Diversity and Your Department

Resources for addressing diversity and inclusion

Linguistics

Linguistic Society of America. (1996, 1996). The LSA Guidelines for Nonsexist Usage. LSA Bulletin. Retrieved April 15, 2015, from http://www.linguisticsociety.org/resource/lsa-guidelines-nonsexist-usage

In this article, the LSA outlines specific rules for how to avoid the use of sexist language. While this is specifically aimed at the examples used by linguistics professors in class, these rules could find usage in the general classroom and the greater world as well. The guidelines are older than most articles included in this bibliography, but they are still used by the society and therefore remain pertinent. This is recommended for all professors.

Tags: Gender
Teaching

Linguistic Society of America. (2015). Committee on Ethnic Diversity in Linguistics (CEDL). Retrieved April 15, 2015, from http://www.linguisticsociety.org/about/who-we-are/committees/ethnic-diversity-linguistics-cedl

This webpage details the work that the CEDL does to increase the presence of underrepresented ethnic minorities. It is a good place to go if you are looking for contacts (it lists all of the committee members) and ideas for projects that would increase diversity.

Linguistic Society of America. (2015). Status of Women in Linguistics (COSWL). Retrieved April 15, 2015, from http://www.linguisticsociety.org/about/who-we-are/committees/status-women-linguistics

This webpage details the work that the COSWL does to increase the presence of females in linguistics. It is a good place to go if you are looking for contacts (it lists all of the committee members) and ideas for projects that would increase diversity.

Macaulay, M., & Brice, C. (1997). Don't Touch My Projectile: Gender Bias and Stereotyping in Syntactic Examples. Language, 73, 798-825. (PDF)

This study largely verifies the necessity of the LSA Guidelines for Nonsexist Usage by examining syntax textbooks and showing that examples are overwhelmingly male and haven't improved in the past twenty five years. This article would be primarily useful to professors that need to see specific and thorough examples of how sexist language permeates into the classroom and textbook.