in the Indian Ocean

One-half unit semester course. The Indian Ocean has been a site of cultural exchange across continents for several millennia, but it has often been marginalized from discussions of modernity based on Euro-American and trans-Atlantic models. What does it mean to be modern in the context of the Indian Ocean, a region crisscrossed by multiple empires, competing religions, and movements of migrants, merchants, slaves, pilgrims, and soldiers? How have individuals and communities in the Indian Ocean been framed by larger transnational processes like colonization, decolonization, slavery, trade, migration, and displacement? How do the non-Western sources of globalization and transnationalism in the Indian Ocean provide modes for thinking about alternative experiences of modernity? Using literature as the primary mode of thinking, this course will consider the ways in which the unique history of circulation of people, objects, and ideas in the Indian Ocean shapes ideas of modernity distinct from those developed in the West. This course will draw on readings from literary studies, history, anthropology, philosophy, and critical race studies to form a contextually informed approach to the study of the literature from the region. The course aims to rethink major concepts associated with modernity such as nation, diaspora, cosmopolitanism, and globalization in relation to the categories of race, gender, ethnicity, caste, and religion in the Indian Ocean context. Conference. Offered spring 2023.

Literature (Chinese) 325 - Songs to Lost Music: Ci-Poetry

See Chinese 325 for course description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 325 Description

Literature (Chinese) 327 - Chinese Inhumanities: Construction of the Other in Chinese Literature

See Chinese 327 for description. 

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 327 Description

Literature (Chinese) 329 - Stranger Things in Medieval China

See Chinese 329 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 329 Description

Literature (Chinese) 330 - Chinese Ghost Stories and Supernatural Tales

See Chinese 330 for description.

Chinese 330 Description

Literature (Chinese) 334 - The Yijing: Text and Tradition of the Book of Changes

See Chinese 334 for description.

Chinese 334 Description

Literature (Chinese) 346 - From Allegories to Documentaries: Screening Postsocialist China

See Chinese 346 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 346 Description

Literature (Chinese) 347 - Modern Sinophone Fiction and Film

See Chinese 347 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 347 Description

Literature (Chinese) 348 - Reading for Translation

See Chinese 348 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 348 Description

Literature (Chinese) 355 - Early Chinese Philosophical Texts

See Chinese 355 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 355 Description

Literature (Chinese) 367 - Love in Late Imperial China

See Chinese 367 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 367 Description

Literature (Chinese) 374 - Reading Early Chinese Novels: The Four Masterworks

See Chinese 374 for description.

Chinese 374 Description

Literature (Chinese) 380 - The Story of the Stone and the Literary Traditions of China

See Chinese 380 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 380 Description

Literature (Chinese) 390 - Realism and Its Discontents in Contemporary Chinese Visual Media

See Chinese 390 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Chinese 390 Description

Literature (French) 392 - French Connections: The Intertwined Histories of French and American Cinema

See French 392 for description.

French 392 Description

Literature (German) 346 - Introduction to Media Studies

See German 346 for description.

German 346 Description

Literature (German) 349 - Cinema and Politics

See German 349 for description. 

Not offered 2022–23.

German 349 Description

Literature (German) 358 - Representing Genocide

See German 358 for description.

German 358 Description

Literature (German) 372 - Psychoanalysis and Literature

See German 372 for description. 

Not offered 2022–23.

German 372 Description

Literature (German) 375 - Thinking Machines: Androids and Automatons in Science and Literature

See German 375 for course description.

German 375 Description

Literature (German) 391 - German Theory I

Introduction to Critical Theory
See German 391 for description. Not offered 2022–23.

Plants and Politics
See German 391 for description. 

German 391 Description

Literature (German) 392 - German Theory II

Revolutions in Poetic Language
See German 392 for description. 

Not offered 2022–23.

German 392 Description

Literature (Ancient Mediterranean) 251 - Ancient Greek Athletics

See Ancient Mediterranean Studies 251 for description.

Ancient Mediterranean Studies 251 Description

Literature (Ancient Mediterranean) 261 - Greek and Roman Mythology

See Ancient Mediterranean Studies 261 for description.

Ancient Mediterranean Studies 261 Description

Literature (Russian) 266 - Russian Short Fiction

See Russian 266 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 266 Description

Literature (Russian) 325 - Multicultural Russia

See Russian 325 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 325 Description

Literature (Russian) 362 - Red Sci-Fi: Science Fiction in Soviet Literature and Film

See Russian 362 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 362 Description

Literature (Russian) 363 - Film Adaptation: When Kurosawa Met Dostoevsky

See Russian 363 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 363 Description

Literature (Russian) 365 - Kiev, Odessa, and the Steppes: Ukrainian Imagination and Russian Literature

See Russian 365 for description.

Russian 365 Description

Literature (Russian) 371 - Russian Literature and Culture from Medieval to Romantic

See Russian 371 for description.

Russian 371 Description

Literature (Russian) 372 - Russian Literature: Realism

See Russian 372 for description.

Russian 372 Description

Literature (Russian) 373 - Modern Russian Literature from Chekhov to the Present

See Russian 373 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 373 Description

Literature (Russian) 387 - Jewishness and Cinema

See Russian 387 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 387 Description

Literature (Russian) 388 - From Lenin to Putin: Soviet Experience and its Aftermath through Film, Literature, and Human Document

See Russian 388 for description. 

Russian 388 Description

Literature (Russian) 390 - Russian Culture under Putin: Resistance and Conformity

See Russian 390 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 390 Description

Literature (Russian) 392 - Nuclear Literatures: A Comparative Approach

See Russian 392 for course description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 392 Description

Literature (Russian) 405 - Niklolaj Gogol’

See Russian 405 for course description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 405 Description

Literature (Russian) 408 - Decadence and Symbolism in Russia and Europe

See Russian 408 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 408 Description

Literature (Russian) 409 - Late Tolstoy: From Anna Karenina to a Religious Teaching

See Russian 409 for description.

Russian 409 Description

Literature (Russian) 410 - Russian Literature in Revolution: 1917–1932

See Russian 410 for course description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 410 Description

Literature (Russian) 412 - Literary Translation Workshop

See Russian 412 for course description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 412 Description

Literature (Russian) 413 - Russian Formalism, Structuralism, Semiotics, Bakhtin

See Russian 413 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 413 Description

Literature (Russian) 436 - Sergei Eisenstein’s Film Art: Decadence, Revolution, and the Mechanics of Ecstasy

See Russian 436 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 436 Description

Literature (Spanish) 343 - Don Quixote and Narrative Theory

See Spanish 343 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Spanish 343 Description

Literature (Spanish) 344 - Visual Art in Spanish Baroque Literature

See Spanish 344 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Spanish 344 Description

Literature (Spanish) 351 - Saints and Sinners: Women in the Early Modern Transatlantic World

See Spanish 351 for description.

Spanish 351 Description

Literature (Spanish) 361 - Decentering the Human

See Spanish 361 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Spanish 361 Description

Literature (Spanish) 372 - Documentary Resistance in Latin America and Spain

See Spanish 372 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Spanish 372 Description

Literature (Spanish) 378 - Space & Power

See Spanish 378 for description.

Spanish 378 Description

Course Offerings - The following courses are scheduled for the 2022–23 academic year:

MALS 670 - Thesis

One unit semester course.

Recent Courses - The following graduate courses have been offered in the past five years:

Anthropology 520 -  Race, Labor, and the Immigrant Experience
Anthropology 541 - Global Health: Critical Perspectives
Art 522 - Early Modern Things
Art 525 - Approaches to Media Studies
Art 530 - Art and Life in Renaissance Florence
Biology 530 - Science and Society: Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine
Biology 550 - Fire Ecology in the Pacific Northwest
Biology 560 - Genetics and Evolution
Dance 551 - Dance and Identity on the Global Stage
English 540 - August Wilson’s Twentieth-Century Cycle
English 553 - British Romanticism and Its Contexts
History 510 - Family History in the Twentieth Century U.S.
History 516 - The Power of American Things: United States and Its Stuff in the Twentieth-Century World
Liberal Studies 502 - Environmental Humanities and the World of Ancient Rome
Liberal Studies 509 - Religious Reformations and Social Transformations in Early Modern Europe
Liberal Studies 525 - Hindu Religious Traditions
Liberal Studies 538 - The Immigrant as Protagonist
Liberal Studies 539 - Russian Culture under Putin: Submission and Resistance
Liberal Studies 542 - Revolution and Reform in Chinese Agriculture
Liberal Studies 544 - Law and Justice in Europe and its Empires, 1200–1800
Liberal Studies 546 - Politics and Policy in America
Liberal Studies 551 - Chicago and the Urban Modern
Liberal Studies 554 - Media, Persons, and Publics in a Globalized World
Liberal Studies 572 - The Rise of the Russian Avant-Garde
Liberal Studies 575 - The Art of Speech
Literature 500 - Introduction to Literary Theory
Literature 524 - Red Sci-Fi: Science Fiction in Soviet Literature and Film
Literature 527 - Drugs, Gangs, and Aliens
Mathematics 547 - The Geometry of Light
Political Science 553 - American Climate Change Politics
Russian 533 - Russian Auteur Cinema
Spanish 583 - From Los olvidados to Roma: Contemporary Mexican Cinema
Theatre 540 - Race in American Theatre

Mathematics 111 - Calculus

One-unit semester course. This includes a treatment of limits, continuity, derivatives, mean value theorem, integration—including the fundamental theorem of calculus, and definitions of the trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions. Prerequisite: three years of high school mathematics. Lecture-conference.

Mathematics 112 - Introduction to Analysis

One-unit semester course. Field axioms, the real and complex fields, sequences and series. Complex functions, continuity and differentiation; power series and the complex exponential. Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 or equivalent. Lecture-conference.

Mathematics 113 - Discrete Structures

One-unit semester course. Sets, cardinality, number theory, combinatorics, probability. Proof techniques and problem solving. Additional topics may include graph theory, finite fields, and computer experimentation. Prerequisite: three years of high school mathematics. Lecture-conference.

Mathematics 141 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics

One-unit semester course. The basic ideas of probability including properties of expectation, the law of large numbers, and the central limit theorem are discussed. These ideas are applied to the problems of statistical inference, including estimation and hypothesis testing. The linear regression model is introduced, and the problems of statistical inference and model validation are studied in this context. A portion of the course is devoted to statistical computing and graphics. Prerequisite: three years of high school mathematics. Lecture-conference and laboratory.

Mathematics 201 - Linear Algebra

One-unit semester course. A brief introduction to field structures, followed by presentation of the algebraic theory of finite dimensional vector spaces. Topics include linear transformations, determinants, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonalization. Geometry of inner product spaces is examined in the setting of real and complex fields. Prerequisite: Mathematics 112. Lecture-conference.

Mathematics 202 - Vector Calculus

One-unit semester course. The derivative as a linear function, partial derivatives, optimization, multiple integrals, change of variables, Stokes’s theorem. Prerequisites: Mathematics 112 and 201, or permission of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Mathematics 241 - Data Science

One-unit semester course. Applied statistics class with an emphasis on data analysis. The course will be problem driven with a focus on collecting and manipulating data, using exploratory data analysis and visualization tools, identifying statistical methods appropriate for the question at hand, and communicating the results in both written and presentation form. Prerequisite: Mathematics 141 or equivalent. Lecture-conference. 

Mathematics 243 - Statistical Learning

One-unit semester course. An overview of modern approaches to analyzing large and complex data sets that arise in a variety of fields from biology to marketing to astrophysics. The most important modeling and predictive techniques will be covered, including regression, classification, clustering, resampling, and tree-based methods. There will be several projects throughout the course, which will require significant programming in R. Prerequisite: Mathematics 141, or experience with linear regressions and programming. Lecture-conference.

Mathematics 311 - Complex Analysis

One-unit semester course. A study of complex valued functions: Cauchy’s theorem and residue theorem, Laurent series, and analytic continuation. Prerequisite: Mathematics 202. Lecture-conference.

Mathematics 321 - Real Analysis

One-unit semester course. A careful study of continuity and convergence in metric spaces. Sequences and series of functions, uniform convergence, normed linear spaces. Prerequisite: Mathematics 202. Lecture-conference.

Mathematics 322 - Ordinary Differential Equations

One-unit semester course. An introduction to the theory of ordinary differential equations. Existence and uniqueness theorems, global behavior of solutions, qualitative theory, numerical methods. Prerequisite: Mathematics 202. Lecture-conference. Offered in alternate years.

Not offered 2022–23.

Mathematics 332 - Abstract Algebra

One-unit semester course. An elementary treatment of the algebraic structure of groups, rings, fields, and/or algebras. Prerequisite: Mathematics 201 and 113. Lecture-conference.

Mathematics 341 - Topics in Geometry

One-unit semester course. Topics in geometry selected by the instructor. Possible topics include the theory of plane ornaments, coordinatization of affine and projective planes, curves and surfaces, differential geometry, algebraic geometry, and non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: Mathematics 202. Lecture-conference. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.

Not offered 2022–23.

Mathematics 342 - Topology

One-unit semester course. An introduction to basic topology, followed by selected topics such as topological manifolds, embedding theorems, and the fundamental group and covering spaces. Prerequisite: Mathematics 202 and 332, the latter of which may be taken concurrently. Lecture-conference.

Mathematics 343 - Statistics Practicum

One-unit semester course. In this course, students will participate in a team-based, semester-long research project. Class time will be divided between supervised research time and a seminar focused on providing students with skills to facilitate their research. Seminar topics will include reproducible workflows, effective strategies for collaborative work, technical writing, statistical consulting, and scientific presentations. The course covers several components of the research process, such as literature reviews, technical writing, and scientific presentations. Emphasis is placed on developing a reproducible workflow. Prerequisite: Mathematics 243, or Mathematics 241 with permission of the instructor. Conference-laboratory. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.

Not offered 2022–23.

Mathematics 344 - Advanced Statistical Modeling

One-unit semester course. This course focuses on a generalization of the classical linear model: the multilevel/hierarchical model. This Bayesian framework has become a common tool to analyze more complex study designs in biology and psychology as well as observational data in political science and economics. The course establishes the foundation of the model in probability and discusses its estimation through Markov chain Monte Carlo. These components allow for extensive practice fitting models to real-world data sets drawn from across the sciences. Prerequisites: Mathematics 111 and either Mathematics 243 or 392. Lecture.

Not offered 2022–23.

Mathematics 345 - Spatial Data and Analysis

One-unit semester course. How do you perform statistical analysis when your observations are distributed in a space? This course will introduce tools for analyzing and visualizing data that has a spatial component. Topics include coordinate systems, distance and clustering metrics, interpolation, spatial autocorrelation, and spatial regression models. Most analysis will be done using R; however, the course will also include a short introduction to QGIS. Prerequisite: Mathematics 141 and Mathematics 241 or 243, or significant experience with programming. Lecture.

Not offered 2022–23.

Mathematics 361 - Number Theory

One-unit semester course. A study of integers, including topics such as divisibility, theory of prime numbers, congruences, and solutions of equations in the integers. Prerequisite: Mathematics 201. Concurrent Mathematics 332 is recommended. Lecture-conference. Offered in alternate years.

Mathematics 372 - Combinatorics

One-unit semester course. Emphasis is on enumerative combinatorics including such topics as the principle of inclusion-exclusion, formal power series and generating functions, and permutation groups and Pólya theory. Selected other topics such as Ramsey theory, inversion formulae, the theory of graphs, and the theory of designs will be treated as time permits. Prerequisite: Mathematics 113 and 201. Lecture-conference. Offered in alternate years.

Mathematics 382 - Algorithms and Data Structures

See Computer Science 382 for description.

Computer Science 382 Description

Mathematics 387 - Computability and Complexity

See Computer Science 387 for description.

Computer Science 387 Description

Mathematics 388 - Cryptography

See Computer Science 388 for description.

Computer Science 388 Description

Mathematics 391 - Probability

One-unit semester course. A development of probability theory in terms of random variables defined on discrete sample spaces. Special topics may include Markov chains, stochastic processes, and measure-theoretic development of probability theory. Prerequisites: Mathematics 113 and 202. Lecture-conference.

Mathematics 392 - Mathematical Statistics

One-unit semester course. Theories of statistical inference, including maximum likelihood estimation and Bayesian inference. Topics may be drawn from the following: large sample properties of estimates, linear models, multivariate analysis, empirical Bayes estimation, and statistical computing. Prerequisite: Mathematics 141 and 391, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Mathematics 393 - Stochastic Processes

One-unit semester course. A brief introduction to calculus-based probability theory, as well as a study of the main discrete- and continuous-time stochastic processes. Topics include Markov chains, martingales, Poisson processes, renewal processes, continuous-time Markov chains, and Brownian motion. A portion of the course is devoted to modeling stochastic processes using computer software. Prerequisites: Mathematics 202 and one of Mathematics 113, 141, or 391. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Mathematics 394 - Causal Inference

One-unit semester course. Overview of the statistical tools used to estimate causal effects. This course uses the potential outcomes framework and structural causal models to define causal estimates, and introduces the methods and assumptions needed to estimate them. Topics include randomized experiments, regression adjustment, propensity scores, matching, weighting, doubly robust and augmented estimation, instrumental variables, regression discontinuity, and sensitivity analysis. Students will present on advanced topics. Assignments involve using R to apply course topics on real and simulated data, and mathematical proofs and derivations. Prerequisites: Mathematics 141 and 391, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. 

Mathematics 411 - Topics in Advanced Analysis

One-unit semester course. Topics selected by the instructor. Prerequisite: Mathematics 321 or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. May be repeated for credit.

Mathematics 412 - Topics in Algebra

One-unit semester course. Topics selected by the instructor, for example, commutative algebra, Galois theory, algebraic geometry, and group representation theory. Prerequisite: Mathematics 332 or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. May be repeated for credit.

Mathematics 441 - Topics in Computer Science Theory

See Computer Science 441 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Computer Science 441 Description

Mathematics 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Mathematics 481 - Independent Study

One-half-unit semester course. Independent reading primarily for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: approval of the instructor and the division.

Music 101 - Private Instruction

Variable (zero or one-half)-unit semester course of individual instrumental or vocal instruction. This course is open to all students regardless of ability or previous experience. Private lessons are available for all orchestral instruments, guitar, harpsichord, piano, and voice, as well as non-Western instruments. Students will take weekly lessons with their private instructor. May be taken for one-half unit with a letter grade, or taken for zero units. If taken for one-half unit with a letter grade, students are required to satisfy weekly individual-practice requirements and/or listening assignments (minimum 5 hours/week), and attend (virtually or in person) one off-campus music event (concert, lecture, master class, etc.). Students will perform publicly at least once during the semester or take a performance exam at the end of the term. Students who are also registered in ensembles are encouraged to register for Music 101. May be repeated for credit. 

Music 104 - Reed Orchestra

Variable (zero or one-half)-unit semester course. Availability of credit is dependent on instruments needed for repertoire to be performed in any given semester. The orchestra rehearses and performs works from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century. It presents one or two concerts each semester. Prerequisite: audition required. Credit/no credit only if taken for one-half unit. Students are strongly encouraged to register for MUS101 private lessons when registered for Reed Orchestra. May be repeated for credit.

Music 105 - Reed Chorus

Variable (zero or one-half)-unit semester course. The chorus, open to all members of the Reed community, rehearses and performs works from all periods of music, often with the orchestra. (No audition required.) Credit/no credit only if taken for one-half unit. May be repeated for credit. 

Music 107 - Collegium Musicum

Variable (zero or one-half)-unit semester course. The Collegium rehearses and performs vocal music from many historic periods suitable for a small group. Prerequisite: audition required. Credit/no credit only if taken for one-half unit. May be repeated for credit. 

Music 108 - Jazz Ensemble

Variable (zero or one-half)-unit semester course. Jazz ensembles selected by the instructor rehearse regularly and give one performance each semester. Rehearsals include improvisational techniques, soloing, accompanying, and jazz theory. Prerequisite: audition required. Credit/no credit only if taken for one-half unit. Students are encouraged to register for MUS101 private lessons when registered for Jazz Ensemble. May be repeated for credit.

Music 109 - Chamber Music

Variable (zero or one-half)-unit semester course. Available by audition when there are enough students at an appropriate level to form an ensemble of one player per part. This course consists of weekly coaching sessions and several performances during the semester. Students should expect to practice individually for 2.5 hours per week, and are strongly encouraged to register for MUS101 private lessons when registered for Chamber Music. Prerequisite: audition. Credit/no credit only if taken for one-half unit. May be repeated for credit.

Music 110 - Fundamentals of Music

One-unit semester course. This course introduces basic elements of music, including notation of pitch and rhythm, intervals, melody, instrumentation/timbre, scales, keys and tonality, pulse and syncopation, triads and seventh chords, chord progressions and cadences. Labs will include some of the same activities in smaller groups, as well as playing (on keyboard or other primary instrument), dictation, identification of concepts/sounds introduced in lecture, close listening, and improvisation. Lecture and laboratory.

Music 142 - Latin American Popular Music

One-unit semester course. This course examines Latin American popular musics within their social, political, and cultural contexts. Musical genres to be studied include tango, samba, son, nueva canción, tropicália, rock nacional, and funk carioca, among others; themes to be discussed include music and the nation, music and dictatorship, and the crisis of cultural inclusion and exclusion in contemporary Latin America. Understanding how these musics are framed by broader assumptions regarding race, class, gender, and ethnicity will be a key concern of the course. Our focused listening will be complemented with analytical, critical, and contextual readings, including relevant selections from Latin American literature in translation and occasional film screenings. Lecture-conference.

Music 150 - The Cultural Study of Music

One-unit semester course. Music carries a tremendous range of meanings and functions, serving as both a symbol and generator of other forces in social life and history. Taking a comparative approach to a variety of world musical cultures (including selected examples of folkloric, popular, and art musics from Africa, the Middle East, India, Asia, the Americas, and Europe), this course will examine how music communicates and is made meaningful within specific historical and cultural contexts. We will focus on developing the critical vocabulary and listening skills needed to account for music as a cross-cultural phenomenon. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 150.

Music 185 - Music and the Environment

One-unit semester course. Drawing on a broad range of musical genres and sonic practices—classical and popular, local and global, historical and contemporary—this class will develop a set of tools that allows us to experience, analyze, critique, and interpret the multifaceted relationship between music and the environment. How have music and sound been used to represent the natural world, reframe the relationship between art and science, construct identity with reference to place, or participate in social activism? What is the environmental footprint of musicking? Can learning to listen encourage practices of sustainability? There will be both written and creative assignments. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 205 - Musicianship

One-unit semester course. This course guides students in the development of their musicianship and aural skills in tandem with topics and concepts covered in Music 210. Class activities will include melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic dictations; group reading of assigned musical excerpts; discussions of challenges and strategies in music making; and student presentations of varied assignments, including transcriptions and covers of student-selected songs, duo and small ensemble performances of two-part musical excerpts, and other creative projects. Prerequisite: Music 110 or equivalent skill, determined by an assessment. Laboratory-conference.

Music 207 - Musical Dialogues Across Disciplines

One-unit semester course. This course is a practice-based music composition seminar where students will engage in cross-disciplinary dialogues with works of literature, visual art, dance, and film in order to generate original musical compositions and hybrid multimedia works. Utilizing the sensory language offered by each medium, students will explore the synergistic and synesthetic language between the visual/sonic, sonic/spatial, spatial/temporal, verbal/nonverbal, and gestural and embodied languages to craft unique musical works inspired by and generated in conversation with these narrative and temporal mediums. Final projects will be presented in hybrid forms of multimedia and time-based arts. Studio.

Music 210 - Diatonic Harmony

One-unit semester course. This course examines the conventions and protocols of tonal harmony as developed by composers of the Western art music tradition from the start of the seventeenth century to the start of the twentieth through the lens of vocal music and text setting. Through written exercises and analysis of selected works, students will identify musical elements such as harmonic rhythm and progressions, cadences, nonchord tones, and secondary dominant chords and study how composers understood the structures, sounds, drama, and meaning in the texts they set. Prerequisite: Music 110 or equivalent skill, determined by placement exam given at the beginning of the academic year. Lecture-conference.

Music 221 - Music History I: Unexpected Encounters in Early Modern Europe

One-unit semester course. Introducing students to a range of sacred and secular genres, this course will study the history of music in early modern Europe with a particular focus on ideas of encounter, exchange, and entanglement with people, sounds, ideas, and materials around the globe. What can music teach us about how people thought, felt, and acted in the past? When does music illuminate the past in ways other historical documents do not? How did encounter within and outside of Europe shape ideas about culture, mapping of the world, and racial and ethnic difference? History is an exercise in storytelling; you will work with primary and secondary sources in order to understand how music history has been constructed, and to craft your own stories that connect music making in the past to our present-day experiences as listeners, musicians, and writers. Music 221 can be taken independently of Music 222. Conference.

Music 222 - Music History II: Enlightenment, Romanticism, Modernism

One-unit semester course. This course will study selected examples of art music cultivated in Western Europe and the United States from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. We’ll pay particular attention to the musical, philosophical, and social conditions that led to the emergence of a canon, as well as the ways canonicity has always been complicated and challenged by musicians, listeners, and scholars. Students will develop the listening, analytic, and critical skills necessary to formulate and engage music-historical questions relating to constructions of gender and race, cultural nationalisms, the impact of globalization, the ethics of borrowing and appropriation, and aesthetics. Music 222 can be taken independently of Music 221. Conference.

Music 225 - Electroacoustic Music

One-unit semester course. Electronic music technology has changed the course of composition and performance since the late nineteenth century, reaching beyond stylistic and geographic boundaries. This course encompasses the study and application of electronic music composition from its origins through contemporary practice. Students will learn about acoustics, psychoacoustics, composition, various tools and techniques of recording and audio production using Logic, Max/MSP, and other software to meet the course’s primary goal: creating original electroacoustic works. Students will examine the development of the medium and explore future directions through weekly labs; quizzes; reading, listening, and writing assignments; and a student-produced public performance at the end of the semester. Conference-studio.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 230 - Tango: Music, Culture, History

One-unit semester course. Tango is a rich and diverse cultural practice. Focusing on music and its connections to other expressive forms, especially dance and verbal art, this course will examine tango in its cultural and historical contexts. We will develop a detailed knowledge of the history and stylistic development of tango as a global genre, and explore how musical debates within tango have both reflected and contributed to the broader transformations of twentieth-century society, culture, and politics in Argentina and beyond. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 234 - Listening to Dance Music

One-unit semester course. This class will explore the field of choreomusicology by engaging with topics including embodiment, movement as language, the work concept, and improvisation in repertoire from seventeenth-century French court ballets to Hamilton. How have bodies moved to music? Which music, and which bodies? How has dance been used as an aesthetic manifestation of social power? In an effort to “keep ourselves off-center in order to stay on target” (in the words of dance historian Brenda Dixon Gottschild), one way we’ll approach music and dance history is through doing. What can we learn about the 17th century through dancing that we couldn’t learn from a book? Is it possible to imagine historical experiences of listening with the right kinesthetic knowledge? Is dance a way of knowing? Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 238 - Music and the Cold War United States

One-unit semester course. Post–World War II negotiations of anticommunism, national identity, and global membership reverberated throughout U.S. musical life in the 1950s. These sociopolitical developments impacted the careers of musicians as disparate as Aaron Copland, Hank Williams, and Dizzy Gillespie; shaped the reception of repertories ranging from experimental music to the Broadway musical to rock and roll; and transformed the meanings of ethnic assimilation, the civil rights movement, and ideologies of modernism and populism. Through study of selected music examples and relevant historical literature, this course will examine the performance, composition, and consumption of music in the United States during the early Cold War period. Conference. Cross-listed as History 298.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 249 - Race, Sexuality, and Empire on the Operatic Stage

One-unit semester course. This course will focus on three operas that premiered during what some European historians have called the “Age of Empire”: Giuseppe Verdi’s Aida (1871), Georges Bizet’s Carmen (1875), and Giacomo Puccini’s Madama Butterfly (1904–07). Set in Egypt, Spain, and Japan, respectively, these works are famous for their scores, which feature some of opera’s best-known music, but also for the complex, romantically doomed, and racially marked women who are the title characters: Aida the enslaved Ethiopian princess, Carmen the “gypsy” femme fatale, and Cio-Cio San the tragic geisha. Students will be introduced to opera as a genre, to late romantic musical aesthetics, to the literary origins of these works, and to relevant scholarship theorizing empire and representations of difference. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 254 - Africa in the Black Musical Imagination

One-unit semester course. “What is Africa to me?” asked the Harlem Renaissance writer Countee Cullen in his 1925 poem “Heritage.” This course will introduce students to the ways and ends to which Black musicians, primarily in the United States, have explored this question. The responses have varied, ranging from early twentieth-century musical theater reconciling modern identities with “dark continent” stereotypes, to the cultural-political embrace of Afrocentricity in Sixties jazz and soul, to the Afro-diasporic parable of Beyoncé’s 2020 visual album Black Is King. This is not a course on music from the African continent. Rather, through suggestive musical examples and literature on such topics as Ethiopianism, African retentions, and the politics of origins, students will consider how and why Black musicians have persistently asserted and negotiated relationships with Africa—whether as a homeland or as a space of fantasy—and the fluidity of these relationship over time. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 254.

Music 271 - Studying Popular Music

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to some of the key aesthetic, theoretical, and methodological concerns in the burgeoning field of popular music studies, which has explored the performance, (re)production, and consumption of popular music. Seeking to develop listening skills and drawing on both field-defining work and new scholarship, the course will explore topics including the analysis of recorded music, the politics of style and genre, the role of technological and social mediation, the production of intersectional identities, and fan reception. Though the focus will be music originating in the United States, students will also consider the circulation of popular music in international contexts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 277 - Music and Politics

One-unit semester course. This course will examine the relationship between music and politics in a variety of historical and cultural contexts, exploring how and why music has been such a powerful carrier of ideology. Grounded in core readings on the politics of music and the arts, we will address themes of musical nationalism, censorship, cultural policy making, the cultural industries, musical activism and social movements, and the broader expediency of musical culture in the global era. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 283 - Musical Avant-Gardes

One-unit semester course. “Piano Piece for David Tudor #3: Most of them were very old grasshoppers.” —La Monte Young (1960). What is an avant-garde? How can music be “ahead of its time?” In this class, students will consider the histories, aesthetics, and sociopolitical contexts of musical avant-gardes and musical experimentalism post-World War II through the lens of critical vanguard studies. While the course focuses on music of the 1950s–1970s (from Fluxus artists such as Yoko Ono and Alison Knowles to the avant-jazz of Ornette Coleman and John Coltrane), we will also consider what a musical avant-garde in the 2020s might sound like, look like, or act like. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 291 - Women and Performance in 1960s Popular Music

One-unit semester course. If U.S. popular music in the 1950s exhibited a relatively narrow bandwidth of performances by women, the possibilities—in sound, style, approach, and affect—expanded dramatically in the 1960s. This course studies how women popular musicians in the sixties, along with their audiences, enacted these diversifying musical performances. Particularly influential for this multiplication of performance modes were seminal developments in second-wave feminism, the cresting civil rights movement, sixties counterculture, and transformations within the music industry. Students will cultivate skills for close listening to recordings and analysis of musical style, and will read literature by a range of scholars thinking through musicology, media studies, U.S. history, African American studies, feminist theory, and performance studies about such artists as Nina Simone, Janis Joplin, Joni Mitchell, the Supremes, Astrid Gilberto, Barbra Streisand, Loretta Lynn, Miriam Makeba, and others. We will also consider how musical performances by 1960s women were mobilized intersectionally with racial, ethnic, class, political, and geographic identities. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Lecture-conference.

Music 302 - Sound Studies

One-unit semester course. This course will provide an introduction to sound studies, an emerging field of inquiry situated at the intersection of critical music scholarship, anthropology of the senses, science and technology studies, and a wide range of sonic practices, artistic and otherwise. Students will read foundational texts in the field (including R. Murray Schafer, Steven Feld, Jonathan Sterne, and Emily Thompson, among others), listen to and discuss a wide variety of sonic practices (musical performance, sound art, acoustic ecology, etc.), and conduct original research projects on current issues regarding the making, experience, meaning, and power of sound in social life and history. Conference.

Music 305 - Musical Ethnography

One-unit semester course. This course will introduce the theory and practice of musical ethnography, the key mode of ethnomusicological research and representation, to advanced students in ethnomusicology, anthropology, and related disciplines. Combining critical readings on ethnography from music scholarship, anthropology, and a variety of disciplines with hands-on projects (including the production and analysis of field recordings, musical transcriptions, and various forms of qualitative ethnographic data), the course will prepare students to both conduct and critically reflect upon ethnographic research. Conference. Cross-listed as Anthropology 305.

Music 308 - Music as Material Culture

One-unit semester course. Questions of materiality are surprisingly absent in scholarly accounts of music, which tend to emphasize ideologies of ephemerality and performance, on the one hand, and the transcendent monumentality of “the work,” on the other. Nevertheless, modern musical culture is saturated with things: sheet music, sound recordings, audiovisual materials, digital file formats, and the articulating equipment they require, to name only a few objects of everyday musical consumption and engagement. How can we account for what Jane Bennett (2010) calls the “vibrant” materiality of these musical objects? How do the different materialities of music relate to one another across affective networks of style, genre, and media production? How do musical materials become subjects of knowledge regarding the past? How is that knowledge mobilized in the practice of collecting and managing historic material culture? How might ongoing practices of remediation challenge our assumptions regarding the stabilities of material forms? Employing a variety of methodological perspectives and drawing upon a wide array of listening examples, this course will introduce students to debates regarding music as material culture and question the ontological presuppositions of contemporary music scholarship. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 310 - Chromatic Harmony

One-unit semester course. This course will examine topics in advanced tonal harmony (including modal mixture, chromaticism, and the development of harmonic and rhythmic resources in late-nineteenth-century musical idioms) through written exercises, analysis, and composition. Prerequisite: Music 210 or permission of instructor. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 314 - Composition

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to contemporary composition. Students will compose and perform short works. The course will deal with problems of instrumentation, notation, and performance, as well as the larger aesthetic issues of coherence and gesture, within a broad range of styles and media. Prerequisite: Music 210 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 315 - Electroacoustic Transformations and Sonic Storytelling

One-unit semester course. Utilizing original field recordings and samples of varying spectra, registers, textures, qualities, and durations, students will learn and apply creative recording techniques and dynamic approaches in audio manipulation and studio transformations to create distinct sonic worlds and musical languages. Engaging in practices of musique concrète and informed by methods and forms employed by contemporary electroacoustic artists such as Matmos, Alvin Lucier, Janet Cardiff, Christina Kubisch, La Monte Young, Björk, and Laurie Anderson, students will work towards the final presentation of a generative, narrative, musical work featuring original aural architectures and crafted works of time-based sensory storytelling. Students are encouraged to perform in their own works, engage in studio collaborations, and compose and present final works for traditional and non-traditional settings. Studio.

Music 316 - Songwriting

One-unit semester course. Students will develop skills in song composition drawing upon a range of genres and styles, including rock, rap, blues, music theatre, folk, protest, and jazz standard. We will examine relevant models of these styles to inform composition, and hone musicianship skills in hearing melodies, rhythms, and harmonic progressions and in setting different kinds of lyrics. Students will notate songs as lead sheets and then make arrangements for performances at a final concert. Prerequisite: Music 210 or consent of the instructor. Conference-studio.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 319 - Collaborative Creativity

One-unit semester course. Collaboration is the foundation upon which many celebrated art projects achieve a whole greater than the sum of their parts. Whether poets and composers writing songs, choreographers and visual artists creating intermedia performance, or any devised-performance group developing new work together, this course seeks to engage students from varied disciplines in collaborative creativity. The central focus of the course is to create collaborative performance projects based upon the unique skill sets and interests of the students enrolled that will be presented in a student-produced performance. Students will study and apply the process of collaboration, group improvisation, and interdisciplinary performance spanning diverse genres, time periods, and media through reading, discussion, and creative work, and learn practical skills to bring such a project to fruition in a professional setting. Conference-studio.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 344 - Junior Seminar: Ideologies of Improvisation

One-unit semester course. This junior seminar will examine improvisation as a musical practice, analytical object, and subject of critical discourse in a variety of historical and cultural contexts, attending to the musical techniques and artistic ideologies of improvisational performance in equal measure. Case studies will engage a diverse selection of historically significant improvisational practices in world musical culture and reflect the scope and range of critical music scholarship on these issues. Students will also conduct and workshop significant research projects on an improvisatory practice of their choice, together developing the methods and skills needed to undertake substantial independent projects. Prerequisite: Music 150, 221, 222, and junior standing. Conference.

Music 357 - Introduction to Conducting

One-unit semester course. The conductor’s role in ensemble leadership is largely misunderstood. A casual observer might claim that setting the tempo is the principal concern of a conductor, but that is only one of the myriad of considerations that go into preparing a performance. This course will provide an introduction to the craft of conducting, including focus on score study rehearsal technique, performance practice, effective gesture, and the role of collective (group) intelligence in large-ensemble music. Students will conduct one another and guest musicians in a laboratory setting to allow for real-time feedback. Assignments will be drawn from a wide variety of genres (choral, instrumental, opera, chamber music) in order to address the specific conducting challenges of each category. Prerequisite: Music 110 and 210. Lecture-conference-studio.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 360 - Music and the Black Freedom Struggle, 1865–1965

One-unit semester course. The civil rights movement in the United States, demanding full citizenship for African Americans, is most commonly associated with the momentous sociopolitical developments of the 1950s and 1960s. Increasingly, scholars have situated this “classical” period of the movement within a broader historical arc encompassing an ongoing “Black freedom struggle” that dates to Reconstruction. Over the course of this century of struggle and resistance, music has continuously been a terrain on which U.S. citizens conceptualized, articulated, and negotiated the terms of an equitable society. Through close study of primary and secondary historical texts and musical repertory that will include the spiritual, jazz, and concert music, this course will explore ways in which ideas about musical sound and musical performance, from the end of the Civil War to the beginning of World War II, articulated the stakes of the Black freedom struggle and the meanings of freedom. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. Conference. Cross-listed as History 390 and Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 359.

Music 372 - Music and Voice

One-unit semester course. The bel canto ideal of Italian opera, the “flow” produced by a rapper’s delivery, the crooning of pop vocalists, the growl of heavy metal vocals, the microtonal inflections of Indian classical singing: such examples indicate a range of vocal practices that shape the production and experience of musical sound. What functions are served by the presence of a voice in music? Is a voice simply a bearer of words, or something more? Through study of selected musical examples and relevant music-historical and theoretical “voice studies” literature, this course will explore the manifestations, roles, and significance of the voice in music, as deployed artistically and as engaged by listeners to make meaning of musical experience. We will also consider how singing voices become linked to gender, race, ethnicity, class, and geographic region, and the ways in which the voice has been reimagined through avant-garde composition and technological intervention. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 410 - Post-Tonal Theory and Beyond

One-unit semester course. This course will examine topics in post-tonal music theory (including set theory, serialism, and other methods of post-tonal composition and analysis) and trends in contemporary music since the twentieth century through written exercises, analysis, essays, presentations, and composition. This advanced seminar will focus on synthesizing knowledge of various theoretical approaches to better analyze and discuss music drawn from a broad spectrum of styles and origins. Prerequisite: Music 310 or permission of instructor. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Music 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Music 481 - Independent Study

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Prerequisite: approval of instructor and division.

Neuroscience 333 - Systems Neuroscience

One-unit semester course. An examination of the neural basis of behavior with a focus on understanding how the brain perceives and processes sensory information from the environment to produce complex behaviors, and how these processes can be modulated. The course will cover the structure of vertebrate nervous systems and neurons, neuronal communication, sensory systems, movement and regulatory systems, sexual behavior, learning and neuronal plasticity, and complex higher-level neuronal processing. We will explore a variety of approaches used to understand the brain, including genetic and molecular methods, neuronal recording, optogenetics, neuroanatomy, and behavior. Students who have previously completed Psychology 333 should not enroll in this course. Prerequisite: Psychology 101, or Biology 101 or 102. Lecture-laboratory.

Neuroscience 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Philosophy 201 - Logic

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to the formal logic of propositions, identity, and quantification, which may include metalogic, philosophy of logic, alternate and deviant logics, and applying formal logic when evaluating real arguments. This course meets the department’s logic requirement. Lecture.

Philosophy 202 - Introduction to Metaphysics

One-unit semester course. An examination of selected topics in metaphysics, such as: What kind of beings are we? Do we have free will? Does God exist? Is time real? Does anything exist independently of our minds? This course meets the department’s metaphysics requirement. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Philosophy 203 - Introduction to Ethics

One-unit semester course. An examination of selected historical and contemporary accounts of how we should live, of what makes life good, of what does harm, of what constrains our actions, and of what gives our lives meaning. This course meets the department’s ethics requirement. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Philosophy 204 - Introduction to Epistemology

One-unit semester course. An examination of the sources, structure, and scope of knowledge and justification. This course meets the department’s epistemology requirement. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Philosophy 205 - Introduction to Philosophy of Science

One-unit semester course. An examination of selected questions in the philosophy of science, such as: Are scientists discovering the real structure of nature or creating models that fit the data? Do our data dictate our theories? Do our expectations about the future have any rational basis? Does science explain anything, help us understand anything, or does it just describe things? How do sciences develop? Do they undergo revolutions? If so, how should that affect our views of science’s aims, activities, and products? This course meets the department’s epistemology requirement. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Philosophy 207 - Persons and Their Lives

One-unit semester course. What is it to be a person, and to live a life distinctive of persons? This course will explore a variety of philosophical issues relevant to answering these questions, among them: What is it to be the same person across time? Is a person essentially a mind? Is there something distinctive about the way persons act? Must their actions always be rational, and must agents always pursue some perceived good? Do persons have free will? What makes a life meaningful? Is immortality required for a meaningful life, or can only mortals have meaningful lives? This course meets the department’s ethics requirement. Conference.

Philosophy 209 - Minds, Computers, Worlds

One-unit semester course. This course will introduce and consider a number of interrelated philosophical questions about minds, computers, and the world(s) they inhabit: Is the human mind identical with the human brain? What exactly is a computer, and could a computer have a genuine mind? How “real” are the “virtual” realities created by actual and possible computers and minds? Could our minds, and could the physical world, turn out to be parts of a computer or computer simulation? This course meets the department’s metaphysics requirement. Conference.

Philosophy 210 - Introduction to Ancient Philosophy

One-unit semester course. This course explores the metaphysics, ethics, and epistemology of the pre-Socratics, the Sophists, Plato, Aristotle, the Epicureans, the Stoics, and the Skeptics. All these schools explored still-essential questions, such as: What are the ultimate constituents of reality? What is the nature of causation? What is a soul? What is knowledge, and what can we know? Is there a best way to live, and, if so, what is it? What is justice? How is my good related to the goods of others? The course seeks both to understand and situate the ancient texts historically and to discover philosophical insights that remain relevant in the social and scientific context of the twenty-first century. This course applies to the department’s history of philosophy requirement. Conference.

Philosophy 213 - Philosophy of Religion

One-unit semester course. This course is an analysis of the nature and grounds of religious belief. Topics include classic and contemporary arguments for the existence of God, the problem of evil, the problem of freedom and foreknowledge, the relation between faith and reason, the meaningfulness of religious language, and the prospects for religious pluralism. This course meets the department’s epistemology requirement. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Philosophy 214 - Philosophy of Memoir

One-unit semester course. In this course we will read memoirs alongside philosophical texts exploring personal identity, the nature of the self, mind, memory, imagination, truth, justice, friendship, and the meaning of life. The course will raise questions like the following: If a memoir is a work of art, does it matter if it is true? Do narrative arcs truthfully represent life? Are lives and persons unified in the way that stories are unified? How are you related to your past? How is your present well-being related to time and to the overall shape of your life? How are you related to others, and how do those relationships generate obligations? Should you tell your story even if it hurts others? In what sense is your story yours to tell? This course meets the department’s ethics requirement. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Philosophy 301 - Ancient Philosophy

One-unit semester course. This course focuses on the relationship between ethics and metaphysics in Aristotle, Epicurus, the Stoics and the Skeptics. For these ancient thinkers, ethics begins with and focuses on the agent’s life as a whole. Their ethical theories view lives intricately embedded into the social context, and their distinctive approach to ethics takes root in natural science. The course seeks both to understand and situate the texts historically and to discover philosophical insights that remain relevant in the social and scientific context of the 21st century. Prerequisite: two 200-level philosophy courses. This course applies to the department’s history of philosophy or ethics requirement. Conference.

Philosophy 302 - Modern Philosophy

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to the metaphysical and epistemological views of major modern philosophers such as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Prerequisites: Philosophy 201 and one other 200-level course in philosophy. This course applies to the department’s history of philosophy requirement. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Philosophy 306 - History of Modern Social and Political Philosophy

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to modern social and political thought and its epistemological foundations, covering authors from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment, such as Machiavelli, More, Erasmus, Luther, Montaigne, Galileo, Descartes, Pascal, Hobbes, and Locke. This course applies to the department’s history of philosophy or ethics requirements. Prerequisite: two 200-level philosophy courses. Conference.

Philosophy 310 - Metaphysics

One-unit semester course. This course is a study of the central topics and problems of metaphysics, including the mind-body problem, free will and determinism, persistence and change, and the natures of particulars, properties, time, space modality, causality, identity, and persons. Prerequisites: Philosophy 201 and one other 200-level course in philosophy. This course meets the department’s metaphysics requirement. Conference.

Philosophy 311 - Epistemology

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to the central topics in the theory of knowledge, including the nature of knowledge, the nature of epistemic justification, and varieties of skepticism. Prerequisites: Philosophy 201 and one other 200-level course in philosophy. This course meets the department’s epistemology requirement. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Philosophy 312 - Ethical Theories

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to the central theories and problems of ethics. Prerequisites: Philosophy 201 and one other 200-level course in philosophy. This course meets the department’s ethics requirement. Conference.

Philosophy 313 - Color

One-unit semester course. Do colors really exist? If so, what are they? These simple questions launch a grand tour of philosophy. We begin by surveying the current science of color and color perception and reviewing the philosophical theories of color from the Enlightenment (Boyle, Locke, Berkeley). We then ask how color terms refer, examine color-based arguments for dualism, and finally evaluate the various contemporary metaphysics of color: eliminativism, relativism, dispositionalism, identity theory, and sense data theory. This course meets the department’s metaphysics requirement. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Philosophy 315 - Philosophy of Language

One-unit semester course. This course is a study of such topics as truth, reference, meaning, convention, linguistic and nonlinguistic communication, and the relationships between language, thought, and reality. Prerequisites: Philosophy 201 and one other 200-level course in philosophy. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Philosophy 316 - Philosophy of Science

One-unit semester course. A philosophical investigation of the nature of science and the light science sheds on the world. Topics covered include the difference between science and pseudoscience, the Quine/Duhem thesis on the underdetermination of theory by evidence, the problem of induction and the grue paradox, the problem of scientific confirmation, Bayesian approaches to confirmation, the nature of scientific explanations and scientific theories, the nature and philosophical implications of scientific revolutions, the rationality of science, the social construction of scientific facts, scientific realism and scientific social responsibility. Prerequisites: Philosophy 201 and one other 200-level course in philosophy, or consent of the instructor. This course meets the department’s epistemology requirement. Conference.

Philosophy 318 - Philosophy of Biology

One-unit semester course. This course is a philosophical study of such topics as adaptation; units of selection; emergence and reduction; function and teleology; the nature of life; the nature and epistemological status of biological mechanisms; the nature and epistemological status of species; evolutionary trends; implications of evolutionary theory for psychology, culture, epistemology, and ethics; and the social implications of contemporary biology and biotechnology (such as the human genome project, genetic engineering, and artificial life). Prerequisites: Philosophy 201 and one other 200-level course in philosophy, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Philosophy 320 - Topics in Logic

One-unit semester course. The course covers topics in logic relevant to contemporary philosophy, beyond the basic elements of first-order logic. Topics covered may include: definite descriptions and scope; elementary metalogic (e.g., soundness and completeness theorems); plural logic; nonexistence and free logic; higher-order logic; generalized quantifiers; temporal and modal logics; epistemic logic; vagueness; paraconsistent logic. Prerequisite: Philosophy 201. This course meets the department’s logic requirement. Conference.

Philosophy 321 - Modal Logic and Metaphysics

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to modal logic, possible-world semantics, and associated philosophical issues. Prerequisites: Philosophy 201 and one other 200-level course in philosophy. This course meets the department’s logic or metaphysics requirement. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Philosophy 370 - Junior Seminar (Philosophy)

One-unit semester course. An intensive study of selected philosophical problems or works. The course aims to develop in each student the skills needed to do independent work in philosophy by having the student write a long research paper on a topic defined by the readings. Prerequisite: junior standing and two 300-level courses in philosophy, or consent of the instructor. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

Philosophy 411 - Advanced Topics in Metaphysics

One-unit semester course. See descriptions for prerequisites. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

Personal Identity
One-unit semester course. A discussion of the topics raised when we ask “What am I?” “Will I survive?” and “Why should I care?” Prerequisite: one 300-level philosophy course. This course meets the department’s metaphysics requirement. Conference. 

Ontology
One-unit semester course. This course will consider several contemporary debates concerning ontology, including whether a minimalist (sometimes called “nihilist”), common-sense, or plenitudinous ontology of (material) objects has a stronger claim to being true; the ontology of the social (groups, “socially constructed” entities); whether “abstract” objects exist and what their abstractness consists in; and the “meta-ontological” issue of the nature of ontological commitment. Prerequisite: one 300-level philosophy course. This course meets the department’s metaphysics requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Philosophy 412 - Advanced Topics in Epistemology

One-unit semester course. See descriptions for prerequisites. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

Classification and Natural Kinds
One-unit semester course. This course surveys contemporary philosophical and scientific work on classification and kinds. Special focus is given to whether certain classifications and kinds are especially objective or natural, and contemporary theories of natural kinds and biological species will be reviewed and applied. The course will also examine new methods for classifying the evolution of technology, using natural language processing and machine learning tools to analyze big textual data repositories. Readings will be taken primarily from contemporary philosophy. Prerequisite: two 300-level philosophy courses, or consent of the instructor. This course meets the department’s epistemology requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Computation
One-unit semester course. This course surveys the important epistemological roles of computation in philosophy and science, especially concerning complex systems. The course surveys computation theory, and it includes computer laboratory exercises involving programming and computer simulations. Key course topics are illustrated with case studies, such as cellular automata, artificial life, and intelligent robot scientists. Prerequisite: two 300-level philosophy courses, or consent of the instructor. This course meets the department’s epistemology requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Testimony and Trust
One-unit semester course. Most knowledge rests, either directly or indirectly, on the testimony of others. But the nature of testimony and its proper role in our epistemic lives remains poorly understood. This course takes up both of the issues just mentioned, as well as related questions of the nature of epistemic authority, the contours of epistemic injustice, and the relation between self-trust and trust in others. We will aim to investigate these general and abstract questions with an eye towards understanding the shifting social epistemic landscape of our own time, including debates over censorship in social media, political polarization, and decentralized systems of knowledge transmission. Prerequisite: two 300-level philosophy courses or consent of the instructor. This course meets the department’s epistemology requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Philosophy 413 - Advanced Topics in Ethics

One-unit semester course. See descriptions for prerequisites. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

The Ethics of Partiality
One-unit semester course. This course will examine the extent and limits of morally justified partial treatment. Some questions we will examine are: Is loyalty a virtue? Is it ever morally justified? How might we distinguish morally acceptable forms of loyalty (e.g., patriotism) from morally reprehensible forms (e.g., racism)? How can we justify special obligations toward some individuals (e.g., members of our family) without thinking that they are morally more important? What is it to treat others “equally?” Is impartiality really a moral ideal we should strive toward? Prerequisite: one 300-level philosophy course. This course meets the department’s ethics requirement. Conference. 

Metaethics
One-unit semester course. This course will focus on the nature and justification of ethical claims. Possible questions to be addressed include: Is ethics objective? What are the prospects for ethical realism, antirealism, quasi-realism? What is the relation between ethics and practical reason? Does evolutionary theory have any bearing on the truth of moral claims? Prerequisite: two courses in philosophy at the 300 level or higher, or consent of the instructor. This course meets the department’s ethics requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Morality at the Margin: What We Owe to Animals, A.I., and Future Generations
One-unit semester course. This course will examine issues around the moral status of, and our moral obligations to things at the margin of what we might call “the moral circle.” Beginning with questions of what constitutes “moral standing,” we will go on to ask whether there is reason to think that moral standing might be limited to our species, and whether species membership could be sufficient. If not, how far might it extend? How should we understand our obligations to animals? How could we have moral obligations to the merely possible people that make up future generations? And to what extent might sufficiently sophisticated A.I “agents” lay claim to our moral concern? Prerequisite: two courses in philosophy at the 300 level or higher, or consent of the instructor. This course meets the department’s ethics requirement. Conference. 

Narrative and Aging
One-unit semester courseDrawing on ancient through contemporary texts, we situate ethical issues in aging within the context of larger questions of what it means to be a person, to have a life, to have a good life, and to be part of a just society. How should a life be valued? Is the present value of a person related to time and to the narrative arc of their life? If so, how is the overall value of a life related to its last stages? What is a just distribution of scarce resources among young and old? How does the science of evolution impact the value of life’s last stages? The syllabus will include Helen Small’s The Long Life, Greg Bognar and Hirose Iwao’s The Ethics of Health Care Rationing, and Frances Kamm’s Bioethical Prescriptions. Prerequisite: two courses in philosophy at the 300 level or higher, or consent of the instructor. This course meets the department’s ethics requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Philosophy 414 - Advanced Topics in Contemporary Philosophy

One-unit semester course. See descriptions for prerequisites. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

Philosophy of Logic and Mathematics
One-unit semester course. We will examine central topics within and spanning the philosophy of logic and the philosophy of mathematics. Likely topics include mathematical Platonism, formalism, logicism, intuitionism, structuralism, conventionalism, Tarski’s theory of logical consequence, free logic, other nonclassical logics, and the status of second-order logic. Prerequisite: Philosophy 201 or one 300-level mathematics course, and one 300-level philosophy course, or consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Philosophy of Money
One-unit semester courseWhat is money? Is it a certain kind of stuff, or is it debt? Must money come from a state? Are cryptocurrencies a form of money? These are metaphysical questions, a subset of social ontology. But they are simultaneously anthropological-historical questions about the origins of money, economic questions about a certain natural kind, and disguised ethical questions about what money ought to be and whose interests it ought to serve. This course surveys answers to the questions above with the twofold goal of clarifying the nature of those questions and attempting to answer them. Prerequisite: two 300-level philosophy courses, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Meaning and Interpretation
See English 393: Meaning and Interpretation for description. Not offered 2022–23.

English 393 Description

Philosophy 415 - Major Figures in Philosophy

One-unit semester course. See descriptions for prerequisites. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

Descartes
One-unit semester course. A course on the philosophy of René Descartes primarily through close reading, study, and discussion of Descartes’s Meditations. Other works by Descartes are to be discussed occasionally, and some secondary literature is to be considered. Prerequisites: two 300-level courses in philosophy. This course applies to the department’s history of philosophy requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

David Hume
One-unit semester course. This course will study some of the major themes and problems from Hume’s work in philosophy of mind, epistemology, philosophy of religion, and ethics. Among the topics to be discussed are: the theory of ideas; skepticism about the external world and causation; arguments against miracles and the existence of god; the scope and nature of practical reason; and the nature of emotions. Prerequisites: Philosophy 201 and one 300-level philosophy course. This course applies to the department’s history of philosophy requirement. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Philosophy 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Philosophy 481 - Individual Work in Special Fields

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Prerequisite: approval of instructor and division.

Physics 101 - General Physics I

One-unit semester course. Calculus-based introduction to the classical mechanics of particles and systems—kinematics, laws of motion, conservation principles, rotational dynamics, oscillators. Corequisite: Mathematics 111 or equivalent. Lecture-conference-laboratory.

Physics 102 - General Physics II

One-unit semester course. Calculus-based introduction to electricity and magnetism, optics, and other topics at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite: Physics 101 and Mathematics 111 or equivalent. Lecture-conference-laboratory.

Physics 152 - Energy and Sustainability

One-unit semester course. This course will focus on the fundamental concept of energy, and its role in human society. Topics include the use of energy in daily life—transportation, heating, food, and electricity; sources and storage of energy—batteries, fuels, wind, solar, and nuclear energy; environmental impacts—air, water, and climate; and assessment of sustainability. The physics underlying each of these topics will be emphasized, and students will learn to quantitatively analyze and clearly communicate scientific information. Lecture.

Physics 164 - Stars and Stellar Systems

One-unit semester course. This course provides an introduction to the physics and astronomy of stars and stellar systems from an observational perspective. Topics covered will include stellar structure and energy sources, stellar evolution, binary star systems, and exoplanetary systems. Labs will consist of both evening telescope observation to collect data and computer labs to analyze these data and other publicly available data sets. Lecture-laboratory.

Not offered 2022–23.

Physics 201 - Oscillations and Waves

One-unit semester course. Damped and driven vibrations, coupled oscillators, and waves. Related mathematical methods are introduced: complex numbers, ordinary differential equations, linear algebra, and Fourier analysis. Weekly laboratories provide an introduction to basic electronics, from filters and voltage dividers to transistors and operational amplifiers. Prerequisite: Physics 101 and 102 and Mathematics 111 (or equivalent) and 112. Lecture- laboratory.

Physics 202 - Modern Physics

One-unit semester course. Introduction to thermal physics, special relativity, and quantum mechanics, with applications to atomic, nuclear, condensed matter, and particle physics as time permits. Weekly laboratories include an introduction to computational physics, the Millikan oil drop experiment, measurement of the speed of light, determination of Planck’s constant, the charge-to-mass ratio of the electron, and blackbody radiation. Prerequisite: Physics 201. Lecture- laboratory.

Physics 311 - Classical Mechanics I

One-unit semester course. Careful examination of the foundations and limitations of Newtonian mechanics leads to development of the Lagrangian formulation, variational principles, and Hamiltonian mechanics. Applications to the motion of rigid bodies, systems of coupled oscillators, and celestial mechanics are treated as time permits. Prerequisite: Physics 201 and 202 and Mathematics 201 and 202. Lecture.

Physics 321 - Electrodynamics I

One-unit semester course. Electrostatics and magnetostatics in vacuum and in matter, electromagnetic induction, force and energy in electrodynamics, Maxwell’s equations. Mathematical methods introduced include multivariable calculus and the solution of partial differential equations by separation of variables. Prerequisite: Physics 201 and 202 and Mathematics 201 and 202. Lecture.

Physics 322 - Electrodynamics II

One-unit semester course. A continuation of Physics 321, this course emphasizes time-varying electric and magnetic fields. Topics include radiation from point charges and dipoles; propagation of electromagnetic plane waves in vacuum and in matter; reflection, refraction, and dispersion; and the relativistic formulation of electrodynamics. Prerequisite: Physics 321. Lecture.

Physics 323 - Topics in Optics

One-unit semester course. Variable topics. Prerequisites: Mathematics 201 and 202 and Physics 201 and 202. Lecture-laboratory. May be repeated for credit.

Optics
One-unit semester course. This course examines theories of light and laser physics. Topics include ray propagation through optical components, interference, diffraction, polarization, Gaussian beam propagation, optical resonators, and atom-light interactions. In laboratory, students construct He-Ne lasers and utilize them to investigate laser physics. Prerequisites: Mathematics 201 and 202 and Physics 201 and 202. Lecture-laboratory. May be repeated for credit. Not offered 2022–23.

Quantum Optics and Quantum Information.
One-unit semester course. This course begins by applying quantum mechanics to simple optical systems consisting of small numbers of photons. It then uses these concepts to explore topics in quantum information science. An emphasis is placed on how quantum systems differ from their classical counterparts. Laboratory experiments include single-photon interference and tests of local realism. Prerequisites: Physics 201 and 202 and Mathematics 201 and 202. Lecture-laboratory. May be repeated for credit. Not offered 2022–23.

Physics 331 - Advanced Laboratory I

One-unit semester course. A study of advanced electronics and computer-assisted data acquisition and analysis intended to provide the student with a basis for understanding and designing laboratory systems used in contemporary experimental physics. Topics include operational amplifiers, filters, oscillators, logic circuits, and computer interfacing and analysis using a LabVIEW system. Prerequisite: Physics 201 and 202. Lecture-laboratory.

Physics 332 - Advanced Laboratory II

One-unit semester course. Guided and independent experimental investigations of physical phenomena using research-style measurement techniques. Prerequisite: Physics 331. Lecture-laboratory.

Physics 342 - Quantum Mechanics I

One-unit semester course. An introduction to quantum theory, beginning with the Schrödinger equation and the statistical interpretation of the wave function. One-dimensional applications, including the infinite square-well, the harmonic oscillator, and scattering; in three dimensions, the theory of angular momentum, central potentials, and the hydrogen atom; time-independent perturbation theory, spin, identical particles, and the Pauli exclusion principle. In general, this course concentrates on exact solutions to artificial problems, in contrast to Quantum Mechanics II, which develops approximate solutions to real problems. Prerequisite: Physics 201 and 202 and Mathematics 201 and 202. Lecture.

Physics 351 - Thermal Physics

One-unit semester course. Examines the essentials of probability and statistics, the kinetic theory of gases, statistical mechanics, temperature, equations of state, heat, internal energy, entropy, reversibility, and distribution functions. Prerequisite: Physics 201 and 202 and Mathematics 201 and 202. Lecture.

Physics 362 - Solid-State Physics

One-unit semester course. Crystalline lattice structures, vibrational modes, and electronic band theory are explored and used to explain the observed electrical, thermal, optical, and magnetic properties of solids. Prerequisite: Physics 201 and 202 and Mathematics 201 and 202. Lecture.

Not offered 2022–23.

Physics 364 - Selected Topics of Astrophysical Interest

One-unit semester course. Specific topics vary from year to year, drawn principally from the following areas: internal constitution, evolution, and death of stars; structure of galaxies; interstellar medium; radiative processes and cosmology. Prerequisite: Physics 201 and 202 and Mathematics 201 and 202. Lecture.

Not offered 2022–23.

Physics 366 - Elementary Particles

One-unit semester course. Introduction to the theory and phenomenology of elementary particle physics. The course includes a semihistorical overview, followed by relativistic kinematics, the Dirac equation, evaluation of simple Feynman diagrams, and a survey of the strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions from the perspective of gauge theory. Prerequisite: Physics 201 and 202 and Mathematics 201 and 202. Lecture.

Physics 367 - Computational Methods

One-unit semester course. Variable topics. Prerequisites: Mathematics 201 and 202 and Physics 201 and 202. Lecture. May be repeated for credit. 

Computational Methods
One-unit semester course. This course focuses on diverse physical problems and computational techniques that can be applied to them, with an emphasis on the mathematical motivation behind the methods. Problems are drawn from electrodynamics, quantum mechanics, classical mechanics, and special and general relativity. The course develops methods for solving ODEs and PDEs and integrating arbitrary functions in multiple dimensions. Numerical linear algebra is covered in both full and iterative form. Additional topics include nonlinear minimization, Galerkin methods, neural network models, and chaotic dynamics. Prerequisites: Mathematics 201 and 202 and Physics 201 and 202. Conference. 

Physics 411 - Classical Mechanics II

One-unit semester course. A continuation of Physics 311; specific content varies from year to year. Prerequisite: Physics 311. Lecture.

Physics 414 - Introduction to General Relativity

One-unit semester course. Students in this course will build enough geometric machinery to understand the mathematical formulation and physical significance of general relativity. Focus will be on field equations and particle motion associated with gravity. Predictions studied will be: perihelion precession, bending of light, gravitational redshift (among others), as well as current experimental tests. Exact solutions to Einstein’s equation and the strong field predictions for particle motion outside of static, rotating, and charged black holes will be considered. Prerequisite: Physics 311 and 321. Lecture.

Not offered 2022–23.

Physics 442 - Quantum Mechanics II

One-unit semester course. A continuation of Physics 342, specific content varies from year to year. The emphasis is on approximation techniques (time-independent and time-dependent perturbation theory, WKB approximation, variational principles, Born approximation), with applications to atoms, molecules, and solids, the quantum theory of radiation, and formal scattering theory. Prerequisite: Physics 342. Lecture.

Physics 470 - Thesis and Physics Seminar

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester. The thesis is independent work on an original problem and is intended as an introduction to research. In addition to the thesis project itself, all seniors are expected to participate in a weekly seminar in which various topics from the current literature are discussed.

Physics 481 - Special Topics in Physics

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Readings and laboratory work of an advanced character. Students will choose a field in which they are interested; they are expected to become familiar with the special instruments and methods of that discipline. Open only to juniors and seniors, by consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Political Science 220 - Introduction to Comparative Politics

One-unit semester course. This course surveys major topics and theoretical and empirical contributions in comparative politics. It addresses such issues as methodology, modernization and economic development, democracy and authoritarianism, political parties, participation, representation, social movements, accountability, institutions of government, ethnic violence, revolutions, and civil wars. Lecture-conference.

Political Science 240 - Introduction to International Relations

One-unit semester course. This course introduces the theoretical study of international relations, with a focus on structures, systems, and strategies. Students will learn to perform basic research and analysis through writing and thinking about events in international relations from different perspectives, including realism, liberalism, and feminism. Readings are drawn from historic and contemporary scholars of international relations, cover a wide variety of issues, and are grouped together in conflicting pairs where possible. Assignments and exams are a mixture of analysis and experiential learning. Lecture-conference.

Political Science 260 - Introduction to American Politics and Public Policy

One-unit semester course. This course provides an introduction to the processes of political decision making, political institutions, and the formation of public policy in the United States. The course introduces students to the basics of political decision making by a collective, including how individual actors (voters, politicians, policy makers) reason; how institutions constrain and shape action; and how policies are ultimately designed and implemented. There will be weekly lectures and individual conferences. Lecture-conference.

Political Science 280 - Introduction to Western Political Theory

One-unit semester course. This course offers an introduction to a Western tradition of political thought by way of major ancient (Plato and Aristotle) and early modern political thinkers (Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau) who are antecedents of contemporary political philosophy and social theory. It engages the latter through the work of Karl Marx, W.E.B. Du Bois, Simone de Beauvoir, and various living scholars, for critical leverage on the tradition. Lecture-conference. 

Political Science 300 - Junior Research Seminar

One-unit semester course. This course focuses on preparing students for political science research, particularly for thesis. Topics include shaping and framing a research question; constructing a literature review; concept formation and measurement; writing with style, clarity, and grace; and presenting results. All areas of inquiry in political science win be given ample coverage. Prerequisite: sophomore status in political science, environmental studies–political science, or international comparative policy studies­–political science, or consent of instructor. Conference.

Political Science 311 - Introduction to Quantitative Analysis in the Social Sciences

One-unit semester course. This course is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to conduct quantitative research in the social sciences. The course provides a hands-on approach to obtaining, managing, and using data. Students will learn how to formulate appropriate research questions, obtain relevant information, and input and analyze data using the R statistical program. Topics will include data acquisition, causal inference, measurement, graphical displays, and multivariate analysis. Students who have previously taken Economics 311, Sociology 311, or Mathematics 141 are discouraged from taking this course due to overlap in coverage. Lecture-laboratory.

Political Science 320 - Politics and Society in Latin America

One-unit semester course. This course combines normative theory, empirical research, and a historical perspective to examine key issues in Latin American politics critically. The topics covered in the class include 1) transitions from authoritarianism to democracy, 2) democratic consolidation and its challenges, 3) poverty and distribution, 4) inequality and the quality of democracy, 5) gender and political representation, 6) the resurgence of the left, and 7) the rise of competitive authoritarianism. The course focuses on the cases of Chile and Argentina. It also reviews politics and political events in several other countries in the region. Prerequisite: Humanities 110. Conference.

Political Science 321 - Latin American Politics

One-unit semester course. This course examines the dynamics of political, economic, and cultural change in contemporary Latin America. The course will focus largely in six countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Peru, and Venezuela. We will examine Latin American politics since the collapse of democracy and the establishment of military regimes in the 1960s and 1970s, through the return of democracy in the 1980s, the economic liberalization of the 1990s, and the contemporary turn to the left and rise of populism in the 2000s. The course will focus on the challenges that persistent inequality, poverty, corruption, clientelism, political violence, and the war on drugs pose to the quality and consolidation of these democracies. Whereas we will engage with some classical texts, most of the readings will be drawing on new research conducted in the region. Prerequisites: Students should have some familiarity with the history and geography of Latin America, as well as with comparative political science. Prerequisite: Political Science 220, 322, 324, or 327, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 322 - Social Movements

One-unit semester course. The goal of the course is to inquire about the causes and consequences of several historical and contemporary social and political movements. Studying social movements in the United States from the ’60s to the current Black Lives Matter movement, social movements in communist regimes in the Eastern Bloc and in Syria, and past and current social and political movements throughout Latin America, the course will assess the consequences these movements had in the political lives of the individuals and groups involved, as well as in the societies in which they took place. The course will conclude examining the political causes and consequences that give rise to different social movements across time and space. Prerequisite: Humanities 110. Conference.

Political Science 324 - Politics, Violence, and Human Rights in Latin America

One-unit semester course. This course combines normative theory, empirical research, and a historical perspective to critically examine human rights in Latin America. By reviewing civil, political, and economic rights in Argentina, Peru, and Chile, the course seeks to familiarize students with human rights in the region. To accomplish this goal, the course reviews human rights issues that have afflicted (and continue to affect) Latin American countries since the Cuban Revolution (1959). The topics covered in the class include the emergence, development, and disappearance of urban and rural guerrillas; transitions from authoritarianism to democracy; violations to human rights and their effects on the selected countries; the creation, work, and consequences of Truth Commissions; and drug cartels, violence, and human rights abuses in present day Mexico and Colombia. Prerequisite: Humanities 110. Students are expected to have familiarity with Latin American history. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 326 - Capitalism and Its Critics

One-unit semester course. What is the relationship between politics and economics? The course addresses this question in four parts. Its first part examines major systems of thought in relation to the historical development of capitalism. We will read the canon from Adam Smith to J.M. Keynes. The second part considers more recent writings, with a focus on the many (policy) issues that frame contemporary economic discourse such as value and profit, unemployment and the business cycle, competition, and investment. In part three, we will consider gender, race, and ecological critiques of capitalism. We will conclude by delving deeper into some of the “hot” topics in political economy today: oil and climate change, globalization and trade, and the politics of welfare. Throughout the course we will take up the following questions: Are we in an economic crisis? If so, what caused it? Where does unemployment come from? What role should the government play in the economy? Does welfare help or hurt the poor? Can poverty and inequality be eradicated? What alternatives exist to capitalism? This is a survey course and accessible to all majors and does not require previous knowledge of economics or politics. Prerequisite: Humanities 110. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 327 - The Politics of Poverty in Developing Countries

One-unit semester course. This course examines everyday politics in poor democracies. Elections enable voters to select leaders and to hold them accountable for their performance in office. Yet, in new democracies where a large number of voters are poor, their political participation could be effectively exchanged (bought) for favors. This course studies the political effects of electoral corruption in democracy by examining the emergence and consolidation of political machines, organizations that provide social services and jobs in exchange for votes. The course will study electoral corruption, clientelism, and machine politics in the early history of the United States, present-day advanced European democracies, Latin America, India, and Africa. Prerequisite: Humanities 110. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 329 - Latin American Social Movements

One-unit semester course. Social movements have often played key roles in Latin American politics. In the 1980s, grassroots movements against dictatorships raised hopes that poor and marginalized groups might spur processes of democratization and development. In the new democratic regimes, however, significant social and economic inequalities persist, marking political and social space in acute ways. This course explores the struggle by poor and marginalized groups for space, both theoretically and literally, through an examination of rural landless movements, Indigenous and Black movements, urban squatter movements, LGBT movements, and women’s movements in the region. In addition to seminar meetings, this course invites students to apply concepts from social movement theory to the study of a contemporary movement of their choice. Prerequisite: Humanities 110. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 331 - Money, Power, and the Politics of Finance

One-unit semester course. This course explores how the financial sector shapes politics, the economy, and our daily lives. We will begin with provocative accounts of the 1929 and 2008 financial crises to understand the complex, contradictory, and contentious nature of finance. Next, we will examine the history and ontology of finance—how did finance evolve from a dull banking industry into a dynamic financial system, most aptly represented by Wall Street? What are the building blocks of finance, its underlying logic? In the third section, we will explore how financial practices are inscribed in our daily lives and the world around us. Here we will move back and forth between the global North and the global South to investigate the sociopolitical structures that sustain financialization. In the final weeks, we will reflect on the political implications of a growing financial sector, specifically its effects on inequality and participatory democracy. We will use novels, TV shows, films, and scholarly writings to explore the power of finance. Prerequisites: Political Science 220, 240, 260, or 326. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 335 - Gender and Politics in Latin America

One-unit semester course. This course combines feminist theory and empirical research to examine gender and politics in Latin America. The course studies the workings of gender in the region over time. We discuss gender in laws and policies on marriage and divorce, regulations on reproduction and sexuality, child care, and political representation. We study how gender works within formal and informal institutions, the market, and international and domestic conflict to produce economic and status inequality. Finally, we consider the institution of normative heterosexuality and debates over gay marriage and LGBTQ rights. The course focuses on three main topics: (1) violence against women, (2) abortion decriminalization, and (3) political representation. Prerequisites: Humanities 110. Conference.

Political Science 336 - Natural Resource Politics

One-unit semester course. This course examines the political and economic consequences of natural resource wealth. We will use a mixture of theoretical overviews, historical analysis, and contemporary case studies to examine key questions such as: What is the resource curse and how can countries escape it? How do natural resources shape political institutions or regime type? What is the relationship between natural resources and conflict? How do natural resources shape the international political economy and interstate relations? How does natural resource management affect Indigenous rights and land use policies? We will first build a foundation for navigating these questions by scrutinizing the development paradigms that have prevailed in the global South since the Second World War. In addition to examining domestic consequences of natural resources, we will also devote considerable time to matters of international dependence and interdependence. Finally, we will address how ecological issues such as climate change intersect with economic and political ones and the complex issues of space exploration and Arctic drilling. The course will make extensive use of case studies in order to develop a contextualized understanding of how resource politics manifests on the ground. Prerequisites: Political Science 220, 240, 260, or 326. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 344 - International Environmental Politics

One-unit semester course. This course examines contemporary international environmental problems from theoretical and policy perspectives. What are the causes of environmental problems? What strategies do international actors use to attempt to address these problems, and which are most successful? What are the most pressing problems facing policymakers today? How do environmental issues create other problems in areas such as security and economics? In an attempt to shed light on these questions, this course analyzes structures, agents, and processes affecting the international environmental politics in the first part. The second part focuses on examining contemporary issue areas including the use of natural resources, overpopulation, pollution, energy use, global climate change, environmental security, and potential future problems. Prerequisite: Political Science 240. Conference.

Political Science 346 - International Political Economy

One-unit semester course. This course introduces students to key conceptual and substantive issues in international political economy. By surveying its major approaches and actors, students will first develop a theoretical understanding of IPE. The course will then cover three main issue areas: international trade, international finance and monetary regimes, and migrant labor. Students will critically engage with issues such as regionalism, antidumping disputes, preferential trade agreements, ongoing trade wars, financial and currency crises, exchange rate regimes, the role of central banks, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund and international labor laws. In the final section of the course, students will contemplate the future of the international economic order by interrogating corporate power, wealth and income inequality, and environmental crises. Prerequisite: Political Science 220, 240, or 260. Conference.

Political Science 347 - Politics of International Development

One-unit semester course. Why are some countries rich and others poor? Scholars have debated this question for decades, offering a plethora of answers, ranging from international trade agreements to domestic political arrangements. In this course, students will evaluate these debates by relying extensively on case studies. The course begins with the thorny question of what we mean by “development.” How does development differ from “human development”, and from the idea of “progress”? Answers to these questions will help set the stage for evaluating theories of development and the historical trajectories of national wealth accumulation. The majority of the course will be dedicated to interrogating how foreign aid, colonial legacies, international trade and finance, culture, geography, the state, private property rights, and regime type contribute to development. The final section of the course will consider the implications of development, focusing in particular on urbanization, wealth and income inequality and environmental destruction. Throughout the course, students will assess the validity of global versus domestic explanations, and consider the role of international institutions, global finance, non-governmental organizations, foreign governments and domestic actors in fostering or hindering development. Prerequisite: Political Science 220, 240, or 260. Conference.

Political Science 350 - Networks and Social Structure

See Sociology 380 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Sociology 380 Description

Political Science 359 - Weapons, Technology, and War

One-unit semester course. This course examines the historical evolution of the conduct of war from a theoretical and normative perspective. What elements of war have changed over time, and what core precepts remain the same? To what degree have advances in technology altered the conduct and outcomes of war? Why have some weapons been deemed cruel and inhumane at times and merciful at others? We will explore the interrelationships among military technology, society, politics, and war, asking how different forces have shaped warfare, focusing on how and why different weapons have been used (or prohibited) over time. Prerequisite: Political Science 240. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 365 - City and Local Politics

One-unit semester course. Cities and local governments offer a rich setting to explore conflicting narratives, processes, and outcomes. How and why do cities grow? How should local services be provided, regulated, and distributed? Who has access to the riches or burdens of urban development and growth? Why are cities the site of social conflict and change? This course will explore cities and local government from perspectives of governance, bureaucracy, and planning. In particular, the course examines the emergence of the modern city and the intersection with race and class. The course surveys models of planning and governance to better understand how cities have taken the form we find them in the United States. The course will also survey planning in the Portland and Oregon context. Prerequisite: one 200-level political science course or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 368 - Environmental Politics and Policy

One-unit semester course. The purpose of this course is to meld the science of environmental problems with the policy and politics surrounding them. Over the semester, we will cover the sources of environmental problems, the foundations of environmental policy, how environmental policy changes over time, the role of science and uncertainty, environmental policy in practice, and alternative routes towards addressing these issues. Throughout, we will focus on the conflicts that arise between the science of these problems, how they are perceived by the public and elites, and the role institutions play in addressing them. Prerequisite: any introductory political science course or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 371 - Identity Politics

One-unit semester course. The course explores the importance of identity politics in understanding American politics. The course utilizes an interdisciplinary approach that incorporates theoretical frameworks and empirical analysis to understand identity, mainly focusing on racial and ethnic identities. The course will proceed into three sections: First, we will discuss identity politics in theoretical ways. This includes different processes of identity politics, such as socialization, stereotyping, and discrimination. Second, we will explore how identity processes matter in various areas of American politics, including intergroup conflict and cooperation, public opinion, and public behavior. Third, we will specifically focus on Asian Americans, nationalism, and anti-immigrant sentiment associated with identity politics. A primary goal of this course is to provide students a foundation in understanding identity politics, guide them through critical thinking of identity politics in the U.S. context, and provide them with tools to generate research papers. Prerequisite: Political Science 220, 240, 260, or Sociology 211. Conference. 

Political Science 374 - Science, Technology, and Politics

One-unit semester course. Why or when should science play a role in policy debates? Why are certain scientific findings accepted over others in these debates? How can society manage the introduction of new technology and address possible risks that may emerge? To explore these questions, the course will explore the relationship between science and politics, how the two at times compete and depend on each other. Second, the course will investigate models of knowledge production and science to understand how we can study science in politics. Finally, the course will engage the challenge of technology. The implementation of science and policy is often found in choices around technology, and this course will engage ideas around managing emerging, risky, or uncertain technologies. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 375 - Disaster Politics and Policy

One-unit semester course. Disasters are the intersection of vulnerability, policy choices, natural systems, and our society. These events are often naturalized or seen as coming from outside of society. Disasters are often products of policy and political choices. These events are also opportunities for new policies to move to the front of the line. This course will examine several areas where disasters and politics interact. First, the course will explore models of disaster and risk as they relate to society. Second, it will examine the current law and policy that structure U.S. responses to disasters. While this is a U.S.-focused course, we will also have some opportunities for comparisons with other countries. Finally, the course will explore the role of disasters (real and imagined) that shape politics and policy making. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Conference.

Political Science 377 - Elections: American Style

One-unit semester course. Elections are fundamental to democratic government, but there seem to be as many variations in electoral institutions, party systems, and campaign styles as there are in democratic societies. In this course, we review the expansive literature covering elections, electoral rules, and electoral behavior in the United States. The course focuses on three main areas. First, we review the electoral process, covering presidential, congressional, state, and local elections. It includes the electoral law, rules and institutions, and election forecasting. Second, we will explore political campaigns, including the roles of advertising, polling, fundraising, news media, and political parties. Finally, we will examine individual and collective vote choice—why individuals choose to vote, how they integrate information from the political environment, and how they cast their ballots. Students should be comfortable with analytical and quantitative material since it makes up such a large portion of the literature in this area. Prerequisites: Political Science 260 and one course in statistics (Economics 311 or 312, Linguistics 337, Mathematics 141, Political Science 311, Psychology 348, Sociology 311, or comparable course). Conference. 

Political Science 382 - Body Politics

One-unit semester course. This course examines the politics of embodiment in relation to gender, race, class, sexuality, and ability. We consider how bodies are marked as deviant, abnormal, and/or pathological, and explore where processes of sexed, raced, gendered, and able-bodied normalization intersect and diverge. We engage conceptual and normative debates about controversial bodily practices (autonomy and alienation in prostitution and pornography; biocapital in surrogacy and organ donation; the self and genetic ancestry testing; the ethics of hunger striking and the weaponization of the body) from a range of perspectives: liberal humanist, radical and Marxist feminist, phenomenological and performative, intersectional and new materialist. Topics range from the marriage contract, domestic labor, and reproductive justice to turn-of-the-century sexology and the modern freak show, the science of homosexuality, the pleasures of trans and queer embodiment, and the biopolitics of AIDS. Conference.

Political Science 384 - Democracy and Data

One-unit semester course. This course explores the entanglement of democracy with data. We begin by historicizing “big data,” exploring the relation between statistics and statecraft, including the census and opinion polling. We then turn to three contemporary challenges associated with (really) big data: First, surveillance by corporations and states for governance, marketing, and control. Second, algorithmic prediction and decision-making, particularly as they relate to the construction of identity and the maintenance of inequality. Finally, information disorder in the digital public sphere and its implications for democratic self-government. Throughout, we will consider how big data and computational technologies might lead us to rethink central concepts in political theory, including consent and freedom; property and (self-)ownership; identity and difference; security, privacy, and the commons. Literature will be drawn from a range of disciplines, including science and technology studies, critical information and media studies, and the history of political thought. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 385 - Hannah Arendt and Origins of Totalitarianism

See History 375 for description.

History 375 Description

Political Science 390 - The Human Condition

One-unit semester course. This course undertakes a systematic study of Hannah Arendt’s The Human Condition (1958), both in its own terms and as a portal into the history of the modern West. We will examine the book’s architecture, along with its conceptual apparatus: earth and world alienation; the vita activa and vita contemplativa; the conditions of natality, mortality, and plurality; the activities of labor, work, and action; the realms of public, private, and the social. We will explore the contexts Arendt invokes—including the ancient world and early modern science—as well as those she doesn’t. That is, we will read in light of Arendt’s own experience: as a German emigre in Cold War America, writing in the shadow of the Nazi death camps and the atom bomb; witnessing the expansion of the welfare state, the acceleration of automation, and the launch of Sputnik. Finally, we will locate the work intertextually, critically assessing Arendt’s readings of Marx, Heidegger, and others. Prerequisite for history credit: Humanities 110. Conference. Cross-listed as History 343.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 391 - Islamic Thought in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

See Religion 321 for description.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 321 Description

Political Science 393 - Liberalism and Its Critics

One-unit semester course. In this course we explore contemporary political theory through critical engagement with works of prominent twentieth-century liberal thinkers and their critics. We address questions including: What makes a thinker liberal or not? What grounds different varieties of liberalism (religion, reason, power, pragmatics)? What is, or ought to be, the connection between liberal political philosophy, liberal justifications, and liberal institutions? We consider the topics of freedom, progress, knowledge, power, equality, law and institutions, the relationships between individual and community, democracy and liberalism, public and private, toleration and unity, difference and gender. We will focus on the positions in this literature regarding what political theory is and why and how we ought to do it. The focus will provide a critical lever for the evaluation of materials and will result in the writing of a major research project in political theory. Prerequisite: one introductory political science course and Humanities 110 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 394 - Sex, Gender, and Political Theory

One-unit semester course. This course provides an intensive study of Western political thought through the lenses of sex and gender. At least since Plato proposed abolishing the family in the name of justice, questions about sex, gender, power, and politics have been central to this tradition. Does biological difference matter in political life? Why or why not? Should it? Can it not? What is “sex”? What is “gender”? Is either, or are both, socially constructed or naturally existing? Can we change the way sex and/or gender figure into political life? Should we? Why or why not? What is “political”? What is “power”? We shall engage these questions with thinkers from Plato to Simone de Beauvoir, Harvey Mansfield, Judith Butler, Kimberlé Crenshaw, and Nancy Fraser. Prerequisite: Political Science 280, or one of Political Science 380 through 415, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 397 - Foucault: Power, Subjectivity, Truth

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to the work of one of the twentieth-century’s most influential thinkers, Michel Foucault (1926–84). We begin with his “genealogical” studies, Discipline and Punish and The History of Sexuality vol. I, focusing on the relationship between power, knowledge, and subjectivity in modernity. We will also address questions of method, including the influence of Nietzsche. Turning to Foucault’s lectures at the Collège de France in the latter half of the 1970s, we will consider how biopower, apparatuses of security, and neoliberal governmentality intersect in the contemporary politics of mass incarceration, digital surveillance, and pandemic response. Finally, we will assess Foucault’s “ethical turn” (the care of the self, an aesthetics of existence, and parrhesia or fearless speech) in terms of its possibilities and limitations for political thought and action. Throughout, we will attend to a variety of challenges posed by Foucault’s critics, including historians (on how we think, write, and deploy history); critical theorists (on the legacy of the Enlightenment); and feminists (on oppression, agency, and liberation). Prerequisite: Humanities 110. Conference.

Political Science 403 - Hegel and Marx

One-unit semester course. This course examines the principal political writings of Hegel and Marx. Much emphasis will be placed on Hegel’s Philosophy of Right and its conceptual and historical foundations. Readings from Marx will include Critique of Hegel’s Philosophy of Right, Paris Manuscripts, Theses on Feuerbach, German Ideology, Capital, and Critique of the Gotha Program. Contemporary ideas on the question of Hegel and Marx will be traced in various writings, including those of Habermas and Althusser. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 405 - Judgment

One-unit semester course. How are particulars subsumed under, or otherwise connected with, universals? The problem of judgment is treated with respect to a range of related concepts: taste, rhetoric, phronesis, interpretation, common sense, and the like. The initial texts are Kant’s Critique of Judgment and Gadamer’s Truth and Method. Particular issues emerging from these texts are treated variously in the writings of Arendt on politics, Dworkin and Fish on textual interpretation, Habermas on communication, and Oakeshott on conversation. All of these issues bear on the broad question of rationality, objectivity, and human understanding. Conference.

Political Science 409 - “Being and Time” and Politics

One-unit semester course. An exploration of the political implications of Heidegger’s ontology, understood primarily as a phenomenology of mind. We will begin by considering some of the contexts of Heideggerian thought through an examination of Husserl’s Cartesian Meditations, and we will end by tracing certain aspects of its moral and political influence both in the writings of Levinas and Arendt and in the more recent critical literature on the question of Heidegger and National Socialism. Our principal task, however, will be to pursue a close and systematic study of Being and Time, focusing on central elements of its conceptual apparatus, including, for example, notions of entity and world, care and concern, anxiety and resoluteness, temporality and death, history and the state. Prerequisites: Humanities 110 or equivalent. Conference.

Political Science 442 - Nuclear Politics

One-unit semester course. This course investigates the origins and effects of the spread of nuclear weapons and power at international and domestic levels. It begins with a discussion of the morality of nuclear technology, the motives different states have for obtaining it, and the problems with intelligence on states’ progress. It continues with asking what nuclear strategies have been and should be used, then moves to sociological critiques of conventional understandings of nuclear weapons as well as debates over the safety of such weapons. The latter half of the class concentrates on case studies of a variety of programs, including proliferation networks and terrorism. Prerequisites: junior standing and Political Science 240, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 444 - Global Catastrophic Risks

One-unit semester course. This course investigates the politics of global risks—challenges, some created by humans and others by nature—that have the potential to drastically alter human civilization, the planet, or life itself. Such “apocalyptic” risks include extreme climate change, ecological catastrophes, global pandemics, nuclear war, artificial intelligence, and asteroid impacts. The course will analyze these nascent Armageddons using a variety of theoretical perspectives including the precautionary principle, the social construction of risk, normal accidents theory, and concepts of high-reliability operations. Prerequisites: junior standing and Political Science 240, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 469 - Food Politics and Policy

One-unit semester course. This course examines the intersection of the political, social, economic, and ecological systems surrounding the production and consumption of what we generally call “food.” The dimensions of the semester-length study of food and food policy ask questions related to the modes of agricultural production—including policies that promote production for the sake of production, the rise and subsequent bureaucratization of the organic movement, and impacts of animal welfare and husbandry tactics. However, interlinked with these modes of production are socioenvironmental implications of consumption in the form of nutrition standards, food deserts, food justice, and the impacts of so-called locavores. The course will explore structures designed to govern food systems across a variety of federal, state, and local jurisdictions. Students will get an overview of food system components, key policies and policy instruments used to govern the food system, influential institutions and policy actors, and emerging food system trends. Prerequisites: sophomore standing, Political Science 260 (previously numbered Political Science 210 and 250), and one upper-division political science or environmental studies–history course. Conference. Previously numbered Political Science 420.

Not offered 2022–23.

Political Science 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Political Science 481 - Independent Reading

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing and approval of instructor and division.

Psychology 101 - Foundations in Psychological Science

One-unit semester course, taught by several faculty members in the department. This course provides an overview of current topics in the field of psychology. Topics include human development, language, learning, memory, motivation, neuroscience, perception, psychopathology, and social behavior. Concept labs and applied labs will address the descriptive and experimental aspects of the topics covered in the lectures. Lecture-laboratory.

Psychology 200–210 - Psychological Science Labs

Courses offered in a seven-week sequence (offered first or second half of semester). Each lab section examines research methods and current topics in various subdisciplines of psychology. Students gain hands-on experience carrying out psychological experiments, leading group discussions, and preparing written and/or oral research presentations. Students register for at least one-half unit in a semester, which includes one lab in each quarter. Note: students who plan to major in psychology would typically register for one full unit over the course of the semester, which would require two labs in each quarter. Not all topics offered every year.

Psychology 200 - Methods in Health Psychology

Quarter-unit half-semester course. This course explores the biological, psychological, and social factors involved in the process of health behavior change using the major theories and models of health behavior. Students will engage in a self-directed behavior modification project on a health behavior of their choosing (e.g., improving sleep hygiene, moderating alcohol intake, reducing screen time, increasing physical activity). Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or concurrent enrollment in Psychology 101. Conference-laboratory. See Psychological Science Labs, above.

Psychology 201 - Methods in Behavioral Pharmacology and Neuroscience

Quarter-unit half-semester course. This course will investigate the basic principles of neuropharmacology and neural science with an emphasis on brain systems and synaptic mechanisms implicated in behavior. Laboratories will include experimentation using animal models. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or concurrent enrollment in Psychology 101. Conference-laboratory. See Psychological Science Labs, above. 

Psychology 202 - Methods in Cognitive Neuroscience

Quarter-unit half-semester course. An investigation into the neural basis of perception, attention, and consciousness. The current research literature will be explored in depth and students will be introduced to experimental techniques including behavioral psychophysics and EEG/ERPs. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or concurrent enrollment in Psychology 101. Conference-laboratory. See Psychological Science Labs, above.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 203 - Methods in Learning and Comparative Psychology

Quarter-unit half-semester course. An exploration of basic principles of learning and behavior across species. Students will be exposed to the latest concepts and methods in the field via discussion and hands-on experimentation, and will learn how to collect, analyze, and interpret animal and human behavior in a comparative context. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or concurrent enrollment in Psychology 101. Conference-laboratory. See Psychological Science Labs, above.

Psychology 204 - Methods in Educational Psychology

Quarter-unit half-semester course. A focus on the application of psychological science to issues of motivation in educational contexts. Students will be introduced to the primary literature and learn to use a variety of methodologies (e.g., quantitative, qualitative) for understanding how motivational processes operate across development. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or concurrent enrollment in Psychology 101. Conference-laboratory. See Psychological Science Labs, above.

Psychology 205 - Methods in Psycholinguistics

Quarter-unit half-semester course. An introduction to research design and computer programming to investigate language processing. Reading primary literature about a well-known psycholinguistic phenomenon, students will be introduced to computer programming, allowing them to design and implement their own study investigating a follow-up question. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or concurrent enrollment in Psychology 101. Conference-laboratory. See Psychological Science Labs, above.

Psychology 206 - Methods in Psychopathology

Quarter-unit half-semester course. This course will explore the use of laboratory-based experimental techniques to examine issues related to the etiology, expression, and treatment of psychiatric conditions. Students will apply methodologies from psychological science to better understand psychopathology across development. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or concurrent enrollment in Psychology 101. Conference-laboratory. See Psychological Science Labs, above.

Psychology 207 - Methods in Social Psychology

Quarter-unit half-semester course. This section examines the ways individuals think, feel, and act in social situations. Students will read the primary literature, learn about current empirical methods to approach social psychological questions, and conduct original empirical research. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or concurrent enrollment in Psychology 101. Conference-laboratory. See Psychological Science Labs, above.

Psychology 208 - Methods in Cognitive Psychology

Quarter-unit half-semester course. In this course, students will be familiarized with some basic cognitive processes and cognitive resources such as working memory, long-term memory, concepts, visual imagery, and reasoning. In addition to reading and discussing the primary literature, students will also become familiar with data collection and data analysis methods. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or concurrent enrollment in Psychology 101. Conference-laboratory. See Psychological Science Labs, above.

Psychology 209 - Methods in Psychology of Music

Quarter-unit half-semester course. In this course, students will discuss primary literature and will learn about methodologies and investigate issues used to explore the psychology of music. Students will have the opportunity to apply research-based skills and become familiar with data collection and data analysis. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or concurrent enrollment in Psychology 101. Conference-laboratory. See Psychological Science Labs, above.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 210 - Methods in Applied Measurement

Quarter-unit half-semester course. In this course, students will consider some of the challenges that arise when trying to measure psychological quantities. Following an introduction to measurement in the abstract, students will perform data collection and quantitative exercises to gain insight into how a variety of standard psychological measures function, including achievement tests, personality inventories, and diagnostic scales. The course will conclude with a demonstration of the challenges of working with observational data, especially when assessing causal claims. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or concurrent enrollment in Psychology 101. Conference-laboratory. See Psychological Science Labs, above.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 217 - Neuroscience of Consciousness

One-unit semester course. This course offers an introduction to the scientific study of consciousness by examining the neural basis of perception, action, and various states of consciousness. Topics will include the impressive capabilities of unconscious perception and action, the relationship between attention and awareness, neural correlates and causes of conscious perception, disorders of consciousness, dreams and altered states of consciousness, neural representations of the self who is conscious, consciousness in nonhuman animals and artificial systems, and the evolution of consciousness. Conference.

Psychology 221 - Animal Models of Addiction

One-unit semester course. This course provides an introduction to various models used to study addiction-like behaviors in nonhuman animals. Specifically, this course will focus on the complexities associated with modeling and translating both licit (e.g., alcohol) and illicit (e.g., cocaine) drug use and abuse, as well as behavioral addictions such as gambling and exercise, in animals such as monkeys, rats, and prairie voles. We will also explore models of individual variation that capture genetic susceptibilities to developing drug addiction and relapse propensity. The utility of these models to assess abuse potential of new drugs by pharmaceutical companies is also described. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 223 - Political Decision-Making

One-unit semester course. This course will offer an introduction to some basic concepts within social psychology and principles of judgment and decision-making in order to explore human attitudes and behavior in a specific context: politics. Specifically, this course will address theories of group dynamics and attitude change and explore how and why political groups often develop and maintain extreme beliefs. This course will include exploration of the phenomena of terrorism and antisocial behavior in relation to politics, as well as bias in the context of politics. This course is anticipated to expose students to a diversity of political views inside the classroom and contain discussion of sensitive topics. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 224 - Introduction to Data Science in Psychology

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to data science, machine learning, and artificial intelligence in psychology. Students will be introduced to a wide range of topics, including data gathering and cleaning, machine learning implementation, feature analysis, and the ethical considerations for the application of machine learning. Students will get an introduction to RapidMiner, python using Jupiter notebooks, and visualization libraries using Seaborn. Lecture-conference-laboratory.

Psychology 225 - Psychology of Stress and Resilience

One-unit semester course. The goal of this course is to give an overview of the theoretical and empirical work on stress, coping, and resilience. Topics will include the neurobiology of stress (e.g., the HPA axis, the immune system), chronic disease (e.g., cardiovascular disease, cancer), mental health (e.g., depression, anxiety), ecological stressors (e.g., social and community factors, catastrophes), common life stressors (e.g., work, interpersonal conflict), and diversity-related stressors (e.g., racism, heterosexism). Conference.

Psychology 232 - Socialization of the Child

One-unit semester course. This course will focus on the socialization process—the ways in which children’s behaviors and personalities are shaped by their relationships to parents, peers, and the larger cultural context. Specific topics will include theory and research on emotional attachment to parents, the origins of friendship and prosocial behavior, aggression and bullying, the development of morality, the socialization of self-control, and the role of teachers and schools. Lecture-conference.

Psychology 241 - Judgment and Decision-Making

One-unit semester course. How do people make judgments and decisions (and can we do better)? We will survey classic and current research in the field of judgment and decision-making to answer this question. The course draws on research from cognitive psychology (memory, biases, and heuristics), economics (rationality), and a little neuroscience (neural substrates of choice) to provide an introduction into this growing interdisciplinary area of research. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 251 - Group Identities and Intergroup Relations

One-unit semester course. Why do humans organize in groups, and how does being aware of our group identities shape our attitudes, perceptions, and action, especially in the context of relations with those from outside our groups? We will encourage a critical look at some of the classic and contemporary theoretical explanations concerning the influence of group identities on a variety of intergroup outcomes, including, but not limited to, (a) intergroup perceptions, (b) the link between in-group love and out-group hate, and (c) responses to group disadvantage. The goal is to understand the psychology behind numerous group-based outcomes, including those that may seem counterintuitive or irrational at first glance. Conference.

Psychology 319 - Psychology of Addictions

One-unit semester course. This course will examine the psychology of addiction to substances, such as alcohol, nicotine, and narcotics, and to behaviors, including gambling, eating, and seeking pornography. We will explore historical and cultural attitudes toward addictions, theories of addiction along with related empirical findings, physical and psychosocial consequences of addictions, and prevention and treatment models. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 322 - Social Psychology

One-unit semester course. An examination of psychological theory and research concerning the ways in which people think, feel, and act in social situations. Conferences will focus on areas of basic social psychological research and theory, including social cognition, attribution, impression formation, social interaction, intergroup and interpersonal relationships, and social influence. Special issues addressed in the course are stereotyping and prejudice, the self within the social context, and applications of social psychology to social problems. Opportunities for students to plan and conduct empirical research are available. Prerequisite: Psychology 101, or consent of the instructor. Conference-laboratory.

Psychology 323 - Motivation in Educational Contexts

One-unit semester course. An overview of theory and research on motivation as it applies to educational contexts, focusing primarily on school-aged children. Why do some students focus on learning while others only care about getting the grade? How do rewards affect motivation? Why does failure sometimes debilitate and other times invigorate? How do we perceive our own academic abilities and how does this affect our self-worth? Where do these motivational processes come from and how do they develop? This course will draw on social, developmental, educational, and cognitive psychology as we address questions about achievement motivation. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Conference.

Psychology 324 - Health Psychology

One-unit semester course. This course explores the dynamic interplay of biological, psychological, and social factors in health and disease. Major topics include psychosocial and contextual influences on health and behavior; the design and evaluation of individual treatments and population interventions; stress and coping; psychosocial effects of disease; physician-provider communication; health services utilization and adherence. Emphasis on theory, research design, and causal inference. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or consent of the instructor. Conference-laboratory.

Psychology 325 - Stereotyping and Prejudice

One-unit semester course. This conference is an analysis of psychological theory and empirical research on stereotyping and prejudice. The course explores the development and causes of intergroup perceptions and antagonism, reasons for the persistence and prevalence of stereotypes and prejudice, ways in which feelings and beliefs about groups influence social perception and interaction, and possible ways to change group stereotypes or reduce prejudice. In examining these issues, conferences consider both the ways that individuals perceive themselves as members of groups and the ways that they perceive other groups. Students conduct original empirical research. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Conference.

Psychology 330 - Comparative Cognition

One-unit semester course. An overview of current research and theory in comparative cognition—the scientific study of cognitive functioning from an evolutionary perspective. The course will emphasize continuities and discontinuities between humans and other animals in basic psychological processes, including decision-making, problem-solving, remembering, symbolic and relational learning, awareness, and communication. We will read and discuss the primary literature, with special emphasis on experimental issues and comparative methods. Prerequisite: Psychology 101, or Biology 101 and 102, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 333 - Behavioral Neuroscience

One-unit semester course. An examination of the neural basis of behavior with a focus on brain anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, and neural modeling. Specific topics include the organization and function of the nervous system, neuronal signaling, sensorimotor physiology, appetitive motivation, drug reward, neuroplasticity, epigenetics, and neuropathology. Laboratory includes mammalian brain dissection and experimentation using animal models. Prerequisite: Psychology 101, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-laboratory-conference.

Psychology 336 - Neuropsychology

One-unit semester course. We will explore models of normal higher cognitive functions based on evidence obtained from brain-damaged individuals and compare it with that obtained from intact individuals or from animal models. We will review functional neuroanatomy as it relates to higher cognitive functions, as well as methods and techniques used in the field. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 337 - Psychophysiology

One-unit semester course. This course is a survey of the basic theoretical, methodological, and applied issues in the field of psychophysiology. Psychophysiology is the branch of psychology concerned with the complexity of links between the mind and body and is of prime importance in understanding how psychological and socio-environmental experiences can influence health and disease. The course will consist of conferences and hands-on laboratory experience collecting and analyzing psychophysiological data. The fundamentals of specific systems will be covered, such as the cardiovascular, central nervous, immune, and endocrine systems, as well as measures such as EMG, ECG, EGG, and heart rate. Applications to psychopathology, health psychology, and behavioral medicine will also be explored. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference-laboratory.

Psychology 342 - Language and Thought

One-unit semester course. An examination of theory and research on the relation between language and cognitive processes. The course begins with the observation that languages differ dramatically in their semantic partitioning of the world. Does such variation cause speakers of different languages to perceive the world differently? Or do linguistic differences illuminate underlying commonalities in human cognition? We will critically evaluate classic and current research on these questions, focusing on the relation between semantic structure and conceptual structure in the domains of color, space, time, number, and theory of mind, among others. Our goal will be to understand the psychological mechanisms by which language reflects and shapes the way we think. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Conference.

Psychology 347 - Statistical Modeling for Applied Research

One-unit semester course. This course is designed to provide an overview of the Bayesian approach to building statistical models, with an emphasis on writing code in order to conduct applied research. The resulting models will be suitable for inference, prediction, and virtual experiments performed by simulation. Topics will include multivariate linear and nonlinear regression, model selection using information criteria, numerical parameter estimation, and multilevel modeling. Prerequisites: Psychology 348, Mathematics 141, Economics 311, or Sociology 311, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 348 - Statistical Analysis for Psychology

One-unit semester course. This course is designed to introduce the basic concepts, logic, and methods of research design and data analysis used in psychological research. Central questions include how to select, perform, and interpret statistical techniques while emphasizing the application of these techniques to students’ own research projects. Topics include descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, t-tests, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, and correlational techniques. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Lecture-laboratory.

Psychology 351 - Psychopathology

One-unit semester course. This course focuses on description, conceptualization, etiology, development, and prognosis of maladaptive functioning. We examine theories and research about the origin and development of specific mental health disorders, including experimental, correlational, and cross-cultural research, and case studies. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Psychology 353 - Affect and Emotion

One-unit semester course. This course will examine the psychological study of affect and emotion, including both historical approaches and current research. This course will concentrate on research stemming from social, cognitive, and personality psychology, theories, concepts, and evidence from evolutionary psychology and neuroscience. Topics will include the origins of affect, core affect, moods, emotional valence, discrete emotional regulation, and the influence of emotions on judgments and decisions. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 361 - Developmental Psychology

One-unit semester course. An examination of theory and research on psychological development through the lifespan focusing primarily on cognitive and social growth in the childhood years. This course begins with an overview of theoretical frameworks and research methods specific to the study of development. We then explore chronologically the development of the individual through five major periods of life: infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Conference-laboratory.

Psychology 366 - Cognitive Processes

One-unit semester course. An overview of the scientific study of human cognition—how people perceive, remember, categorize, communicate, represent, and reason about the world. We will examine classic and current empirical research in light of contrasting theories that characterize the mind as an information-processing device or as an embodied system. Conferences will focus on discussion of the primary literature, with special emphasis on the logic of experimental design, critical analysis of opposing findings, and real-world applications. Throughout the semester, students will work in small groups to design and carry out an empirical research project. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Conference-laboratory.

Psychology 367 - Social Cognition

One-unit semester course. The subfield of social cognition focuses on the cognitive mechanisms responsible for a variety of social thoughts, behaviors, and interactions. This course will examine key theories, concepts, and findings in social and cognitive psychology relevant to social cognition. Topics will include dual process theory, semantic processing, heuristics and biases, priming, affect, memory and metacognition. This course will also cover the development and history of social cognition within the field of psychology. Due to both the breadth and depth of the literature in social cognition, we will not be able to cover everything in class. I have selected key findings I believe are broadly demonstrative of the research in this field and are relevant to our everyday lives. Prerequisites: Psychology 101, and either Psychology 322 or 366. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 373 - Learning

One-unit semester course. We will undertake a systematic examination of the factors governing learned behavior, with emphasis on the relationship of animal to human behavior. Topics include learning through associations, selection by consequences, and modeling; drug addiction; discrimination and concept formation; choice and self-control; voluntary action and free will; and verbal behavior. Experimental methods and analyses are emphasized. Prerequisite: Psychology 101, or Biology 101 and 102, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference-laboratory.

Psychology 374 - Functional Variability

One-unit semester course. Much of psychology involves a search for predictable relationships, i.e., for deterministic laws. But variable and unpredictable behavior is often functional. Creativity, problem-solving, exploration, scientific discovery, learning, voluntary (or free-willed) actions, self-control, mindfulness, and many other competencies may depend in part upon ability to vary thoughts and behaviors. This course is grounded in behavioral studies on variability but brings together research and discussions from different perspectives on the study of functional variability. We will explore how behavioral variability arises (its elicitation, motivation, and reinforcement); how it is explained (including chaotic and stochastic theories); and influences on it (including neurological injury, psychopathologies, drug states, age, and states of consciousness). Prerequisite: Psychology 101, or junior or senior standing, or consent of the instructor. Conference-lecture.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 381 - Sensation and Perception

One-unit semester course. In this course students will investigate how the nervous system detects, analyzes, and creates meaning from environmental stimuli. The course explores the anatomy, physiology, and function of the sensory cells and the brain nuclei involved in various sensory modalities including vision, audition, olfaction, and touch. It investigates how these cells work in concert to produce a seamless perception of colors, textures, flavors, sounds, and smells. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Lecture-laboratory.

Psychology 393 - Psycholinguistics

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to the study of the human language-processing system, and how it is organized to produce and comprehend language. We will study speech perception, lexical access, and sentence processing in the context of language acquisition, bilingualism, sign language, and brain function. Basic linguistic concepts will be covered. Students are expected to design and carry out a research project. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or Linguistics 211, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference-laboratory. 

Psychology 412 - Cognitive Science Research: Thinking in Practice

One-unit semester course. An in-depth examination of how people think, reason, and communicate about the world around them, emphasizing hands-on experience with research methods and statistical analysis in cognitive science. The course has two complementary objectives: to study thinking in practice—cognition about real-world issues—by critically evaluating the primary research literature, and to practice the study of thinking by designing and carrying out collaborative research projects. Students will learn techniques for measuring cognition explicitly and implicitly, for analyzing everyday discourse as a window into the mind, and for conducting open, reproducible science. Prerequisite: Psychology 342 or 366, or consent of instructor. Conference-laboratory.

Psychology 415 - Learning and Comparative Research Methods

One-unit semester course. A systematic exploration of research methods in human and animal learning and cognition from a comparative perspective. Structured laboratory exercises are designed to provide students with hands-on experience in experimental and quantitative analysis used by investigators in the field, with special emphasis placed on the unique conceptual and methodological challenges of comparing behavior across species. Conferences will focus on critical examination of the primary research literature, emphasizing experimental issues and comparative methods. Prerequisite: Psychology 330 or 373. Conference-laboratory.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 417 - Attention and Consciousness Research

One-unit semester course. This course offers an in-depth look at the scientific study of consciousness by exploring research into the neurophysiology of attention and perception, and by addressing relevant theoretical considerations from neurophilosophy. Central questions will include: How can the electrical firing of neurons produce subjective experience? What types of brain processes establish the contents of consciousness, the continuity of consciousness, and the self who is conscious? How does neural activity differ for conscious versus unconscious processing? Students will critically examine the research literature and work in small groups throughout the semester on independent research projects. Prerequisite: Psychology 217, 334, or 381. Conference-laboratory.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 422 - The Social Self

One-unit semester course. This course is an analysis of classic and current theory and research on the self within the social context. We examine the complex interplay of the self with situational factors to affect intrapersonal and interpersonal outcomes. Conferences focus on the content, structure, and organization of the self; personal and social identities; implicit and explicit views of the self; motives of the self; self-protection and coping with self-uncertainty; self-regulation; the self within close relationships; and cultural models of the self. Students conduct original empirical research on the social self. Prerequisites: Psychology 101 and either Psychology 322 or 355. Conference-laboratory.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 433 - Behavioral Neuroscience Research

One-unit semester course. An advanced-level course designed to provide comprehensive and in-depth exposure to the methods and protocols used in neuroscience research. This includes brain dissection, stereotaxic surgery, neurohistology, and drug-receptor interactions. Conferences will focus on an examination and critical analysis of primary research materials as well as discussion of ethics in animal-based research. Prerequisite: Psychology 333 or consent of the instructor. Conference-laboratory.

Psychology 434 - Advanced Topics in Neuropharmacology

One-half-unit semester course. The course focuses on the molecular, biochemical, and behavioral characterization of neuroactive drugs by investigating their actions on cells, circuits, and receptor mechanisms. Methods of research in behavioral pharmacology will also be examined. Prerequisite: Psychology 333 or consent of the instructor. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

Psychology 439 - Psycholinguistic Research: Bilingualism

One-unit semester course. This course focuses on theory, design, and methods of psycholinguistic research specializing in the study of bilingualism. We will consider developmental, neuropsychological, cognitive, linguistic, and sociolinguistic theory and data, with an emphasis on psycholinguistic and cognitive neuroscience methods applied to the study of bilingualism. Topics include developmental aspects; cognitive consequences of bilingualism; bilingual memory; bilingual brain representation and aphasia; lexical access and language processing in bilinguals; and the notion of a critical period in second-language acquisition. Students will work in small groups to conduct empirical research projects throughout the semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 393. Conference-laboratory.

Not offered 2022–23.

Psychology 442 - Clinical Psychology

One-unit semester course. We will discuss design and methodological issues related to studying the effectiveness and efficacy of psychological interventions. We examine theory and research for various schools of psychotherapy, including psychodynamic, existential-humanistic, behavioral, and cognitive-behavioral interventions, with brief coverage of multicultural, family, child, and group approaches. Students participate in fieldwork in off-campus facilities related to mental health. Prerequisites: Psychology 101 and 351 and junior or senior standing. Students who have not completed Psychology 351 should contact the instructor for permission to enroll in this course. Conference-laboratory.

Psychology 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester. Theses in psychology will include empirical research—experimental, observational, or data analytical. Under unusual circumstances the requirement for empirical research may be waived by the department.

Psychology 481 - Individual Work in Special Fields

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, and approval of the instructor and the division.

Religion 112 - Introduction to Shinto through Anime

One-unit semester course. This course will introduce students to Japan’s “indigenous” religion by exploring the enchanted universe of Shinto through a popular cultural lens. We will utilize the rich trove of manga and anime as a window into a world full of gods and ghosts that still affects everyday life and politics in Japan. Students will encounter full-length feature movies such as Princess Mononoke, Spirited Away, or Onmyoji, anime series such as Spice and Wolf or Mushi-shi, and manga series such as Dream Saga. In so doing, you will playfully learn about the structure and function of temples and their relationship to local communities, the connection between Japan’s political elite and kami worship, miko and bodily possessions, and the complex relationship between Buddhism and Shinto. At the same time, we engage in these popular cultural materials as a means to problematize the modern yet anachronistic construction of Shinto as a “national” religion that is thought to preserve and reflect “authentic” and “essential” aspects of what it means to be Japanese. Conference.

Religion 115 - Introduction to Chinese Religions

One-unit semester course. This course introduces fundamental features of several religious traditions in China. We will focus on the idea of ritual as a transformative tool and observe its manifold manifestations in three religious communities: Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism. We will encounter such diverse practices as ritualized self-immolation, moral self-cultivation, and biospiritual self-cultivation. These techniques are all linked to the idea that a ritual performance may trigger a transformative process in practitioners and/or their surroundings. In our case, they transform practitioners into an enlightened being (Buddhism), into a sage ruler that may magically attract people from near and far (Confucianism), and into a powerful catalyzer that exudes the nourishing and ordering powers of the cosmos (Daoism). While this course is a general introduction to Chinese religions, it is also a course in critical thinking. Drawing upon examples from premodern China, we will consider ways people have thought about their worlds and have acted on those thoughts in the world. We will also examine the ways other people (including ourselves) have thought about those people’s ideas and activities. To inspire such moments of reflection, we will regularly engage in experiential and experimental exercises as a means to create moments in which one may personally and sensually relate to some aspects of these religious practices. Hence, we strive to learn from these religious communities’ distinctiveness in this course in order to engage with our own prejudices and convictions, a transformative goal we may only achieve through direct involvement with their practices and ideas. Lecture-conference.

Religion 121 - The Rise and Formation of Islam

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to the rise and formation of Islam as a prophetic religious tradition. Focused thematically on revelation, empire, ritual, and tradition, it examines the emergence of Islam in late antiquity and studies the development of Muslim intellectual traditions and sociopolitical institutions through the eleventh century. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 123 - Islam in the Modern World

One-unit semester course. This course introduces students to how Muslim institutions and conceptions of authority changed in the modern era in relation to such historical developments as industrialization, scientific progress, European colonialism, the rise of nation-states, and feminism. Readings include literary works and autobiographies of Muslims from different cultural backgrounds as well as ethnographies and historical studies of social groups and institutions. Conference.

Religion 131 - Introduction to Hinduism

One-unit semester course. This conference will explore the foundations and developments of the South Asian religion called Hinduism. Our sources draw from the vast corpus of mythic and epic literature: cosmogonic Vedas, philosophically speculative Upanishads, duty-focused (dharma) epics, and later devotional (bhakti) poetry. Through primary sources as well as ethnographic accounts of diverse lived traditions we will familiarize ourselves with several gods, goddesses, heroes, ideas, and practices that persist throughout South Asian history. Conference.

Religion 132 - Introduction to South Asian Buddhism

One-unit semester course. This course is designed to explore the foundational “three jewels” of Buddhism: the Buddha, the dharma (the teaching), and the samgha (the Buddhist community). This survey of Buddhist thought and practice in its Indic context will introduce various philosophical and practical currents that have made an indelible mark on the variety of Buddhisms historically practiced throughout the world. The emic “three jewels” framework will organize our inquiry: special attention will be given to 1) the centrality of the Buddha biography; 2) the canonical teachings, speculative abhidharma literature, philosophical systems of the Mahāyāna, and scholasticism; and 3) the practical impact of the samgha in history, including Buddhist nationalism and activism today. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 141 - Christianity: The First Seven Centuries

One-unit semester course. The course serves as an introduction to the Christian religion in the ancient world until the rise of Islam. After an introduction to the earliest Christian writings, translated from the Greek, Latin, Coptic, and Syriac, the course traces the development of Christian institutional forms, the religion’s manifold interpretive strategies and theological debates, its ritual practices and associated material cultures, and its expansion from its origin in Roman Iudaea eastward to the greater Middle East, the Indian subcontinent, and China; southward to Egypt and the Horn of Africa; and westward to Europe and North Africa. The course assumes no prior knowledge of the Christian religion and is open to first-year students. Lecture-conference.

Religion 151 - Introduction to Judaism

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to the self-definition of Judaism. The course will analyze Judaism’s understanding of itself by examining such central concepts as God, Torah, and Israel. This central self-definition will then be tested by close readings of selected representative texts and investigation of the varieties of Jewish history, as manifested in such phenomena as mysticism, sectarianism, and messianism. Lecture-conference.

Religion 201 - Theories and Methods in the Study of Religion

One-unit semester course. An introduction to various interpretive frameworks and methodological issues that inform religion as a critical, reflexive, academic discipline. Texts pertaining to the definition and scope of the inquiry and methods of investigation will be critically engaged and their applicability tested with an eye toward their utility for understanding religion and religious phenomena. Prerequisite: Humanities 110 and at least one 100-level course in religion. Lecture-conference.

Religion 215 - Religion, Race, and Ethnicity

One-unit semester course. In 1999 Charles H. Long noted that “there is a complex relationship between the meaning and nature of religion as a subject of academic study and the reality of the peoples and cultures who were colonized...” This course seeks to explore that complexity through critical reflection on religion and race in three contexts: religion and ethnic reasoning before modernity; the intertwined emergence of religion and race as elements of the modern social imaginary in Western Europe; and recent works on religion and race in the American context that directly engage religious studies research methodologies and critical theories. Prerequisite: Humanities 110. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 225.

Religion 226 - Islam in America

One-unit semester course. This course will examine the history of Islam in America from the colonial period to the aftermath of 9/11. Through examination of select primary sources, the course will contextualize the phenomenon of American Islam at the intersection of American religious history and modern Islamic history. It will inquire into how the history of American Islam could enrich conventional understandings of religious pluralism in the United States and the relationship between Islam and modernity. Topics to be discussed include the relationship between race, ethnicity, and religion in the United States; the influence of comparative theology and religious studies on American conceptions of religious diversity; the relationship between missions, colonialism, and industrialization in the late nineteenth century; the role of Islam in the civil rights movement in the United States and in nationalist movements in Muslim-majority societies; and the rise of militant Islam as a matter of global concern. Prerequisite: Humanities 110, sophomore standing, or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 226.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 242 - Christianity: Between the Ancient and the Modern

One-unit semester course. The course serves as an introduction to geographically diffuse and culturally diverse Christian literatures in the period and to a variety of associated ritual practices, material cultures, and institutional forms. Particular attention will be paid to Christian-Muslim relations, the flourishing of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, the evangelization of northern and eastern European peoples, and the emergence of the practice of vernacular preaching and theological writing in Western Europe. The course is open to first-year students. Prerequisite: Religion 141. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 259 - Jews across the Americas

See English 303, Jews across the Americas, for description.

English 303 Description

Religion 311 - Death and the Afterlife in East Asian Religions

One-unit semester course. In this conference, we will learn about spectacular heavens, grotesque hells, elaborate Buddhist burial rites, Confucian ancestor devotion, and the secret to Daoist immortality. Death and the afterlife are instructive lenses for understanding what cultures value most and how they see the world. We will draw from visual and material culture, religious texts, and rituals to explore how cultures in East Asia deal with issues of dying, death, the afterlife, and memorialization. Though some attention is paid to the differences between Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism, this course is organized thematically in order to highlight resonances and shared understandings within the three traditions. The six themes of the course are: (1) humanity’s place in the cosmos, (2) karma, merit, and rebirth, (3) deathbed rituals and “good death,” (4) heavens, immortality, and Buddha lands, (5) hells and gender, and (6) ancestor devotion. Prerequisites: Religion 112, 115, 116, 131, 132, 201; or Humanities 231, or 232; or with consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 312 - The Body in Daoism

One-unit semester course. The body! There is probably no other phenomenon in the world that is as directly experienceable and tangible as our own physique, yet at the same time disconcerts and remains opaque to us due to its oftentimes unforeseeable and hardly controllable responses. In this course, we won’t try to conclusively solve the question about what the corpus truly is. Instead, we will use the diversity of responses the body has triggered throughout human history and engage in conceptualizations of sex, body, and gender that are quite distinct to our modern-day perceptions. In particular, we will explore early and medieval Daoist visions of the corpus as a micro replica of the cosmos and its effect on various practices such as inner alchemy, techniques of the bedchamber, Chinese medicine, and mountain-and-water paintings. We will use these perspectives as an opportunity to question our own understandings that are mainly influenced by a dichotomy between the body and soul/mind as developed in a Euro-Christian context and its materialization in the modern disciplines of medicine and psychology. We will delve into Daoist conceptualizations of sex, body, and gender in order to understand the emphasis and some of the limitations of our own preconceived notions that are far from being universal or exhaustive, yet heavily determine our actions. For students with background in classical Chinese, this course offers opportunities to read original texts in extra sessions. Prerequisite: Religion 115 or 116, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Religion 314 - The Zhuangzi, A Daoist Classic

One-unit semester course. The Daoist classic Zhuangzi, a collection of sayings and short anecdotes attributed to the mysterious Master Zhuang Zhou (trad. 369–286 BCE), has deeply influenced cultural life in East Asia. Considered to be one of the most important texts in Chinese religious and cultural history, it triggered a wide range of discourses on the nature of the universe and good living while informing diverse practices such as calligraphy, landscape painting, poetry, drama, Daoist ritual, Zen Buddhism, sitting meditation, and politics. In this course, we engage in both the Daoist classic’s multifaceted content and its diverse reception over the last two millennia. In the first half, we read the Zhuangzi as a primary source, focusing on its short philosophical vignettes on the possibility and limits of knowledge and language, its humorous anecdotes that celebrate deformed and useless bodies, and its youthful invectives against Confucians, as well as its powerful calls to live a creative and independent life as a recluse. In the second half, we will encounter concrete responses to the Zhuangzi in the form of commentaries, paintings, plays, ritual manuals, performances, and comic books that exemplify the scripture’s far-ranging cultural impact. This course provides both a focused and multifaceted avenue to the cultural history of East Asia and a personal experience of the life-changing appeal and topicality of the text. For students with background in classical Chinese, this course offers opportunities to read original texts in an extra session. Prerequisite: Religion 115 or 116, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 321 - Islamic Thought in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

One-unit semester course. A chronological survey of Islamic thought during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Focusing on conceptions of God and of the ideal human relationship with God in selected Muslim religious and political writings, the course will analyze the interrelation between sociohistorical and theological developments in the Islamic tradition during this period. The geographical focus of the course will be primarily on the Middle East and South Asia. Among the authors whose theologies we will examine in depth are: Sayyid Ahmad Khan, Muhammad Iqbal, Abu‘l-A‘la Mawdudi, Jamal ad-Din Afghani, Muhammad ‘Abduh, Sayyid Qutb, ‘Ali Shari‘ati, and Ruhallah Khomeini. Prerequisite: Religion 121 or 123, or consent of the instructor. Prerequisite for students taking the course for political science credit: Politicial Science 280 or one political science political theory course (numbered 380415). Conference. Cross-listed as Political Science 391.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 322 - Semantics of Love in Sufism

One-unit semester course. Sufism broadly refers to a complex of devotional, literary, ethical, theological, and mystical traditions within Islam. More specifically, it refers to the activities associated with institutionalized master-disciple relationships, which define the paths (turuq) through which Muslims have sought experiential knowledge of God. In both the broad and narrow sense of Sufism, love has been a prominent means of Sufi self-representation. In this course we will explore the ideas and practices semantically associated with love in the Sufi tradition and analyze the ways in which these ideas and practices have both shaped and been shaped by individual lives, religious institutions, and sociocultural contexts. Prerequisite: Religion 121 or 123. Conference. 

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 327 - Erasure and Location of Muslims in Western Humanities

One-unit semester course. This course inquires into how the erasure and forgetting of the connections Muslims have historically created between Europe, Africa, and Asia have been central to the making of the idea of the West. Using Reed’s iconic humanities program as a case study, in the first half of the course we explore the making of racialized and civilizational humanities “general education” courses as a framing mechanism for understanding and explaining the modern era. Here we work to theorize the concept of erasure and understand its significance in shaping contemporary conceptions of religious, racial, and cultural differences. In the second half of the course, we aim to locate Muslims within the context of the exchanges and rivalries that have historically and genealogically connected Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Drawing on recent advances made in the study of religion, we work to conceptualize a more cross-cultural and global approach to the humanities. Students who have previously taken Religion 227 should not enroll in this course. Prerequisite: Humanities 110, sophomore standing, or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 327.

Religion 331 - Lives of the Buddha

One-unit semester course. This course trains attention on the central story at the heart of the Buddhist tradition: the biography of the (historical) Buddha Siddhartha Gautama, as rendered in narrative and material forms. We will explore the role of hagiography, narrative, and epic poetry (kāvya) in creating and sustaining Buddhist thought and practice. Our sources include the first-century Sanskrit Buddhacarita, the fifth-century Pali Jātakanidāna, the twelfth-century Pali Jinalankara, and the twentieth-century Nepal Bhasa Sugata Saurabha, as well as bountiful sculptural examples from Buddhist sites in India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka. We will ask, What do the variety of retellings and representations reveal about the concerns and aspirations of their respective communities? We will find that the category of “biography” extends beyond the representation of a singular life, in terms of both content (previous lives are included) and form, as biography is the vehicle that conveys Buddhism’s central teachings, the dhamma. Prerequisites: Religion 132 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 333 - Arousing Faith in Hinduism and Buddhism

One-unit semester course. This course explores the affective domain of religion, training attention on the literary and material cultures that prompt and sustain Hindu and Buddhist devotional practices. An emphasis will be on the close reading of primary sources: stūpas and temples that inspire pilgrimage; the creation, use, and interpretation of devotional images of a vast pantheon of deities, Buddhas, and bodhisattvas; and literature in translation (including canonical Buddhist jātaka tales, Amitāyurbuddhānusmrti Sūtra, and seventeenth-century poet Alagiyavanna Mukaveti; from Hindu sources, the Bhāgavata Purāna, poetry of the sixth- through ninth-century Vaishnava Alvars, Jayadeva’s twelfth-century Gītagovinda, and modern poetry). Prerequisite: Religion 201, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 334 - Gender and Buddhism

One-unit semester course. In this conference, we will consider the ways in which categories such as “woman,” “man,” “ubhatovyanjañaka” (“intersex”), “paṇḍaka,” “feminine,” “masculine,” “gender,” “nun,” and “monk” have been explained and imagined by Buddhist communities through various historical and cultural locations. We will begin with an examination of early Buddhist sources, including depictions of the Buddha as a sexualized “bull of a man,” and the stories surrounding the founding of the nun’s order and the songs of women saints (Pāli Therīgāthā). We will then explore gender(ed) imagery in Mahāyāna sources, with a focus on the gender transformation of the bodhisattva Avalokiteśvara in India to Guānyīn in China and Kannon in Japan, as well as the feminine principle envisioned by Tibetan Vajrayāna traditions. Key questions drive our inquiry: how do Buddhists, especially those who have taken vows, understand theoretical and practical tensions inherent in the Buddhist tradition? How do sacred images relate to social realities? Prerequisites: Religion 132 and 201, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Religion 335 - South Asian Religious Nationalisms

One-unit semester course. This conference will explore legends and legitimacy, specifically the use of Hindu theologies and mythologies in the formation and perpetuation of South Asian religious nationalisms. By examining how nationalist discourse invokes and applies historical and theological sources, we will question layers of legitimacy, and explore how and why religious narratives and mythically-infused histories are conceived, preserved, explained, and employed. Sources range from pre-independence novels to political treatises, classical religious texts to modern documentaries. Issues to consider include: How is religion used to explain or justify political action? How do images operate in augmenting the discourse? What is the broader context of postcolonial identity formation? What is the impact of Subaltern Studies on historiography and religion? Prerequisites: Religion 131 or 132 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 336 - Buddhist Ethics

One-unit semester course. This conference will consider theoretical structures, patterns of behaviors, and societal norms operative in Buddhist communities of the past and present. We will begin with shared doctrinal foundations of Buddhist ethics, key elements and values that represent a thread of continuity among Buddhist traditions. Our focus will be on canonical formulations and examples from various genres of Buddhist literature, historical and contemporary accounts of Buddhist behaviors and motivations along thematic lines: Buddhist morality; foundational concepts (such as karma, four noble truths, the practical path or Middle Way); the three marks of existence—namely dis-ease, impermanence, no-self; key practical values; human rights; social ethics; sexuality; gender; abortion and contraception; medical ethics; war, terrorism, and peace; economic ethics; Engaged Buddhism; and animals and the environment. Our goal is to develop a sophisticated lexicon and confidence in our understanding that enables as to delve deeply into primary case examples, literary, documentary, scholarly, or other in nature. We seek to understand the ways Buddhist ethics shape, sustain, and reflect Buddhist worldviews and lives. Prerequisite: Religion 132 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Religion 341 - Ascesis in the Benedictine and Orthodox Monastic Traditions

One-unit semester course. The course focuses on a complex set of literary, communal, and embodied practices concerned with training and self-regulation, or ascesis, that promises the possibility of self-transformation and an experience of God. With an eye toward understanding contemporary Benedictine and Orthodox Christian monastic thought and practice, the literature of ascesis will be explored in a number of contexts: the late ancient Mediterranean; the medieval West and Byzantium; and the United States, Russia, and Greece in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Academic theories of asceticism and works addressing social-historical contexts will provide the basis for critical reflection and sustained comparison. Prerequisite: Humanities 110 and Religion 141 or 201, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 345 - The New Testament

One-unit semester course. Although the works comprising the canonical New Testament represent but a fraction of the extant ancient writings that attest to Christian origins, the task of understanding them has long been a discrete field for students of Christian antiquity. This course serves as an introduction to various modes of critical New Testament study and offers students the opportunity to explore the five major classes of works in the collection: the Epistles of Paul, the synoptic Gospels and Acts of the Apostles, the Deutero-Pauline epistles, the Catholic epistles, and the Johannine literature. Prerequisite: Humanities 110 and Religion 141 or 201, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Religion 348 - Works of Mercy in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Christian Traditions

One-unit semester course. This course focuses on historically important examples of Christian literature that are concerned with alleviating human suffering caused by poverty, disability, and various forms of social exclusion. With an eye toward an understanding of contemporary Roman Catholic and Eastern Christian thought and practice concerning works of mercy, contemporary scholarship addressing social-historical contexts and theoretical concerns will provide the basis for critical reflection and sustained comparison. Prerequisite: Humanities 110 and Religion 141 or 201, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 349 - Christian Mysticism: Foundations

One-unit semester course. This course provides an introduction to foundational texts in the Christian mystical tradition that is centered on the thought of Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite. The course situates Pseudo-Dionysius within the social-historical environment and the main intellectual currents and contemplative practices of the premodern Mediterranean world. Prerequisites: Humanities 110 and Religion 141 or 201, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 352 - Moses in Abrahamic Religions

One-unit semester course. This course explores the role and significance of Moses in Abrahamic traditions. The course begins with an investigation of the biblical Moses and the symbiotic development of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in the late antique milieu through study of the development of the golden calf narrative. The course then turns to an investigation of Sigmund Freud’s final book Moses and Monotheism, and a number of authors’ responses to this work. The sub-genre of religious studies dedicated to debating Moses and Monotheism provides a rich entry point to discussing such central questions as: Who owns Moses? and What role do religions and religious figures continue to play in today’s world? Prerequisite: Religion 201. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 356 - Modern Jewish Thought

One-unit semester course. Hope for a future time of perfection constitutes a leading theme in modern Jewish thought. The idea of the future, whether construed in secular terms as utopia, communism, or Zionism or expressed as a traditional belief in the Messiah, whether Orthodox or Lubavitcher, is a feature shared by otherwise disparate sectors of Jewish thought, and therefore is a fruitful object of study in understanding the range of twentieth-century thinking as expressed in a Judaic idiom. Course materials will derive from Marxist, Zionist, neo-Kantian, Lubavitcher, and other sources, in addition to those of philosophers and theologians. What does this orientation to the future mean? Why is it a central feature not only of Jewish thought, but also of Jewish social organization? How do we make sense of our questions from the perspective of religious studies? What does this twentieth-century thought and action tell us about Jewish strategies for the twenty-first century, for understanding present Jewish thought in a post-9/11 world? Prerequisite: Religion 201 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 358 - Classical Jewish Mysticism

One-unit semester course. This course studies the background, development, and ramifications of Kabbalah, with emphasis on the ways in which this central Jewish mystical tradition originated and evolved. Particular attention will be given to both rabbinic and non-rabbinic sources of Kabbalah. These sources will be examined by means of the primary practice of the course, the close reading of selected representative texts. Prerequisite: Religion 201 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Religion 362 - Religion and Media

One-unit semester course. This course addresses contemporary theories that attempt to explain the current intersections of religion and media. The primary focus will be on media theory which is arguably the most dynamic new approach in Religious Studies. Such theorists as Niklas Luhmann, Friedrich Kittler, and Vilém Flusser have laid the foundations for media theory today, following on the limited advances of such pioneers as Marshall McLuhan. Cybernetics, cognitive science, and systems science are each now contributing to the third stage in the development of a media theory of religion. The first half of the semester will be devoted to the foundational media theories of Marshall McLuhan, Niklas Luhmann, Friedrich Kittler, and Vilém Flusser. In the second half, we will look at case studies in religious evolution in the present age of rebelief. The operating assumption will be that the phenomena of so-called globalization and so-called fundamentalism are both functions of a primary media process, namely digitalization. Case studies to pursue will include artificial intelligence, transhumanism, the merging of communications and technology, the history of technology as religious evolution, and the history of communications as religious evolution. Prerequisite: Religion 201. Conference.

Religion 365 - Understanding Religion

One-unit semester course. This course provides students with an opportunity to consider religion from a variety of perspectives employed in the contemporary study of religion. Evidence for religion and religions will be examined from multiple traditions, geographical locations, and historical periods, but the course is not intended to be a survey of “world religions” or a historical overview of classic books in the academic study of religion. Instead, exemplary humanistic and social scientific approaches to the study of religion will provide a basis for empathetically exploring religious self-understandings while critically examining them within larger social, political, cultural, and epistemological contexts. Prerequisite: Humanities 110. Conference.

Religion 382 - Special Topics in Jewish History: Jewish Mysticism

Full course for one semester. This course is a research seminar devoted to the investigation of a particular topic in Jewish history. Prerequisite: Religion 201. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

Religion 402 - The Junior Seminar in Religion

One-unit semester course. This course offers intensive study of a particular topic, drawing on various methodologies in the study of religion. While the course is intended to prepare department majors for the senior program, it is open to all qualified students. Prerequisite: junior standing, Religion 201, and three additional courses in religion, or departmental permission. Conference.

Religion 470 - Thesis and Religion Symposium

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Religion 481 - Individual Work in Special Fields

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Prerequisite: approval of instructor and division.

Russian 120 - First-Year Russian

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester. Essentials of grammar and readings in simplified texts. The course is conducted in Russian as much as possible. Conference.

Russian 220 - Second-Year Russian

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester. Readings, systematic grammar review, verbal drill, and writing of simple prose. The course is conducted in Russian and is intended for students interested in active use of the language. Prerequisite: Russian 120 or placement based on results of the Russian language exam. Conference.

Russian 266 - Russian Short Fiction

One-unit semester course. Intended for lower-division students, this course is devoted to close readings of short stories and novellas by such nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Babel, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Askyonov, and Tolstaya. Our approach is twofold. First, we attempt “open” readings, taking our texts as representatives of a single tradition in which later works are engaged in a dialogue with their predecessors. Second, we use the readings as test cases for a variety of critical approaches. Conducted in English. An additional weekly session will be scheduled for students taking the course for Russian credit. Meets English departmental requirement for 200-level genre courses. Prerequisite: students who wish to take the course for Russian credit must have completed Russian 220 or obtain the consent of the instructor. Cross-listed as Literature 266. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 300 - Advanced Russian: Language, Style, and Culture

One-unit semester course. This course is designed to meet the needs of students striving to reach an advanced level of competency in reading, speaking, listening, and writing in Russian. The course expands and deepens the student’s understanding of expressive nuances of Russian through a study of select lexical, morphological, syntactical, and rhetorical features and through an examination of their contextual usage in appropriate target texts—fiction, journalism, and mass media—and corresponding cultural matrices. Case study materials include both classic and contemporary texts as well as classic Soviet films. Course assignments include reading and translation, grammar review, structured composition exercises, and oral presentations. The course is conducted in Russian. Prerequisite: Russian 220, or by placement examination. Conference. May be repeated for credit.

Russian 325 - Multicultural Russia

One-unit semester course. This course focuses on identity politics and the diversity of cultural expression in the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the post-Soviet states. We will analyze works of literature, film, and the visual arts from regions considered “peripheral” to the Russian heartland: Central Asia, the Caucasus, Siberia, the Russian Far North, the Baltics, and Eastern Europe. Additionally, we will consider works by African American and Turkish writers who spent time in the Soviet Union and were allied with the Soviet cause. Additional theoretical readings, scholarly literature, and historical documents will introduce students to Russia’s non-Western intellectual and aesthetic traditions and aid in an exploration of the ways in which ethnic, national, racial, and class-based identities were imagined, codified, performed, and enforced by institutions and individuals. The course is conducted in English, but an additional weekly session will be scheduled for students taking the course for Russian credit. Prerequisite for Russian credit: Russian 220 or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as Literature 325.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 351 - Introduction to Russian Poetry

One-unit semester course. The course covers the history of lyric poetry in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature and its main representatives, trends, genres, and movements. Special attention will be paid to the construction of the prophetic image of the poet and poetry’s role in shaping the overall Russian and Soviet culture. Among poets to be studied are Derzhavin, Pushkin, Baratynsky, Tiutchev, Nekrasov, Blok, Akhmatova, Pasternak, Mandelstam, Tsvetaeva, Zabolotsky, Slutsky, Evtushenko, Brodsky. The course also serves as an introduction to poetics and poetic analysis. Prerequisite: Russian 220 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 362 - Red Sci-Fi: Science Fiction in Soviet Literature and Film

One-unit semester course. Though working behind the Cold War “iron curtain,” post-World War II Soviet writers and filmmakers were preoccupied with the same ideas and questions as their Western and American counterparts, often working in parallel genres. One such genre was science fiction, which became enormously popular in the Soviet Union starting in the mid-1950s. Relying on the rich tradition of the 1920s, the postwar writers and filmmakers used science fiction to reflect on urgent societal and philosophical issues. In the presence of state censorship and official ideology, science fiction became the venue for veiled and subversive critique of the regime. In this course, through reading and watching major works of Russian sci-fi fiction and cinema, we will explore how they imagined artificial intelligence and time travel; space exploration and alien species and transformations of gender and race; the quest for immortality; and the nuclear apocalypse. We will situate these works in their immediate artistic and cultural contexts and the wider, primarily American, comparative context of postwar science fiction. Readings and screenings from the Strugatsky brothers, Alexander Beliaev, Evgeny Zamyatin, Mikhail Bulgakov, Andrei Tarkovsky, Kir Bulychev, Sever Gansovsky, and others. All readings, screenings, and discussion in English. An additional weekly session will be scheduled for students taking the course for Russian credit. Prerequisite: students who wish to take the course for Russian credit must have completed Russian 220 or obtain the consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 362.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 363 - Film Adaptation: When Kurosawa Met Dostoevsky

One-unit semester course. Since the invention of cinema at the turn of the twentieth century, the relationship between literature and film has been one of the most central, contentious, and fruitful aspects of cinematic history, aesthetics, and production. What happens when a fictional text is adapted to screen? How important is the film’s faithfulness to the original literary work? Is cinema secondary to literature or can screen and page be on equal footing? Does adaptation constitute an interpretation or a betrayal of the primary source? These are some of the chief questions we will examine in this course through studying an array of cinematic adaptations produced in Europe, Asia, and the United States in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will watch and analyze films by such directors as Lina Wertmuller, Robert Bresson, Luchino Visconti, Orson Welles, Paul Mazursky, John Huston, Akira Kurosawa, Grigory Kozintsev, and based on the works of Fyodor Dostoevsky, Nikolai Gogol, Leo Tolstoy, Anton Chekhov, Franz Kafka, William Shakespeare, I. B. Singer, James Joyce, Raymond Chandler, Patricia Highsmith, and Philip Roth, among others. We will study each film in its historical and cultural context and read the work on which it is based, scrutinizing the relationship between the two. Students will also be introduced to some of the key texts of adaptation theory which will frame the class discussions. An additional weekly session will be scheduled for students taking the course for Russian credit. Prerequisite: students who wish to take the course for Russian credit must have completed Russian 220 or obtain the consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 363.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 365 - Kiev, Odessa, and the Steppes: Ukrainian Imagination and Russian Literature

One-unit semester course. Russia’s war against Ukraine compels us to examine and revisit the complex and rich history of Ukrainian-Russian coexistence and the prominence of Ukrainian imagination in Russian literature. This course will accomplish this goal by studying how Ukrainian spaces; characters; historical events, including such catastrophes as Holodomor and the Holocaust; and philosophies of identity were constructed and portrayed by eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century writers. We shall begin with the old documents originating from Kievan Rus, the birthplace of Ukrainian and Russian civilizations, and proceed with the eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century works of various genres, including short stories, poetry, novels, and philosophical essays. Among the writers we shall study are Grigorii Skovoroda, Alexander Pushkin, Nikolai Gogol, Marko Vovchok, Anton Chekhov, Mikhail Bulgakov, Vladimir Jabotinsky, Alexander Kuprin, Isaac Babel, Osip Mandelstam, Eduard Bagritskii, Vasilii Grossman, Boris Slutskii, Konstantin Paustovskii, Anatolii Kuznetsov, Friedrich Gorenstein. Prerequisite: students who wish to take the course for Russian credit must have completed Russian 220 or obtain the consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as Literature 365.

Russian 371 - Russian Literature and Culture from Medieval to Romantic

One-unit semester course. How did Russian literature come into being? This course traces the complex, culturally diverse, and perpetually contested history of the Russian literary tradition from the late ninth century to the early nineteenth century. Although our primary focus will be on written texts produced in Kievan Rus’, Muscovy, and the Russian Empire (including chronicles, saints’ lives, autobiographies, travelogs, drama, poetry, and prose), we will also analyze oral tales, religious art and architecture, and a variety of ceremonial and decorative objects. Class discussions, readings, short written assignments, presentations, quizzes, and a multistep research paper are designed to provide students with contextual knowledge and systematic training in close reading and guided critical strategies. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have a working knowledge of the major cultural, historical, and intellectual currents that paved the way to the “Golden Age” of Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. Conducted in English. An additional weekly session will be scheduled for students taking the course for Russian credit. Prerequisite: students who wish to take the course for Russian credit must have completed Russian 220 or obtain the consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 371.

Russian 372 - Russian Literature: Realism

One-unit semester course. This course is an introduction to the major writers, movements, genres, and works of Russian literature from the early nineteenth century to the immediate prerevolutionary era. With a primary focus on the emergence of realism and its associated thematics, this course includes works of fiction by Turgenev, Goncharov, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Leskov, and Chekhov, as well as letters and essays by their contemporaries. Secondary readings will offer additional contextual information and critical perspectives on these works and their role in the continued development of a national canon. All readings will be in English translation, and class meetings will be conducted in English. An additional weekly session will be scheduled for students taking the course for Russian credit. Prerequisite: students who wish to take the course for Russian credit must have completed Russian 220 or obtain the consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 372.

Russian 373 - Modern Russian Literature from Chekhov to the Present

One-unit semester course. Survey of the modern Russian and Soviet short story and novel, exploring the evolution of these genres in relation to historical and cultural developments and considering a variety of critical approaches. Readings include the prose of Chekhov, Gorky, Bely, Babel, Olesha, Teffi, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Solzhenitsyn, Ginzburg, and Pelevin. Conducted in English. An additional weekly session will be scheduled for students taking the course for Russian credit. Prerequisite: students who wish to take the course for Russian credit must have completed Russian 220 or obtain the consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as Literature 373.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 387 - Jewishness and Cinema

One-unit semester course. This course is devoted to representations of Jewishness, Judaism, and the Holocaust in twentieth- and twenty-first-century cinema. Produced in various countries at various crucial historical points, Jewish film provides a unique window onto the study of intersections between ethnic identity and cinema, trauma and cinema, and religion and cinema. Consisting of different genres, from drama to musical comedy to adaptation, it invites diverse theoretical and comparative formal, cultural, and sociological approaches. We will begin with Yiddish cinema, produced in the United States, Poland, and the Soviet Union in the 1930s, and move on to the early Holocaust films of the late 1940s and ’50s, produced also in both Europe and the United States. We’ll investigate constructions and representations of Jewishness on Soviet, American, European, and Israeli screens from the 1960s until the present day, paying special attention to the many relevant cinematic, cultural, and historical contexts. Among the topics to be discussed are anti-Semitism, assimilation, Black-Jewish relations, Arab-Israeli conflict, and gender. The directors to be studied include Maurice Schwartz, Edgar Ulmer, Aleksander Ford, Alexei Granovsky, Alexander Askoldov, Elaine May, Sidney Lumet, Paul Mazursky, Chantal Akerman, Amos Gitai, Stanley Kubrick, and Spike Lee, among others. Conducted in English. An additional weekly session will be scheduled for students taking the course for Russian credit. Prerequisite: students who wish to take the course for Russian credit must have completed Russian 220 or obtain the consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as Literature 387.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 388 - From Lenin to Putin: Soviet Experience and its Aftermath through Film, Literature, and Human Document

One-unit semester course. This course explores Soviet culture and its aftermath in Russia through the prism of human experience. In our interdisciplinary approach to history, we will study films and works of literature, as well as personal documents, such as diaries and memoirs, looking for reflections in them of Soviet and post-Soviet people’s experience and subjectivity. How were the lives and identities of ordinary people affected by the revolutions, utopian ideology, totalitarian government, political terror, and partial modernization? The themes include the reforms of calendar; organization of industrial time; city and house planning; communal living; pedagogical undertakings (the concept of New Men and Women); regulating family, sexuality, and gender; living through terror and forms of resistance to it; the decline and fall of the Soviet Empire as lived experience. We will conclude with surveying main social, cultural, and political developments in post-Soviet Russia. Our primary sources will include both artistic masterpieces (films by Sergei Eisenstein, Dziga Vertov, Alexander Dovzhenko, Larisa Shepitko, Andrei Tarkovsky, and Alexander Sokurov; writings by Isaac Babel, Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Anna Akhmatova, Lydia Ginzburg, and Svetlana Alexievich) as well as testimonial and personal writings. All readings and discussions will be in English. An additional weekly session will be scheduled for students taking the course for Russian credit. Prerequisite: students who wish to take the course for Russian credit must have completed Russian 220 or obtain the consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as Literature 388.

Russian 390 - Russian Culture under Putin: Resistance and Conformity

One-unit semester course. This course examines major cultural developments in Russia over the last two decades—the developments that took place in a conservative social climate and under the pressure of increasingly repressive government policies. We will discuss heterogeneous materials: works of literature (both fiction and nonfiction), film, poetry, performance art, journalist and scholarly writings, TV, and internet texts. As we explore both Russian “highbrow culture” and “mass culture,” we will pay special attention to both the techniques of conformity and strategies of resistance, as adopted by the Russian creative class. Among the topics which we will address are historical memory and its manipulations, new nationalism, corruption and its impact on society, economic inequality and cultural divisions, Russian versions of artistic and political postmodernism, and the cultural politics of gender and sexuality. All readings and discussions in English. An additional weekly session will be scheduled for students taking the course for Russian credit. Prerequisite for Russian credit: Russian 220 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as Literature 390.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 392 - Nuclear Literatures: A Comparative Approach

One-unit semester course. This course is a comparative study of the nuclear theme in several literary traditions which are usually treated separately: Japanese literature on the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; Soviet and post-Soviet reactions to the ecological disasters at Chernobyl, Semipalatinsk, and other sites; American literature of the Cold War; and contemporary literary and artistic reactions to the 2011 disaster at Fukushima. We will also examine the interrelationship of political rhetoric, scientific language, and poetic language in the way nuclear power is imagined, implemented, experienced, and resisted. Our comparative approach will be informed by readings from the schools of postcolonialism, eco-criticism, and critical Indigenous theory. We will focus not only on the Atomic Age’s legacy of human and environmental devastation, but also the geopolitical, existential, and epistemological questions raised by the threat of nuclear accidents and warfare. Conducted in English. An additional weekly session will be scheduled for students taking the course for Russian credit. Prerequisite: students who wish to take the course for Russian credit must have completed Russian 220 or obtain the consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as Literature 392.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 405 - Niklolaj Gogol’

One-unit semester course. Nikolaj Gogol’ (1809–1852), Russia’s greatest comic writer, one of the most controversial figures in Russian literature, proclaimed variously an “enigma,” “undecipherable,” and “unintelligibly strange,” stands at the crossroads of romanticism, realism, and what will come to be called magical realism. Our readings will explore the various genres of his aesthetic practice: novellas, a play, essays, a prose epic, correspondence; and, an astonishing array of texts on which they draw, among them the commedia dell’arte, the Ukrainian puppet theater, E.T.A. Hoffman, Tieck, Homer, Aristophanes, and medieval hagiography. Among the topics of our consideration will be Gogol’s theory of language, the nature of laughter, the relationship between low and high culture, sexuality, and his critique of empire. Theoretical and critical readings include Eikhenbaum, Bakhtin, Lotman, Todorov, Benveniste, Bely, and Nabokov. We will reflect on the reception and afterlife of Gogol’s texts in the twentieth century. Conducted in English, this course offers an additional weekly session for students taking the course for Russian credit. Prerequisite: students who wish to take the course for Russian credit must have completed Russian 220 or obtain the consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 405.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 408 - Decadence and Symbolism in Russia and Europe

One-unit semester course. The course explores Russian Decadent and Symbolist literature and culture comparatively, in a broad Western European context. We will study the philosophical foundations of Decadent culture (Friedrich Nietzsche, Vladimir Solovyov); preoccupation with “degeneration,” common in the European science of the fin de siècle (Max Nordau, Richard von Krafft-Ebing); “aestheticism” (J.-K. Huysmans, Oscar Wilde); new interpretations of gender and sexuality (Otto Weininger, André Gide, Thomas Mann), Decadent mysticism, and other topics. The Russian side of the Decadent and Symbolist movements will be represented by the prosaic works of Leo Tolstoy, Anton Chekhov, Solovyov, Viacheslav Ivanov, Fedor Sologub, Zinaida Gippius, Mikhail Kuzmin, Evdokia Nagrodskaia, and Andrei Bely. A number of classes will be dedicated to the discussion of film (Evgeny Bauer), opera (the phenomenon of Wagnerism), dance (Isadora Duncan; Sergei Diaghilev’s “Ballets Russes”) and visual arts (the group “World of Art”). This course will emphasize a research component, and students will have an option of writing a single 20-page research paper, due at the end of the semester. All reading and discussions are in English. An additional weekly session will be scheduled for students taking the course for Russian credit. In these sessions, we will focus on the poetry of the Russian Silver Age (Solovyov, Valerii Briusov, Konstantin Bal’mont, Sologub, Gippius, Aleksandr Blok, Bely, Ivanov, Kuzmin, Sofia Parnok, Anna Akhmatova, et al.). Prerequisite for Russian credit: Russian 220 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as Literature 408.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 409 - Late Tolstoy: From Anna Karenina to a Religious Teaching

One-unit semester course. The course explores the second period of Leo Tolstoy’s career, from Anna Karenina (1870s) to his late fiction, such as The Death of Ivan Ilych (1886) and Hadzhi Murat (1904), and his aesthetic, ethical, theological, as well as political writings. We will study Tolstoy’s transformation from a fiction writer to a moral theorist and religious activist as we pay special attention to Tolstoy’s doctrine of nonviolence and his antiwar writings. Apart from a study of Tolstoy’s poetics and ideology, we will engage a number of cultural contexts for his works: Russian political and intellectual history, aesthetic and artistic developments in late nineteenth-century Russia, Tolstoy’s role and reputation in Russian society, his impact on anti-racist, anticolonial, and pacifist movements around the world. The workload includes extensive reading, oral presentations, and several writing assignments. All readings and discussions are in English. An additional weekly session will be scheduled for students taking the course for Russian credit. Prerequisite: students who wish to take the course for Russian credit must have completed Russian 220 or obtain the consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as Literature 409.

Russian 410 - Russian Literature in Revolution: 1917–1932

One-unit semester course. The years of revolution in Russia (1917–32) challenged writers to respond in innovative ways to the political and social upheaval, modernization, and the challenge of engineering an “ideal” mass society. This course addresses the question: how did social and political revolution and revolution in the arts relate to each other? Our inquiry will range over manifestoes, criticism, and artistic prose representing various camps (such as acmeism, OBERIU, ornamentalism, formalism, RAPP, and socialist realism) to explore how these formulate and address four key questions: Who should write? For whom? What should be written? How should one write? Topics for investigation will include gender and voice; elite and popular culture; theory and its relationship to practice; vertical vs. horizontal literary institutions. Writers will include Isaac Babel, Maxim Gorky, Daniil Kharms, Valentin Kataev, Velimir Khlebnikov, Alexandra Kollontai, Osip Mandelstam, Boris Pasternak, Boris Pilnyak, Andrey Platonov, Viktor Shklovsky, Teffi (Nadezhda Lokhvitskaya), Yevgeny Zamyatin. Students will submit weekly response papers and two term papers. Conducted in English. Those taking the course for Russian credit will meet for an additional weekly session to consider materials in the original. Prerequisite: students who wish to take the course for Russian credit must have completed Russian 220 or obtain the consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 410.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 412 - Literary Translation Workshop

One-half-unit semester course. This course offers an opportunity to develop a literary translation project in a workshop setting with a collaborative dimension that emphasizes an exploratory approach guided by readings in literary theory and translation theory and grounded in the practical challenges of the craft of translation. Ideally, participants will have some prior experience in creative writing and/or some background in literature in the language from which they will be translating. The target text will be selected in consultation with the instructor. The semester’s work will culminate in the preparation of a portfolio of the participants’ literary translations, with introductory essays and reflections on the task of the translator. Prerequisite: at least two years of formal instruction in any one of the following Slavic languages: Russian, Slovene, Serbo-Croatian; or the following Romance languages: French, Italian; or the instructor’s permission. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 412. 

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 413 - Russian Literary Theory: Formalism, Structuralism, Semiotics, Bakhtin

One-unit semester course. This course is an examination of the critical trends of twentieth-century Russian literary criticism and theory, including works produced by the Russian formalist school, by linguistic and structural criticism, and by semiotic approaches to literature and culture. The course will consider the origin and development of different methodologies and will look at their application to specific works of Russian and Western literature. Readings include works by Shklovsky, Eikhenbaum, Tynjanov, Propp, Jakobson, Bakhtin, Lotman, and Ginzburg, among others. Conducted in English. An additional weekly session will be scheduled for students taking the course for Russian credit. Prerequisite: students who wish to take the course for Russian credit must have completed Russian 220 or obtain the consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 413.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 436 - Sergei Eisenstein’s Film Art: Decadence, Revolution, and the Mechanics of Ecstasy

One-unit semester course. This course explores the works of Sergei Eisenstein (1898–1948), a Soviet film director and theorist, widely considered one of the most influential creative artists of the twentieth century. Eisenstein’s Battleship Potemkin (1925) revolutionized film as an art form, and his other cinematic works, such as Strike (1925), October (1927), The General Line (1929), ¡Que viva México! (1932), Alexander Nevsky (1938), and Ivan the Terrible (1944–45), made a great and deeply original contribution to the development of filmmaking and film aesthetics. As a theorist, Eisenstein formulated the principles of film editing (known as montage) and studied viewers’ and readers’ response to art. He authored provocative autobiographical writings as well as works of sexual theory, psychology, literary scholarship, and philosophy. Thousands of his drawings comment, ironically and often obscenely, on the mechanics of artistic, sexual, and religious ecstasy—which Eisenstein saw as a unity. We will study Eisenstein in a number of contexts: aesthetic (in connection to Decadence and avant-garde), political (Stalinism), and filmic (D.W. Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, Walt Disney, Dziga Vertov, Alexander Dovzhenko, et al.). The workload includes weekly film screenings and extensive reading and writing, as well as class presentations. Conducted in English. An additional weekly session will be scheduled for students taking the course for Russian credit. Prerequisite: students who wish to take the course for Russian credit must have completed Russian 220 or obtain the consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 436.

Not offered 2022–23.

Russian 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Russian 481 - Independent Study

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Prerequisite: approval of instructor and division.

Sociology 201 - Postcommunist Cultures: Identity, Power, Resistance

One-unit semester course. Cotaught by a sociologist and a literature scholar, this interdisciplinary course examines how different communities and actors in postcommunist societies (largely in Ukraine and Russia) experienced and responded to the dramatic institutional dislocations that followed the fall of communism. We will study and discuss sociological as well as literary works (highbrow and mass culture), cultural criticism, journalism, electronic media products, films, and historical and ethnographic accounts. Our topics include techniques of state domination; post-Soviet nostalgia; historical memory and its manipulations; colonialism, imperialism, genocide, and the legacies of mass state violence; strategies of resistance to state domination; the gendering of new currents of national identity and nationalism; and the refashioning of political identities around contemporary Western discourses. Finally, we will explore the phenomenon of “postmodernism” in Ukrainian and Russian arts and politics. An additional weekly session will be scheduled for students taking the course for Russian credit. Prerequisite: students who wish to take the course for Russian credit must have completed Russian 220 or obtain the consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. Previously cross-listed as Russian and Literature 391.

Not offered 2022–23.

Sociology 211 - Introduction to Sociology

One-unit semester course. An introduction to sociological perspectives on patterns of human conduct ranging from fleeting encounters in informal gatherings to historical processes of institutional persistence and change. Topics of discussion and research include the stratification of life chances, social honor and power in human populations, and the differentiation of these populations by gender, race, age, ethnicity, and other characteristics both achieved and ascribed; the integration of differentiated roles and statuses into systems capable of maintaining their structure beyond the life span of living individuals, and capable as well of revolutionary and evolutionary social change; and the interrelationships of familial, economic, political, educational, and religious institutions in the emerging world system of late modernity. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. In 2022–23, first-year students may register on a space-available basis in designated sections. Lecture-conference and computer lab.

Sociology 280 - Social Movements

One-unit semester course. Why do some social movements fail, while others succeed? The goal of this course is to introduce students to sociological theories of social movement success and failure. Through a review of classical and contemporary theories and case studies of women’s liberation, gay liberation, abortion, civil rights, environmentalism, and the peace and disarmament movements, we will identify key analytical questions and research strategies for studying contemporary social movements in depth. Among the perspectives reviewed will be classical approaches (de Tocqueville, “mass society,” and “relative deprivation”), as well as more recent perspectives that focus on rational choice, resource mobilization, political process, and new social movements. Prerequisite: Sociology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Sociology 311 - Research Methods

One-unit semester course. The primary objective is to provide background for empirical research in the social sciences. Specific objectives include deepening understanding of the logic of inference by exploring the relationship between empirical observations and causal models and introducing basic research techniques. Topics include the logic of inference, the nature of evidence, and a nonmathematical introduction to quantitative social analysis, emphasizing regression. Prerequisites: Sociology 211 and one additional unit in sociology. Conference.

Sociology 322 - Gender and Work

One-unit semester course. Gender is a central organizing principle in social relations and is deeply embedded in how work is organized, rewarded, and experienced. This course provides an overview of the theoretical, methodological, and empirical contributions of scholarship in the area of gender, work, and organizations. Emphasis on the intersection of gender, sexuality, race/ethnicity, and class. Topics include inequalities in the labor force, low wage and informal work and poverty, sex/sexuality in the workplace, masculinity/femininity at work, work/family conflict and the division of labor in the home, and how the institution of family, gender, and work culture are integrated into work practices, policies, and programs. Prerequisite: Sociology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Sociology 326 - Science and Social Difference

One-unit semester course. Is race biological? Do men and women have different brains? Categories such as race and gender are often presumed to be socially constructed classifications linked to difference. At the same time, references to scientific claims that prioritize the biological underpinnings of behavior and outcomes are common. This raises questions about the role of biology in determining differences between men and women, among racial/ethnic groups, and regarding sexuality, and how these ideas relate to the design of science policy and practice. Considering a series of contemporary cases, students in this course will examine the reciprocal relationships between scientific inquiry, science politics, social identity, and belonging. The course does not attempt to resolve these often contentious topics, but rather focuses on the processes by which ideas about difference are transmitted to students of science and the public; how social groups and identities are taken into account in science research, technological design, and clinical studies; who gets to “do science”; and the people and groups invested in the outcomes. Prerequisite: Sociology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Sociology 331 - Topics in Organizational Analysis

One-unit semester course. Variable topics. Omnipresent in “modern” settings, organizations are a potent structuring force in social, economic, and political life, and provide a wealth of possibilities for sustained inquiry in a topics course. Prerequisite: Sociology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference. May be repeated for credit. 

Organizations: Cooperatives and Nonprofits
One-unit semester course. Organizations are central to our daily lives. They reflect and shape opportunity; create or contest status hierarchies of gender, race, and privilege; generate and alter power relations; and are products and producers of social capital. This course examines in depth two kinds of organizations—cooperatives and nonprofits. Despite the emphasis in our capitalist society on corporate hierarchies, individual profit seeking, and the market, we rely to a striking extent on cooperatives, nonprofits, and kindred forms to organize our efforts and get work done. This course will explore these organizing strategies, critically addressing 1) their history, evolution, and prospects; 2) their important role in public policy and everyday economic life; and 3) their service as platforms for broader projects, including contesting corporate capitalism, promoting workplace democracy, fostering community and economic development, overcoming dependency, empowering poor or marginalized groups, and achieving social justice. Prerequisite: Sociology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2022–23.

Sociology 337 - The Collapse of Communism

One-unit semester course. This conference focuses on selected research areas that span between the sociology of capitalism and sociology more broadly. We will broaden our understanding of the cultural and social processes involved in the production of social inequality and identity in contemporary societies that were ruled by communist states throughout the twentieth century and have been deeply affected by the return to capitalism. We explore contemporary sociological and anthropological studies examining the production of new social identities and symbolic boundaries, with a focus on how preexisting gender, ethno-racial, and institutional cultures and subcultures created during communist rule are being changed and challenged by contemporary economic restructuring, in tandem with the rise of new capitalist economic relations. The role of gender in the refashioning of collective identities will be highlighted through the readings. Prerequisite: Sociology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference. 

Sociology 340 - American Capitalism

One-unit semester course. This is a comparative historical course on the development of American capitalism, focusing on the rise of mass markets and giant corporations as its dominant organizing principles. We survey theoretical approaches used to explain American capitalism and engage historical analyses of the key turning points in the development of our economy. A central objective is to document the existence of more efficient, democratic, and decentralized alternatives to the type of capitalism that came to prevail in the United States. Topics include the role of culture, politics, and finance capital in the development of the corporation; the rise and fall of cooperative, regionally based systems; mass production; populist responses to economic centralization; American labor; and state regulation. Prerequisite: Sociology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Sociology 342 - Sociology of Asian America

One-unit semester course. Who are Asian/Americans and where is Asian America? This seminar examines the historical and contemporary formations of Asian populations in the United States. Centering sociological and interdisciplinary research, we will examine the sociohistorical relational constructions of “Asians” and “Asian Americans.” The course is organized around four themes: (1) disciplinary constructions of Asians in the United States from sociology and Asian American studies; (2) citizenship, rights, and policy; (3) identity and community formation; and (4) emerging directions in research. Students will learn key theoretical frameworks and how significant historical moments such as the Chinese exclusion acts, World War II, the Third World Liberation Front, the rise of the model minority myth, and 9/11 shaped and reshaped the racial formation of Asians in the United States. Prerequisite: Sociology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 342.

Not offered 2022–23.

Sociology 343 - Sociology of Race and Racism

One-unit semester course. What is race? Race is a social construction. But what does it actually mean for race to be a social construction? In this seminar, we will examine how sociologists, social scientists, and legal scholars in the United States have theorized, debated, and researched the constructions of race and the practices and consequences of racism. Struggles over the meaning of race are entanglements over assertions of power so we will engage with scholars who demonstrate the coconstitution of race with other structures of power such as class, gender, sexuality, law, and colonialism. Students will gain an understanding of key paradigms that explicitly center or decenter race, including internal colonialism, the “underclass,” racial formation theory, and women of color feminisms. Prerequisite: Sociology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 343.

Sociology 346 - Race, Violence, and Power

See Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 300 for course descriptions.

Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 300 Description

Sociology 348 - Race, Economy, Public Policy

One-unit semester course. This course examines the social and institutional structures of economic life, economic policy, and their effects on race, stratification, and the system of ethnic relations in the contemporary United States. It examines those dynamics through the lenses of economic and organizational sociology, which view economic activities and outcomes as socially structured via networks, corporate and state hierarchies, systems of association and interpersonal exchange, and ecologies of public, private, and nonprofit organizations. Topics include the rise and fall of the mass production corporation; the role of unions, ethnic enclaves, and employment networks in allocating resources; the effects of civil rights law on corporate practices; how the state, the law, and neighborhood associations shape segregation, housing market dynamics, and the differential accumulation of wealth; the nature of and transformations in the welfare state; and the role of nonprofit enterprise and small-business formation in shaping the fates of African Americans and other groups. Prerequisite: Sociology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 348.

Not offered 2022–23.

Sociology 352 - Sociology of Money

One-unit semester course. Is money a self-propelling medium of exchange, solely about mundane financial calculations, transactions, and interests? Do we only use it to quantify various qualities into a standard metric to exchange them? What happens when money penetrates what is typically considered priceless, such as our norms, emotions, intimate relations, bodies, or nature? In today’s world, it is common for various economic, legal, and social institutions to place financial values on things as profound as human life, death, blood, organs, justice, sexual or romantic partnerships, and wildlife. Does this exercise flatten, commodify, corrode, and corrupt, as many scholars, legalists, activists think it does? Or, does it operate interdependently with our moral principles, cultural practices, interpersonal relationships? Then, how can those supposed corrosive commodification practices, in reality, turn into meaningful relations within which our lives, values, and ties are construed, maintained, and shaped? This conference invites its participants to grapple with these fundamental problems and more. Drawing on neoclassic economic theory to its Marxist critics, critical socio-legal scholarship to moral philosophy, cultural studies to economic sociology, we’ll delve deep into the social life of money. Thus, we’ll examine money not merely as a financial instrument but with the social and cultural processes mediating its significance from within. Prerequisite: Sociology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Sociology 361 - Power, Hegemony, Resistance

One-unit semester course. This course invites its participants to treat politics as grounded in everyday life, as arising from power and agency, and as a medium of domination and change. It introduces key sociological debates on relations of power in which, as Karl Marx famously suggests, individuals generate their thinking and acting not as they please but under the restrictions of structural contexts and social inequalities. Those social forces, however, do not divest individuals from becoming agents. People almost always have potentials for resisting and changing. When, why, and how people realize these possibilities are undoubtedly central concerns of this class. But, why people are resigned to and how they participate in their own domination are equally crucial. This course thus calls as much attention to those individualistic and collective forms of resistance as it does to their absence. Prerequisite: Sociology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Sociology 362 - Culture and Inequality in Contemporary Communities

One-unit semester course. How do cultural processes reinforce social inequality? What meanings and practices serve to hide, normalize, or validate stratifications between individuals and social groups? What makes subordinate groups create subversive cultures in the struggle for community, dignity, and equity? This conference draws on cultural sociology to address all these questions and more. We start with classical texts, establishing key concepts (such as symbolic boundaries and intersectionality) in the field of study. We then focus on case studies tackling issues as diverse as elite education and privilege, poverty and social aids, economic restructuring and gentrification, sexual minorities and the city. Throughout these studies, we pay attention to the cultural processes within which class, gender, and race inequalities are rendered invisible or unproblematic and thus socially normalized. Further, we look at the process of contestation through which communities use social relations and cultural frames to defend themselves against top-down economic, social, and political changes. Prerequisite: Sociology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Sociology 363 - Sociology of Culture

One-unit semester course. The course surveys recent sociological studies of cultural production. It surveys how cultural materials are used to establish and maintain boundaries that differentiate among middle-class status groups in contemporary America and how diverse organizations such as museums, art galleries, and record companies manage the production and distribution of cultural symbols for a diversified market. Prerequisite: Sociology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Sociology 364 - Law and Society

One-unit semester course. This course is intended as an introduction to law and society scholarship. Drawing on interdisciplinary debates over legality and illegality, legal pluralism, human rights, access to justice, legal consciousness, law and social inequality, law and social control, and legal mobilization, we focus on social and cultural dimensions of the law through varied historical and geographical contexts. Among the specific problems we cover are: With what concepts and methods can we explain the affinities between law and society? What are the sources, workings, and consequences of the law’s legitimacy? How does the law reinforce or mitigate class, gender, and race-based inequalities? Who mobilizes the law—how and with what results? In grappling with these questions, we examine the law as constitutive of the status quo and social change. Prerequisites: Sociology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Sociology 371 - Military and Society

One-unit semester course. What is the relationship between the military, military service, and society? How does the military as a coercive and ideological state institution shape practices of nationalism, security, and citizenship? This course will address national security, war, military occupation, and overseas bases to examine the ways in which the military shapes and is shaped by local contexts. It will emphasize the relationship between the military and social formations such as race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. Students will read work from military sociology that examines the relationship between the military as an organization in society, as well as interdisciplinary work from critical military studies, gender studies, and ethnic studies that engages with questions about the impacts of military-based power on marginalized communities. Through the course, students will examine how the military shapes everyday lives as well as broader social relations, structures, and communities. Prerequisite: Sociology 211 or consent of the instructor. Conference. 

Not offered 2022–23.

Sociology 380 - Networks and Social Structure

One-unit semester course. Social network dynamics influence phenomena within communities, neighborhoods, families, work life, scientific and technical innovation, terrorism, trade, alliances, and wars. Network theories of social structure view actors as inherently interdependent, and examine how social structure emerges from regularities in this interdependence. This course focuses on the theoretical foundations of structural network dynamics and identifies key analytical questions and research strategies for studying network formation, organization, and development. Attention is paid to both interactionist and structuralist traditions in network analysis, and includes a focus on the core principles of balance and centrality, connectivity and clustering, power and hierarchy, and social structure writ large. Substantive topics include social mobility and stratification, group organization and mobilization, patterns of creativity and innovation, resource distributions, decision making, the organization of movement and belief systems, conflict and cooperation, and strategic interaction. This course couples theoretical and substantive themes with methodological applications. Approximately one-third of course time is spent on the methodology of collecting, analyzing, and interpreting social network data. Prerequisites for sociology credit: Sociology 211; for political science credit: Political Science 240 and one upper-level international relations course. Conference. Cross-listed as Political Science 350.

Not offered 2022–23.

Sociology 390 - Junior Research Colloquium

One-half-unit semester course. This course prepares students for conducting sociological research in the junior qualifying exam, senior thesis and beyond. Concepts and practices addressed include surveying research in an area, reconstructing the core debates, and constructing literature reviews; using citation analyses to evaluate the impact of scholarly work; formulating research questions; assessing and developing research designs; using multiple methods; formulating measurement strategies; presenting results from qualitative and quantitative research; and crafting new research projects to address unresolved issues in prior research. This course is directed mainly toward students writing their junior qualifying examination in sociology and allied fields (American Studies–Sociology, ICPS–Sociology, Sociology–CRES), but may be helpful for students in the first semester of thesis research. Prerequisites: Sociology 211, two upper-division sociology courses, and completed or having taken Sociology 311, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Sociology 391 - Seminar in Sociology: Contemporary Topics

One-half-unit semester course. An examination and exploration of current topics and areas in sociology with an emphasis on surveying contemporary published research. Participants will review recent publications in core sociology journals, collectively design a semester reading syllabus, and help lead group discussions of this work. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, Sociology 211, and two additional units of sociology (one of the additional units may be taken concurrently with consent of the instructor). Conference. May be repeated for credit.

Sociology 401 - Institutional Analysis

One-unit semester course. This is an advanced treatment of the theory and empirical practices of institutional analysis in sociology and related fields. The course focuses first on structure, treating institutions and fields as contextual determinants of action and identifying the different mechanisms by which institutions promote order, stability, and distinctive patterns of organization, behavior, economic development, and public policy. Topics covered include path dependence and “lock in,” isomorphism, structure-induced equilibrium, institutional logics and contingency, diffusion, and institutionalization. The course then focuses on agency and action, tackling the thorny issue of how to explain change without abandoning the contextual insights of earlier formulations. Topics covered include punctuated equilibria vs. evolutionary change, deinstitutionalization, processes of transposition, theorization and recombination, endogenous change dynamics, institutional entrepreneurship, and the relationships between social movements and institutional fields. Prerequisite: Sociology 211 and one upper-division course in sociology. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Sociology 469 - Research Practicum

One-half-unit semester course. This course is designed to prepare students to conduct independent sociological research, mainly in senior thesis, and will be based heavily on workshops organized around students’ specific research projects. Topics and issues covered will depend partly on the nature of students’ projects and will include formulating research questions and working though dead ends, effective literature reviews, developing research designs for comparative and case study analysis, case selection, gaining access to the field, applying for IRB approval, conducting field work and interviews, locating quantitative data sets, modeling strategies and table building, collecting and coding qualitative data, writing up and presenting results from qualitative and quantitative analyses, and time management and writing strategies. This course is geared heavily toward sociology majors beginning thesis work, but is open to second-semester junior majors preparing for such research, and sociology seniors in the second semester of their thesis. The course may also be taken by first-semester thesis students in other social science majors with consent of the instructor. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in Sociology, American Studies–Sociology, ICPS–Sociology, or Sociology–CRES 470, or completion of or concurrent enrollment in Sociology 311, or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Sociology 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Sociology 481 - Special Topics

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Work is restricted to special fields in sociology—demography, communication analysis, and community surveys. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and approval of instructor and division.

Spanish 110 - First-Year Spanish

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester. A balanced study of written and oral aspects of Spanish. Includes an introduction to reading. Conference.

Spanish 210 - Second-Year Spanish

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester. An intermediate-level study of grammar, composition, and conversation. Emphasis on reading: essays, theatre, short stories, and poetry. Prerequisite: equivalent of one year of college Spanish. Conference.

Spanish 311 - Advanced Language and Culture: Spanish Cinema

One-unit semester course. This course provides a historical and critical overview of Spanish cinema from the early 1950s to the present. By analyzing films in their cultural context, along with selected critical texts, the course will explore questions such as censorship and ideology; war, reconciliation, and democracy; representations of gender and sexuality; immigration and exile; globalization; climate change; and others. We will watch and discuss films by Luis García Berlanga, Carlos Saura, Víctor Erice, Fernando Trueba, Pedro Almodóvar, Icíar Bollaín, Fernando León de Aranoa, Chus Gutiérrez, and Almudena Carracedo. This course is designed to refine and enhance language skills. It includes a focused consideration of problem areas of Spanish language and an introduction to various rhetorical forms. In addition to oral practice in class, students will write numerous short essays. Prerequisite: Spanish 210 or equivalent with the consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Spanish 312 - Advanced Language and Culture: Spanish Migrations

One-unit semester course. For centuries, Spain has been defined as a country of emigration, from the expulsion of Jews and Muslims in the early modern period to the colonialization of the Americas. However, in the past 30 years, Spain has become a country of immigration (primarily of people from North Africa and Latin America) and large-scale internal migration. This course examines the representation of emigration, immigration, and internal migration in literature, film, art, and other cultural productions. How do contemporary artists represent what is for some immigrants a complex return to the “home” of their ancestors? How do they negotiate among a growing plurality of voices in a country that has imagined itself as homogeneous? How are calls for nationhood for an autonomous region (Catalonia, for example) represented nationally? This course is designed to refine and enhance language skills. It includes a focused consideration of problem areas of Spanish language and an introduction to various rhetorical forms. In addition to oral practice in class, students will write numerous short essays. Prerequisite: Spanish 210 or equivalent with the consent of instructor. Conference.

Spanish 321 - Theory and Practice of Hispanic Literature

One-unit semester course. This course is designed to give students a theoretical, historical, and cultural framework for the more advanced study of Spanish and Spanish American literature. It will include considerations of genre, reception, and critical theory. Students will be responsible for undertaking close readings of the texts as well as research projects. Prerequisite: Spanish 210 or equivalent. Conference.

Spanish 343 - Don Quixote and Narrative Theory

One-unit semester course. This course will consist of a close reading of Cervantes’s masterpiece in conjunction with the works of theorists such as Michel Foucault, Gyorgy Lukács, Anthony Cascardi, and Mary Malcolm Gaylord, who have written about Don Quixote in the development and exploration of their various “theories of the novel.” To better understand the context of Don Quixote, we will begin with a careful consideration of political, cultural, and historical aspects of the Spanish Golden Age. During the final weeks of the semester we will read texts by Jorge Luis Borges and Paul Auster that exploit narrative conventions found in Don Quixote. We will end the semester with student presentations that focus on adaptations and appropriations of Don Quixote in modern narrative. Conducted in English. Students taking the course for Spanish credit will meet in extra sessions. Prerequisite for students taking the course for Spanish credit: Spanish 321 or equivalent with consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 343.

Not offered 2022–23.

Spanish 344 - Visual Art in Spanish Baroque Literature

One-unit semester course. This course studies the relationship between visual art and literature in early modern Spain. In an epoch in which the production of images has attained unprecedented cultural importance, literature redefines its aesthetic agenda, both modeling itself after and rivaling visual art. Considering various plays, poems, and novellas alongside relevant paintings, emblems, architectural works, and sculptures, we reflect upon how the interactions among these different art forms serve to mobilize audience emotion and comment on gender and class tensions. Also discussed are mounting anxieties about the role of art in a society marked by political crisis. In particular, we think about how the celebration of iconocentric culture is undercut by critical views of images as dangerous vehicles of moral and sexual depravity. Authors and artists studied include Teresa of Avila, Cervantes, Zayas, Calderón de la Barca, Guillén de Castro, Velázquez, Titian, El Greco, and Rubens. Conducted in English. Prerequisite for Spanish credit: Spanish 321 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 344.

Not offered 2022–23.

Spanish 351 - Saints and Sinners: Women in the Early Modern Transatlantic World

One-unit semester course. Targets, on the one hand, of criminalizing or pathologizing discourses that called for their exclusion from the public sphere, women were also key agents of hegemonic power in the Spanish colonial world. This course reflects on the generation of mutually conflicting female subjects in a context obsessed with the fight against religious and cultural otherness: the sinning body prone to sexual temptation and demonic possession and the saintly body, exemplary imitator of Christ’s suffering. Considering a varied corpus of Inquisition trials, spiritual autobiographies, wifely conduct manuals, mystical poetry, novellas, chronicles, paintings, and printed images from Spain and its American colonies, we think about the contradictions inherent in global Counter-Reformation gender politics and the myriad ways in which female writers and fictional personae co-opt or resist the stringent corporeal and mental discipline imposed on them. Students will, in addition, gain an understanding of the rich web of associations between religious confessional culture and emergent fictional genres. Authors studied include St. Teresa of Avila, Fray Luis de León, Christopher Columbus, Bartolomé de las Casas, María de Zayas, St. Rose of Lima, Sor María de Agreda, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Conducted in English. Prerequisite for Spanish credit: Spanish 321 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 351.

Spanish 361 - Decentering the Human

One-unit semester course. This course provides an introduction to what has been called the nonhuman turn, an umbrella term that refers to various schools of thought (such as posthumanism, critical race theory, animal studies, new and vital materialism, object-oriented ontology, and affect theory) that call for an integral redefinition of the human and thus question, critique, and/or move beyond human exceptionalism and the ontological dualities (nature/culture, human/nonhuman, mind/body, self/other, subject/object, etc.) that constitute it. The course combines interdisciplinary theoretical perspectives with a focus on how the relation between humans, nonhumans, and the environment has been represented, questioned, and problematized in cultural productions from the Hispanic world. The course ultimately asks students to think critically about what it means to be human today, if, that is, we have indeed ever been human. Conducted in English. Students taking the course for literature credit will read cultural texts in translation and write in English. Students taking the course for Spanish credit will read cultural texts and write essays in Spanish. Prerequisite for students taking the course for Spanish credit: Spanish 321 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 361.

Not offered 2022–23.

Spanish 362 - Spanish Migrations

One-unit semester course. Historically, we have considered Spain to be a country of emigration, from the expulsion of Jews and Muslims in the early modern period to the colonization of the Americas. However, in the past 40 years, Spain has become a country of immigration, primarily of people from North Africa and Latin America. This course focuses on the complex history of migration between Spain and North Africa by examining its representation in literature, film, and other cultural productions. How do contemporary artists represent what is for some immigrants a complex return to the Spanish “home” of their ancestors? How do they negotiate among a growing plurality of voices in a country that has imagined itself as homogeneous? How do they attempt to give voice to an immigrant population that has been silenced or in extreme cases erased? How might the foregrounding of migration destabilize the category of “Spanish” itself? Materials include texts and films created by Spanish and North African artists whose work has been translated into Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 321 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Spanish 365 - Literature, State, and Nation in Nineteenth-Century Latin America

One-unit semester course. This course examines the relationship between literature and politics understood in the framework of an intellectual history of nineteenth-century Latin America. The selected texts reflect the range of different meanings that the concept of nation takes on, according to the distinct context and junctures in which it is evoked. The first part of the course focuses on discourses about the nation that are primarily concerned with questions of culture and identity, as well as with mythical-symbolic import. Discussed in this light are neoclassical, romantic, and naturalist poetics. Representative genres read include poetry, short stories, novels, and essays by Olmedo, Heredia, Bello, Hidalgo, Echeverría, Gómez de Avellaneda, Matto de Turner, Altamirano. The rest of the term is devoted to a tradition of republican thought that addresses institutional and juridical problems. Readings include letters, essays, and speeches by Bolívar, Artigas, Lastarria, Sarmiento, Alberdi, and Bilbao, among others. Prerequisite: Spanish 321 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Spanish 368 - Jorge Luis Borges: Fiction and Criticism

One-unit semester course. This course studies the writings of one of the most important authors of the twentieth century through various critical approaches that have been applied to his work: structuralism, poststructuralism, psychoanalysis, hermeneutics, and sociocriticism. Emerging from this corpus are two opposing views: one that associates Borges with the Argentinean literary system, foregrounding his participation in national aesthetic and cultural debates, and one that emphasizes the cosmopolitanism, skepticism, and sense of unreality marking his literature. Also considered will be emerging critical studies that accentuate the historical and political relevance of Borges’s oeuvre. Along with these lines of inquiry, a series of theoretical categories and themes that are key for the comprehension of Borges’s writing will be discussed: avant-garde ultraism; criollismo; metaphor and metonymy; Argentinean tradition; reading, misreading, and translation; authorship and figures of the author; canon and literary genealogy; history, memory, and forgetting. This course serves as the junior seminar for 2022–23. Prerequisite: Spanish 321 or consent of the instructor. Conference.

Spanish 372 - Documentary Resistance in Latin America and Spain

One-unit semester course. What makes a documentary a form of resistance? What defines this genre or mode? What elements and techniques characterize these documentary films? The course focuses on documentary films from Latin America and Spain that represent struggles for social justice and function as a cultural form of protest and resistance. By discussing the films in their historical and political contexts, the course examines the strategies, genres, and techniques that filmmakers use to address and participate in social change, as well as ethical and aesthetic questions about representation and production. We will watch and discuss films by Patricio Guzmán (Chile), Fernando Solanas (Argentina), Mario Handler (Uruguay), Lourdes Portillo (Mexico), Claudia Llosa (Peru), and Xapo Ortega and Xavier Artigas (Spain), among others. Prerequisite for Spanish credit: Spanish 321 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 372.

Not offered 2022–23.

Spanish 373 - Religion and Modernity in Latin American Literature

One-unit semester course. In this course we will discuss figures and concepts from the major religious traditions of Latin America as they appear in short stories, novels, poetry, and drama from the twentieth century. We will consider the definition of modernity as a “disenchantment of the world,” and ask what that means in a region that through the present day boasts vibrant Indigenous traditions and a strong Catholic presence with origins in colonialism. The course will focus on the use of religious thought as a critical tool for examining social and political issues, such as racial and economic inequality, sectarian violence, and national identity. We will consider whether religion is a unique way of knowing, the influence of theology and belief on political systems, and what role literature has in redrawing the boundaries between politics, culture, and tradition. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 321 or consent of instructor. Conference.

Spanish 375 - Memory and Image in Latin American Literature and Art

One-unit semester course. This course focuses on memory and image, two categories that have acquired great relevance since the 1980s, in ethical, political, juridical, epistemological, and aesthetic domains. The terms “subjective turn” and “iconic turn” used by cultural critics reflect this phenomenon that is analyzed through recent literary and visual artworks. Together with testimonies and other nonfiction works, a series of documents embodying different memorialization policies (museums and memorial sites) are examined and contrasted with practices (literature, performance, visual arts) that use aesthetics to engage with the past. Particular attention is paid to the presence of the imaginary, the anachronistic, obsolescence, and the emptying of objects. Parallel to the ethics-political character of memory, the function of forgetting and the intellective in relation to the past is discussed. Included are works by Rodolfo Walsh, Doris Salcedo, León Ferrari, Mario Bellatin, Cynthia Rimsky, Alejandro Zambra, Ricardo Piglia, Alan Pauls, José Emilio Pacheco, Margo Glantz, and Diamela Eltit. Prerequisites: Spanish 321 or equivalent. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Spanish 377 - Art after Franco

One-unit semester course. What happens to a culture when released from systematized repression? This course examines the creative explosion in literature and film produced in Spain after 1975, the year in which Francisco Franco died and his totalitarian regime ended. Conference discussion will concern transformations that characterize the post-Franco era: the recuperation (or not) of historical memory, the emergence of a fluid conception of gender, and the creation of new forms of popular art. Particular attention will be given to the “movida,” the disruptive social and cultural transformations celebrated in the films of Pedro Almodóvar and others. Films and readings will include works by Almodóvar, Ventura Pons, Carmen Martín Gaite, Rosa Montero, Juan Marsé, and Eduardo Mendicutti. Prerequisite: Spanish 321 or equivalent with consent of instructor. Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Spanish 378 - Space and Power

One-unit semester course. What is space? How is it perceived, experienced, produced, and reproduced? And what is its connection with power and relations of domination/emancipation? Drawing from spatial, urban, political, feminist, and critical race theory, this course aims to explore and analyze these questions in relation to the representation and problematization of domestic, urban, national, and border spaces in, mostly, Latin American novels and films. Conducted in English. Students taking the course for literature credit will read cultural texts in translation and write in English. Students taking the course for Spanish credit will read cultural texts and write essays in Spanish. Prerequisite for students taking the course for Spanish credit: Spanish 321 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 378.

Spanish 381 - Literature and Culture of Argentina from Independence to the Present

One-unit semester course. In the framework of an Argentinean cultural history, this course analyzes the relationship between aesthetics, ethics, and politics. A series of nineteenth- and twentieth-century texts, both fictional and nonfictional, will serve to trace the trajectory from a political use of literature to the emergence of an autonomous intellectual sphere. The course is organized around the topics of “civilization and barbarism”; gauchos, frontiers, and “the desert”; the Generation of 1880 and immigration; Peronism and anti-Peronism; and militarism and democracy. Prerequisite: Spanish 321 or equivalent with consent of the instructor. Conference.

Spanish 384 - Latin America’s Revolutionary Century

One-unit semester course. Throughout the twentieth century, Latin America was one of the epicenters of insurgent and revolutionary struggles in the world. These represented, regardless of their ideological differences, the entry of the equality principle in national spaces that had mostly imagined and structured themselves as two-tiered societies in which a large segment of the population—Indians, minorities, and even women—had been, for all practical purposes, systematically excluded. By focusing on the cultural production (novels, films, essays, etc.) related to four revolutionary constellations—the Mexican and Cuban Revolutions, the Central American guerrillas, and the Zapatistas—this course aims to explore and analyze the languages of insurgency and counterinsurgency, the figure of the revolutionary and guerrilla fighter as a political subjectivity, and the relation between politics and aesthetics. Primary texts will be supplemented with historical and theoretical readings. Prerequisite: Spanish 321 or consent of the instructor. Conference. 

Not offered 2022–23.

Spanish 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Spanish 481 - Independent Reading

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Prerequisite: approval of instructor and division.

Theatre 100 - Theatre Laboratory

One-half-unit semester course. Theatre 100 is a class in which students, faculty, and staff work together to create departmental stage productions. In this class, students learn about different parts of making theatre—from onstage to backstage work—that are required to make a theatre production. Students also learn the arts of collaboration and producing. Students may repeat this course for credit, and each time a student takes this class they can experience a different production role. Roles available include performer in mainstage shows, dramaturg, designer, stage manager, assistant director, and more. This course is available to majors and nonmajors, and students are admitted to the course by audition or department approval. All students, regardless of experience, are welcome to take this class, and if a student is interested in this class, the faculty will work with the student to help them find a role. Studio. May be repeated for credit.

Theatre 201 - Stagecraft

One-unit semester course. As an introduction to theatre technology, this course will familiarize students with the many components of theatrical production. It will provide students with a deeper understanding of the organizational structure and concepts involved in producing live performances, as well as provide instruction in safe practices. Students will be introduced to many of the tools and mechanisms that are used today and how they have been made popular and/or standard. Topics will include the historical progression of theatre technology and machinery; the science of sound, light, and material structure; and current techniques used to implement production designs in scenery, lighting, sound, costumes, and properties. Lecture-lab.

Theatre 202 - Introduction to Theatrical Design

One-unit semester course. Introduction to the design of the physical environment of the stage. Unifying aesthetic principles and distinctions will be considered in relation to scenery, costume, lighting, makeup, and sound for live performance. The course emphasizes script analysis, the elements of design, and the principles of composition and design conceptualization with reference to historical and modern practices and technologies. Conference-lab.

Theatre 204 - Fundamentals of Acting and Performance: Movement

One-half-unit semester course. This course introduces students to the craft of acting and actor-driven performance creation, with a focus on embodiment. We will base our activities in physical theatre methods, including but not limited to Suzuki, Viewpoints, Composition, Lecoq, and/or Laban. Additional attention will be paid to the role of breath and voice in preparing the body to speak. This course is intended to complement Theatre 205; Theatre 204 and 205 may be taken in any sequence. Studio. May be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. 

Theatre 205 - Fundamentals of Acting and Performance: Text

One-half-unit semester course. This course introduces students to the craft of acting and actor-driven performance creation, with a focus on scene study. We will base our activities in Stanislavskian theatre methods, as well as exercises drawn from Spolin and/or Boal. The course will include script analysis, objectives and actions, physicalization, character development, and vocal resonance and projection. This course is intended to complement Theatre 204; Theatre 204 and 205 may be taken in any sequence. Studio. May be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. 

Theatre 221 - History of Clothing: Clothing as Communication and Rebellion

One-unit semester course. This course will give an overview of the form and function of clothing through time, and particularly as a device for communicating rebellion, dissonance, and political affiliation. In it, we will examine how clothing and personal décor function as social tools; how cultural forces influence specific fashions, aesthetics, and traditions in dress; and how these tools have been used or altered throughout history and media. Theatre 202 is recommended. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Theatre 223 - Visual Performance Narratives

One-unit semester course. This course will look at both the history and contemporary practice of visual storytelling as the basis for performance. We will investigate futurist sintesi, tableaux vivants, The Theatre of Images, durational and serial performance, multiscreen installation, and other similar forms. We will examine the techniques and theories of related artists, thinkers, and movements, and do readings on the nature of images. Students will invent and perform their own image-based performances, using various media and performance styles, ending the class with a public presentation of the original works. Studio.

Theatre 225 - Drawing, Rendering, and Modeling Live Performances

One-unit semester course. Before we act, we have to imagine what it is we want to enact. In this course students will study and practice approaches to communicating visual ideas as a tool in the development of a live performance. Students will respond to prompts and performance texts in sketches, models, drafting, and digital rendering. Both analog and digital tools and techniques will be explored. Students will learn key concepts in visual representation including accuracy and precision, scale and proportion, projection and perspective. Studio.

Not offered 2022–23.

Theatre 233 - Devising

One-unit semester course. This is a studio-based class in which students learn the tools and techniques for creating original performance based on source material—including poetry, prose, plays, found text, music, site, and self. The emphasis will be on ensemble-based/collective creation, and the key methodology will be improvisation/movement research. Students will create short, original performances. Studio.

Theatre 251 - Theatre History I: Antiquity to Naturalism

One-unit semester course. This course is a survey of theatre history from antiquity to the late 1800s. In it, we will examine the relationship between theatre and society, including how theatre both reflects and shapes the world outside its walls, and vice versa. This course focuses on reading plays, critical essays, and historical documents, as well as essay writing and a final project. We will address questions of physical performance space, performance style, audience, the development of design, and the political and social consequences of making theatre at different moments in history. Lecture-conference. 

Theatre 252 - Theatre History II: Naturalism to 9/11

One-unit semester course. This course surveys developments in twentieth-century European and American experimental theatre by examining the work of influential directors, playwrights, designers, theorists, and theatre collectives. Changing views of the theatre’s aesthetic and social functions will be explored. Special topics will include the rise of the director, the evolution of theatrical space, models of theatrical organization, and the role of the avant-garde. Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Theatre 253 - Theatre History III: 9/11 to Now

One-unit semester course. This course examines developments in theatre history in the wake of 9/11. We will look at global trends in theatre practice and theory, with a particular focus on theatre in the United States. This course will also include study of theatre in our own midst in Portland, Oregon. Topics we will explore in this course include technology and theatre, contemporary theatre criticism and the field’s major journals, international theatre festivals, immersive theatre, twenty-first-century collectives, and theatre as a part of contemporary protest movements (Occupy, the Arab Spring, Black Lives Matter). Lecture-conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Theatre 261 - Play Lab

One-unit semester course. This course will serve as a laboratory in which to explore theatrical texts and develop text analysis skills fundamental for any theatre practice. Texts chosen will largely be modern works from playwrights of color and queer playwrights. Students will develop skills for cold reading and will examine plays by reading through them as an ensemble of players. This examination will be bolstered by post-reading discussions centered around representation, identity, race, equity, and beyond. This course is intended both for students who are curious about theatre but don’t know how to begin exploring their curiosity, as well as for advanced theatre makers eager to discuss how to improve the art form. The course will culminate in a final project. Conference.

Theatre 270 - Race and Identity in American Theatre

One-unit semester course. The course explores the role American theatre has played in the construction, preservation, and interrogation of race and gender categories. Students analyze works that employ performance as a venue for political activism, for cultivation of intraethnic pride, and for explorations of social issues too sensitive to be addressed in other contexts. Drawing upon readings from the theatre and other humanities and social science disciplines, this course examines the ways dramatic texts help to foster intra- and cross-cultural understanding, and also how a familiarity with the politics of representation and various other concerns of identity-based cultural groups can inform performance practices. Students examine works from a variety of cultural traditions in an effort to understand how seemingly common institutions or value systems (family, gender, class dynamics) must always be viewed through specific historical and cultural lenses. This course provides students with a more nuanced understanding of what race is and how it functions in America, and how theatre has been implicated as both a tool of racism and a means by which to resist its effects. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 270. Lecture-conference. 

Theatre 276 - Community-Based Performance

One-unit semester course. This course explores the role of theatre making in civic change around race and inequality. In the course, students will study approaches to theatre that directly interact with the civic life of diverse communities, as well as ways the history of theatre can be better understood as being intertwined with and responsible to civic life. In collaboration with local theatre companies and practitioners, students will incorporate their classroom studies on historically relevant theatre practices (such as Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed; the United Farmworkers’ El Teatro Campesino; and the Black Arts Movement) with a firsthand engagement in local community-based theatre groups and non-arts organizations using theatre for community engagement. Cross-listed as Comparative Race and Ethnicity Studies 276. Conference-studio.

Not offered 2022–23.

Theatre 280 - Gender and Theatre

One-unit semester course. This course examines the roles gender has played in shaping world theatre as well as the roles theatre has played in shaping various cultural conceptions of gender. We will focus particularly on twentieth-century performance, including cross-dressing, “re-dressing” of canonical plays, the ascent of performance art, and questions of theatre and gender raised by performers from Japan to Cuba. We will interrogate the historical, cultural, and personal variability of the notion of gender itself, asking ourselves: What are theatre artists doing with the idea of gender? Conference.

Not offered 2022–23.

Theatre 290 - Introduction to Performance Studies

One-unit semester course. Performance studies is an interdisciplinary field that examines “performance” in all of its multiple incarnations—including theatre, dance, visual art, everyday life, folklore, rituals and celebrations, and protests. Richard Schechner defines performance as “twice-behaved behavior”—repeatable, embodied activities. This course serves as an introduction to the major themes and issues within the discourse of performance studies. We will look at both the roots of this interdisciplinary field and the directions it might be heading. Readings will include some of the seminal texts in the field, including the work of Richard Schechner, J.L. Austin, Judith Butler, Erving Goffman, Diana Taylor, and others. We will examine how performance studies contributes to the study of theatre, as well as to an understanding of our increasingly mediated and globalized world. The course will be divided into sections including ritual and drama; performativity/performative utterance; embodiment/performing Identity; globalization and interculturalism; and performance ethnography. Students will apply readings in performance theory to performance sites such as theatre, museums, sports events, meals, community celebrations and more. Conference-lab.

Not offered 2022–23.

Theatre 301 - Junior Seminar

One-unit semester course. This course is a rigorous investigation of theatre for junior theatre and interdisciplinary theatre majors. In this course, students will hone their skills in dramatic theory, critical writing, and research methodologies. Additional areas of study include theatre and social constructs, theatre and performance studies, the relationship of theatre and politics, and the business of professional theatre. This course asks the questions: What tools do I need to study and make theatre at an advanced level? How do artistic practice and academic scholarship work together to make a total artist/scholar? This course will focus on close readings, writing assignments, embodied exercises, and collaboration. This course prepares students both for the junior qualifying examination in theatre and for advanced production work and the senior thesis. Prerequisite: Junior standing in theatre or a theatre-combined interdisciplinary major. Conference.

Theatre 302 - Junior Production Studio

One-unit semester course. This course is a study of collaboration and theatre producing. In this course, students in the junior year who are majoring in theatre and interdisciplinary theatre subjects take on major roles (including those in design, acting, dramaturgy, assistant directing) in a mainstage production that is selected and directed by a faculty member and/or guest artist. The goal of this course is for juniors to gain experience in a professionally-directed production process before senior year thesis work, and for juniors to work together in advance of attaining senior standing in the department. All juniors will participate in production meetings and other collaborative conversations for this production. Previous coursework in the intended area of focus should be completed before taking the course. Prerequisite: junior standing in theatre or a theatre-combined interdisciplinary major or by permission of the instructor. Studio.

Theatre 310 - Techniques of Acting: Contemporary Theatre

One-unit semester course. This course focuses on the theory and practice of various acting techniques employed in contemporary Western theatre. Emphasis will be placed on both physical and psychological aspects of performance and characterization. Readings and research will focus on major practitioners and playwrights. Studio work is supplemented with writings by contemporary theorists and practitioners relevant to these topics. Prerequisites: Theatre 204 or 205 (previously numbered 203), or approved alternate with audition. Conference-lab.

Theatre 323 - Puppetry and the Performing Object

One-unit semester course. This course focuses on the history and practice of puppetry in historical and contemporary contexts, and the incorporation of puppets and performing objects into avant-garde performance contexts. We focus our study on the traditions of shadow puppetry in various regions (e.g., Indonesia, China, Greece) as well as other puppetry traditions such as Japan’s Bunraku and contemporary object performance. Lab work includes designing, constructing, and performing in various different puppetry styles. The course culminates in a large-scale shadow puppet performance. Studio.

Not offered 2022–23.

Theatre 326 - Costume Design

One-unit semester course. This course will examine the costume designer’s responsibilities as an artist and collaborator and explore the relationship among text, concept, and production as we undertake costume design projects throughout the semester. We will develop research, communication, and rendering skills as applied to the collaborative process of costume design. Discussions will include fabrication materials, performative movement, character and emotion, fashion, and pure visual expression as we work to create designs for clothing for text-based performances. Prerequisite: Theatre 202 or approved alternate. Conference-laboratory. 

Not offered 2022–23.

Theatre 331 - Directing

One-unit semester course. This course is an investigation of approaches to script analysis and directorial tools for working with actors in bringing a text from page to stage. We will explore the process of developing and implementing a production concept: its formulation through analysis, rehearsal processes, and realization in theatrical terms in performance. Lab work will be supplemented by relevant writing by influential directors. Prerequisite: Theatre 204 or 205 or approved alternate with consent of the instructor. Studio. 

Theatre 335 - Playwriting

One-unit semester course. This course is an exploration of the art and craft of playwriting. Structure, form, character, plot, and theme will be discussed, as will the art of critique and feedback. The course is structured around readings of published plays, discussions of essays about the theory and practice of playwriting, and practical writing exercises. Writing projects will lead to the development of short plays for public readings. Prerequisites: Completion of at least two theatre courses (including one from among 100, 202, 203, 204, 205, 331) or admission through an approved writing sample (instructor approval). Conference-lab.

Theatre 336 - Dramaturgy

One-unit semester course. This course is an examination of the art, craft, and study of dramaturgy. In it we will attempt to build an answer for the vexing question “What is a dramaturg?” and, most of all, we will seek to discover who dramaturgs are, how they work and what they do. In this course we will study the large number of things that make up the art of dramaturgy: translation and adaptation, new play development, production dramaturgy, theatre criticism, in-depth research, literary management, season selection, and artistic collaboration, among others. We will also study established dramaturgs, their writings, and how they work in the theatre. This conference will combine theoretical and practical approaches, collaborative work and individual research. This conference will prepare students to work as dramaturgs on departmental productions, and give a solid foundation in how to do research and writing in the field of theatre. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and one 200-level theatre history course. Conference.

Theatre 470 - Thesis

Two-unit yearlong course; one unit per semester.

Theatre 481 - Independent Study

Variable (one-half or one)-unit semester course. Prerequisite: approval of instructor and division.

Theatre 590 - Performance Studies: Performativity and Performance in Everyday Life

One-half unit semester course. Performance studies is an interdisciplinary field that examines “performance” in all of its multiple incarnations—including theatre, dance, visual art, everyday life, folklore, rituals and celebrations, and protests. This course serves as an investigation of the major themes and issues within the discourse of performance studies. We will look at both the roots of this interdisciplinary field and the directions it might be heading. Readings will include some of the seminal texts in the field, including the work of J.L. Austin, Judith Butler, E. Patrick Johnson, Petra Kuppers, Richard Schechner, Diana Taylor, and others. We will examine how performance studies contributes to the study of theatre, as well as to an understanding of our increasingly mediated and globalized world. Conference. Offered summer 2022.